Death, Guns & Hype: The Louisville Way

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Under the administration of former President James Ramsey, the University of Louisville Foundation borrowed millions more than its board of directors authorized from the school’s $715 million endowment to fund real estate purchases, employee salaries and other expenses. [WDRB]

Right to work authorization, tax reform and protections for small businesses are among the leading priorities for legislation sought from the 2017 Kentucky General Assembly, Greater Louisville Inc. has announced. [C-J/AKN]

Metro Police received reports of a shooting shortly after 1 p.m. Sunday in the 700 block of South Shelby Street near Broadway. [WHAS11]

Runnymede Farm, whose owners say it is Kentucky’s oldest continuously operated Thoroughbred breeding operation, is preparing for its 150th anniversary. But before he talks about history, Brutus J. Clay III wants to show off pictures of recently successful mares. [Tom Eblen]

Can you imagine what could be accomplished if local teevee news hypers put this much effort into Metro Animal Services? Instead of regurgitating press releases from the Kentucky Humane Society, all kinds of animal lives would be saved. But we all know that’s never going to happen here in Compassionate City. [WLKY]

President-elect Donald Trump on Thursday appeared as if he never ended his campaign, attacking “the extremely dishonest media,” boasting about his “landslide” victory, and dashing speculation he might pivot and start acting like a president. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after multiple people were shot at a restaurant in Shively. [WAVE3]

Yahima Leblanc Núñez and her husband, Pavel Reyes, were Cuban government workers when, in 2009, they plotted an escape. Five years later, after an arduous trek across Central America, including 15 days in a Mexican jail, they arrived here with two backpacks of clothes and a single tidbit of information — “Kentucky Fried Chicken” — about the state they now call home. [NY Times]

Louisville Metro Government plans to formally intervene in a request before the Public Service Commission from Louisville Gas and Electric to raise utility rates. [WFPL]

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein said early Sunday that she will file a lawsuit in federal court on Monday seeking a statewide recount in Pennsylvania. [The Hill]

Kroger Co. is caught up in the middle of a stretch of food price deflation that’s cutting into its profits and almost snapped its industry-leading streak of consecutive quarters generating same-store sales growth. [Business First]

Rental property registration will begin in New Albany on Monday, Dec. 5. All landlords within the city will have until Jan. 31, 2017, to register their properties. [News & Tribune]

Ugh. Another Deadly Thanksgiving.

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At least two people are dead after reports of multiple shootings at Shawnee Park [yesterday] afternoon. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric’s new rate proposal attempts to shift all of its fixed costs for residential electricity service to a regular monthly fee, a move that drew outcries from advocates for the poor and supporters of the area’s fledgling solar industry. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This story will make your eyes roll back in your head. The level of disconnect as it relates to Metro Animal Services is absurd. [WHAS11]

The Fayette County Coroner’s Office is asking for the public’s help as they search for the relatives of a woman who died Sunday. [H-L]

A store owner called police after one of his regular customers was shot. [WLKY]

Reminder – coal is dead/dying and it is never going to be a great thing for Kentucky again. Never. Canada plans to phase out most coal-powered electricity plants by 2030, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna announced Monday. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Volindah Costabell has lived in the Highlands for 30 years. She’s siding with the Original Highland Neighborhood Association. [WAVE3]

An Estill County citizens group is taking legal action against three state entities. The organization wants more information on the state’s response to the illegal dumping of low-level radioactive waste in the county landfill. [WEKU]

Louisville’s more than 2,000 nonprofits have accounted for $10.6 billion in annual revenue over the past year, according to a new study by the Center for Nonprofit Excellence. [WFPL]

Even a well known story depends on where you begin to tell it. In the summer of 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African-American boy visiting Mississippi, was lynched by white men who said he’d flirted with a white woman. Till’s body was returned home to Chicago where his mother insisted on an open casket. Photos were wired around the globe and the world saw his mutilated body. His murderers would be free within a month. [NPR]

A panel of Humana, Kindred, UPS and automotive executives explored ways the companies are trying to attract and retain talent. [Business First]

The house at 1218 E. Oak St. should have already fallen to the ground. For years it was in a state of disrepair and was ready for the wrecking ball. [News & Tribune]

Go Read That Herald-Leader Column

Homicide detectives are investigating after two men were gunned down in the same neighborhood Monday night as kids were out trick-or-treating. [WDRB]

Customers of LG&E and Kentucky Utilities would finally get advanced electric meters – sometimes called smart meters – at their homes and businesses under a proposal on Tuesday that includes a substantial rate increase. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The fall hospital report cards are out, and in some cases they contain disturbing results. [WHAS11]

Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to mark the passing of Kynect.ky.gov, Kentucky’s health insurance exchange. WATB Matt Bevin killed it, not because it wasn’t working, but because it was working too well. [H-L]

Police are investigating the Metro’s 94th homicide. The shooting happened at 28th and Market streets around 8:05 p.m. Monday. [WLKY]

City officials in Orlando, Florida, on Monday released recordings of mass shooter Omar Mateen’s conversations with police during his standoff at a gay nightclub in June. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Students at the Lincoln Performing Arts School dressed up as words for Halloween. [WAVE3]

Opening arguments in the trial of a former University of Cincinnati police officer charged with murdering a black Ohio man during a traffic stop focused Tuesday on whether the victim tried to flee from police, putting the officer’s life in danger. [Reuters]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray accused U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of having “wild-ass philosophies and theories” in their first and only face-to-face debate of the election year. The at times freewheeling event underscored the candidates’ differences on foreign policy and economic values. [WFPL]

Two decades ago, Muslim refugees fleeing Bosnia arrived in St Louis and became a crucial part of the city. Now anti-immigrant fervour might lead the Bosnians of St Louis to become more politically active. [BBC]

Almost Family Inc. signed a $128 million deal to buy a controlling interest in the home health and hospice assets of Community Health Systems Inc. [Business First]

Superintendents from seven southern Indiana school corporations came together Monday morning to urge legislators to think about the education of students in the Hoosier state. [News & Tribune]

Juicy Frankfort Scandal Gets Juicier

Charter Communications, Louisville’s cable TV provider, claims Metro government gives favorable treatment to its competitors Google Fiber and AT&T while keeping Charter “under the yoke of an extensive and burdensome regulatory regime,” according to a federal lawsuit filed Friday. [WDRB]

Tim Longmeyer used much more than just a few thousand dollars he got in an illegal kickback scheme to make straw contributions to the Democratic campaigns he supported in recent years, according to a federal prosecutor. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Dave Mutchler, President of the FOP River City Lodge 614, said he wants someone to with “subpoena power” to look into the findings of a recently released audit. The KLEFPF audit was released last week by the Kentucky Auditor of Public Accounts. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s fourth-largest health insurer says it will stop selling individual plans in the state next year, prompting another round of finger-pointing between a pair of feuding governors over the merits of President Obama’s federal health care law. [H-L]

A man killed in a knife fight near the University of Louisville campus has been identified. What a truly Compassionate City… [WLKY]

The first aerial survey of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch shows that the amount of debris swirling in the North Pacific has been “heavily underestimated,” the expedition group said. [HuffPo]

A wedding expo aimed specifically at gay and lesbian couples made its first stop in Kentucky on Sunday. [WAVE3]

Former Miss Universe Alicia Machado hit back at Donald Trump’s vicious Twitter tirade from the early morning hours of Friday, calling his attacks “slander and lies.” [Politico]

An agreement has been reached between Louisville Gas and Electric Company and the Sierra Club in their dispute over the discharge of wastewater from an LG&E coal ash pond. [WFPL]

Donald Trump has attacked a former beauty pageant winner who criticised him for alleged sexist and misogynistic remarks as “disgusting”. [BBC]

Louisville-based ResCare Inc. has named a new president and CEO. [Business First]

While the vocal majority seems in favor of two way street changes in New Albany, there’s a faction of downtown business owners that would rather things just stay the way they are. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Is Now Back To Its Old Tricks

LG&E is closing its coal ash ponds at its power plants in Louisville and Trimble County. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has moved a Layne Elementary teacher to another school in the district after it said it found a “pattern of poor professional judgment and unsafe behavior,” particularly in relation to how the teacher used restraint on students. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS and JCTA are still unable to come to an agreement on salaries and contracts. [WHAS11]

The number of homeless students in Lexington schools has nearly doubled in the past three years, according to a new report that recommends more money and attention to schools with the highest percentage of homeless students. [H-L]

The Kentucky Arts Council says it has awarded a Teaching Art Together grant that will fund an artist residency in eight schools in the eastern part of the state. [WLKY]

A vastly underappreciated legacy of Barack Obama’s presidency is one that neither his conservative opponents nor his liberal allies like to mention: He’s presided over a historically unprecedented reduction in government employees. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jefferson County Public Schools employees are taught to restrain students who might be a danger to themselves or others. In the last two school years at JCPS, restraints were used 8,537 times. [WAVE3]

Ignore all the hype! If you’re wondering why Kentucky Democrats avoided Fancy Farm this year, look no further than the event’s emcee, who cracked racist jokes right off the bat. Republicans didn’t need the help of Democrats to burn their racist Trump barn down this year. [Page One]

Louisville’s Planning Commission has approved rules governing the siting of anerobic biodigesters in the city. The regulations approved Thursday were stricter than what planners had originally proposed, but won’t be finalized until they’re approved by Metro Council. [WFPL]

How dare anyone want safe drinking water or the preservation of lands. That makes native Appalachians environmental extremists, according to Rand Paul. He goes from literally telling black people they shouldn’t be allowed to sit at the lunch counter to making shit up about coal. [The Gleaner]

Churchill Downs Inc. CEO Bill Carstanjen said Thursday that the company’s Twinspires.com subsidiary will move from Mountain View, Calif., to Louisville before the end of the year and gave more details on its planned joint-venture acquisition of a Berlin, Md., casino and racetrack that was announced Tuesday. [Business First]

Pamela Fisher said she’s never shot a gun in her life. A gun range is planned for Clarksville. [News & Tribune]

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LG&E + Solar Just Feels Super-Dirty

If there’s one thing Louisville loves as much as a compassionate shooting, it’s a compassionate pedestrian accident. A child was hit by a car Monday night in a south Louisville neighborhood. [WDRB]

State laws have blocked the expansion of grassroots community-led solar power, and now utilities are putting their own stamp on new ways letting customers get their energy from the sun with requests before Kentucky energy regulators. Customers of Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities may get a chance to participate in what’s called “community solar,” where customers pay into a new solar farm and then receive credit on their bills for electricity generated from those solar panels. [C-J/AKN]

A Louisville Metro Corrections officer finds himself out of a job after a 5-month investigation revealed he used racist, derogatory language towards another employee. [WHAS11]

Italian spirits maker Campari, parent of Wild Turkey, on Tuedsay reported that sales for the first six months were down 1.8 percent to $834 million. Excluding the effect of the exchange rate and other factors, the company said organic growth was up 5 percent, boosted in part by gains from Wild Turkey and Aperol. [H-L]

The Kentucky Alliance hosted a panel discussion Monday about gun violence and race relations. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s former campaign manager reignited the long-debunked “birther” conspiracy theory on Tuesday night. Corey Lewandowski, now a CNN analyst/in-house Trump surrogate, suggested that President Barack Obama hadn’t released his Harvard transcripts because they might show he wasn’t a citizen of the United States. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness wants to help people in WAVE Country stop smoking. [WAVE3]

In Syria’s civil war, it’s dangerous to even treat the wounded. Since the beginning of the civil war, the Syrian government has killed hundreds of medical personnel, and dozens of doctors have been assassinated by ISIS. The few doctors who dare to treat the casualties have been forced to work in secret. [ProPublica]

White supporters of the movement have encountered responses (from welcoming to wariness) from some African-American activists. That hasn’t stopped them from leading pro-BLM protests in Louisville. [WFPL]

If you’ve yet to read this story, put on your crazy glasses. A report of a car full of men in body armor with semi-automatic weapons brought Lexington police to the Walmart on Richmond Road on Saturday night. Officers found two men, one in body armor, a 20-year-old woman and a six-month old baby. [More H-L]

The internet is no stranger to debate — just ask anyone who’s read through the comments on a YouTube video or Facebook post. But there also are debates between internet providers, such as those who have a stake in Louisville as Google Inc. considers rolling out its Fiber gigabit internet service here. Some companies already in the market are voicing their concerns through a pending lawsuit and a letter sent to government officials. [Business First]

He’s served in an interim role since July 1, but by about 4:15 p.m. Thursday, Lindon Dodd officially became the director of Clark County Community Corrections. [News & Tribune]

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UofL Dumpster Fire Is Still Smoldering

Your sewer bill is about to go up again, but not as much as the Metropolitan Sewer District wanted. [WDRB]

Rebuffed by the Louisville Metro Council for a 20 percent rate boost to pay for a backlog of major maintenance, the Metropolitan Sewer District on Monday will ask its board to charge its customers 6.9 percent more. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Neighbors are upset over tree removal at Bowman Field. [WHAS11]

Four children sat cross-legged as their teacher flipped through a numbers book. When the page turned, they raced to yell the next number first — “six,” “seven” and then, “nine!” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s tough to take Adam Edelen seriously because he wanted to be on the Foundation board. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s policy agenda would quickly push the national debt to its highest level in history, according to a new report. [HuffPo]

The Jefferson County Public School Board of Education has met on multiple occasions to discuss the evaluation of Superintendent Dr. Donna Hargens. [WAVE3]

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew on Monday called on the Senate to take immediate action this week to address Puerto Rico’s $70 billion debt crisis before the critical July 1 deadline for the island territory’s next debt payments. [Reuters]

The Louisville Metro Council will spend the next two weeks on summer break. When the 26-member legislative body returns to City Hall, they’ll likely focus on establishing a natural gas franchise agreement with Louisville Gas and Electric. That will set parameters the utility provider must abide by to use the public rights of way for natural gas transmission. [WFPL]

A short-handed Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas law that tightens abortion clinic requirements in a way that critics say unduly restricts women’s access. [McClatchy DC]

Now that GE Appliances has been acquired by Qingdao Haier, several executive moves are taking place. [Business First]

It’s been a difficult few weeks for Erik Brewer, a former truck driver who recently became homeless before his van was totaled in a crash on Interstate 74 in western Indiana last month. [News & Tribune]