People Freaking Out Over Humana

Aaron Wheatley estimates he spends four to five days on the Ohio River each week in his hunt for big catfish. [WDRB]

The Ford Motor Co. president and CEO Mark Fields outlined a bouyant vision for the automaker’s future and Louisville’s role during a lunch speech Friday. [C-J/AKN]

A mother’s love knows no bounds. WHAS11 was given permission to listen to a voice mail from Dashieka Ross—it was sent to her 20-year-old daughter Raveen Horn. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul stood before nearly 200 fans Saturday afternoon and made clear his intentions to force the expiration of the Patriot Act when the U.S. Senate meets for a rare session Sunday. [H-L]

According to newly released police interviews, the fatal shooting of a 16-year-old Louisville girl is linked to the death of a 14-year-old boy months earlier. [WLKY]

The new 21c in Durham looks pretty great. [HuffPo]

Almost 4,000 local GE workers are entering a critical few weeks for their future. Their union is about to start negotiating a new contract, fighting for better pay and benefits as GE looks to control costs. [WAVE3]

Ford Motor Company issued two new recalls Wednesday covering nearly 445,000 vehicles after receiving numerous complaint and incident reports, including at least four accidents related to loss of power steering and high underbody temperatures. [Consumerist]

Louisville Metro Council members unanimously approved an ordinance Thursday temporarily changing a flood rule that has left a number of homeowners with flood-damaged homes they can’t repair. [WFPL]

Saturday night’s statewide Republican dinner was supposed to be about unity, and it was, in more ways than one. But none of his former opponents showed up. [Ronnie Ellis]

Shares of Humana Inc. closed Friday with a 20 percent gain after a report by The Wall Street Journal that the Louisville-based health-benefits company is considering being acquired. [Business First]

Brandon Terry reaches his hand into a brown paper bag and tosses its contents onto his coffee table — a pack of syringes, sterile cotton swabs, a ream of condoms. He also has an orange box with hazardous warning stickers on the side. [News & Tribune]

How’ll That Waterfront Property End Up?

Have you seen this puppies and rainbows b.s. with Donna Hargens? Giving this woman a free pass is the last thing Louisville needs right now. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Police Department has ordered 988 body cameras from Arizona-based TASER International ahead of its upcoming body camera pilot program, the department confirmed Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

It’s a building and a company that dominates the downtown Louisville skyline and the city’s business community. For more than five decades, the healthcare giant Humana and its employees have remained an important piece of this area’s economic fabric. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader endorsed Hal Heiner over Jamie Comer, which is likely to push Comer over the edge behind closed doors. [H-L]

Researchers say children in Louisville are being sold for sex. The KristyLove Foundation is a first-of-its-kind shelter in Louisville created by a woman who escaped the sex trade and turned her heartbreak into healing. [WLKY]

Faith in humanity, restored. A worker in a Qdoba fast food restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky was caught on video feeding a customer who was unable to feed herself. [HuffPo]

A Louisville police chief says there’s a lot of work to be done to ease tensions between law enforcement and the community. He believes body cameras could be part of the answer. [WAVE3]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Waterfront Development Corp. wants two of its downtown properties just south of Waterfront Park to be developed. The agency asked on Thursday for development proposals for the properties. [WFPL]

Ha! Daniel Grossberg has an ad highlighting Jacob Conway’s blackmail/extortion/threat attempt. [Click the Clicky]

American Pharaoh strolled out of his trailer and into the stables with ease when he arrived at Pimlico Race Course Wednesday afternoon. [Business First]

The Floyd County Council voted 5-2 last week to cut $150,000 from the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter budget to help balance the county’s 2015 general fund. That won’t end well. [News & Tribune]

Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]

Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Will Still Hit Poorest Hardest

Scott County, Indiana, wants its needle exchange program to keep running even after the governor’s executive order expires. [WDRB]

Trinity High officials on Wednesday touted their decision to begin random drug- and alcohol-testing of their 1,200-plus students, saying the move will act as a deterrent and could help keep students from becoming addicted later in life. [C-J/AKN]

Police in Lawrence, Ind. have located a Louisville pizza delivery driver’s car that was stolen May 3. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has approved a plan by Keeneland to move its simulcasting — betting on live horse races run elsewhere — to The Red Mile in Lexington. [H-L]

Officials approved a plan to minimize the effects of bridge tolls on low-income residents. And it won’t do much of that. [WLKY & Press Releases]

About a half-dozen states are considering cutting income taxes and simultaneously increasing sales or excise taxes — sparking debate on whether wealthier taxpayers will benefit disproportionately at the expense of those living on lower incomes. [HuffPo]

Ignore the bit where Connie Leonard snidely uses “Democrat” as an adjective. A lot of taxpayers are up in arms over recent home assessments in Metro Louisville. That’s because in many cases, assessed values jumped much higher than homeowners expected and certain neighborhoods are in more sticker shock than others. [WAVE3]

A federal appeals court panel ruled on Thursday that the NSA’s bulk collection of metadata of phone calls to and from Americans is not authorized by Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act, throwing out the government’s legal justification for the surveillance program exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden nearly two years ago. [The Intercept]

Louisville Metro Council members are scrutinizing new property assessments that, in some neighborhoods, have spiked by as much as 40 or even 150 percent. [WFPL]

Three men campaigning to lead the state of Kentucky faced potential voters Wednesday night in Booth Auditorium at the University of Pikeville. [WYMT]

Over the years, Papa John’s International Inc. has added a few non-pizza foods to its menu, including chicken wings, a giant chocolate chip cookie and, most recently, garlic knots. [Business First]

Democratic incumbent Jeff Gahan defeated challenger David White by almost 700 votes, or 60 percent to 39 percent, in the New Albany mayoral primary Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Can’t Stay Out Of The Dang News

Year-round employees in Jefferson County Public Schools — from central office staff and high school principals to custodians and some secretaries — will be forced to take two unpaid days in the coming school year under a proposal by Superintendent Donna Hargens. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Council’s government accountability committee wants answers about rising home assessments in certain neighborhoods. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police officers should start wearing their body cameras within the next couple months. [WHAS11]

Winter’s full fury arrived late in much of the country, but once it did it was relentless, forcing state transportation agencies to spend more than $1 billion to keep highways safe and passable, according to a first-of-its-kind survey. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man has been indicted in the dragging death of his friend, a crime that has left two families stunned. [WLKY]

This screwed up Louisville story made the national news. [HuffPo]

An August 2, 2016 trial date has been set for a southern Indiana man accused of raping his girlfriend, killing her and then consuming parts of her body. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s two U.S. senators have introduced legislation they say will level the playing field for American bourbon and whiskey producers. [WKYUFM]

People born poor are more likely to stay that way if they live in Jefferson County than if they live in surrounding Bullitt or Oldham counties, according to a recent Harvard study. [WFPL]

In New York City, supporters of public libraries say that respect for — and repair of — the libraries is long, well, overdue. [NPR]

A federal judge in Florida has dismissed a lawsuit that alleges Maker’s Mark is being misleading by calling its product “handmade.” [Business First]

Floyd County Clerk Christy Eurton huddled her staff before the office opened at 8 a.m. Thursday for an important discussion. It wasn’t a talk about next week’s primary election — a task that requires hours of preparation and dedication to successfully and accurately conduct — but rather Eurton attempted to calm her employees about the budget cuts issued by the Floyd County Council the night before. [News & Tribune]