When Will JCPS Get A Non-Awful Supe?

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee tabled a motion on Wednesday to change the city’s public nuisance law. [WDRB]

Another battle is brewing between County Attorney Mike O’Connell and a district court judge over Drive Safe Louisville, O’Connell’s revenue-generating traffic school. [C-J/AKN]

New data released by the Kentucky Department of Education shows mixed results for JCPS scores. Donna Hargens and her PR firm friends you’re paying for can’t hype this up. [WHAS11]

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

Is TARC the devil? Probably. A bicyclist was injured Thursday morning in an accident involving a TARC bus. That comes on the heels of a TARC-school bus accident. [WLKY]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]

A recent murder has put Old Louisville in the spotlight as residents push for more police. Several complaints have already been made to police by people who live in the area. Those residents say they are frustrated over the lack of response. [WAVE3]

We might not be able to remember every stressful episode of our childhood. But the emotional upheaval we experience as kids — whether it’s the loss of a loved one, the chronic stress of economic insecurity, or social interactions that leave us tearful or anxious — may have a lifelong impact on our health. [NPR]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Congress is blocking legal marijuana in Washington, D.C. and maybe causing a spike in murders. [Mother Jones]

Let’s quit acting like Steve Beshear doesn’t already have someone picked to serve on UofL’s board of trustees. [Business First]

Floyd County has to submit a budget to the state by Oct. 28. And as of Monday night, it is still unknown how much will be set aside for the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter in 2016. [News & Tribune]


And we don’t mean the teevee newsreaders constantly hyping up Will Russell’s sad state…

A fire in Old Louisville that left three people dead has now been ruled arson. The fire happened on South Second Street in early July. [WDRB]

You should definitely go to this! The Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center in Clarksville will reopen in January with a completely revamped exhibit space including state of the art interactive exhibits. [C-J/AKN]

Wasn’t this flipping great? Around 9 p.m. Sept 21 Johnson and Cornelius escaped from the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections Community Corrections Center on East Chestnut Street. The inmates used bed sheets to facilitate an escape. [WHAS11]

Fees will be waived at several recreation areas in the Daniel Boone National Forest this weekend to celebrate National Public Lands Day. [H-L]

Some Jefferson County Public School pre-kindergarten students are using drama to learn math and other subjects. [WLKY]

The amount of money the world has pledged to divest from fossil fuels now exceeds $2.6 trillion, a group of policymakers, philanthropists and activists announced Tuesday. The figure is 50 times higher than the $52 billion that had been divested exactly one year ago. [HuffPo]

OH GOD WE’RE ALL GONNA GET THE SUPER LICE! The treatment-resistant form of lice scientists are calling ‘super lice’ has been found in 25 states including Kentucky and Indiana. [WAVE3]

If we’re handcuffing autistic children at the elbows or throwing them in jail overnight, then we’re failing them. If we’re hitting kids with felony weapons charges for bringing fishing tackle to school, then we’re failing them. And if we’re using suspensions (which absolutely do not work) against students who build clocks, or twirl pencils, or write about pot, or chew their Pop-Tarts into the shape of a gun, then we’re failing them. [Click this Clicky]

More than 60 percent of Louisville’s occupied housing structures are detached, single-family buildings, according to a Washington Post analysis of U.S. Census data. [WFPL]

Remember LMPD Chief White? He’s still up to the same old crap. [Click this Clicky]

My Morning Jacket drummer Patrick Hallahan, attorney Jon Salomon and chef Bobby Benjamin will open a new restaurant called Butchertown Grocery this November in Louisville. [Business First]

The conversation has only just begun. That’s the goal of Facing Homelessness: A Community Conversation, a public forum hosted by the News and Tribune and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]

The Fun Shootings Move To Old Louisville

Louisville Metro Police have a new way for the public to file complaints against it’s officers. [WDRB]

For thousands of people in Jefferson County, the public school system was desegregated 40 years ago simply to fulfill a court order. But for supporters, it was a remedy to inequalities between poor, predominantly black schools in the city of Louisville — where some teachers even had to check out a pair of scissors to use for a couple of hours because there weren’t enough to go around — and the mostly white and wealthy schools in Jefferson County. [C-J/AKN]

A local preservation group has filed to make the old Louisville Water Company building a historic landmark, WHAS has learned. [WHAS11]

If an industry can’t function without the backup of casino-style gambling, maybe it’s time to move on? Horse track operators and breeders are concerned the good times might be trotting to a close as some states move to rein in a lucrative subsidy that’s helped prop up their long suffering-industry. [H-L]

One person was injured in a shooting early Wednesday morning in Old Louisville. The shooting happened shortly before 3 a.m. in the 300 block of East St. Catherine Street. [WLKY]

Sorry, folks, please stop asking, not interested in writing about Kim Davis. A link is about all you’re gonna get. George Steele, mayor of Grayson, said the national spotlight here has been an economic boost to the small town he governs, however, he realizes some residents wish the attention would be directed elsewhere. [Ashland Independent]

If you aren’t on board with this plan, something is wrong with you. Louisville’s Russell neighborhood is about to get connected. [WAVE3]

According to a new report from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, racial bias can affect the likelihood of people pulling the trigger of a gun—even if shooters don’t realize they were biased to begin with. Researchers found that, in studies conducted over the past decade, participants were more likely to shoot targets depicting black people than those depicting white people. [Mother Jones]

The cauldron of Kentucky politics was dramatically exposed this week for the whole world to see. [WFPL]

On Thursday, the U.S. Department of Education issued a progress report for those seeking student debt relief who say they were defrauded by their for-profit colleges, but for many former students, the process may drag out for a long time. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville’s largest auto dealership has been sold for an undisclosed amount. We’re mentioning this again because it’s an opportunity to tell you that Jim Bruggers has jokes and you should try to find them on the Twitter. [Business First]

As part of an ongoing effort to raise awareness of human sex trafficking across the state, Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller visited the Clark County Youth Shelter & Family Services facility in Jeffersonville on Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Russell’s A Start And A Big Step Forward

The number of people being shot in Louisville is on the rise, according to Louisville Metro Police. [WDRB]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out about what James Procell, of UofL’s music lie-berry, discovered. [WHAS11]

Sometimes the best ideas really do come while enjoying a glass of bourbon. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands of zombies took over the Highlands on Saturday night, but it’s what some of the undead left behind that has neighbors upset. [WLKY]

Louisville is the 4th-most segregated city in America (or the metro area is), apparently, and no one wants to talk about it. When are we going to talk about it? Or are we always just going to hold feel-good events and talk about puppies and rainbows on the teevee instead of trying to improve life for people living in the West End? [HuffPo]

We often hear the stories of homicide victims, but the stories of people who actually survive violent attacks often are left untold. [WAVE3]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

In about a month, Metropolitan Sewer District officials will wrap up a short-term program aimed at buying out homeowners whose houses flood frequently. [WFPL]

The national campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs through Labor Day weekend and is aimed at reducing deaths and injuries caused by motorists driving drunk or impaired by drugs. During the 2014 Labor Day holiday, there were six alcohol-related highway deaths on Kentucky roadways. Statewide, law enforcement officers arrested 55 people for DUI during that same time period. The 2015 Labor Day enforcement period begins at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept.4 and extends through Monday, Sept. 7 at 11:59 p.m. [Press Release]

Revitalizing Russell — once a bustling economic center in West Louisville — has been a hot topic for some community leaders for years. But the buzz seems to be increasing lately as several projects have committed substantial investment to the neighborhood. [Business First]

Jeffersonville Parks Authority President Ed Zastawny says he wants the public to know the city only had an issue maintaining the 10th Street medians once the Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission stopped taking care of them early last year. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Hargens Is Bad At Something

Two people have been shot in the Shawnee neighborhood Sunday a little after 7 p.m. [WDRB]

The subject of both praise and controversy, Louisville Metro Police’s VIPER Unit is set to fold into a new mobile division that will continue VIPER’s data-driven approach to targeting violent crime in the city, officials announced Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Here comes the Louisville media to report on this man’s downfall. Locals love blood, gore, suffering and sadness. News directors should be ashamed. Or maybe just straight up kicked to the curb. [WHAS11]

Going to school saved James Mouser’s life in early April. Mouser, then a senior at Northpoint Academy in Pike County, cut his hand while at school on a Friday. Unable to see a doctor because he has no car, he lanced his own hand over the weekend after it became infected. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a story about those shootings Louisville loves so much. [WLKY]

Kim Davis: dumb as hell. A county clerk in Kentucky who petitioned the Supreme Court to allow her to refuse to wed LGBT couples unknowingly married a trans man and a pansexual woman, the couple says. [HuffPo]

In a closer look at the issue of behavior and discipline in the classroom, the Jefferson County Teachers Association tells us JCPS is not doing enough to deal with the issue. The teacher’s union comes to that conclusion after recently conducting a survey this summer. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama on Saturday defended his decision to allow Royal Dutch Shell to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean under what he said were rigorous standards, fending off criticism by environmental groups. [Reuters]

Residents are invited to provide comment on a proposed bike lane installation on Sixth Street that would stretch from River Road to Zane Street. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Board of Education has chosen two finalists in its search for a new state education commissioner. It’ll be someone the opposite of great and, sadly, you know I’m right. [WKYT]

Why the hell are news directors continually reporting on the downfall of people when they’re clearly vulnerable and need assistance instead of hype? It’s not just BF. It’s every outlet in town. [Business First]

Although Southern Indiana Animal Rescue has operated for 10 years, the Clark County Board of Zoning Appeals decided Wednesday to place restrictions on it. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Hating The Gays Is Really Expensive

Horse racing fans can now purchase their tickets to Churchill Downs races through Ticketmaster, according to a press release from the racetrack. [WDRB]

Louisville leaders have spent decades preaching about the need for a better-trained workforce to strengthen the local economy and improve prospects for workers facing increasingly complex and technologically advanced workplaces. [C-J/AKN]

The Cardinals have returned to their nest. The University of Louisville is once again bustling with students on the first day of classes. [WHAS11]

The private attorneys whom Beshear hired to handle the state’s appeals have a $260,000 contract, of which $231,348 had been paid by July 20, according to state records. Total cost to taxpayers: $2,351,297. [H-L]

The coroner has released the name of a teenager found fatally shot Saturday night outside a southwest Jefferson County apartment building. [WLKY]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]

Be prepared: the living dead are ready to take over Louisville. And they’re not talking about the way you feel after listening to Greg Fischer speak. [WAVE3]

If you’ve followed the saga involving Joshua Powell and Montgomery County Schools? This episode of This American Life will send chills down your spin. [This American Life]

Louisville’s new effort to make dangerous intersections safer could have unforeseen consequences. Metro Police have begun ticketing jaywalking pedestrians and motorists who don’t yield at crosswalks. Rolf Eisinger, the city’s bicycle and pedestrian coordinator, said Metro government is seeking to prevent pedestrian deaths. But the crackdown could have a disproportionate effect on minorities and low-income people. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama has been briefed on developments in global financial markets, the White House said on Monday after world stock markets plunged. [Reuters]

When more than 1,500 acres inside the 6,000-acre River Ridge Commerce Center recently received megasite certification, it did so under the exacting standards of the automotive industry. [Business First]

During a strategic plan update, Greater Clark County Schools Superintendent Andrew Melin said whichever way the district’s referendum shakes out, administrators will be busy after November. [News & Tribune]

MSD Monster Grows, No One Notices

A Kentucky company has been dumping toxic waste into public waters for over a year and the leaders of Bullitt Utilities say the company can’t afford to fix this problem. [WDRB]

This sounds like a disaster in the making. Louisville officials are creating another level of bureaucracy, of sorts, with the promise that it can help save tens of millions of dollars and slow rate increases for city water and sewer customers. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Hillview, Ky. filed for bankruptcy protection, Chapter Nine, on Aug. 20. [WHAS11]

The state is looking for volunteers to review cases of children placed in foster care in 35 counties. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! To date, dozens of people have been killed on the streets of Louisville, and many of the victims are under the age of 25. [WLKY]

Scientists at Ohio State University say they’ve grown the first near-complete human brain in a lab. Maybe Rand Paul will receive it as a transplant. [HuffPo]

An increase in property assessments means Jefferson County Public Schools will not ask for a tax rate increase for the 2015-2016 school year. [WAVE3]

New disclosures about the National Security Agency’s partnership with AT&T could reignite constitutional challenges to the spy agency’s efforts to wiretap the Internet. [ProPublica]

Why is there such a large gap between the number of Kentucky students who graduate high school on time and those who go straight to college? [WFPL]

Birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, but Donald Trump and other candidates are keeping alive the idea that some Americans should not have equal rights at birth. [The Nation]

Mayor Greg Fischer says he’s “very bullish” on Louisville as a spot to possibly expand Major League Soccer, and Wayne Estopinal, Louisville City FC’s operating manager, plans to meet with Fischer next week to discuss his team’s current situation and start talks on building a stadium specifically for soccer. [Business First]

Floyd County may soon have only one recycling site for residents to drop-off items. The Floyd County Council voted 4-3 against giving solid waste $70,000 in additional appropriations, which Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley said would keep all sites open through the end of the year. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]