Really Gonna Miss All This Compassion

Gov. Matt Bevin must first fill two open seats on the University of Louisville Board of Trustees before the board can take up a proposed vote of “no confidence” in the leadership of President James Ramsey, according to the terms of a settlement reached last month in a lawsuit challenging the board’s lack of minority representation. [WDRB]

A new survey of Louisville roads released Tuesday by Metro Public Works shows a slight improvement in the city’s overall road conditions, but more than one-third of major thoroughfares are still so deteriorated that they require “immediate attention,” including rehabilitative work. [C-J/AKN]

Compassionate City just can’t stop killing its people. [WHAS11]

That line of pear trees in the Palomar neighborhood in south Lexington is gorgeous, fluffy and decked out like clouds descended to suburban earth. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Additional charges could be filed after a University of Louisville student was shot and killed during a triple shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WLKY]

A new report nearly doubles previous predictions for sea level rise if global emissions continue unabated, portending a doomsday scenario for many of the world’s coastal cities. [HuffPo]

According to the city of New Albany, preliminary work to prepare for the final planned section of the city’s portion of the Ohio River Greenway project has begun. [WAVE3]

In these first years of the 21st century, we may be witnessing a new world being born inside the hollowed-out shell of the American system. [Bill Moyers]

In the United States, we like to think that our success is determined only by how hard we work. But in reality, some of it’s just luck. And some of that luck has to do with things we can’t control: Our race. Our gender. Our sexual orientation. What language we grow up speaking. [WFPL]

Shandra Woworuntu arrived in the US hoping to start a new career in the hotel industry. Instead, she found she had been trafficked into a world of prostitution and sexual slavery, forced drug-taking and violence. It was months before she was able to turn the tables on her persecutors. Some readers may find her account of the ordeal upsetting. [BBC]

When you buy a car, the salesman makes a commission. The same’s often true when you buy insurance from an agent — unless they’re selling you a health plan from Louisville insurance giant Humana Inc. or one of the other major insurers who have decided not to pay them. [Business First]

Michael Shepard headed to his campus food court this week looking for students hungry for political action. He came away unsatisfied. [News & Tribune]

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Huh? Gang Activity? What Gang Activity?

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad says the amount of violent crime in the city has increased 4.4 percent in comparison with 2015, according to the most recent data. [WDRB]

Here’s a story from a week ago that essentially got ignored. Looking to trim labor costs, Ford Motor Co. is offering hourly workers with at least 8 1/2 years of service a $70,000 lump sum payment to take a voluntary retirement or separation this year. [C-J/AKN]

Seven Counties is continuing its fight against addiction specifically with heroin and opioids. [WHAS11]

The state Senate was minutes away from adjourning Tuesday night when Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer announced that a special visitor wanted to address the chamber — Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An urban farm is coming to Louisville’s Hazelwood neighborhood and taking over the former Iroquois housing site. [WLKY]

Republican front-runner Donald Trump said Tuesday he doesn’t plan to honor his pledge to support the party’s nominee for president if it’s not him. [HuffPo]

Seems like only yesterday Jerry Abramson and crew were claiming gangs were not a thing in Possibility Compassionate City. Nothing to see here, move along, puppies and rainbows. [WAVE3]

With homelessness surging and rent prices skyrocketing nationwide, one congresswoman is urging her colleagues to rapidly increase federal funding for affordable housing in hopes of stemming the tide. [ThinkProgress]

Last month, for the first time in about 15 years, Kentucky changed its fish consumption advisories. There are high levels of mercury in most of the commonwealth’s lakes and rivers. But there is a conflict between what state agencies are saying and what they’re doing: On one hand, the state is warning people not to eat large amounts of fish because it contains the toxic chemical. On the other, state agencies are suing the federal government over pollution controls that would keep mercury out of waterways in the first place. [WFPL]

Grassroots Republicans are growing frustrated with their Washington Beltway counterparts, who they think are giving up the fight for the White House. [The Hill]

HOWWWWW much money is KentuckyOne health spending on this ongoing PR campaign? It’s never-ending, apparently. [Business First]

Jim Wathen said two years ago he had an idea to stabilize Floyd County’s fiscal future — sell Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services. That idea didn’t go too far at the time. [News & Tribune]

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Clark County Schools Seem A Hot Mess

Busing kids in Clark County may have just hit a pothole. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five intersections have been identified as the most dangerous locations for pedestrians to cross, according to a five-year study by city officials. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Now Jim Ramsey wants to meet one-on-one with University of Louisville trustees. [WHAS11]

Another bad week for Damon Thayer… Matt Bevin cannot remove members of the Kentucky Horse Park Commission but must allow them to serve out defined terms, according to an opinion released Monday by Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Off-duty police officers will be walking the streets in Old Louisville. It’s part of an initiative to cut down on crime in the area. [WLKY]

There’s a presidential candidate being compared to Adolf Hitler — and odds are, it’s not the one you’re thinking of. Disgraced televangelist Jim Bakker recently equated the support Democratic hopeful Bernie Sanders is getting from America’s youth to support for Adolf Hitler in Nazi Germany. [HuffPo]

“I-STEP is just another standardized test that doesn’t do anything but give kids anxiety,” Leslie Rayborn, mother of a Clarksville Elementary School student, said. “It doesn’t measure their true potential.” [WAVE3]

Some Republican state senators spent a long weekend back and forth between family and working on their version of a two-year state budget. [Ronnie Ellis]

Oldham County has the state’s best health outcomes, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. [WFPL]

Republican leaders adamantly opposed to Donald J. Trump’s candidacy are preparing a 100-day campaign to deny him the presidential nomination, starting with an aggressive battle in Wisconsin’s April 5 primary and extending into the summer, with a delegate-by-delegate lobbying effort that would cast Mr. Trump as a calamitous choice for the general election. [NY Times]

Another day, another hurdle for the merger of Aetna Inc. and Humana Inc. There are a number of people scrutinizing the deal and its possible impact on competition among health insurers, but antitrust regulators said this week that they’ll pay especially close attention. [Business First]

Floyd County employees hoping to soon vote for union representation will have to wait a little longer, that is if the commissioners give them the opportunity to vote at all. [News & Tribune]

Brown Gave Master Class In Throwing Shade

Community activist Angela Newby-Bouggess has died. [WDRB]

Nearly 500 sexual assault kits that would have continued to sit untested in the Louisville Metro Police property room will now be sent for lab testing after a shift in LMPD philosophy. The department is sending 1,386 untested rape kits to Kentucky State Police for testing – 463 more than originally intended. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “We have to start opening our eyes and reconciling the fact that these things happened,” says Attorney Larry Wilder, a statement he has repeated since October when his client’s book Breaking Cardinal Rules hit store shelves. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission has dedicated 88 acres to an existing preserve in Pulaski County. [H-L]

Another day, another fun pedestrian accident in Possibility Compassionate City! [WLKY]

The White House has narrowed its search for a Supreme Court nominee to three federal appeals court judges, Sri Srinivasan, Merrick Garland and Paul Watford, a source familiar with the selection process said on Friday. [HuffPo]

If she can do it, you can do it. One year after her story went viral, Asia Ford returned to the Rodes City Run 10K Saturday. [WAVE3]

Obama Administration transparency is a lot like Fischer Administration transparency. It’s not a real thing. Two years ago last month, I filed a public-records request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency as part of my reporting into the flawed response to Hurricane Sandy. Then, I waited. [ProPublica]

Kelly Downard has apparently turned into all bark and no bite. No clue what happened to him but he’s been entirely neutered. [WFPL]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A pair of sisters is opening a barber shop that will be a little different than most others. [Business First]

Two contracts up for a vote in April got some scrutiny by the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s board of trustees work session Monday. [News & Tribune]

Murder City’s Homicide Unit Is Expanding

The small city of Hillview is suing its former attorney for more than $15 million. In a complaint filed in Bullitt Circuit Court Tuesday, the city alleges Mark Edison, who served as Hillview city attorney from Jan. 2003 to March 2015, failed to properly advise city leaders during a land dispute case in the early 2000s. That case led to a judgment against the city of $11.4 million. [WDRB]

At the end of every April, OneWest interim director Jenny Recktenwald says, out-of-town companies hunt for western Louisville’s most vulnerable residents with overdue tax bills. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro Police Department is expanding its Homicide Unit in an effort to lower crime in 2016 and take more violent offenders off the streets. [WHAS11]

With Gov. Matt Bevin’s blessing, a state House panel Thursday approved a bill that would allow Lexington’s Urban County Council to pass an additional 2.5 percent transient room tax to help pay for an expanded Lexington Convention Center. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WLKY]

Remember when this happened in Kentucky and then everyone forgot about it? A Georgia-based telecom startup had a clear, pointed response after the state’s senate approved a measure that will allow business owners to cite their religious beliefs in denying services to same-sex couples. [HuffPo]

Surprise! A new ranking of the happiest and healthiest cities is out and it is not good news for Louisville. [WAVE3]

New orders for long-lasting U.S. manufactured goods in January rose by the most in 10 months as demand picked up across the board, offering a ray of hope for the downtrodden manufacturing sector. [Reuters]

Deborah Collins squinted her eyes, triple-checking the information on the screen in front of her. She traced the blinking cursor with her finger, repeating her ZIP code, address and phone number. [WFPL]

The FBI’s much-discussed request to Apple can seem innocuous: Help us extract six weeks of encrypted data from the locked iPhone of Syed Farook, an employee of San Bernardino’s health department who spearheaded an attack that killed 14 people. Most people believe Apple should comply. But the FBI is demanding a lot more than the data on a single phone. [ProPublica]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. will be selling four transitional care hospitals and acquiring five long-term acute care facilities from Select Medical Holdings Corp. [Business First]

Jeffersonville police and fire chiefs are asking for some of the money the city council didn’t fund for this year when it tried to create a balanced budget. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

JCPS Outrage Reaching Fever Pitch

Some Jefferson County Public Schools board members are raising questions about the district potentially misusing Every 1 Reads funds. Surprise! David Jones doesn’t think it’s a big deal because $420,000 to him is like $420 to you. And Allison Martin blaming someone else? No surprise there. [WDRB]

No amount of positive spin stories like these getting shopped around by people like Mark Hebert will improve UofL’s scandal-ridden mess of a leadership debacle. The University of Louisville produced 10 Fulbright scholars this school year — the same number as Stanford — and ranking it among the 42 highest universities in the United States. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Flashing red and blue lights and police choppers were all creating quite a scene at the Big Four Bridge on Saturday. [WHAS11]

An affidavit filed in federal court says the shooting of a U.S. postal worker in Louisville was the result of a drug deal. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents on both sides of the gun debate showed up at a committee meeting Tuesday to voice their opinion on whether guns should be allowed inside Town Hall. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell draws a fine line between their nefarious calls for delay and his wise calls for delay. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian struck on the streets of Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s troubled public pension funds are fighting a bill requiring them to disclose performance fees paid to outside asset managers and use more transparent methods when selecting those managers. [Reuters]

The attorney hired to represent Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky in a lawsuit over abortion services says he’ll ask a judge to dismiss the case. [WFPL]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

We at Louisville Business First often report about programs to encourage entrepreneurs in the area, and now those efforts are gaining broader attention. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman gave a shout-out to Louisville’s startup community in his Feb. 17 column. [Business First]

There was only one winner Thursday night at the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s Teacher of the Year recognition dinner. [News & Tribune]

Another Gag-Worthy Week For UofL

A job listing just posted online for Louisville Metro Police Department has some wondering if the city’s police force is short on officers. [WDRB]

It’s hilarious that Rick Pitino is defending Jim Ramsey, as if they’re both victims of things they can’t help. Both of these men are the worst of the worst in higher education. Pitino, with sex scandal after sex scandal. Ramsey, with financial corruption mess after financial corruption mess. Both should be relieved of their duties instead of allowing a bunch of kids to take the blame for crap that those two are ultimately supposed to take responsibility. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees member has resigned following months of questions surrounding its racial imbalance. [WHAS11]

Just eight years ago, most of the domestic violence deaths in Louisville were from strangulation. Today, more than 71 percent are from guns. [H-L]

How excited are you that the shootings are spreading to Southern Indiana? [WLKY]

Health care got some attention in Saturday night’s GOP presidential debate. And when it was Texas Sen. Turd Cruz’s turn to speak, he started by cataloging the alleged evils of “socialized medicine.” [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WAVE3]

Noting their excitement about “the energy that exists across campus,” Maribeth and Louis Berman, of Louisville, have pledged $1 million to Eastern Kentucky University to support a combination of academic and student-focused initiatives. [Richmond Register]

The Louisville Metro Council will soon consider measures to streamline the process for bringing ultra-fast Internet access, including a plan to condense the franchise-granting authority of Jefferson County’s suburban cities for communication services into one entity. [WFPL]

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ campaign has reportedly raised $3 million since Monday night’s Iowa caucuses. [The Hill]

A new study shows that Kentucky and Arkansas had the sharpest decline in the percentage of adult residents without health insurance from 2013 to 2015. [Business First]

Voters on both sides of the aisle will have options for the Clark County Council race, as 10 people signed up to run for the three At-large seats up for election in each party in May’s primary. [News & Tribune]