A Roundup Without A Bunch Of Murders! What A Rarity!

The Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency, awarded the Portland Museum a “Museums for America” grant of $24,652 for a series of Young Curators projects in the Portland neighborhood. The Museum plans two project series – one from elementary age school students and the other for middle school students. The programs will provide enriching cultural experiences to youngsters. [Press Release]

Louisville Metro Police are moving forward with a road side drug testing pilot program. [WDRB]

Kentucky lottery sales continue to show mixed results, but the sale of instant tickets has been especially strong, the lottery corporation directors were told at a recent board meeting. [C-J/AKN]

You already know Louisville is the allergy devil. [WHAS11]

Southern Indiana officials say a construction worker was rescued from a trench after a soil collapse left the man partially buried for several hours. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating an attempted abduction of an 11-year-old girl after a woman said a man attempted to abduct her grandchild at a bus stop. [WLKY]

Kentucky Fried Chicken may have changed its name to KFC years ago to downplay its cooking method in a more health-conscious consumer market, but the world’s second-largest fast food chain didn’t stop frying. [HuffPo]

You’ll probably need some tissues when you watch this video from Home of the Innocents that’s going viral. [WAVE3]

We may not want to believe it, but the United States is now the most unequal of all Western nations. To make matters worse, America has considerably less social mobility than Canada and Europe. [Salon]

Kentucky state regulators are set to consider whether to raise Louisville-area utility bills, in response to a proposed rate increase by Louisville Gas and Electric. The Public Service Commission held a public meeting last night to take comments; about 50 people showed up, and unsurprisingly, no one testified in favor of the rate increase. [WFPL]

Oil prices might be very low, but that’s not going to take away from investments in renewable energy. [ThinkProgress]

David Lehr is retiring as track superintendent of Louisville’s Churchill Downs Racetrack in May, marking the first time in 48 years that a member of the Lehr family will not be part of the track maintenance team. [Business First]

The numbers are staggering. The Blessings in a Backpack program feeds 1,960 children each week in Floyd County. [News & Tribune]

Watch Greg Pretend He Didn’t Want To Run

Another day, another pedestrian death. Doesn’t matter who is at fault – the victim or the driver – this city is riddled with pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Shots rang out early Tuesday morning in the Beecher Terrace housing project, leaving in their wake the city’s 21st homicide victim of 2015. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer claims he has no intention to try running for U.S. Senate again in 2016. But he absolutely wanted to. He still doesn’t comprehend that he’ll never win statewide office. Ever. And if anyone had enough money, he wouldn’t currently be mayor. [WHAS11]

When I first heard that Alan Stein had agreed to chair the Fayette County Public Schools’ redistricting committee, I thought: Has he lost his mind? [Tom Eblen]

For this year’s 60th Celebration of the Kentucky Derby Festival, KDF has teamed up with the Kentucky Lottery to name someone the 2015 Festival Fanatic. [WLKY]

Darren Wilson, the former police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August, will not face federal civil rights charges in connection with Brown’s death, Justice Department officials said Wednesday. [HuffPo]

A fight among teenagers Monday led to gunfire in the Shawnee neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Here’s Greg Stumbo using Legislative Research Commission staffers to write a column about how he believes he’s a pension genius who saved the pension system. Sadly, everyone old enough to legally think on their own knows all hell is breaking loose on that front. [Floyd County Times]

A voluntary biennial survey for Kentucky teachers that’s meant to measure their opinions of schools, resources, education leadership and community support is now available to take online. [WFPL]

Over the past decade, states have slashed workers’ compensation benefits, denying injured workers help when they need it most and shifting the costs of workplace accidents to taxpayers. [ProPublica]

Is it just us or is this yet another hyped up Fischer stunt that won’t go anywhere? [Business First]

Residents of the 200 and 300 blocks of Pearl Street in downtown Jeffersonville soon will have a designated place to park. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City Had A Murderous Weekend, Kids

A solution to a sidewalk problem in Fairdale will only take two weeks to finish and many who live in the area say the project is a big deal. [WDRB]

The Louisville Jefferson County Democratic Party on Sunday selected attorney Pat Mulvihill to be its nominee for an election in November to serve out the final year of the late Metro Councilman Jim King’s term. [C-J/AKN]

It’s kind of sad that anyone thought they could stop the local Democrats from playing corrupt politics. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Court of Appeals says a company that once managed 125,000 Medicaid recipients must pay the state damages for leaving the contract early. [H-L]

When will JCPS get its act together? Police arrested a JCPS principal on speeding and DUI charges early Saturday morning. [WLKY]

Insurers aren’t required to encrypt consumers’ data under a 1990s federal law that remains the foundation for health care privacy in the Internet age — an omission that seems striking in light of the major cyberattack against Anthem. [HuffPo]

In two days, four people were killed within Louisville city limits during one of the most violent weekends the city has seen in years. But ask Greg Fischer and everything is puppies and rainbows. [WAVE3]

EquiLottery CEO and inventor of the patented lottery game with the same name, Brad Cummings, will be testifying on behalf of SB74 in Frankfort, Kentucky on Tuesday, Feb. 10 (that’s today). The bill, which supports a lottery game like EquiLottery based on the outcome of live horse racing, will be heard in front of the Senate Licensing, Occupations and Administrative Regulations Committee at 10 am in Room 169 of the Capitol Annex and is open to the general public. [Press Release]

When it came time for Anna Brashear to finish high school, college seemed out of reach. Financially, Brashear couldn’t swing it. And she said her family wasn’t in position to help either. [WFPL]

It was a busy legislative week on one end of the capitol during the second week of the 2015 General Assembly, as the Republican Senate passed a series of bills its leaders call their priorities – most of which have little chance of success in the Democratic-controlled House. [Ronnie Ellis]

In 1974, music critic Jon Landau famously wrote, “I have seen rock and roll future and its name is Bruce Springsteen.” [Business First]

Floyd County Democratic Party Chairman Adam Dickey is accepting applications to fill a vacancy on the Franklin Township Board created by the resignation of Hazel Riley. [News & Tribune]

A Million Bucks To Study Louisville’s Character

A new grant will help protect JCPS student athletes while they’re playing sports. The grant was officially accepted by JCPS during a board meeting on Monday night. [WDRB]

National preservationists will spend $1 million over the next three years to study Louisville, devising plans to help preserve smaller buildings in “character-rich” areas and neighborhoods and promote healthy, urban living. [C-J/AKN]

On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid. [WHAS11]

Really? We’re now just going to spread Kentucky Lottery games to the internet? What was that, again, about online gambling being the devil? [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! When will all of these murders end? Louisville Metro Police are investigating a fatal shooting in South Louisville and the victim has been identified. [WLKY]

On March 22, 1991, a visibly shaken and angered President George H.W. Bush said he was “sickened and outraged” by what he saw on television. That was the beating of black motorist Rodney King by a swarm of LAPD cops. A year later, following the acquittal of four LAPD cops by a Simi Valley jury with no blacks on it, Bush ordered then-Attorney General William Barr to begin the process of slapping federal civil rights charges on the four officers. [HuffPo]

Is Bobby Flay moving closer to buying a property in Louisville for a new restaurant? [WAVE3]

You can say a lot of things about the U.S. Congress. One thing you can’t really say, though, is that they’v(sic) been in Washington way too long. [WaPo]

When Polish artist Jakub Szczęsny arrived at the GE FirstBuild factory two weeks ago as the company’s first artist in residence, he expected his first day at work to play out like a scene from a mad scientist’s lab in American film. [WFPL]

A Seattle police plan to outfit officers with body cameras was back on for early December after the agency struck an unusual deal with an anonymous programmer whose massive public-records requests threatened to cripple the program, police said on Friday. [Reuters]

A Louisville-based farm has been named the agribusiness of the year in the Kentuckiana region. [Business First]

Removing legal jargon and condensing the city’s property codes into a concise form is the main purpose behind an ordinance that could be introduced by the New Albany City Council next month. [News & Tribune]

Probably Time To Start Ignoring Josh Young?

Maybe this kid will get his ducks in a row if media stop giving him attention? Less than a week after being cited for shoplifting, police have arrested 18-year-old Josh Young on another charge. [WDRB]

Really? Just breaking even? The festival honoring the 100th anniversary of the Belle of Louisville was a success by nearly every measure and has a good chance of breaking even, waterfront officials said Monday. [C-J/AKN]

An investigation is underway after a threat was made against Miller Hall on the University of Louisville campus. [WHAS11]

Keeneland is scrapping plans for its on-site expanding gambling venture and instead will team with The Red Mile to open an instant racing parlor near downtown Lexington. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another fun shooting death. [WLKY]

All of these maps about drug use make Kentucky look pretty terrible. [HuffPo]

A new lottery game is expected to generate more millionaires than any other game in history. [WAVE3]

While law-abiding citizens want to support law enforcement in the dangerous role they play in protecting us, no one, including the police, are above criticism. More than five weeks have passed since a man, who lived in Lexington but grew up in Richmond, died after an officer-involved shooting just off the Eastern Bypass near a busy shopping district and the Eastern Kentucky University Campus. [Richmond Register]

Jefferson County Board of Education candidates discussed topics ranging from low-performing schools to charter schools in a forum Tuesday. [WFPL]

What CAN’T Greg Fischer screw up? Hired a lady as an Animal Services official who was both fired and arrested at her last animal shelter job. [The ‘Ville Voice]

A Louisville-based startup has a new product on a couple of stores’ shelves now, but it’s working on bringing a new dehydration treatment to the masses. [Business First]

All the budgets passed unanimously for the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp., but more money is still headed its way, officials said at Monday’s meeting of the board of trustees. [News & Tribune]

Homelessness Is A Big Problem In Possibility City

Across Kentucky and Indiana, people gathered on Memorial Day to pay tribute to those who died in service to America. [WDRB]

Shortly after moving to Louisville, Patricia Mahaun stopped by the local veterans hospital in October, hoping to find a new doctor, get checked for a possible urinary tract infection and get a flu shot. [C-J/AKN]

The first Crime Reduction and Awareness Walk this year is being held by metro councilwoman Marianne Butler and the fourth division of Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

A federal judge in Kentucky has dismissed a lawsuit brought by an atheist group challenging tax exemptions for churches and religious groups in the federal tax code. [H-L]

A local group is asking for help after a puppy was reportedly hit on purpose in western Kentucky. [WLKY]

Gay rights activist Harvey Milk, who was shot dead in 1978, has been honoured on a new US postage stamp. [BBC]

It was a 50-50 chance of winning for two horses at Churchill Downs Monday morning. [WAVE3]

Can you imagine Greg Fischer doing something like this? Stockton, Calif., Mayor Anthony Silva is determined to put an end to homelessness in his city, but before he could make any meaningful changes, he decided to see for himself the challenges that people on the streets face. [HuffPo]

The state lottery produces a multitude of losing tickets every week, but its director has a message that she hopes will make people feel better about their odds. [News & Tribune]

You may think of homelessness as a distinctly urban issue, with people sleeping in shelters or on the streets. But homelessness happens in rural communities too, and it happens to children. [NPR]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Kentucky May Just Never Be Energy Efficient

Several local organizations are in desperate need of food and clothing for the area’s poor and homeless. [WDRB]

A case pending before the Kentucky Court of Appeals could affect how dozens of libraries across the state are funded. [C-J/AKN]

From tragedy to life saving. We are taking a look at a national program with roots right here in Louisville. VINE grew from domestic violence murder into a safety net for victims. [WHAS11]

As it struggled to satisfy bond obligations and pay vendors, some considered the New Albany Sewer Department to be a train wreck just a few years ago. [News & Tribune]

Just two years ago, Louisville’s food truck scene was virtually non-existent. Now nearly 30 companies have permits to sell on-the-go. [WLKY]

University of Louisville administrators see many students load up on classes only to drop some of them before the end of the semester. [Business First]

It’s terrible that the guy was murdered and no one is disputing that. But this kind of coverage doesn’t happen when someone is shot in the West End. And this kind of coverage has never occurred in St. Matthews when people are raped, robbed or have their property vandalized. [WAVE3]

The federal government made enough money on student loans over the last year that, if it wanted, it could provide maximum-level Pell Grants of $5,645 to 7.3 million college students. The $41.3 billion profit for the 2013 fiscal year is down $3.6 billion from the previous year but it’s a higher profit level than all but two companies in the world: Exxon Mobil cleared $44.9 billion in 2012, and Apple cleared $41.7 billion. [USA Today]

The state of Indiana is one the last places in the U.S. that regulates the retail sale of beer by temperature. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Lottery Corp. says it has reached $15 billion in overall sales since the lottery was started in 1989. [WLEX18]

A whistleblower who brought to light memos and studies that dealt a severe blow to large tobacco companies has died in Ocean Springs, Miss. [Business First]

Comes as no surprise to anyone that Kentucky is one of the least energy efficient states in the nation. [Click the Clicky]