How Compassionate! Another Child Dead

Ugh, people are the absolute worst. Especially when they’re the type of Christianist who would attack someone for cracking a damn joke. [WDRB]

Nope, hot brown doesn’t put Louisville on any culinary list. The city is filled with amazing, affordable restaurants but get a damn grip on the hot brown front. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another child shot dead in Possumbilly Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

On a scale of 1 to 10, how disconnected from reality is the Metro Council? 30? 50? Youth curfews only make rich white people in St. Matthews feel safer. [H-L]

It’s an effort aimed at keeping youngsters on the right track. My Brother’s Keeper is sponsored by the Catholic Enrichment Center. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama has invited a businessman who helps low-income residents afford solar panels to the State of the Union. [HuffPo]

Maybe it’s time for people to calm down? Graffiti, including what appears to be Arabic text, was found spray painted on the wall of Fairdale High School on Saturday morning, JCPS officials confirmed. [WAVE3]

For the first time, you can easily search whether your hospital, clinic, pharmacy or health insurer has been named in patient privacy complaints, breaches or violations. [ProPublica]

The Louisville Affordable Housing Trust Fund is looking for a new executive director after the departure of Rachel Hurst. [WFPL]

US jobs growth remained solid in December as the economy added 292,000 jobs, beating expectations. [BBC]

Because there’s nothing more pressing at the University of Louisville. [Business First]

A decision on what company will carry out the facilities and feasibility studies for West Clark Community Schools’ referendum project will come next week, after the board interviewed six firms Thursday night. [News & Tribune]

Council’s Following Frankfort Off A Cliff

The principal at a top performing JCPS school is concerned about losing teachers. [WDRB]

In a stunning move, Democrat David Tandy said Tuesday he will not seek a fourth term and will forgo a bid to serve a second consecutive term as Metro Council president. Most political observers were the opposite of stunned. Tandy’s been attacked the past year by the Stumbo Democrats – the anti-progressives who learned how to play dirty at the hands of David Yates, Stumbo’s former deputy. On top of that, Tandy has a history of running from fights. Reference: Cordish, everything Abramson ever tried, nearly everything the corrupt Jim King pushed. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. Nothing’s new in 2016. [WHAS11]

Mitch McConnell says a Republican takeover of the statehouse is inevitable. He’s right. But it’ll only last a few years. [H-L]

Making an already difficult system worse. TARC will be adjusting service on seven bus routes beginning Jan. 31. Most of the service changes involve minor adjustments to pick-up times in response to traffic conditions and delays. [WLKY]

Of course Indiana bigots want to fine transgendered individuals for using the “wrong” restroom. [HuffPo]

There’s a new rally cry to help prevent juveniles from getting into trouble late at night. Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad has been asking for a curfew law that is easier for officers to enforce for nearly two years. Now, Louisville Metro Council Members are asking questions. [WAVE3]

A foreclosure case involving Land of Tomorrow Productions LLC, the company that owns the Funtown Mountain property in Cave City, is moving forward, according to action taken during Barren Circuit Court on Monday morning. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Just what Louisville needs, another Greg Fischer protege! [WFPL]

An emotional US President Barack Obama has unveiled new restrictions on gun purchases, saying the “constant excuses for inaction” have to stop. [BBC]

Just a few days before Christmas, the Oldham Chamber and Economic Development named a new leader it believes can march the county toward new heights. [Business First]

Clark County is soon to undergo an inventory and assessment of signs in the county, to comply with federal regulations. [News & Tribune]

Another Compassionate Holiday Murder (Maybe)

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found dead in the 2100 block of Dahlia Avenue, near the intersection of Bardstown Road and Lancashire Avenue, early Monday. [WDRB]

In a unanimous vote, the Louisville Metro Council moved to hold a significant chunk of Louisville’s $18.9 million surplus on Thursday in order to consider other uses for the funds. The decision came after members from both parties complained Mayor Greg Fischer’s office was not forthcoming with the full surplus amount and didn’t give council members much say over how the money should be allocated. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) is on Winter Break until classes resume on January 4. For many in our community who are busy during this time, school is not something at the forefront of their planning calendar. [WHAS11]

Some in Lexington may have Internet access about 22 times faster than their neighbors. Cable and Internet provider Windstream announced a 1-gigabit-per-second Internet service trial in Lexington on Friday, with the potential for a full launch during the first half of 2016, according to a company press release. [H-L]

Guess Cordish was desperate for some positive press? No, really, this is a good thing. Donated food and supplies were handed out to military and families in need Monday morning as part of the 11th annual Christmas Angel Program at Fourth Street Live. [WLKY]

The latest report on the Arctic by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration finds dwindling sea ice and temperatures as much as 3 Celsius (5.4 Fahrenheit) above average are disrupting walrus and fish populations and having major impacts on the ecosystem. [HuffPo]

Less than two weeks before the end of one of the deadliest years in Louisville’s history, roughly 100 people marched to remember the city’s murder victims Sunday afternoon. The Louisville Urban League hosted the walk. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama urged Americans to remain vigilant against the potential threat of homegrown Islamic State militants on Friday, acknowledging the difficulty of tracking “lone wolf” attackers like those who went on a shooting spree in California. [Reuters]

A Louisville state representative wants to tax electronic cigarette equipment and the liquid nicotine that the devices turn into smokeable vapor. [WFPL]

The Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the first time in nine years Wednesday. NPR’s Audie Cornish talks to Megan Greene, chief economist at John Hancock, about what this means for consumers. [NPR]

A Utah company has expanded in the Louisville market with the purchase of two senior-care facilities, effective Dec. 2. [Business First]

A meeting designed to answer questions about the 2015 Floyd County budget shortfall only created more Tuesday afternoon at the Pine View Government Center. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

UofL Seems Nice & Positive These Days

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

The Greater Clark County Schools board is moving forward with a plan to improve school building infrastructure in the district. [WDRB]

Newly-elected Metro Councilman Pat Mulvihill wants to cap how much an appointed member to the council can spend while in office after his predecessor, Steve Magre, nearly depleted the district’s discretionary accounts this year. [C-J/AKN]

Jim Ramsey is killing it these days. A help-wanted ad posted by the University of Louisville is getting backlash Thursday afternoon because of the requirements listed for the position. [WHAS11]

With his first year as U.S. Senate Majority Leader drawing to a close, Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell said Wednesday that “by any objective standard, we’ve had a year of significant accomplishments.” [H-L]

New information has been released about the slaying of Thomas Grismer at the Red Roof Inn on Preston Highway. [WLKY]

Apparently the deficit hawks flew south for the winter. At least that’s the conclusion that could be drawn from looking at the price tag for the package of bills unveiled early Wednesday morning to keep the government running and extend a bunch of tax breaks, many permanently. [HuffPo]

Are we reliving 2008? Wednesday, city officials met with neighbors and representatives from Swift Pork Company to discuss the odor coming from the Swift plant on Story Avenue. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary unemployment rate for November 2015 was 4.9 percent, remaining unchanged from the revised 4.9 percent rate in October, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. [Press Release]

Kentucky regulators have affirmed a utility’s plan to build massive landfills near two power plants, saying that option will have the smallest effect on ratepayers. [WFPL]

For years, Jammie Nichols struggled with a drug habit that left the Florida mother reeling from blackouts, seizures, depression and poverty – and a decision to give one of her children up for adoption. [Reuters]

Some Bullitt County residents spent hours Tuesday speaking out against an industrial park that’s been proposed near their neighborhood. [Business First]

A true assessment of Jeffersonville’s financial activity for 2013 could not be determined by a State Board of Accounts audit because of poor bookkeeping, according to a report released late October. Jeffersonville’s leadership is incompetent? Surely not! [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Another Weekend Of Death In Compassionate City

Police are on the scene of a fatal shooting in the 1500 block of South 12th Street in the Algonquin neighborhood. [WDRB]

Attorneys and judges can now file their documents electronically in Jefferson County courts, a step officials say will cut costs and increase efficiency. Jefferson County – which handled 200,000 paper-based court cases last year – was the last of Kentucky’s 120 counties to adopt “eFiling,” which allows many in the legal system to file criminal and civil case records from outside the courthouse and its operating hours. [C-J/AKN]

A transgender woman files suit against a Louisville nursing college. The lawsuit, filed Sept. 25 in Jefferson Circuit Court, alleges the Galen College of Nursing discriminated against Vanessa Gilliam for being transgender. The complaint also accuses the college of excluding Gilliam from using the women’s restroom even though she identifies as a female. [WHAS11]

The 66 percent of Owsley County that gets health coverage through Medicaid now must reconcile itself with the 70 percent that voted for Republican Governor-elect Matt Bevin, who pledged to cut the state’s Medicaid program and close the state-run Kynect health insurance exchange. The community’s largest-circulation newspaper, the Three Forks Tradition in Beattyville, did not say much about Kynect ahead of the election. Instead, its editorials roasted Obama and Hillary Clinton, gay marriage, Islam, “liberal race peddlers,” “liberal media,” black criminals and “the radical Black Lives Matter movement.” [John Cheves]

Police in St. Matthews said they received a call about a body in a parking garage in Suburban Hospital. [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) has consistently voiced his disapproval of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy decisions, but on Thursday his criticism went a step further, implying the president is an “idiot” for how he’s handled U.S. involvement in the Syrian conflict during an Iowa campaign stop. [HuffPo]

A racial issue at the University of Louisville has resulted in a lawsuit that claims minorities are still underrepresented on the University’s Board of Trustees. [WAVE3]

Capital punishment in the United States has moved into the slow lane, with the number of executions and new death sentences likely to hit lows not seen for more than 20 years. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee has unanimously approved a measure that will allow people to get more information about how flood prone their property is, among other things. [WFPL]

Technology and social media companies are pushing out an ever-increasing amount of data to tally up which 2016 presidential candidates are winning the race for most mentions online. [The Hill]

A lot of undocumented immigrants got federally subsidized health insurance through Louisville-based Humana Inc. this year, but they didn’t keep it for long. [Business First]

Imagine a Main Street attraction in Clarksville with a mixed-use central district, or a revamped riverfront to take advantage of the town’s perch along the Ohio River. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

Stumbo Lackey Wants To Be Pretzeldent

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

The Centers for Disease Control is in Scott County, Indiana, testing hundreds of people for HIV. [WDRB]

This should be an awkward Greg Stumbo-style disaster. David Yates is jumping into the race for Metro Council president next year in an effort to unify Louisville Democrats, suggesting incumbent David Tandy is losing support among the splintered majority caucus. [C-J/AKN]

The search is on for a murder suspect police say shot and killed a man near a Valley Station business Tuesday evening. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s police department hopes to have its officers equipped with body cameras by June. [H-L]

A pedestrian was struck and killed by an LMPD wrecker in the 4900 block of Southside Drive. [WLKY]

As friends and family gathered Tuesday at the funeral of Tyshawn Lee — one of the youngest Chicago residents lost to gun violence this year — to mourn and remember the boy, Father Michael Pfleger delivered a fiery eulogy indicting the city over the execution of a 9-year-old child. [HuffPo]

Here comes the positive media spin from Chad Carlton and crew about tolls. And whattya know, they couldn’t even get the facts straight about when the area last saw tolls. [WAVE3]

The last time Kentucky elected a Republican governor he ran into trouble with the Democratic attorney general. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

In its ongoing Failure Factories series, the Tampa Bay Times is investigating the disastrous effects of the Pinellas County School Board’s 2007 decision to abandon school integration in favor of “neighborhood schools.” Schools in high-poverty black communities were promised additional funding and resources. Then the promises weren’t met, and performance at the schools has plummeted. [ProPublica]

An organization led by Louisville’s high-profile rehabilitation king Gill Holland has recently received $250,000 in private funding. [Business First]

New police body camera video shows a struggle during an arrest in Clarksville for which a local business owner was later found not guilty. [News & Tribune]

Hype Isn’t Gonna Help JCPS Improve

We love to hate on Donna Hargens and Jefferson County Public Schools but come on. This is the dumbest thing yet from WDRB about JCPS and it’s being used by the racist anti-busing crowd. The insinuation (watch them try to claim otherwise in 3, 2…) that all teachers who resign do so because they feel unsafe is dangerous and based in teabagger delusion land. Remember that there are something like 6,000 teachers when they try to claim that a dozen resignations = harbinger of doom. [WDRB]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer refused to sign an ordinance Thursday shielding area community centers for needy residents from his administrative changes after an overwhelming margin of Metro Council members passed the measure. Instead of vetoing the legislation, which was approved by a 20-3 vote last month, Fischer has asked the state attorney general to weigh in, launching the city’s two branches of government into a legal joust over who has final say about a potential overhaul at Neighborhood Place sites. [C-J/AKN]

Three people have been arrested and a man continues to recover in the hospital after a shooting in the Chickasaw neighborhood Friday night. [WHAS11]

Kip Cornett said he and his wife were at an airport in June when he read on his cellphone a column by Barry Weisbord, president and co-publisher of Thoroughbred Daily News. [H-L]

A 27-year-old Louisville man became the city’s latest homicide victim on Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

The medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders released its internal report on Thursday about the October attack on its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The report also revealed that pilots shot at staff members fleeing the hospital. [HuffPo]

The Americana Community Center, Inc. held its annual fundraiser Saturday night. The center strives to provide a spectrum of services to the diverse individuals and families of the Louisville Metro area, including refugees, immigrants and those born in the United States. [WAVE]

By most accounts, Kentucky’s implementation of President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare reform was a success. Tuesday’s elections in the state could mean big changes are coming, however – with ominous portents for the future of the president’s signature legislative achievement. [BBC]

The fallout continues from Halloween, when University of Louisville President James Ramsey and his staff posed for a photograph at a U of L party wearing stereotypical “Mexican” costumes. The photo went viral, and a few written apologies were issued, but they’ve been lacking. [WFPL]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Wait, people are surprised this is happening? Its been quite a ride, but the Velocity Indiana entrepreneurial accelerator and co-working space is effectively closing shop. [Business First]

In another plea for the state’s help on Clark County’s diminishing revenue stream, County Attorney Lisa Glickfield is drafting a letter of support from board members to legislators to raise the tax levy. [News & Tribune]