They Poured Out Perfectly Fine Bourbon!

Thought everything was puppies and rainbows with the new person running Metro Animal Services? So much for hiring an underwear model to run an agency mired in scandal. Now Possibility City sees what happens when Greg Fischer puts these folks in charge. [C-J/AKN]

What, you thought Matt Bevin wasn’t a backward-ass bigot? [WDRB]

If there’s a bike lane, bicyclists better use it, or they may find themselves in jail. That’s the message a Louisville Metro Police officer gave to bicycling advocate and former mayoral candidate Jackie Green on Friday in the form of a double citation for blocking traffic and running a red light. [More C-J/AKN]

The Dare to Care Kids Café has expanded to include a new location. Children 18 and younger can now go to the Shawnee Community Center on South 37th Street for a hot, healthy meal between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The cost is free. [WHAS11]

Louisville Gas and Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. are asking regulators to allow them to own and operate charging stations for electric vehicles. [H-L]

WARNING! AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As authorities continue to investigate a shooting and carjacking in Old Louisville, many who live and work there say their community is no more dangerous than any other part of the metro. [WLKY]

Apparently, if you are a Democratic presidential candidate, there is no longer such a thing as being too strict about gun safety. All three candidates were locked in a fierce battle to prove their gun control bona fides at the Democratic debate at Drake University in Iowa on Saturday night. [HuffPo]

If you wanna pour out Elijah Craig, just send it here instead. It’s a big stink in the California neighborhood, even after some community leaders struck a deal with Heaven Hill Distillery for a proposed biodigester. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an anti-abortion group’s bid to force the federal government to reveal more information about a $1 million grant it made in 2011 to women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in New Hampshire. [Reuters]

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce President Dave Adkisson says he’s at odds with Governor-elect Matt Bevin over dismantling Kentucky’s health care exchange. [WFPL]

Carter Caves may be the “best kept secret of the park system,” according to its park manager, but it may also be Carter County’s best-kept secret for how to truly open up recreational tourism in the northeast region of Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s pledge to scale back the Medicaid expansion and dismantle Kynect, Kentucky’s award-winning health insurance exchange, has caused concern among health clinics. [Business First]

An advertising campaign to drive students to Clarksville Community Schools cost more than $163,000, but the 83 students it’s credited with bringing in gave the district an extra $548,000 in tuition support from the state for the district. [News & Tribune]

Water Company Is Maybe A Giant Sewer

Told ya there was more coming on the Water Company. This story has been shopped to me for AT LEAST a year with lurid stories of affairs and all kinds of shenanigans and legal maneuvers. The Water Company folks are just plain old corrupt. [WDRB]

This isn’t the only big legal problem facing folks from the Water Company. James Brammell, president and chief executive of the Louisville Water Co., pleaded guilty Wednesday to charges of speeding and aggravated driving under the influence. [C-J/AKN]

An explosion has been reported at LG&E’s Mill Creek plant, located at 14660 Dixie Highway. It is now being reported that two contractors were injured in a contained fire while welding. [WHAS11]

Ultimately, less than half of Kentucky’s voters are satisfied with their choices for governor this year, but that number is slightly worse for Bevin than it is for Conway. [H-L]

Halloween is a couple of days away, but there was a different type of spirit at the Frazier History Museum. [WLKY]

Both the Democratic and Republican National Committees have agreed to give their blessing to a presidential town hall set up by activists in the Black Lives Matter movement. But organizers within the network have said that gesture isn’t enough. They want the parties to devote one of their official — and more high-profile — debates to racial justice issues. [HuffPo]

You should read the lawsuit because it’s pretty damning. A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of a woman who claims she was sexually assaulted by a former Louisville Metro Department of Corrections officer. [WAVE3]

Their lips are moving. They’re lying: Ben Carson, Rand Paul and the right-wing’s truthiness problem. When Rand Paul, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz start citing history and “facts,” best double-check them right away. [Salon]

Few pieces of legislation drew as much attention this year as the bill addressing Kentucky’s recent surge in heroin abuse and overdose-related deaths. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) is now viewed negatively by a majority of Republicans, a new poll says. [The Hill]

United Parcel Service Inc. will triple the size of its Louisville ground package-sorting facility, known as Centennial Hub. [Business First]

Name recognition won’t be a problem for voters when choosing three New Albany City Council At-large candidates next month. [News & Tribune]

Bad News For UofL Continues To Flow

When Kentucky and Indiana start charging drivers to cross the Ohio River next year, a cadre of behind-the-scenes workers will oversee toll transactions on three bridges. It’s estimated that more than 110,000 vehicles will use those spans each day. [WDRB]

A “major progress announcement” in regard to the Downtown Crossing portion of the Ohio River Bridges Project is scheduled to be made by Gov. Steve Beshear and other top officials Monday morning. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Plans are proceeding to build in Mercer County the largest solar-powered generating facility in Kentucky. Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities announced Friday that they have secured a contract for engineering, procurement and construction of the facility, and that construction is expected to begin in November. [H-L]

Oh, wait! Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Black men from around the nation are gathering on the National Mall to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March and call for policing reforms and changes in black communities. [HuffPo]

It’s the latest unfavorable national headline for the University of Louisville. This one reads, “Louisville created and continues to nurture dangerous culture for women,” and it tops a story that was posted on Sports Illustrated’s website Friday. [WAVE3]

Back in 1990, as the debate over climate change was heating up, a dissident shareholder petitioned the board of Exxon, one of the world’s largest oil companies, imploring it to develop a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from its production plants and facilities. The board’s response: Exxon had studied the science of global warming and concluded it was too murky to warrant action. The company’s “examination of the issue supports the conclusions that the facts today and the projection of future effects are very unclear.” [LA Times]

In what alternate universe does Louisville have a transportation plan that doesn’t suck? [WFPL]

The color of debt: how collection suits squeeze black neighborhoods. [ProPublica]

Louisville, meet your new integration overlord. His name is Rick Jelinek, and he’s been selected by Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. to help it integrate Louisville-based health insurer Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

Clarksville is moving forward with the next phase of its comprehensive plan, with the Planning Commission now working toward writing up the formal plan based on input gathered at five recent public meetings. [News & Tribune]

Miss The Goober Debate? Don’t Worry

As winter approaches, there’s good news for Louisville Gas and Electric customers. If approved by the Kentucky Public Service Commission, the utility’s residential natural gas customers can expect to see a decrease of nearly 15 percent on an average heating bill. [WDRB]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Well, that sounds more fun than prostitutes. University of Louisville police said a person was hurt in a small explosion in the Shumaker Research Building. [WHAS11]

Guess we should be glad we’re not dealing with what Lexington is dealing with. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Community services and volunteers came together to cater to Louisville’s homeless community. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act’s chief aim is to extend coverage to people without health insurance. One of the 2010 law’s primary means to achieve that goal is expanding Medicaid eligibility to more people near the poverty level. But a crucial court ruling in 2012 granted states the power to reject the Medicaid expansion. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky School for the Blind has been a part of the community since 1842. Its mission is provide comprehensive education services to all Kentucky students who are blind and visually impaired. But three mothers say that is not happening.

If the prevailing judgment about the 2015 gubernatorial race is that no one is excited about it, then Tuesday evening’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway probably didn’t set any fires under prospective voters. [Ronnie Ellis]

What the hell is wrong with all these backward-ass gun nuts these days? We love us some guns but come on, people, enough with the bigotry. Louisville Metro Police officials say they are monitoring developments in the days leading up to a rally planned for this weekend outside the Islamic Center on River Road. [WFPL]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

The University of Louisville men’s basketball team is highly decorated: Multiple Final Four appearances and three national titles, the most recent in 2013. [Business First]

If you’re pleased with the city’s progress over the last four years, Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore thinks he’s the obvious pick for Jeffersonville mayor come Nov. 3. [News & Tribune]

All Of The Most Compassionate Deaths

Even before a pontoon boat struck a barge on the Ohio River on July 4, killing five people in Louisville, Kentucky was on pace to have the most boating-related deaths since 2010, federal and state data show. [WDRB]

Lawyers for the Sierra Club and LG&E on Thursday argued for two hours over the meaning the word “occasional” in a federal court hearing stemming from a pollution lawsuit filed last year involving the Mill Creek power plant. [C-J/AKN]

The NAACP is calling out the governor for his decision to not reappoint the only African-American of UofL’s Board of Trustees. Raoul Cunningham said this makes the first time in 45 years that there is not an African-American on the 17-member board. [WHAS11]

If this is the worst thing Kentucky Democrats can come up with, they probably ought to just hand over the governor’s mansion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! One week after flames tore through a building in Old Louisville, more information on the investigation has been released. [WLKY]

Kim Davis is officially a national embarrassment. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School teacher has been fired following an investigation into a inappropriate relationship with a student. [WAVE3]

Heroin use in the US has surged in the past decade as experts say people using opioid painkillers are increasingly turning to heroin as a cheaper high. [BBC]

Health officials, confronted with a shocking increase in heroin abuse, are developing a clearer picture of who is becoming addicted to this drug and why. The results may surprise you. [WFPL]

There’s reason to celebrate declines in deaths from colon cancer in the United States — unless you live in three areas that are still lagging behind, a new report finds. Hint: This is bad news for Kentucky. [CBS News]

Kentucky’s Innovation Center, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, announced that it is in the process of transforming a rundown nightclub spot at 252 E. Market St. into a new home for Code Louisville, a code training program operated by KentuckianaWorks, and a new coding boot camp run by The Learning House Inc., an education technology provider. [Business First]

This is a thing you should do in Indiana. On Saturday, July 11, the Georgetown Twin Drive-In Theater is opening its gates to four-legged family members, allowing dogs on a leash to attend for a $2 admission fee. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Bunch Of Death

A homicide investigation is being conducted by LMPD’s Homicide Unit and the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office in the 4400 block of Blevins Gap Road, near Saw Mill Road. [WDRB]

Maybe it can be hidden away in the Louisville Underground? The long-beleaguered Louisville Clock will be moved Friday from its home on Fourth Street at Theater Square to a warehouse in the Portland neighborhood, where it will rest until a suitable permanent location can be found. [C-J/AKN]

The Courier Journal reported JCPS was following up anonymous complaints and found chips, waters, and other vending machine items came into Waggener, but the amount of money being deposited from vending machine sales was short of what it should have been to the total of $3,900. [WHAS11]

The number of heroin overdoses at five northern Kentucky hospitals has continued to climb, but officials aren’t sure if that’s because more people are calling 911 for help, or more people are using heroin. [H-L]

The reward in the case of a missing Nelson County woman has again increased. [WLKY]

Coming back from its Independence Day vacation, Congress appeared no closer Tuesday to finding a way to avoid yet another government shutdown showdown in the fall. [HuffPo]

They are split-second decisions made by police — choices that can mean the difference between life and death for a suspect. Should officers use force? And how much? Community activists like Chad Golden believe sometimes police go farther than they should. [WAVE3]

Questions have been raised about some statues in downtown Lexington. Now, Mayor Jim Gray wants a city board to take a closer look at the statues. [WKYT]

A case over water pollution from Louisville Gas & Electric’s Cane Run Power Plant is scheduled for a hearing in federal court in Louisville tomorrow. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Harry Reid passed the blame on Wednesday over the Senate’s inability to overhaul the Bush-era No Child Left Behind bill. [The Hill]

Some business organizations have decried President Obama’s proposed changes to overtime pay for salaried employees, but most restaurant and retail companies are still working through how, and whether, the regulations would affect them. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair said he was “surprised” that a $450,000 appropriation for police cars was included on Monday’s agenda. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]