What Shade Will Anchorage Throw Next?

Louisville Metro Police arrested a man and charged him with murder but some of the suspect’s friends say he shouldn’t have been charged at all. [WDRB]

A judge has thrown out a lawsuit by the city of Anchorage against Bellewood Presbyterian Home for Children, rejecting the small city’s effort to block the center from accepting youths officials deem too dangerous for the neighborhood. Imagine that. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS students have just three more days of summer break, and on August 8 the Louisville Urban League hosted a summit to get students excited to get back to the classroom. [WHAS11]

In April 2005, President George W. Bush hailed “clean coal” as a key to “greater energy independence,” pledging $2 billion in research funds that promised a new golden age for America’s most abundant energy resource. [H-L]

Apparently, “middle town” is a place now. Louisville Metro Bomb Squad say a suspicious package left at a Target department store in middle town was a false alarm. [WLKY]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich drew applause during Thursday’s Republican presidential debate for saying that he accepted gay marriage even though it was counter to his “traditional” views. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police officers who shot and killed an 18-year-old who was wielding a knife were carrying Tasers, prompting some people to wonder why they didn’t try using them first. [WAVE3]

A majority of Americans, white and black, believe that more needs to be done to fight racism in the United States, following a year of protests over the treatment of minorities by police, according to a Pew Research Center survey released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Jefferson County Public Schools administrators are recommending no property tax rate increase for the 2015-16 fiscal year, the school district announced Friday. [WFPL]

After thinking about it overnight, Republican candidate for state auditor Mike Harmon announced Thursday Jesse Benton will cut ties to Harmon’s campaign. [Ronnie Ellis]

Retailers and bars can now buy Jim Beam bourbon by the barrel. The new sales program started in July. Clermont, Ky.-based Jim Beam is owned by Beam Suntory Inc., a Japanese company that has its U.S. headquarters in Deerfield, Ill. This isn’t the parent company’s first run at a by-the-barrel sales program. It’s been selling Knob Creek this way since 2011. [Business First]

Members of the Floyd County Council held a work session Monday afternoon to ask questions, and have some answered, concerning the formation of a Regional Development Authority. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Short-Term Rental Cat Fight Takes Shape

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Leaders with Louisville Metro Council are asking for additional input while they work out details of an ordinance aimed at creating more regulatory oversight in the short term housing market. You should at least have to live in the homes you’re renting out like a hotel. [WDRB]

Another guy without a gun was shot and killed by police officers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Stop signs will soon be placed at a railroad crossing where two people were seriously injured this week in Buechel on Crawford Ave. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Department of Education is seeking public feedback on dozens of proposed social studies standards. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two years after Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis was killed in the line of duty, police continue to investigate. [WLKY]

Bloomberg Philanthropies on Wednesday announced the first eight cities it has selected to participate in a new pilot program to improve life in America’s cities. Chattanooga, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; Kansas City, Missouri; Mesa, Arizona; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jackson, Mississippi; Seattle and New Orleans will be the first to benefit from the What Works Cities Initiative. The project intends to spend $42 million over three years to help U.S. cities address issues like economic development, public health, crime and transportation. [HuffPo]

The developers tasked with rehabbing the iconic 800 Building in downtown Louisville want the taxpayers to help foot the bill. Now, that is a step closer to happening. [WAVE3]

In the early morning hours of June 30, 1995, a fire sparked to life in Kristine Bunch’s mobile home. It fanned out across the floor and climbed up the walls, then formed an impassable barrier across the middle of the trailer. Bunch, 21, snapped awake in the living room. Her three-year-old son, Tony, shrieked for her on the other side of the flames. [Mother Jones]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Later this month, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will escape for a family retreat to mourn his late son, Beau, but also to mull, as his dying son urged him to do, a campaign for president. Some of Mr. Biden’s friends and allies worry that he will decide it is a good idea. [NY Times]

Greater Louisville Inc. has named Deana Epperly Karem vice president of economic development. Karem is the current executive director of the Oldham County Chamber and Economic Development. She’ll start work at GLI on Sept. 1. [Business First]

When Floyd County Solid Waste Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley receives a complaint about the two mobile recycling sites that were closed recently due to budget cuts, she refers them to the people who ordered the reductions. [News & Tribune]

Watch Matt Bevin Just Fall Apart

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

A historic building formerly occupied by the Louisville Water Company will be going into storage. According to a letter to the citizens of Louisville sent by Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, the vacant Water Company building located near the corner of 2nd Street and Liberty Street will be dismantled and placed into storage to make way for the $289 million Omni hotel and apartment building. [WDRB]

Myliah Rose Davis slept on a blanket in her mother’s lap, her tiny hands moving every now and then, as if orchestrating a dream. [C-J/AKN]

A friendly game of hula hoop or interaction with a police horse – it’s the simple activities Louisville Metro Police say break down some often uncomfortable barriers. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin’s love-hate-love-hate relationship with the annual Fancy Farm picnic this last weekend was confusing, contradictory and likely ill-advised. As if there’s anything the man does that isn’t ill-advised. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A railroad crossing accident at Buechel and Crawford avenues this week was the second incident there in four months. [WLKY]

A hard-to-watch video, filmed in 2012 by undercover investigators with Mercy for Animals, shows Idaho dairy farm workers viciously abusing cows. [HuffPo]

Weeks after the Louisville Metro Council allocated $5 million in additional funding for roadwork, progress on the roads was moving slower than some had hoped. [WAVE3]

On Tuesday, Allan Kauffman (D), mayor of Goshen, Indiana, posted a statement announcing that the City Council would not be voting on a proposed LGBT nondiscrimination ordinance that night. “Despite several attempts to tweak the ordinance amendment to respond to concerns expressed, they have not been enough to gain good consensus from City Council members,” he wrote. [ThinkProgress]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s political figures decried the long awaited carbon emission regulations announced Monday by President Barack Obama. [Ronnie Ellis]

A Cincinnati company last week purchased an 88-unit apartment complex off Preston Highway and could start on a substantial renovation as early as this month. [Business First]

Mayor Mike Moore is tired of waiting for the 10th Street medians to be maintained on a regular basis. So he made an executive decision during Wednesday night’s Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission meeting to take care of overgrown weeds — and then some. Just in case anyone needed another reason to think this guy is a sad excuse of a mayor. [News & Tribune]

Track Crime & Scare Meemaw More Easily With Handy New Site

America Place, a Metro Louisville real estate developer, is wrapping up construction of its second, industrial building at River Ridge Commerce Center — and it’s buying up more land for another. [WDRB]

A new Louisville-area labor report shows that the area job market continues its strongest showing in a decade, with a jobless rate for June of just 4.7 percent, compared to 6.1 percent in June 2014. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe Possibility City will finally start taking its train crossings seriously. Don’t worry, not holding our breath. Two people were hospitalized with serious injuries Monday after their truck was hit by a train at a notoriously dangerous Louisville intersection. Police responded to the incident around 3 p.m. at Crawford Avenue in Buechel. [WHAS11]

The first Republican debate of the 2016 presidential election, said Sen. Rand Paul, will be between him and people who “want to blow up the world.” The Thursday night showdown will pit him against opponents who will “send half a million of your sons and daughters back” to Iraq. He promised that he will ask his Republican presidential rivals, face to face, whether they “want to always intervene in every civil war around the world.” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Construction on a new VA hospital is set to get underway in 2017. [WLKY]

Two congressmen behind a federal provision protecting state-legal medical marijuana operations are seeking an investigation into the Department of Justice’s continued crackdown on medical marijuana patients and providers, saying the DOJ may be in violation of federal law. [HuffPo]

An online crime tracking tool is now live on the Louisville Metro Police Department’s website. [WAVE3]

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit accusing a school resource officer in Kentucky of handcuffing two disabled children to punish them for behavior related to their disabilities, ACLU officials said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Four-year-old Evander Conroy was born with a neuroblastoma tumor compressing his spinal cord. Because of the tumor, he’s never been able to move his legs. This is worth another read. [WFPL]

Democrats unleashed a barrage of attacks here Saturday on Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin, calling him nearly every name in the book. [Ronnie Ellis]

Jeffersonville’s RiverStage had its biggest crowd ever on Saturday night, as a free concert and great weather brought an estimated 11,000 to 12,000 people to the riverfront. [Business First]

The Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission will pony up more money to pay for the rising cost of the heavy-haul road. [News & Tribune]

People Dying & You’re Mad Over A Lion

Told ya Jack’s probably gonna win. Conway, the Democratic nominee, leads Bevin 45 percent to 42 percent, with 13 percent of voters undecided. Curtis polled at 8 percent, leaving Conway with 43 percent and Bevin with 38 percent. [H-L]

An investigation by the Louisville Fire Department found GE could have done more to prevent a fire that destroyed a building at Appliance Park, but company officials say investigators are wrong and they have the video to prove it. [WDRB]

Fire investigators have blamed the total loss of a General Electric warehouse on outdated Appliance Park equipment that failed when fire crews rushed to the scene April 3. [C-J/AKN]

A shooting just before midnight has sent a victim to the hospital, only hours after fatal shooting in the same area. [WHAS11]

A lawsuit filed in federal court in California against Maker’s Mark Distillery was dismissed on Monday. The plaintiffs had alleged that they were mislead by the premium bourbon’s claims on the label to be “handmade” but U.S. District Judge John A. Houston found that the claim “cannot reasonably be interpreted as meaning literally by hand nor that a reasonable consumer would understand the term to mean no equipment or automated process was used to manufacture the whisky.” [H-L]

Metro police are investigating a stabbing at a south Louisville bar. But everything is puppies and rainbows in Possibility City. [WLKY]

There’s a simple, popular solution that Republican leaders in Congress could grab hold of to get themselves out of their embarrassing public fight over the highway bill, and President Barack Obama could help force them to do it. [HuffPo]

Louisville officials spent at least $2.5 million on additional security measures after a night of mob violence rocked the city in 2014, according to records obtained by WAVE 3 News. [WHAS11]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Rowan County has thrown bigoted hypocrite Kim Davis to the wolves. [WFPL]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

United Parcel Service Inc. says it’s already working closely with retail customers on planning for this year’s peak season — even though there are indications of a softer shipping season this year. [Business First]

As statewide numbers showed a climbing trend, school districts in Clark and Floyd counties also realized an increase of children living in poverty. [News & Tribune]

Seeing “Cordish” Is Like Seeing A Big Car Crash On The Side Of The Road

Because the company doesn’t investigate, it just covers things up and pays people off. However, Smith refused to explain how the company investigated the allegations on their own. “I will not go into that,” Smith said when he was asked how the company does it’s own investigations. [WDRB]

Dismayed by allegations of racial discrimination at 4th Street Live, activists denounced the entertainment district and its developer on Wednesday, suggesting that the developer has some civil rights groups in its pocket. [C-J/AKN]

The person police said is behind a threatening note left at the Louisville Jewish Community Center is now behind bars. [WHAS11]

Brown-Forman CEO Paul Varga said Wednesday that the company aspires to grow Woodford Reserve, Old Forester, the Herradura tequila family and other major labels into billion-dollar brands. [H-L]

Property owners near GE Appliance Park have until Saturday, Aug. 1 to submit claims for cleanup costs related to April’s six-alarm fire. [WLKY]

It’s a whole new day for Republican presidential contenders making their second bid for the White House. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is making serious efforts to woo black voters, and is becoming one of the fiercest critics of real estate mogul Donald Trump. Meanwhile former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, known for his stringent opposition to same-sex marriage, is softening his rhetoric about gay people. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? A dog left inside a car in the hot sun died from heat exhaustion, leading to the arrest of an Oldham County woman. [WAVE3]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

Barry Barker would rather not talk about some buses in TARC’s fleet. They’re buses like the one Metro Councilman Tom Owen rode into downtown early Tuesday morning. That bus stalled and had to be banged, slammed and shoved by the driver to get running again, Owen said. [WFPL]

Even as immigration remains a hot topic in the U.S. presidential campaign, the number of people emigrating from Mexico to the United States, legally and illegally, has dropped sharply in recent years, research published Wednesday shows. [Reuters]

U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best Hospitals List Tuesday, which ranks hospitals on medical specialties such as cancer, cardiology, orthopedics and so on. [Business First]

The state will pay $124,500 to end a lawsuit brought by a man who wasn’t provided with a sign language interpreter during his mother’s criminal hearings in 2010 and 2011. In March, the U.S. District Court Southern District of Indiana in New Albany found in favor of Steven Prakel after he claimed courts and judges in Dearborn County failed to hire an interpreter during his mother’s hearings related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated and driving on a suspended license charges. [News & Tribune]

Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]