All The News Is About Shootings & Such

Located about a mile from each other, Roosevelt-Perry and Byck elementary schools have long served the children of the Russell neighborhood – the majority of whom come from low-income families. [WDRB]

Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has filed a federal suit alleging the state’s Judicial Conduct Commission, which is considering possible disciplinary action against the judge, has violated his First Amendment rights. [C-J/AKN]

If you live in Louisville, you’re going to get shot dead or run over by a car. Or maybe hit by a train or school bus. Right? That’s the sense one gets by watching local news. [WHAS11]

Windstream announced Monday that it is launching one-gigabit Internet service in Lexington, as Windstream and Time Warner continue to battle for area customers. In a news release, Windstream said it was the first provider to bring the service to residential and small business customers in Fayette County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man is dead following a shooting at the intersection of 32nd and Kentucky streets. [WLKY]

But Matt Bevin, your half-wit governor, would have! Republican presidential candidate John Kasich said Sunday that he wouldn’t have signed a North Carolina law that banned cities in the state from passing anti-discrimination measures and mandated that transgender people use the public bathrooms for the gender they were assigned at birth. [HuffPo]

Another day, another shooting on Compassionate City. This time involving a juvenile. [WAVE3]

Here’s more of the University of Kentucky just TRYING to make you hate it. Moonshine packs a punch in this corner of Appalachia, where making hooch is steeped in local lore. But when Colin Fultz, the grandson of a bootlegger, opened a gourmet distillery here last fall, he ran afoul of a spirit even more potent than white lightning: University of Kentucky basketball. [NY Times]

Louisville’s planning commission is calling a public hearing to get input on proposed zoning regulations for short-term rentals. [WFPL]

It is only April, but some on Wall Street are already predicting a rotten 2016 for U.S. banks. [Reuters]

Kevin Cogan, who is battling to build a high-rise condominium in Cherokee Triangle, said the ease with which people can appeal rulings could start sinking big projects. [Business First]

Angela Renfro promised herself that if she ever escaped her life in prostitution and human trafficking, she would help every woman and child she could. [News & Tribune]

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Even Lexington Does Housing Better Than Us?

Louisville-based Kindred Healthcare told shareholders Tuesday that it spent $2.15 million to buy the Glenview home of a top company executive last year out of concern for the “personal safety” of the executive and his family. [WDRB]

Without a national search and after considering only two internal candidates, a search committee made its recommendation for University of Louisville’s next provost, the school’s second highest-ranking officer. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer is apparently “on the record” in this recorded interview. Watch at your own risk. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin and Kentucky Sports Radio host Matt Jones traded barbs Thursday night on Twitter over Bevin’s order to cut university funding. [H-L]

This is actually pretty exciting news for that neighborhood! Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home is almost ready for the world to see. [WLKY]

Not quite the same situation in Louisville. New York City saw a significant drop in major crimes in the first quarter of 2016 with the fewest murders and shootings in its recorded history, Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) announced during a Monday press conference. [HuffPo]

Twenty-six faculty and staff members at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College (ECTC) have not been invited to return to campus next fall. Declining enrollment and Gov. Matt Bevin’s cuts to higher education are to blame, according a statement from the school. [WAVE3]

Low gas prices could give Democrats a third straight term in the White House, an economic election model said Monday. [The Hill]

The quick success of Lexington’s affordable housing trust fund is a striking contrast to Louisville’s struggles to fund such an initiative. [WFPL]

Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump’s extreme call for an immigration policy plan that prevents Muslim immigrants from remaining in the United States may already be underway. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville-based Papa John’s International Inc. is continuing with its sports branding effort. [Business First]

You should check this out and then go to the Louisville Science Center. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Really Gonna Miss All This Compassion

Gov. Matt Bevin must first fill two open seats on the University of Louisville Board of Trustees before the board can take up a proposed vote of “no confidence” in the leadership of President James Ramsey, according to the terms of a settlement reached last month in a lawsuit challenging the board’s lack of minority representation. [WDRB]

A new survey of Louisville roads released Tuesday by Metro Public Works shows a slight improvement in the city’s overall road conditions, but more than one-third of major thoroughfares are still so deteriorated that they require “immediate attention,” including rehabilitative work. [C-J/AKN]

Compassionate City just can’t stop killing its people. [WHAS11]

That line of pear trees in the Palomar neighborhood in south Lexington is gorgeous, fluffy and decked out like clouds descended to suburban earth. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Additional charges could be filed after a University of Louisville student was shot and killed during a triple shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WLKY]

A new report nearly doubles previous predictions for sea level rise if global emissions continue unabated, portending a doomsday scenario for many of the world’s coastal cities. [HuffPo]

According to the city of New Albany, preliminary work to prepare for the final planned section of the city’s portion of the Ohio River Greenway project has begun. [WAVE3]

In these first years of the 21st century, we may be witnessing a new world being born inside the hollowed-out shell of the American system. [Bill Moyers]

In the United States, we like to think that our success is determined only by how hard we work. But in reality, some of it’s just luck. And some of that luck has to do with things we can’t control: Our race. Our gender. Our sexual orientation. What language we grow up speaking. [WFPL]

Shandra Woworuntu arrived in the US hoping to start a new career in the hotel industry. Instead, she found she had been trafficked into a world of prostitution and sexual slavery, forced drug-taking and violence. It was months before she was able to turn the tables on her persecutors. Some readers may find her account of the ordeal upsetting. [BBC]

When you buy a car, the salesman makes a commission. The same’s often true when you buy insurance from an agent — unless they’re selling you a health plan from Louisville insurance giant Humana Inc. or one of the other major insurers who have decided not to pay them. [Business First]

Michael Shepard headed to his campus food court this week looking for students hungry for political action. He came away unsatisfied. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Can We Quit Pretending We’re Compassionate?

Strengths and weaknesses of each Jefferson County Public Schools facility, a redesign proposal that would impact three middle schools and the Class of 2016 graduation schedule will all be up for discussion on Tuesday. [WDRB]

Some 7,700 Louisville Water Co. service lines are made of lead – and now for the first time, customers can quickly check to see whether those old pipes are made of lead. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s new State Police Commissioner was announced Monday and they’re from right here in the Louisville area. [WHAS11]

A judge has denied a request by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration to temporarily close a Lexington abortion clinic that the state claims is operating illegally. [H-L]

A man shot and killed his wife and children before setting their house on fire and killing himself in Saratoga Springs on Sunday, Louisville Metro Police said. [WLKY]

After nearly a decade of generally lukewarm concern over what’s been called the “greatest threat“ of our time, Americans are finally taking climate change seriously. [HuffPo]

It wouldn’t be a day in Compassionate City without a school bus accident. mergency crews responded to a multi-vehicle crash involving a school bus. [WAVE3]

It’s 2016, but the Eastern Kentucky Correctional Complex didn’t get the memo. The minimum and medium security prison in West Liberty, Kentucky has a mail policy that prohibits prisoners from receiving books and magazines that “promote homosexuality” — whatever the prison thinks that means. In just a four-month period in 2015, EKCC used the policy 13 different times to confiscate mail including letters, cards, “pages out of book,” and magazines like Out and The Advocate. [ACLU]

It’s obvious just from looking at it that the Black Leaf site in West Louisville is in an extreme state of disrepair. [WFPL]

Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid (Nev.) on Thursday called on Republican leaders in Congress to renounce Donald Trump because of his controversial views, saying their “moral cowardice” led to the GOP presidential front-runner’s rise. [The Hill]

Don’t expect another big purchase from Kindred Healthcare Inc. anytime soon — at least, not in the world of home health care. [Business First]

Floyd County Democratic Party Chairman Adam Dickey has announced the declared candidates for a special vacancy caucus for the position of party vice chair. The caucus was called following the resignation of Stacy Deck last month. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

HOW Is JBS Still In The Damn News?!

Inclusivity is powerful. Much more than being just the opposite of exclusivity, it’s a distinct way of looking at the world. Its power has been revealed to me over and over in the internet business, in political campaigns, and from living in my adopted hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. [Matthew Barzun]

Seniors in Jefferson County Public Schools would graduate over a three-day period at the end of May, according to a proposal that will be up for school board approval on Tuesday, March 22. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric Company warned Mayor Greg Fischer on Monday it will stop collecting a 2 percent fee used to fund public safety and other community initiatives if a new franchise agreement cannot be reached by the end of March. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! JBS Swift plant’s plan to begin killing pigs using CO2, rather than the current method of electrocution, called for a public meeting Wednesday night. [WHAS11]

John Sanders’ room on the second floor of St. James Place is comfortable yet cramped. There is no storage space for his pots and utensils in the small kitchenette on one side of his room. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A woman was rushed to University Hospital after a shooting Wednesday night in southwest Louisville. [WLKY]

In an effort to curb America’s deadly opioid crisis, federal health officials are urging doctors to largely avoid prescribing highly addictive painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin when treating patients for chronic pain. [HuffPo]

Critics say it’s a destruction of civil rights. Supporters say it’s part of Kentucky’s constitution. Tuesday, Kentucky’s Senate has passed a bill allowing businesses to refuse service to people based on their religious beliefs in certain situation. [WAVE3]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A call this week for fiber Internet service providers to begin applying for franchise status marks the next step in Louisville’s quest to become a gigabit city. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell spoke to Donald Trump on Tuesday and recommended that the business mogul condemn violence at his rallies. [Politico]

The state of Florida has already given Humana Inc. the OK to merge with its Connecticut-based competitor, Aetna Inc. But some doctors groups aren’t so sure. [Business First]

The first phase of a project to install security cameras along Riverside Drive in Clarksville is completed and the town is ready for phase two. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Still Loving The Christy Brown Shade

The federal government is throwing new resources at the growing heroin problem in Kentucky and throughout the nation. [WDRB]

Louisville planners recommended Thursday morning that short-term rentals be allowed in most zoning districts but that a special permit should be necessary if the unit is not a host’s primary residence. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The best part of this whole Speed Museum coverage? All the photos of Christy Brown throwing shade at Matt Bevin. May we all grow up to be as skilled as her. [WHAS11]

Lexington is apparently trying to imitate Louisville again. Second overnight shooting in a week. [H-L]

Valley Station may be one of the few areas of the city where Rand Paul would be welcomed with open arms. [WLKY]

Another Donald Trump supporter was caught on video evoking Nazis as he yelled at protesters following a rally in Cleveland on Saturday. “Go to Auschwitz,” the man said to the protesters after raising his arm in an apparent Nazi salute. “Go to fucking Auschwitz.” [HuffPo]

Really, all that shade Christy Brown threw was terrific. Somebody please give her an award. [WAVE3]

Apollo Global Management says it’s buying specialty grocery store chain Fresh Market Inc., for $1.36 billion, in a deal that adds a premium of more than 20 percent to Fresh Market’s closing stock price last week. [NPR]

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced federal funding for several Kentucky health care centers to help fight the state’s opioid epidemic. [WFPL]

How hot was it last month globally? It was so hot that the famed Iditarod sled race in Alaska brought in extra snow from hundreds of miles away by train. [ThinkProgress]

Two-thirds of state economic development spending benefits big businesses, according to a sample of three states analyzed by Good Jobs First. [Business First]

One of the last things left before Gateway Park opens in Clarksville is to wait for the grass to fill in. [News & Tribune]

Murder City’s Homicide Unit Is Expanding

The small city of Hillview is suing its former attorney for more than $15 million. In a complaint filed in Bullitt Circuit Court Tuesday, the city alleges Mark Edison, who served as Hillview city attorney from Jan. 2003 to March 2015, failed to properly advise city leaders during a land dispute case in the early 2000s. That case led to a judgment against the city of $11.4 million. [WDRB]

At the end of every April, OneWest interim director Jenny Recktenwald says, out-of-town companies hunt for western Louisville’s most vulnerable residents with overdue tax bills. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro Police Department is expanding its Homicide Unit in an effort to lower crime in 2016 and take more violent offenders off the streets. [WHAS11]

With Gov. Matt Bevin’s blessing, a state House panel Thursday approved a bill that would allow Lexington’s Urban County Council to pass an additional 2.5 percent transient room tax to help pay for an expanded Lexington Convention Center. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WLKY]

Remember when this happened in Kentucky and then everyone forgot about it? A Georgia-based telecom startup had a clear, pointed response after the state’s senate approved a measure that will allow business owners to cite their religious beliefs in denying services to same-sex couples. [HuffPo]

Surprise! A new ranking of the happiest and healthiest cities is out and it is not good news for Louisville. [WAVE3]

New orders for long-lasting U.S. manufactured goods in January rose by the most in 10 months as demand picked up across the board, offering a ray of hope for the downtrodden manufacturing sector. [Reuters]

Deborah Collins squinted her eyes, triple-checking the information on the screen in front of her. She traced the blinking cursor with her finger, repeating her ZIP code, address and phone number. [WFPL]

The FBI’s much-discussed request to Apple can seem innocuous: Help us extract six weeks of encrypted data from the locked iPhone of Syed Farook, an employee of San Bernardino’s health department who spearheaded an attack that killed 14 people. Most people believe Apple should comply. But the FBI is demanding a lot more than the data on a single phone. [ProPublica]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. will be selling four transitional care hospitals and acquiring five long-term acute care facilities from Select Medical Holdings Corp. [Business First]

Jeffersonville police and fire chiefs are asking for some of the money the city council didn’t fund for this year when it tried to create a balanced budget. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

JCPS Admin An Extension Of Frankfort

Gossip started more than a week ago that Allison Martin was bringing Daniel Kemp with her to JCPS. Because that’s apparently how things work these days – government jobs are handed out to friends, not the person who is best for the job. Screw what’s best for the school district. Konz, along with other local reporters, were under an embargo not to mention it until Monday. [WDRB]

A federal judge last month denied a request by Karen Cunagin Sypher to be placed in a halfway house for the final 12 months of her sentence for attempting to extort University of Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino. [C-J/AKN]

It’s the most important time of year! Girl Scout cookie season! [WHAS11]

A 22-year-old man had been living on the streets less than a month when he was found unresponsive outside a Lexington Taco Bell and later died, his wife said Friday. [H-L]

Greater Clark County Schools students enjoyed another day off Monday, but many are talking about the humorous way the message was delivered. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act is nearly six years old, and over that time it’s made real headway accomplishing some of its key goals. [HuffPo]

Always exciting when there’s a story that doesn’t involve pedestrian deaths, shootings, Donna Hargens or Jim Ramsey. Louisville’s Joe Autry got first place in the professional division of the 16th International Snow Sculpting Competition Japan Cup, which took place Feb. 9-13, in Nayoro, Japan. [WAVE3]

Most students in the U.S. are learning about climate change in schools, according to a new survey. But the quality of that climate science education is, for many students, questionable. [ThinkProgress]

A panel to review deaths and near-deaths in Kentucky’s correctional facilities would be created by legislation introduced Thursday in the state House of Representatives. [WFPL]

Landowners who had opposed efforts to put a natural gas pipeline across 13 counties have been victorious in the Kentucky Supreme Court. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

A Bardstown business found its Facebook page shut down Thursday over what the social networking site first said were “policy violations.” [Business First]

After one member questioned some of the processes for budget changes and how grants are distributed, the Clark County Special Education Cooperative may review some of their practices at a meeting in March. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]