JCPS Is A Ton Of Awful Fun Again

JCPS officials have fired a teacher who was under investigation over accusations she had inappropriate contact with a student. [WDRB]

Former Jefferson County Board of Education member Debbie Wesslund says Adam Edelen’s JCPS audit was a fraud. Mainly because it was selective and manipulative, which everyone already knew. [C-J/AKN]

On June 23 Jefferson County Public Schools fired a bus driver, Melinda Sanders, who dragged a student, 7-year-old Ally Rednour, down a street by her backpack on May 15. [WHAS11]

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year and there are dozens of other events happening around the metro area to celebrate Independence Day. [WLKY]

You won’t believe this horrible Fox story about the homeless. Or maybe you will. [MMFA]

She was arrested, along with Louisville’s former Chief Financial Officer Steve Rowland, and charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct. The police report said they were engaged in “disruptive, provocative and intimate behavior.” [WAVE3]

They took a page out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. City workers and police cleared an encampment of homeless people from the west side of Baltimore on Friday morning, provoking a brief traffic-blocking protest and leaving some of the city’s homelessness services organizations chagrined at what they say was a surprise operation. [ThinkProgress]

James Blanton is the new director of the Louisville Free Public Library, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday. He takes over for retiring director Craig Buthod, who announced his resignation in November after 17 years on the job. [WFPL]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has approved a settlement that reduces the base rate increases sought by Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. [Business First]

It starts with a professional rodeo and ends with a demolition derby. In between there will be a queen pageant, midway rides, interactive activities for children and exhibits to view. And yes, there will be plenty of animals. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Can’t Stay Out Of The Dang News

Year-round employees in Jefferson County Public Schools — from central office staff and high school principals to custodians and some secretaries — will be forced to take two unpaid days in the coming school year under a proposal by Superintendent Donna Hargens. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Council’s government accountability committee wants answers about rising home assessments in certain neighborhoods. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police officers should start wearing their body cameras within the next couple months. [WHAS11]

Winter’s full fury arrived late in much of the country, but once it did it was relentless, forcing state transportation agencies to spend more than $1 billion to keep highways safe and passable, according to a first-of-its-kind survey. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man has been indicted in the dragging death of his friend, a crime that has left two families stunned. [WLKY]

This screwed up Louisville story made the national news. [HuffPo]

An August 2, 2016 trial date has been set for a southern Indiana man accused of raping his girlfriend, killing her and then consuming parts of her body. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s two U.S. senators have introduced legislation they say will level the playing field for American bourbon and whiskey producers. [WKYUFM]

People born poor are more likely to stay that way if they live in Jefferson County than if they live in surrounding Bullitt or Oldham counties, according to a recent Harvard study. [WFPL]

In New York City, supporters of public libraries say that respect for — and repair of — the libraries is long, well, overdue. [NPR]

A federal judge in Florida has dismissed a lawsuit that alleges Maker’s Mark is being misleading by calling its product “handmade.” [Business First]

Floyd County Clerk Christy Eurton huddled her staff before the office opened at 8 a.m. Thursday for an important discussion. It wasn’t a talk about next week’s primary election — a task that requires hours of preparation and dedication to successfully and accurately conduct — but rather Eurton attempted to calm her employees about the budget cuts issued by the Floyd County Council the night before. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Free Public Library Director Search: Another Cringe-Worthy Fischer Mess

Former Library Director Craig Buthod is retired from metro government but the Library Advisory Commission is paying him $66,000 a year whether he does any work or not.

See for yourself:


CLICK TO ENLARGE — PDF

Crazy stuff.

But what’s crazier?

Julie Scoskie, a former Jefferson County Public Schools administrator with no librarian credentials and just 18 months of library experience, is being considered to replace Buthod. She’s currently on library payroll with a salary greater than many department directors, which is some real Possibility City magic.

If she’s hired as director, Scoskie will have to go back to school to take classes in library science in order to meet requirements set in the Kentucky Revised Statutes. While countless other extremely well-qualified but less-connected individuals are passed over, of course.

We’ve tried to get details about the search process for a new director but have been met with secrecy at every turn. It seems Sadiqa Reynolds, as usual, has been largely absent. Even though she has a lot to say about it (i.e., telling people that Scoskie will get the job). A headhunter was hired to conduct a national search even though three finalists are from Kentucky and two of them are current library employees. Because that makes sense.

The position announcement brochure mysteriously disappeared from the government website and no one will give us answers about it.

Here’s the document:


CLICK TO ENLARGE — PDF

That announcement specified that the position requires a masters degree in library science or the equivalent and that qualified candidates would have seven (7) years of library management experience. Then it was yanked when it became clear they (Greg and Sadiqa) wanted an unqualified friend to have the job.

The Fischer Administration claims to love transparency. So we thought it’d be a good idea to help them be transparent by shining a light on another questionable move.

You A Pedestrian? Your Days Are Numbered

Walsh Construction won’t be cited after three workers were thrown into the Ohio River as they sought to retrieve a boat that had broken free from the downtown bridge construction site. [WDRB]

A year after two members of Congress asked for an investigation into the appraisal price of the planned Brownsboro Road VA Medical Center site, there has been no response and opponents are launching an 11th-hour appeal to persuade Veterans Affairs officials to pick another site. [C-J/AKN]

Three pedestrians in the Kentuckiana area were struck in three separate accidents within two hours Friday night. Nothing to see here, move along, Possibility City, compassion, transparency. [WHAS11]

The state Senate voted Friday to limit Kentucky’s debt, and the Senate president later said the chamber will search for another way to strengthen the state’s teacher pension system instead of the House-approved plan to borrow $3.3 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A local reporter was indicted for leaving the scene of a deadly crash. Police said Jeff Woods, a WHAS sports reporter, was driving a station vehicle when he hit a woman in downtown Louisville in January. [WLKY]

There’s good news and bad news for both parties, in a Pew Research poll out Thursday: Republicans are seen as extreme and intolerant but more trusted to handle international issues, while Democrats’ position as the party of the middle class doesn’t translate into an edge on the economy. [HuffPo]

Remember Debbie Fox? She’s the woman who half-assed everything so badly at Metro Animal Services that everyone threatened to resign unless Fischer moved her ASAP. Now she’s making mega bucks handling an agency that’s far more important. [WAVE3]

Indiana could be the first US state to introduce baby boxes – anonymous drop-off points designed to prevent the deaths of abandoned infants. [BBC]

Young people living in Louisville’s westernmost neighborhoods have less opportunities for physical, social and cognitive development than in other parts of the metropolitan area, according to findings of a recent study by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. [WFPL]

More jails are replacing face-to-face visits with video, passing the costs on to inmates. [Mother Jones]

Hillerich & Bradsby Co., maker of Louisville Slugger baseball bats, may be up for sale. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is looking for a new director. [News & Tribune]

Homeless Kids? What Homeless Kids? Surely Not

Here’s your annual Greg Fischer Pee Alert: Citing his progress in making Louisville a globally-regarded city for caring and compassion, a coalition of international organizations has honored Mayor Greg Fischer with a City Leadership award for compassion. [Lane Report PR Regurgitation]

Nakiya Crawford hasn’t seen her father in more than a year. Crawford Confessed, “I don’t talk about it much.” [WDRB]

On a bus trip with 18 western Louisville residents to see how sustainable power plants turn waste into energy, Keith S. Hackett, assistant director of the Metro Department of Public Works, wondered aloud how much tax money could be saved. [C-J/AKN]

For one east Louisville family, early mornings are about getting in the yard and enjoying quiet time. Recently, the family experienced a big scare during their morning routine. [WHAS11]

A Superintendent Screening Committee will be formed to help the Fayette County school board select a new leader for the district. Under state law, the committee must include one parent, who will be elected by the presidents of the PTA or parent organization at all of the district schools. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Once again all eyes are on Ferguson as the nation waits for the grand jury’s decision on whether to indict Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson for firing the shots that killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. [WLKY]

The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation’s high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence. [HuffPo]

The possibility of a labor strike looms after tempers rose during a Metropolitan Sewer District Board meeting. [WAVE3]

In Mitch McConnell’s world, it doesn’t matter who works in his Hill office, who left for K Street or who runs his campaign, almost everyone calls the Kentucky Republican “Boss.” [Politico]

Kentucky’s community college system offers little accountability in its presidential search. [WFPL]

After saying “no” last April, the Kentucky Court of Appeals said Friday that it now will hear oral arguments on two lawsuits that threaten the financial stability of most of the state’s public libraries, including Rowan. [The Morehead News]

The KFC Yum! Center will be at the heart of March Madness in 2016. [Business First]

A national watchdog organization for issues pertaining to church and state separation sent a letter to New Albany regarding Saturday’s 46th Annual Mayor’s Community Prayer Breakfast. [News & Tribune]

The Gays Caused That Big Hail Storm. Amen.

Walking up to Aleazia Caldwell’s home, he could not wait to ask me my favorite TLC song. “Scrubs!” I replied. As fast as he could, he slammed the CD into his boom box, set up on the porch of his home on 32nd street in Louisville’s west end. [WDRB]

Two years after the city of Louisville paid $8.5 million to a man wrongly convicted of homicide, its police department has adopted policies to prevent false confessions and eyewitness misidentification. [C-J/AKN]

Early sign-ups begins for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program,best known as LIHEAP. [WHAS11]

Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes has regained a two-point edge over Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell in Kentucky’s U.S. Senate Race, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Officials from several states are convening in Louisville to discuss how to deal with the issue. [WLKY]

The Supreme Court turned away appeals Monday from five states seeking to prohibit same-sex marriages, paving the way for an immediate expansion of gay and lesbian unions. [HuffPo]

The largest public library built in Louisville in 45 years opened to the public Sunday. [WAVE3]

Meanwhile, people like Hal Heiner continue to push this nonsense in an attempt to further demonize public education. [Salon]

Jefferson County Public Schools moved from the 35th percentile to the 51st percentile in state test results released Friday, meaning the district performed better than half of Kentucky’s school systems in 2013-14. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to decide once and for all whether states can ban gay marriage, a surprise move that will allow gay men and women to marry in five states where same-sex weddings were previously forbidden. [Reuters]

The University of Louisville has a strong financial standing as a metropolitan teaching and research institution, accounting firm BKD LLP said in an independent audit. [Business First]

It’s an ideal confluence. Big Four Station will be completed just in time for the long-awaited return of Steamboat Days Festival and the Belle of Louisville’s 100th birthday celebration, city officials say. [News & Tribune]

Kentucky May Just Never Be Energy Efficient

Several local organizations are in desperate need of food and clothing for the area’s poor and homeless. [WDRB]

A case pending before the Kentucky Court of Appeals could affect how dozens of libraries across the state are funded. [C-J/AKN]

From tragedy to life saving. We are taking a look at a national program with roots right here in Louisville. VINE grew from domestic violence murder into a safety net for victims. [WHAS11]

As it struggled to satisfy bond obligations and pay vendors, some considered the New Albany Sewer Department to be a train wreck just a few years ago. [News & Tribune]

Just two years ago, Louisville’s food truck scene was virtually non-existent. Now nearly 30 companies have permits to sell on-the-go. [WLKY]

University of Louisville administrators see many students load up on classes only to drop some of them before the end of the semester. [Business First]

It’s terrible that the guy was murdered and no one is disputing that. But this kind of coverage doesn’t happen when someone is shot in the West End. And this kind of coverage has never occurred in St. Matthews when people are raped, robbed or have their property vandalized. [WAVE3]

The federal government made enough money on student loans over the last year that, if it wanted, it could provide maximum-level Pell Grants of $5,645 to 7.3 million college students. The $41.3 billion profit for the 2013 fiscal year is down $3.6 billion from the previous year but it’s a higher profit level than all but two companies in the world: Exxon Mobil cleared $44.9 billion in 2012, and Apple cleared $41.7 billion. [USA Today]

The state of Indiana is one the last places in the U.S. that regulates the retail sale of beer by temperature. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Lottery Corp. says it has reached $15 billion in overall sales since the lottery was started in 1989. [WLEX18]

A whistleblower who brought to light memos and studies that dealt a severe blow to large tobacco companies has died in Ocean Springs, Miss. [Business First]

Comes as no surprise to anyone that Kentucky is one of the least energy efficient states in the nation. [Click the Clicky]