Hating The Gays Is Really Expensive

Horse racing fans can now purchase their tickets to Churchill Downs races through Ticketmaster, according to a press release from the racetrack. [WDRB]

Louisville leaders have spent decades preaching about the need for a better-trained workforce to strengthen the local economy and improve prospects for workers facing increasingly complex and technologically advanced workplaces. [C-J/AKN]

The Cardinals have returned to their nest. The University of Louisville is once again bustling with students on the first day of classes. [WHAS11]

The private attorneys whom Beshear hired to handle the state’s appeals have a $260,000 contract, of which $231,348 had been paid by July 20, according to state records. Total cost to taxpayers: $2,351,297. [H-L]

The coroner has released the name of a teenager found fatally shot Saturday night outside a southwest Jefferson County apartment building. [WLKY]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]

Be prepared: the living dead are ready to take over Louisville. And they’re not talking about the way you feel after listening to Greg Fischer speak. [WAVE3]

If you’ve followed the saga involving Joshua Powell and Montgomery County Schools? This episode of This American Life will send chills down your spin. [This American Life]

Louisville’s new effort to make dangerous intersections safer could have unforeseen consequences. Metro Police have begun ticketing jaywalking pedestrians and motorists who don’t yield at crosswalks. Rolf Eisinger, the city’s bicycle and pedestrian coordinator, said Metro government is seeking to prevent pedestrian deaths. But the crackdown could have a disproportionate effect on minorities and low-income people. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama has been briefed on developments in global financial markets, the White House said on Monday after world stock markets plunged. [Reuters]

When more than 1,500 acres inside the 6,000-acre River Ridge Commerce Center recently received megasite certification, it did so under the exacting standards of the automotive industry. [Business First]

During a strategic plan update, Greater Clark County Schools Superintendent Andrew Melin said whichever way the district’s referendum shakes out, administrators will be busy after November. [News & Tribune]

MSD Monster Grows, No One Notices

A Kentucky company has been dumping toxic waste into public waters for over a year and the leaders of Bullitt Utilities say the company can’t afford to fix this problem. [WDRB]

This sounds like a disaster in the making. Louisville officials are creating another level of bureaucracy, of sorts, with the promise that it can help save tens of millions of dollars and slow rate increases for city water and sewer customers. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Hillview, Ky. filed for bankruptcy protection, Chapter Nine, on Aug. 20. [WHAS11]

The state is looking for volunteers to review cases of children placed in foster care in 35 counties. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! To date, dozens of people have been killed on the streets of Louisville, and many of the victims are under the age of 25. [WLKY]

Scientists at Ohio State University say they’ve grown the first near-complete human brain in a lab. Maybe Rand Paul will receive it as a transplant. [HuffPo]

An increase in property assessments means Jefferson County Public Schools will not ask for a tax rate increase for the 2015-2016 school year. [WAVE3]

New disclosures about the National Security Agency’s partnership with AT&T could reignite constitutional challenges to the spy agency’s efforts to wiretap the Internet. [ProPublica]

Why is there such a large gap between the number of Kentucky students who graduate high school on time and those who go straight to college? [WFPL]

Birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, but Donald Trump and other candidates are keeping alive the idea that some Americans should not have equal rights at birth. [The Nation]

Mayor Greg Fischer says he’s “very bullish” on Louisville as a spot to possibly expand Major League Soccer, and Wayne Estopinal, Louisville City FC’s operating manager, plans to meet with Fischer next week to discuss his team’s current situation and start talks on building a stadium specifically for soccer. [Business First]

Floyd County may soon have only one recycling site for residents to drop-off items. The Floyd County Council voted 4-3 against giving solid waste $70,000 in additional appropriations, which Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley said would keep all sites open through the end of the year. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Your Good Morning Grass & Jay Walking

You may have noticed some grass around Louisville standing taller than people. Lots of people complained about the eyesore and even called it a hazard, so we asked the city what is taking so long to get it cut. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Council members ripped into Mayor Greg Fischer’s office on Tuesday afternoon about the lack of prompt grass cutting at city parks and medians along major thoroughfares. [C-J/AKN]

There are around 1,000 school bus drivers carrying tens of thousands of Jefferson County Public School students during the school year. Officials say sometimes an office mistake can happen. [WHAS11]

In the early 1880s, James M. Bond walked from Barbourville to Berea, leading a young steer that he sold to pay for tuition. Bond, who was born into slavery, graduated from Berea and later from Oberlin College with a divinity degree. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! And it’s Metro Council, not City Council. [WLKY]

A year ago, after 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, police responded to even peaceful daytime protests in the St. Louis suburb by deploying attack dogs and tactical vehicles, pointing sniper rifles at peaceful protesters, arresting people for simply standing still on public sidewalks, flooding demonstrators with tear gas — often without warning — and shooting them with bean bags, wooden pellets and balls filled with pepper spray. [HuffPo]

Louisville is one of the states with the highest number of pedestrian related crashes in the country, according to Louisville Metro Police Department Sgt. Ruby Ellison. [WAVE3]

The phone rings just as Katrina Fingerson and Latoya McClary are about to leave to start their shift at the Goddard Riverside Community Center. [ThinkProgress]

General Electric said Monday it is unveiling a new top-load washing machine design that will mark the biggest new product launch in its laundry division in two decades. [WFPL]

The poor are treated like human ATM machines, and our politicians are actively encouraging their exploitation. In the 1960s, the Lyndon Johnson administration launched an official War on Poverty. Needless to say, poverty has emerged victorious. [Salon]

An old distillery in Kentucky soon will start spirits production again. In May 2014, Peristyle LLC announced plans to restore and reopen the historic Old Taylor Distillery in Woodford County. Work has been taking place at the facility since. [Business First]

An ordinance adopting an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration from the Clark County health officer was formally passed Thursday evening at a county commissioners meeting. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

What Shade Will Anchorage Throw Next?

Louisville Metro Police arrested a man and charged him with murder but some of the suspect’s friends say he shouldn’t have been charged at all. [WDRB]

A judge has thrown out a lawsuit by the city of Anchorage against Bellewood Presbyterian Home for Children, rejecting the small city’s effort to block the center from accepting youths officials deem too dangerous for the neighborhood. Imagine that. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS students have just three more days of summer break, and on August 8 the Louisville Urban League hosted a summit to get students excited to get back to the classroom. [WHAS11]

In April 2005, President George W. Bush hailed “clean coal” as a key to “greater energy independence,” pledging $2 billion in research funds that promised a new golden age for America’s most abundant energy resource. [H-L]

Apparently, “middle town” is a place now. Louisville Metro Bomb Squad say a suspicious package left at a Target department store in middle town was a false alarm. [WLKY]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich drew applause during Thursday’s Republican presidential debate for saying that he accepted gay marriage even though it was counter to his “traditional” views. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police officers who shot and killed an 18-year-old who was wielding a knife were carrying Tasers, prompting some people to wonder why they didn’t try using them first. [WAVE3]

A majority of Americans, white and black, believe that more needs to be done to fight racism in the United States, following a year of protests over the treatment of minorities by police, according to a Pew Research Center survey released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Jefferson County Public Schools administrators are recommending no property tax rate increase for the 2015-16 fiscal year, the school district announced Friday. [WFPL]

After thinking about it overnight, Republican candidate for state auditor Mike Harmon announced Thursday Jesse Benton will cut ties to Harmon’s campaign. [Ronnie Ellis]

Retailers and bars can now buy Jim Beam bourbon by the barrel. The new sales program started in July. Clermont, Ky.-based Jim Beam is owned by Beam Suntory Inc., a Japanese company that has its U.S. headquarters in Deerfield, Ill. This isn’t the parent company’s first run at a by-the-barrel sales program. It’s been selling Knob Creek this way since 2011. [Business First]

Members of the Floyd County Council held a work session Monday afternoon to ask questions, and have some answered, concerning the formation of a Regional Development Authority. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Short-Term Rental Cat Fight Takes Shape

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Leaders with Louisville Metro Council are asking for additional input while they work out details of an ordinance aimed at creating more regulatory oversight in the short term housing market. You should at least have to live in the homes you’re renting out like a hotel. [WDRB]

Another guy without a gun was shot and killed by police officers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Stop signs will soon be placed at a railroad crossing where two people were seriously injured this week in Buechel on Crawford Ave. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Department of Education is seeking public feedback on dozens of proposed social studies standards. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two years after Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis was killed in the line of duty, police continue to investigate. [WLKY]

Bloomberg Philanthropies on Wednesday announced the first eight cities it has selected to participate in a new pilot program to improve life in America’s cities. Chattanooga, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; Kansas City, Missouri; Mesa, Arizona; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jackson, Mississippi; Seattle and New Orleans will be the first to benefit from the What Works Cities Initiative. The project intends to spend $42 million over three years to help U.S. cities address issues like economic development, public health, crime and transportation. [HuffPo]

The developers tasked with rehabbing the iconic 800 Building in downtown Louisville want the taxpayers to help foot the bill. Now, that is a step closer to happening. [WAVE3]

In the early morning hours of June 30, 1995, a fire sparked to life in Kristine Bunch’s mobile home. It fanned out across the floor and climbed up the walls, then formed an impassable barrier across the middle of the trailer. Bunch, 21, snapped awake in the living room. Her three-year-old son, Tony, shrieked for her on the other side of the flames. [Mother Jones]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Later this month, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will escape for a family retreat to mourn his late son, Beau, but also to mull, as his dying son urged him to do, a campaign for president. Some of Mr. Biden’s friends and allies worry that he will decide it is a good idea. [NY Times]

Greater Louisville Inc. has named Deana Epperly Karem vice president of economic development. Karem is the current executive director of the Oldham County Chamber and Economic Development. She’ll start work at GLI on Sept. 1. [Business First]

When Floyd County Solid Waste Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley receives a complaint about the two mobile recycling sites that were closed recently due to budget cuts, she refers them to the people who ordered the reductions. [News & Tribune]

Watch Matt Bevin Just Fall Apart

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

A historic building formerly occupied by the Louisville Water Company will be going into storage. According to a letter to the citizens of Louisville sent by Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, the vacant Water Company building located near the corner of 2nd Street and Liberty Street will be dismantled and placed into storage to make way for the $289 million Omni hotel and apartment building. [WDRB]

Myliah Rose Davis slept on a blanket in her mother’s lap, her tiny hands moving every now and then, as if orchestrating a dream. [C-J/AKN]

A friendly game of hula hoop or interaction with a police horse – it’s the simple activities Louisville Metro Police say break down some often uncomfortable barriers. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin’s love-hate-love-hate relationship with the annual Fancy Farm picnic this last weekend was confusing, contradictory and likely ill-advised. As if there’s anything the man does that isn’t ill-advised. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A railroad crossing accident at Buechel and Crawford avenues this week was the second incident there in four months. [WLKY]

A hard-to-watch video, filmed in 2012 by undercover investigators with Mercy for Animals, shows Idaho dairy farm workers viciously abusing cows. [HuffPo]

Weeks after the Louisville Metro Council allocated $5 million in additional funding for roadwork, progress on the roads was moving slower than some had hoped. [WAVE3]

On Tuesday, Allan Kauffman (D), mayor of Goshen, Indiana, posted a statement announcing that the City Council would not be voting on a proposed LGBT nondiscrimination ordinance that night. “Despite several attempts to tweak the ordinance amendment to respond to concerns expressed, they have not been enough to gain good consensus from City Council members,” he wrote. [ThinkProgress]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s political figures decried the long awaited carbon emission regulations announced Monday by President Barack Obama. [Ronnie Ellis]

A Cincinnati company last week purchased an 88-unit apartment complex off Preston Highway and could start on a substantial renovation as early as this month. [Business First]

Mayor Mike Moore is tired of waiting for the 10th Street medians to be maintained on a regular basis. So he made an executive decision during Wednesday night’s Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission meeting to take care of overgrown weeds — and then some. Just in case anyone needed another reason to think this guy is a sad excuse of a mayor. [News & Tribune]

Track Crime & Scare Meemaw More Easily With Handy New Site

America Place, a Metro Louisville real estate developer, is wrapping up construction of its second, industrial building at River Ridge Commerce Center — and it’s buying up more land for another. [WDRB]

A new Louisville-area labor report shows that the area job market continues its strongest showing in a decade, with a jobless rate for June of just 4.7 percent, compared to 6.1 percent in June 2014. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe Possibility City will finally start taking its train crossings seriously. Don’t worry, not holding our breath. Two people were hospitalized with serious injuries Monday after their truck was hit by a train at a notoriously dangerous Louisville intersection. Police responded to the incident around 3 p.m. at Crawford Avenue in Buechel. [WHAS11]

The first Republican debate of the 2016 presidential election, said Sen. Rand Paul, will be between him and people who “want to blow up the world.” The Thursday night showdown will pit him against opponents who will “send half a million of your sons and daughters back” to Iraq. He promised that he will ask his Republican presidential rivals, face to face, whether they “want to always intervene in every civil war around the world.” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Construction on a new VA hospital is set to get underway in 2017. [WLKY]

Two congressmen behind a federal provision protecting state-legal medical marijuana operations are seeking an investigation into the Department of Justice’s continued crackdown on medical marijuana patients and providers, saying the DOJ may be in violation of federal law. [HuffPo]

An online crime tracking tool is now live on the Louisville Metro Police Department’s website. [WAVE3]

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit accusing a school resource officer in Kentucky of handcuffing two disabled children to punish them for behavior related to their disabilities, ACLU officials said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Four-year-old Evander Conroy was born with a neuroblastoma tumor compressing his spinal cord. Because of the tumor, he’s never been able to move his legs. This is worth another read. [WFPL]

Democrats unleashed a barrage of attacks here Saturday on Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin, calling him nearly every name in the book. [Ronnie Ellis]

Jeffersonville’s RiverStage had its biggest crowd ever on Saturday night, as a free concert and great weather brought an estimated 11,000 to 12,000 people to the riverfront. [Business First]

The Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission will pony up more money to pay for the rising cost of the heavy-haul road. [News & Tribune]