Another Weekend Of Death In Compassionate City

Police are on the scene of a fatal shooting in the 1500 block of South 12th Street in the Algonquin neighborhood. [WDRB]

Attorneys and judges can now file their documents electronically in Jefferson County courts, a step officials say will cut costs and increase efficiency. Jefferson County – which handled 200,000 paper-based court cases last year – was the last of Kentucky’s 120 counties to adopt “eFiling,” which allows many in the legal system to file criminal and civil case records from outside the courthouse and its operating hours. [C-J/AKN]

A transgender woman files suit against a Louisville nursing college. The lawsuit, filed Sept. 25 in Jefferson Circuit Court, alleges the Galen College of Nursing discriminated against Vanessa Gilliam for being transgender. The complaint also accuses the college of excluding Gilliam from using the women’s restroom even though she identifies as a female. [WHAS11]

The 66 percent of Owsley County that gets health coverage through Medicaid now must reconcile itself with the 70 percent that voted for Republican Governor-elect Matt Bevin, who pledged to cut the state’s Medicaid program and close the state-run Kynect health insurance exchange. The community’s largest-circulation newspaper, the Three Forks Tradition in Beattyville, did not say much about Kynect ahead of the election. Instead, its editorials roasted Obama and Hillary Clinton, gay marriage, Islam, “liberal race peddlers,” “liberal media,” black criminals and “the radical Black Lives Matter movement.” [John Cheves]

Police in St. Matthews said they received a call about a body in a parking garage in Suburban Hospital. [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) has consistently voiced his disapproval of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy decisions, but on Thursday his criticism went a step further, implying the president is an “idiot” for how he’s handled U.S. involvement in the Syrian conflict during an Iowa campaign stop. [HuffPo]

A racial issue at the University of Louisville has resulted in a lawsuit that claims minorities are still underrepresented on the University’s Board of Trustees. [WAVE3]

Capital punishment in the United States has moved into the slow lane, with the number of executions and new death sentences likely to hit lows not seen for more than 20 years. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee has unanimously approved a measure that will allow people to get more information about how flood prone their property is, among other things. [WFPL]

Technology and social media companies are pushing out an ever-increasing amount of data to tally up which 2016 presidential candidates are winning the race for most mentions online. [The Hill]

A lot of undocumented immigrants got federally subsidized health insurance through Louisville-based Humana Inc. this year, but they didn’t keep it for long. [Business First]

Imagine a Main Street attraction in Clarksville with a mixed-use central district, or a revamped riverfront to take advantage of the town’s perch along the Ohio River. [News & Tribune]

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Stumbo Lackey Wants To Be Pretzeldent

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The Centers for Disease Control is in Scott County, Indiana, testing hundreds of people for HIV. [WDRB]

This should be an awkward Greg Stumbo-style disaster. David Yates is jumping into the race for Metro Council president next year in an effort to unify Louisville Democrats, suggesting incumbent David Tandy is losing support among the splintered majority caucus. [C-J/AKN]

The search is on for a murder suspect police say shot and killed a man near a Valley Station business Tuesday evening. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s police department hopes to have its officers equipped with body cameras by June. [H-L]

A pedestrian was struck and killed by an LMPD wrecker in the 4900 block of Southside Drive. [WLKY]

As friends and family gathered Tuesday at the funeral of Tyshawn Lee — one of the youngest Chicago residents lost to gun violence this year — to mourn and remember the boy, Father Michael Pfleger delivered a fiery eulogy indicting the city over the execution of a 9-year-old child. [HuffPo]

Here comes the positive media spin from Chad Carlton and crew about tolls. And whattya know, they couldn’t even get the facts straight about when the area last saw tolls. [WAVE3]

The last time Kentucky elected a Republican governor he ran into trouble with the Democratic attorney general. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

In its ongoing Failure Factories series, the Tampa Bay Times is investigating the disastrous effects of the Pinellas County School Board’s 2007 decision to abandon school integration in favor of “neighborhood schools.” Schools in high-poverty black communities were promised additional funding and resources. Then the promises weren’t met, and performance at the schools has plummeted. [ProPublica]

An organization led by Louisville’s high-profile rehabilitation king Gill Holland has recently received $250,000 in private funding. [Business First]

New police body camera video shows a struggle during an arrest in Clarksville for which a local business owner was later found not guilty. [News & Tribune]

Hype Isn’t Gonna Help JCPS Improve

We love to hate on Donna Hargens and Jefferson County Public Schools but come on. This is the dumbest thing yet from WDRB about JCPS and it’s being used by the racist anti-busing crowd. The insinuation (watch them try to claim otherwise in 3, 2…) that all teachers who resign do so because they feel unsafe is dangerous and based in teabagger delusion land. Remember that there are something like 6,000 teachers when they try to claim that a dozen resignations = harbinger of doom. [WDRB]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer refused to sign an ordinance Thursday shielding area community centers for needy residents from his administrative changes after an overwhelming margin of Metro Council members passed the measure. Instead of vetoing the legislation, which was approved by a 20-3 vote last month, Fischer has asked the state attorney general to weigh in, launching the city’s two branches of government into a legal joust over who has final say about a potential overhaul at Neighborhood Place sites. [C-J/AKN]

Three people have been arrested and a man continues to recover in the hospital after a shooting in the Chickasaw neighborhood Friday night. [WHAS11]

Kip Cornett said he and his wife were at an airport in June when he read on his cellphone a column by Barry Weisbord, president and co-publisher of Thoroughbred Daily News. [H-L]

A 27-year-old Louisville man became the city’s latest homicide victim on Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

The medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders released its internal report on Thursday about the October attack on its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The report also revealed that pilots shot at staff members fleeing the hospital. [HuffPo]

The Americana Community Center, Inc. held its annual fundraiser Saturday night. The center strives to provide a spectrum of services to the diverse individuals and families of the Louisville Metro area, including refugees, immigrants and those born in the United States. [WAVE]

By most accounts, Kentucky’s implementation of President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare reform was a success. Tuesday’s elections in the state could mean big changes are coming, however – with ominous portents for the future of the president’s signature legislative achievement. [BBC]

The fallout continues from Halloween, when University of Louisville President James Ramsey and his staff posed for a photograph at a U of L party wearing stereotypical “Mexican” costumes. The photo went viral, and a few written apologies were issued, but they’ve been lacking. [WFPL]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Wait, people are surprised this is happening? Its been quite a ride, but the Velocity Indiana entrepreneurial accelerator and co-working space is effectively closing shop. [Business First]

In another plea for the state’s help on Clark County’s diminishing revenue stream, County Attorney Lisa Glickfield is drafting a letter of support from board members to legislators to raise the tax levy. [News & Tribune]

West End Methane Plant Fun Continues

On Tuesday, voters in Clark County voted in resounding fashion to quash a move to bring in millions of extra tax dollars to improve school buildings. [WDRB]

Nature’s Methane is offering a coalition of western Louisville leaders and organizations around $5 million in gifts and investments as it tries to move forward with its plan to build a controversial methane plant fueled by food waste in the California neighborhood, according to several sources familiar with the negotiations. [C-J/AKN]

Pat Mulvihill has been elected to the job of 10th district councilman. He’s ready to help his constituents, but unlike his predecessor, the embattled Economy Inn won’t be his top priority. [WHAS11]

The latest report on coal production and employment in Kentucky reinforces how far and fast the industry has fallen. [H-L]

The date has been set for the public celebration on the Downtown Bridge. [WLKY]

The long-awaited text of a landmark U.S.-backed Pacific trade deal was released on Thursday, revealing the details of a pact aimed at freeing up commerce in 40 percent of the world’s economy but criticized for its opacity. [HuffPo]

Patrick Mulvihill may be serving the shortest term of any local political elected Tuesday, but he says he plans to make the most of it. [WAVE3]

ProPublica and Frontline reopen the investigation into a death squad run by former South Vietnamese military men that killed journalists, torched businesses and intimidated those who challenged its dream of re-starting the Vietnam War — all on American soil. [ProPublica]

AT&T has filed a protest against a Kentucky state government project to expand broadband fiber throughout the state. The telecommunications giant claims KentuckyWired has an unfair advantage in the bidding process. In its protest, AT&T states KentuckyWired “almost certainly has confidential, inside information that no other bidder could have.” AT&T said KentuckyWired Executive Director Steve Rucker was deputy secretary of the state’s Finance and Administration Cabinet when the agency started developing its request for proposal. [WFPL]

America is undergoing a religious polarization. With more adults shedding their religious affiliations, as evidenced in the latest from the Pew Research Center, the country is becoming more secular. In the past seven years, using the new Pew data, Americans who identify with a religion declined six points. Overall, belief in God, praying daily and religious service attendance have all dropped since 2007. [WaPo]

Shares of Louisville-based Papa John’s International Inc. plunged Wednesday, following the company’s third-quarter earnings report yesterday. By the end of the trading day, shares were down $8.22 per share, or 12.08 percent, to $59.83. [Business First]

Clark County election results were left open-ended into early morning Wednesday as close to 1,000 absentee ballots were in question countywide because a voting machine couldn’t read them. [News & Tribune]

Death & Destruction In The “Compassionate City”

A Rowan County man has been arrested in connection with a body that was found inside a wooden box in Louisville. [WKYT]

Giving up on the West End is the last thing the West End needs right now. A well-known West Louisville pastor — who has spent the last 10 plus years trying to help reduce the crime and violence — is leaving the neighborhood. [WDRB]

The former principal of Louisville Male High School, fired last year amid investigations finding standardized testing improprieties, has filed a lawsuit against Jefferson County Public Schools claiming he was wrongfully fired and defamed. [C-J/AKN]

“Fifty feet from my front door, I saw a corpse.” And that shocking scene prompted dozens of people to pack into a small room in the Salvation Army on Beecher Street. [WHAS11]

In their last debate before voters go to the polls next Tuesday, Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway continued to trade jabs, but in the end, one candidate did manage to compliment the other. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jeffersonville has seen a lot of growth over the past few years, and the two candidates for mayor said they’re the best choice for continued growth. [WLKY]

The White House on Monday slammed FBI Director James Comey’s notion that pervasive cellphone footage featuring police actions has led to an uptick in violent crime. [HuffPo]

Monday evening the Jefferson County Public School board voted to hire two search firms. You can thank Donna Hargens for this unnecessary spending. [WAVE3]

A new report reveals multiple errors and hundreds of cases missing from federal data on fatal police shootings. [Mother Jones]

Residents of Louisville Metro Council District 10 — which includes parts of the Highlands, Germantown, Camp Taylor and Buechel — will elect a new council member next week. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, the Republican running for governor who’s been called a “pathological liar” in ads by his opponent, Democrat Jack Conway, told Conway to “stop lying to people” during a contentious debate Sunday evening at Eastern Kentucky University. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville’s Power Creative advertising agency is preparing to spin off a new business, which will be led by Power Creative CEO David Power, and it could be open for business as early as Dec. 1. [Business First]

Eight local manufacturers, service companies and trucking companies have filed suit against the city of New Albany, New Albany Mayor Jeff Gahan, the Floyd County Commissioners, Indiana Department of Transportation and other government agencies alleging that a recent redesign of East Main Street has negatively affected their right to safely access the street. [News & Tribune]

Woah, This Is Clarksville’s First Black Cop?!

Community leaders and parents are saying enough is enough with all the recent violence in Louisville. [WDRB]

Four Louisville Metro Council members are pooling their resources to hire former Democratic Caucus Director Elizabeth Hoffman for an unspecified role in City Hall less than a month after she was fired. [C-J/AKN]

Seriously? Not even a mention of failing a polygraph being essentially meaningless? And we’re supposed to trust the teevee folks. [WHAS11]

ESPN reported Tuesday that five former University of Louisville basketball players and recruits told their “Outside the Lines” reporters that they attended parties at a campus dorm from 2010-14 that included strippers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Months after Crystal Rogers, 35, a mother of five disappears, new details are emerging about the case. [WLKY]

A key House Democrat suggested Monday that Vice President Joe Biden can’t win the Democratic nomination on his own and should not enter the contest. [HuffPo]

Thanks to a $250,000 grant, the Clarksville Police Department has hired three new officers, including the first African American to serve on the force. [WAVE3]

The two women who want to be Kentucky’s next lieutenant governor offered sharply contrasting views on education and economic policies in a televised debate on Kentucky Education Television Monday evening. [Ronnie Ellis]

Nearly 1,000 local leaders and neighborhood revitalization advocates from across the nation are in Louisville this week for the annual NeighborWorks America Community Leadership Institute. [WFPL]

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has granted Kentucky a one-year extension for meeting requirements of the stringent new identification security law known as REAL ID – meaning a Kentucky driver’s license is still sufficient for gaining access to the vast majority of federal installations. [Press Release]

The Courier-Journal’s horse racing reporter, Jennie Rees, who’s been with the paper for 34 years, will leave after accepting a buyout offer from the paper’s parent company. [Business First]

After three city department heads decried the measure, New Albany City Councilman Kevin Zurschmiede pulled his ordinance to adopt the International Property Maintenance Code on Thursday night. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Kill Like This

200 trees? Try 200,000. Then we can start talking about the tree canopy here in Possibility City. [WDRB]

A bipartisan pair of Louisville council members want to restrict Mayor Greg Fischer’s office from making any changes to the city’s portion of the Neighborhood Place partnership without Metro Council approval. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating the murder of a man found at the intersection of 20th and Chestnut streets. [WHAS11]

More than 100 former Jefferson County Public Schools students who dropped out are now re-enrolled in classes. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway after two people were found dead Monday afternoon inside a home in southeastern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Will body cameras be a tool for police reform? Only if bad policy doesn’t get in the way. [HuffPo]

Eight people have been wounded by gunfire in the Greater Louisville area since Friday afternoon. Four of them died. It is in this background that Louisville Councilwoman Mary C. Woolridge will introduce the new Commander of the Louisville Metro Police Department Second Division to the community.

The Shell Farms & Greenhouses is an expansive 1,000-acre property in Garrard County, 37 miles south of Lexington, Kentucky. The five-generation family farm is operated by 31-year-old Giles Shell and his 60-year-old father, Gary. The two are whizzes at making ornamental flowers flourish, and like most farmers in the area, the family has grown tobacco for years. [Newsweek]

The author of the bestselling book on people’s relationship with water will be among the speakers Monday during the IdeaFestival Water event. [WFPL]

On the evening of April 29th last year, in the southern Minnesota town of Waseca, a woman was doing the dishes when she looked out her kitchen window and saw a young man walking through her back yard. [New Yorker]

Sarah Davasher-Wisdom has been promoted to senior vice president of public affairs and strategy at Greater Louisville Inc. [Business First]

Throughout all three debates this election season, Jeffersonville mayoral candidates Mike Moore and Dennis Julius challenged the accuracy of some of each others’ statements, asking audience members to look it up for themselves. [News & Tribune]