JCPS Is A Ton Of Awful Fun Again

JCPS officials have fired a teacher who was under investigation over accusations she had inappropriate contact with a student. [WDRB]

Former Jefferson County Board of Education member Debbie Wesslund says Adam Edelen’s JCPS audit was a fraud. Mainly because it was selective and manipulative, which everyone already knew. [C-J/AKN]

On June 23 Jefferson County Public Schools fired a bus driver, Melinda Sanders, who dragged a student, 7-year-old Ally Rednour, down a street by her backpack on May 15. [WHAS11]

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year and there are dozens of other events happening around the metro area to celebrate Independence Day. [WLKY]

You won’t believe this horrible Fox story about the homeless. Or maybe you will. [MMFA]

She was arrested, along with Louisville’s former Chief Financial Officer Steve Rowland, and charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct. The police report said they were engaged in “disruptive, provocative and intimate behavior.” [WAVE3]

They took a page out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. City workers and police cleared an encampment of homeless people from the west side of Baltimore on Friday morning, provoking a brief traffic-blocking protest and leaving some of the city’s homelessness services organizations chagrined at what they say was a surprise operation. [ThinkProgress]

James Blanton is the new director of the Louisville Free Public Library, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday. He takes over for retiring director Craig Buthod, who announced his resignation in November after 17 years on the job. [WFPL]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has approved a settlement that reduces the base rate increases sought by Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. [Business First]

It starts with a professional rodeo and ends with a demolition derby. In between there will be a queen pageant, midway rides, interactive activities for children and exhibits to view. And yes, there will be plenty of animals. [News & Tribune]

Happy Greg Fischer Rainbow Funtimes

Bank Street in Portland could become the new E. Market Street in Nulu. A new soccer stadium for the Louisville City Football Club could be built in West Louisville. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have opened an in-custody death review after a man who police handcuffed late Saturday became unresponsive and died soon after. [C-J/AKN]

A salary review is underway for six top UofL officials, including president James Ramsey. [WHAS11]

Health insurance costs will probably jump by 10 percent or more next year for many Kentuckians buying coverage through Kynect, the state-run insurance exchange created under the federal Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

An activist and a University of Louisville doctor are shining light on gun violence in the city. [WLKY]

A majority of Democratic members in the House and Senate have now signed on to letters rebuking the Obama administration for expanding the practice of detaining immigrant women and children. [HuffPo]

Oh, look, people are finally realizing that Greg Fischer is an entitled d-bag. Kind of like the Brown Family found out after it was too late. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah drew the favorable post number five for the 147th running of the Belmont Stakes on Saturday when the colt looks to become the first Triple Crown winner in nearly four decades. [Reuters]

Is this the “essence and spirit” of Louisville or of every other modern building in every other generic city on earth? It’s not ugly but it’s certainly not got anything Louisville about it. [WFPL]

College admissions take a crucial factor into account that could be creating enormous racial bias, but it’s not grades or extracurricular activities or even SAT scores. It’s a student’s disciplinary record. [ThinkProgress]

The LG&E Center, the downtown office tower at 220 W. Main St., has a new owner. [Business First]

Citing more time for review, the Jeffersonville Board of Public Works has twice tabled city paving bids wherein the lowest bidder sued the city last year. [News & Tribune]

At Least It Moved To Cordish Central

Remember the Louisville “purge” nonsense? Now it’s a thing in Baltimore — where Cordish is headquartered. [Baltimore Sun]

They are family homes, but they’re being used like extended stay hotels in neighborhoods where that was never the plan. Now, new rules regulating boarding houses in Louisville are aiming to put a stop to it. [WDRB]

Meanwhile, we give away MILLIONS to Cordish for doing nothing. The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is eliminating half of its clinics serving residents in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program because of a projected $800,000 budget shortfall this year. [C-J/AKN]

When Tess Graham, 64, looks in the mirror these days she sees the female she’s also felt she was inside. “I waited 55 years to see me. That is a long time,” Graham said. [WHAS11]

Trying to pry information out of professional chauffeur T.J. Doyle is harder than wrestling a winning trifecta ticket out of a poor man’s hand. [H-L]

A Louisville elementary school got some big-name recognition when Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear visited to celebrate the school reaching an environmental milestone. [WLKY]

This highly entertaining pothole move is hilarious. It’s a shame it hasn’t happened in Louisville. [HuffPo]

All the pageantry and tradition of Derby week really boils down to one thing: the incredible athletic talent of 20 horses that reach the starting gate on the first Saturday in May. Kentucky loves its horses, and the Derby horses are some of the best treated around. But the Bluegrass is also home to many people who are working to better the lives of other horses that don’t have it anywhere near as good. [WAVE3]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission was scheduled to hold a hearing on Tuesday on Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities’ proposed rate increase. [WFPL]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

Louisville-based Baptist Healthcare System Inc., operator of Baptist Health Louisville and several other hospitals across the state, plans to expand its corporate headquarters on Eastpoint Parkway in Louisville in the coming years. [Business First]

The space the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center’s museum exhibits once occupied now is a labyrinth of metal frames and stacks of drywall. A cacophony of clanging metal on metal and shrieking power tools overwhelms the senses there now, but it won’t be too long before a different sound fills the air. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Willow Grande Just Needs To Quit It

You can thank Greg Fischer for this horrible national press. [Click the Clicky]

Kelly Downard says LG&E is misleading the public. “I’m going to outline a consistent record of misrepresentation of facts by Louisville Gas and Electric,” Downard said. “In some cases, there can be no other interpretation of statements by LG&E than the intention to mislead the public, to mislead you, and the flagrant and intentional violation of laws of the Constitution of the Commonwealth.” [WDRB]

Yet another legal challenge has been filed against the embattled Willow Grande condominium tower, this one seeking to overturn a city planning agency’s recent approval of zoning concessions for the proposed Cherokee Triangle project. [C-J/AKN]

A Jefferson County Public Schools Resource Officer and LMPD officer Jonathan Hardin, 31, was indicted April 21 in a case involving a physical confrontation with a student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Utilities’ customers will pay more for their monthly electric bill while Louisville Electric & Gas customers will pay more for their gas bills according to a settlement reached Tuesday concerning the companies’ rate requests. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! No arrests have been made a year after the slayings of a Nelson County teacher and her teenage daughter. [WLKY]

Luisa Cintron, 25, is sitting up as straight as she can, perched on the edge of the neatly made bed that doubles as a couch inside her dimly lit apartment. She is wearing a sweater and slacks, talking about the government program that she says changed her life, and trying — without much success — not to get distracted by the 4-year-old talking loudly about Batman in the next room. [HuffPo]

Students began a sit-in Monday afternoon outside the office of University of Louisville President James Ramsey over the school’s contract with a popular apparel manufacturer. [WAVE3]

President Obama’s approval ratings have reached their highest mark in almost two years, according to a new poll from CNN/ORC. [The Hill]

Louisville Metro Council members looking into the controversial handling of an injured dog last year by Metro Animal Services said on Monday that the agency still hasn’t turned over all the requested emails and information. [WFPL]

As Earth Day approaches, a new survey shows overwhelming support from Kentuckians for environmental education, but room for improvement in residents’ environmental literacy. The Survey of Kentuckians’ Environmental Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors from the Kentucky Environmental Education Council (KECC) reveals that while 96 percent of Kentuckians believed that environmental education should be taught in schools, some basic information, such as the primary source of water pollution in Kentucky, was unknown by the majority of survey respondents, according to KEEC Executive Director Elizabeth Schmitz. [Press Release]

KentuckyOne Health Inc., operator of Jewish Hospital, University of Louisville and other facilities, is dropping its plans for a $55 million inpatient facility in Bullitt County. [Business First]

The field was narrowed down to the best 21 certified and 23 classified employees from Greater Clark County Schools, with one chosen to represent each school and building in the district as a Champion for Children. [News & Tribune]

A Roundup Without A Bunch Of Murders! What A Rarity!

The Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency, awarded the Portland Museum a “Museums for America” grant of $24,652 for a series of Young Curators projects in the Portland neighborhood. The Museum plans two project series – one from elementary age school students and the other for middle school students. The programs will provide enriching cultural experiences to youngsters. [Press Release]

Louisville Metro Police are moving forward with a road side drug testing pilot program. [WDRB]

Kentucky lottery sales continue to show mixed results, but the sale of instant tickets has been especially strong, the lottery corporation directors were told at a recent board meeting. [C-J/AKN]

You already know Louisville is the allergy devil. [WHAS11]

Southern Indiana officials say a construction worker was rescued from a trench after a soil collapse left the man partially buried for several hours. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating an attempted abduction of an 11-year-old girl after a woman said a man attempted to abduct her grandchild at a bus stop. [WLKY]

Kentucky Fried Chicken may have changed its name to KFC years ago to downplay its cooking method in a more health-conscious consumer market, but the world’s second-largest fast food chain didn’t stop frying. [HuffPo]

You’ll probably need some tissues when you watch this video from Home of the Innocents that’s going viral. [WAVE3]

We may not want to believe it, but the United States is now the most unequal of all Western nations. To make matters worse, America has considerably less social mobility than Canada and Europe. [Salon]

Kentucky state regulators are set to consider whether to raise Louisville-area utility bills, in response to a proposed rate increase by Louisville Gas and Electric. The Public Service Commission held a public meeting last night to take comments; about 50 people showed up, and unsurprisingly, no one testified in favor of the rate increase. [WFPL]

Oil prices might be very low, but that’s not going to take away from investments in renewable energy. [ThinkProgress]

David Lehr is retiring as track superintendent of Louisville’s Churchill Downs Racetrack in May, marking the first time in 48 years that a member of the Lehr family will not be part of the track maintenance team. [Business First]

The numbers are staggering. The Blessings in a Backpack program feeds 1,960 children each week in Floyd County. [News & Tribune]

LMPD’s WASP Problem Is Front & Center

The building formerly occupied by the restaurant Taco Punk in the NuLu neighborhood has a new owner. [WDRB]

Three teachers from duPont Manual High are challenging longtime Jefferson County Teachers Association leader Brent McKim in the union’s presidential election, saying they want to see the union push harder to fix the state’s woefully underfunded teacher pension system. [C-J/AKN]

Students at Brooklawn School will soon be getting their hands dirty all part of the learning process. [WHAS11]

Five barrels seized last week from behind a shed in Franklin County do contain Wild Turkey bourbon, according to a statement from Gruppo Campari, the distillery’s parent. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city apparently can’t get enough of this story. A 73-year-old Louisville woman was found dead in an old septic tank Tuesday night. [WLKY]

These bills, it turns out, are essentially efforts to undermine Wall Street reform and Obamacare while greenlighting pollution. [HuffPo]

Oh, looky, LMPD has begun its revisionist history tour with its religious pretty boy who fancies himself an actor. [WAVE3]

When a four-year-old comes home from Pre-K proudly announcing that she spent her “choice time” playing on the computer, what’s a parent to do? [NPR]

Louisville Gas and Electric is still on track to open the company’s natural gas-fired power plant in Louisville in May, as it retires the current Cane Run coal power plant. The new power plant won’t produce coal ash, but 60 years worth of old ash will remain on site. [WFPL]

Several battleground states are planning ballot measures that could force presidential contenders to take firm stances on marijuana legalization. [The Hill]

Clifton’s Pizza Co. has been a Louisville and Frankfort Avenue institution for more than two decades and will celebrate its 25th anniversary this weekend. [Business First]

An appeal hearing over the New Albany Police Merit Commission’s decision to fire Officer Laura Schook has been continued at her request. [News & Tribune]

What A Death-Filled Week It’s Been!

Raven Taylor’s high school education suddenly came to a halt when, at the age of 15, she got pregnant. [WDRB]

The eight-state commission that sets water quality standards for the Ohio River has recommended relaxing its rules for mercury and certain other toxic pollutants that concentrate as they move through the food web. [C-J/AKN]

The Ohio River once again leads the nation for industrial pollution. That’s even as the eight-state commission that sets the river’s water quality standards recommends relaxing rules on mercury and certain other toxic chemicals. [More C-J/AKN]

In light of recent tragedies involving multiple JCPS school communities, district officials held a news conference to tell the public how the district is supporting its students and staff at an emotional time. [WHAS11]

The partisan divide over same-sex marriage among top elected officials remains stark, with Democrats overwhelmingly on record in favor and Republicans mostly silent so far. [H-L]

A group of people gathered at 26th and Chestnut streets Monday morning to protest an officer-involved shooting Saturday afternoon. [WLKY]

The gender pay gap is alive and well everywhere in America, but it’s more alive in some states than in others. [HuffPo]

Police said a 4-year-old girl died Saturday of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound suffered on Friday. [WAVE3]

In 1986, I was as ready to leave the closet as I would ever be—but how would I do so? Though I was a third term Democratic congressman from Massachusetts, I had lived too long with the burden of “the gay thing” to treat coming out as a political matter alone. [Politico]

Louisville Gas and Electric is still on track to open the company’s natural gas-fired power plant in Louisville in May, as it retires the current Cane Run coal power plant. The new power plant won’t produce coal ash, but 60 years worth of old ash will remain on site. [WFPL]

Late last week Governor Beshear’s office pushed out a release about kyhealthnow (can we quit it with the no caps and such?) so go look at the stuff. [Click the Clicky]

Louisville is now the United States headquarters for the Leadership Pipeline Institute, a Denmark-based international leadership organization. [Business First]

February’s winter storms proved costly for Clark County. The commissioners declared an emergency Thursday to use cumulative capital fund dollars pay for more than $85,000 in expenses for snow-related road maintenance during a two-week period in February. [News & Tribune]