Local Media Turns Into 1980s D.A.R.E.

We love that the West End is seeing a rebirth of sorts. There’s a new push to boost home sales in Louisville’s poorest neighborhoods. [WDRB]

The dumb is thick in Oldham County. A lawsuit that questions the validity of Oldham County’s recent wet-dry referendum could delay officials’ plans to expand alcohol sales countywide. [C-J/AKN]

The clerk-treasurer of Selllersburg, Indiana has filed a complaint saying she has faced retaliation after raising questions about the town spending. [WHAS11]

Will Jim Gray beat Rand Paul? Probably not with his current team that consists almost entirely of Conway people. Stranger things have happened, though. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another shooting in Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Any high school in the U.S. that wants to carry an emergency opioid overdose reversal kit will now be able to get one free of charge, thanks to a new initiative announced Monday by the Clinton Foundation and the drug’s manufacturer. [HuffPo]

Quick, everybody freak out about drugs! A new trend is leading down a dangerous path. People think they are buying prescription pills to get high, but they are given something even more addictive. [WAVE3]

With the new year comes the continued challenge for area nonprofits to serve as many families and residents in need as possible. To energize those efforts, employees of Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company are lending a hand. Coupled with financial support from the LG&E and KU Foundation, the utilities’ voluntary employee-giving campaign, Power of One, raised more than $1.7 million in contributions. [Richmond Register]

A cedar log carved into a double helix with a chainsaw. A collection of wood veneer scraps twisted and wrapped to look like a tree trunk. A round sculpture built out of woven straw that is implanted with mushroom spores. [WFPL]

Of all things for Adam Edelen to attack, he chose to hit Rand Paul on foreign policy. That may be the only thing most Democrats can stomach from Paul. He’s also wrong about sexual orientation. Anti-gay discrimination is alive and well in Kentucky. Hell, the Kentucky Democratic Party runs so quickly away from the gays that it’s alarming. We can all agree that Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) is a delusional troll. But Adam Edelen needs to check his straight, white, male privilege once in a while before spouting off in another sweaty rant. [Roll Call]

The $5.4 billion price tag for GE Appliances was “a pleasant surprise,” General Electric Co. CEO Jeff Immelt said. [Business First]

For better or worse, an ordinance to require approval from the New Albany City Council for additional appropriations on projects was rejected at Thursday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

Sanctuary? More Like Torture Farm

A Jefferson County Board of Education is speaking out against a district proposal that would increase class sizes and potentially eliminate assistant principals from some elementary schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said it will be “looking into” a recent barn fire at a Charlestown, Ind., wildlife refuge that killed 41 animals. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools is trying to distance itself from a fake Twitter account that was getting a lot of attention on Tuesday. [WHAS11]

Prompted by new federal regulations, the state’s two largest utility companies are closing several storage ponds that collect the coal ash burned by power plants. [H-L]

Fire broke out Tuesday at a popular but controversial animal sanctuary that is home to lions and tigers. [WLKY]

“As frustration grows, there will be voices urging us to fall back into tribes, to scapegoat fellow citizens who don’t look like us, or pray like us, or vote like we do, or share the same background.” [HuffPo]

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office is hosting several firearms training session to provide information beneficial to anyone owning and carrying a gun. [WAVE3]

General Electric will announce [today] that it has selected Boston for global headquarters, according to an official familiar with the process. [Boston Globe]

Pork processor JBS Swift now has official permission to use a Butchertown parking lot for staging refrigeration trucks, despite the objections of its neighbors. [WFPL]

As winter sets in around the country, thousands of the nation’s poor are struggling to keep the heat on thanks to intentional underfunding of a key federal progam(sic). [ThinkProgress]

Thorntons Inc., a Louisville-based gas station and food store chain, broke ground on its new $27.8 million headquarters on Friday. [Business First]

Advocates are praising Congress’ recent softening of a longtime ban on federal dollars going to needle exchanges amid growing intravenous drug abuse that’s spreading hepatitis and HIV in many states. [News & Tribune]

UofL Seems Nice & Positive These Days

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

The Greater Clark County Schools board is moving forward with a plan to improve school building infrastructure in the district. [WDRB]

Newly-elected Metro Councilman Pat Mulvihill wants to cap how much an appointed member to the council can spend while in office after his predecessor, Steve Magre, nearly depleted the district’s discretionary accounts this year. [C-J/AKN]

Jim Ramsey is killing it these days. A help-wanted ad posted by the University of Louisville is getting backlash Thursday afternoon because of the requirements listed for the position. [WHAS11]

With his first year as U.S. Senate Majority Leader drawing to a close, Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell said Wednesday that “by any objective standard, we’ve had a year of significant accomplishments.” [H-L]

New information has been released about the slaying of Thomas Grismer at the Red Roof Inn on Preston Highway. [WLKY]

Apparently the deficit hawks flew south for the winter. At least that’s the conclusion that could be drawn from looking at the price tag for the package of bills unveiled early Wednesday morning to keep the government running and extend a bunch of tax breaks, many permanently. [HuffPo]

Are we reliving 2008? Wednesday, city officials met with neighbors and representatives from Swift Pork Company to discuss the odor coming from the Swift plant on Story Avenue. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary unemployment rate for November 2015 was 4.9 percent, remaining unchanged from the revised 4.9 percent rate in October, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. [Press Release]

Kentucky regulators have affirmed a utility’s plan to build massive landfills near two power plants, saying that option will have the smallest effect on ratepayers. [WFPL]

For years, Jammie Nichols struggled with a drug habit that left the Florida mother reeling from blackouts, seizures, depression and poverty – and a decision to give one of her children up for adoption. [Reuters]

Some Bullitt County residents spent hours Tuesday speaking out against an industrial park that’s been proposed near their neighborhood. [Business First]

A true assessment of Jeffersonville’s financial activity for 2013 could not be determined by a State Board of Accounts audit because of poor bookkeeping, according to a report released late October. Jeffersonville’s leadership is incompetent? Surely not! [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Brown Puts Her Money Where Her Mouth Is And Other Wealthy Scions In The City Should Follow Her Dang Lead

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

The transformation of a former public housing complex in Louisville is almost finished. Construction is continuing at the renovated Sheppard Square in Smoketown. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Board of Education Chairman David Jones Jr. said he wants to hear more information on the idea of bringing in an outside operator to run some of the district’s lowest-performing schools. [C-J/AKN]

The Judge Stevens slap fight is getting out-of-control crazy. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics will receive a $12 million gift from Papa John’s Pizza founder and CEO John Schnatter and the Charles Koch Foundation, officials announced Tuesday. [H-L]

Seriously, Tom Wine is in teabagger meltdown mode. What on earth? How dare anyone bring up race in Possibility City! A legal battle between a local judge and a top prosecutor is heating up again, and the prosecutor is asking for the judge’s removal. [WLKY]

ICYMI: Bill sits down with former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear to discuss his time in office and his plans for the future. [KET]

The hotel will bring 140 more hotel rooms to Louisville and will be in one of the city’s trendiest neighborhoods. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission (KSNPC) has presented its Biological Diversity Protection Award to Christy Lee Brown of Louisville. The annual award is given to an individual or organization that has made a significant contribution to the knowledge and protection of Kentucky’s biodiversity. “Brown is truly an international leader promoting a holistic understanding and appreciation of the earth and its environs,” said Don Dott, executive director of the KSNPC. “She leads and inspires others in the fields of sustainable food production, environmental quality and its fundamental role in human health, the interrelatedness of our natural systems, and of biodiversity protection and the conservation of land.” [Press Release]

Horrible walrus Jim Gooch has returned to embarrass the Commonwealth. A bill pre-filed in the General Assembly would declare Kentucky a “sanctuary state” for people and companies who don’t want to follow federal environmental laws that will restrict carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC) has affirmed its earlier approval of combustion waste landfills at power plants operated by the state’s two largest electric utilities, despite sharp increases in the cost of the facilities. But the PSC, in an order issued today, declined requests by Kentucky Utilities Co. (KU) and Louisville Gas & Electric Co. (LG&E) to extend that approval to future expansions of the landfills. The landfills are at the Trimble County Generating Station and at the Ghent Generating Station in Carroll County. [Press Release]

LG&E and KU Energy LLC wants to get much more involved in the solar energy world. To make this happen, the utility company plans to offer individual, renewable solar-generation facilities to industrial and business customers. [Business First]

The possibility of arming a trained teacher in a school was discussed at West Clark Community Schools board meeting this week. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

They Poured Out Perfectly Fine Bourbon!

Thought everything was puppies and rainbows with the new person running Metro Animal Services? So much for hiring an underwear model to run an agency mired in scandal. Now Possibility City sees what happens when Greg Fischer puts these folks in charge. [C-J/AKN]

What, you thought Matt Bevin wasn’t a backward-ass bigot? [WDRB]

If there’s a bike lane, bicyclists better use it, or they may find themselves in jail. That’s the message a Louisville Metro Police officer gave to bicycling advocate and former mayoral candidate Jackie Green on Friday in the form of a double citation for blocking traffic and running a red light. [More C-J/AKN]

The Dare to Care Kids Café has expanded to include a new location. Children 18 and younger can now go to the Shawnee Community Center on South 37th Street for a hot, healthy meal between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The cost is free. [WHAS11]

Louisville Gas and Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. are asking regulators to allow them to own and operate charging stations for electric vehicles. [H-L]

WARNING! AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As authorities continue to investigate a shooting and carjacking in Old Louisville, many who live and work there say their community is no more dangerous than any other part of the metro. [WLKY]

Apparently, if you are a Democratic presidential candidate, there is no longer such a thing as being too strict about gun safety. All three candidates were locked in a fierce battle to prove their gun control bona fides at the Democratic debate at Drake University in Iowa on Saturday night. [HuffPo]

If you wanna pour out Elijah Craig, just send it here instead. It’s a big stink in the California neighborhood, even after some community leaders struck a deal with Heaven Hill Distillery for a proposed biodigester. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an anti-abortion group’s bid to force the federal government to reveal more information about a $1 million grant it made in 2011 to women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in New Hampshire. [Reuters]

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce President Dave Adkisson says he’s at odds with Governor-elect Matt Bevin over dismantling Kentucky’s health care exchange. [WFPL]

Carter Caves may be the “best kept secret of the park system,” according to its park manager, but it may also be Carter County’s best-kept secret for how to truly open up recreational tourism in the northeast region of Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s pledge to scale back the Medicaid expansion and dismantle Kynect, Kentucky’s award-winning health insurance exchange, has caused concern among health clinics. [Business First]

An advertising campaign to drive students to Clarksville Community Schools cost more than $163,000, but the 83 students it’s credited with bringing in gave the district an extra $548,000 in tuition support from the state for the district. [News & Tribune]

Water Company Is Maybe A Giant Sewer

Told ya there was more coming on the Water Company. This story has been shopped to me for AT LEAST a year with lurid stories of affairs and all kinds of shenanigans and legal maneuvers. The Water Company folks are just plain old corrupt. [WDRB]

This isn’t the only big legal problem facing folks from the Water Company. James Brammell, president and chief executive of the Louisville Water Co., pleaded guilty Wednesday to charges of speeding and aggravated driving under the influence. [C-J/AKN]

An explosion has been reported at LG&E’s Mill Creek plant, located at 14660 Dixie Highway. It is now being reported that two contractors were injured in a contained fire while welding. [WHAS11]

Ultimately, less than half of Kentucky’s voters are satisfied with their choices for governor this year, but that number is slightly worse for Bevin than it is for Conway. [H-L]

Halloween is a couple of days away, but there was a different type of spirit at the Frazier History Museum. [WLKY]

Both the Democratic and Republican National Committees have agreed to give their blessing to a presidential town hall set up by activists in the Black Lives Matter movement. But organizers within the network have said that gesture isn’t enough. They want the parties to devote one of their official — and more high-profile — debates to racial justice issues. [HuffPo]

You should read the lawsuit because it’s pretty damning. A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of a woman who claims she was sexually assaulted by a former Louisville Metro Department of Corrections officer. [WAVE3]

Their lips are moving. They’re lying: Ben Carson, Rand Paul and the right-wing’s truthiness problem. When Rand Paul, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz start citing history and “facts,” best double-check them right away. [Salon]

Few pieces of legislation drew as much attention this year as the bill addressing Kentucky’s recent surge in heroin abuse and overdose-related deaths. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) is now viewed negatively by a majority of Republicans, a new poll says. [The Hill]

United Parcel Service Inc. will triple the size of its Louisville ground package-sorting facility, known as Centennial Hub. [Business First]

Name recognition won’t be a problem for voters when choosing three New Albany City Council At-large candidates next month. [News & Tribune]

Bad News For UofL Continues To Flow

When Kentucky and Indiana start charging drivers to cross the Ohio River next year, a cadre of behind-the-scenes workers will oversee toll transactions on three bridges. It’s estimated that more than 110,000 vehicles will use those spans each day. [WDRB]

A “major progress announcement” in regard to the Downtown Crossing portion of the Ohio River Bridges Project is scheduled to be made by Gov. Steve Beshear and other top officials Monday morning. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Plans are proceeding to build in Mercer County the largest solar-powered generating facility in Kentucky. Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities announced Friday that they have secured a contract for engineering, procurement and construction of the facility, and that construction is expected to begin in November. [H-L]

Oh, wait! Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Black men from around the nation are gathering on the National Mall to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March and call for policing reforms and changes in black communities. [HuffPo]

It’s the latest unfavorable national headline for the University of Louisville. This one reads, “Louisville created and continues to nurture dangerous culture for women,” and it tops a story that was posted on Sports Illustrated’s website SI.com Friday. [WAVE3]

Back in 1990, as the debate over climate change was heating up, a dissident shareholder petitioned the board of Exxon, one of the world’s largest oil companies, imploring it to develop a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from its production plants and facilities. The board’s response: Exxon had studied the science of global warming and concluded it was too murky to warrant action. The company’s “examination of the issue supports the conclusions that the facts today and the projection of future effects are very unclear.” [LA Times]

In what alternate universe does Louisville have a transportation plan that doesn’t suck? [WFPL]

The color of debt: how collection suits squeeze black neighborhoods. [ProPublica]

Louisville, meet your new integration overlord. His name is Rick Jelinek, and he’s been selected by Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. to help it integrate Louisville-based health insurer Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

Clarksville is moving forward with the next phase of its comprehensive plan, with the Planning Commission now working toward writing up the formal plan based on input gathered at five recent public meetings. [News & Tribune]