Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Will Still Hit Poorest Hardest

Scott County, Indiana, wants its needle exchange program to keep running even after the governor’s executive order expires. [WDRB]

Trinity High officials on Wednesday touted their decision to begin random drug- and alcohol-testing of their 1,200-plus students, saying the move will act as a deterrent and could help keep students from becoming addicted later in life. [C-J/AKN]

Police in Lawrence, Ind. have located a Louisville pizza delivery driver’s car that was stolen May 3. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has approved a plan by Keeneland to move its simulcasting — betting on live horse races run elsewhere — to The Red Mile in Lexington. [H-L]

Officials approved a plan to minimize the effects of bridge tolls on low-income residents. And it won’t do much of that. [WLKY & Press Releases]

About a half-dozen states are considering cutting income taxes and simultaneously increasing sales or excise taxes — sparking debate on whether wealthier taxpayers will benefit disproportionately at the expense of those living on lower incomes. [HuffPo]

Ignore the bit where Connie Leonard snidely uses “Democrat” as an adjective. A lot of taxpayers are up in arms over recent home assessments in Metro Louisville. That’s because in many cases, assessed values jumped much higher than homeowners expected and certain neighborhoods are in more sticker shock than others. [WAVE3]

A federal appeals court panel ruled on Thursday that the NSA’s bulk collection of metadata of phone calls to and from Americans is not authorized by Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act, throwing out the government’s legal justification for the surveillance program exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden nearly two years ago. [The Intercept]

Louisville Metro Council members are scrutinizing new property assessments that, in some neighborhoods, have spiked by as much as 40 or even 150 percent. [WFPL]

Three men campaigning to lead the state of Kentucky faced potential voters Wednesday night in Booth Auditorium at the University of Pikeville. [WYMT]

Over the years, Papa John’s International Inc. has added a few non-pizza foods to its menu, including chicken wings, a giant chocolate chip cookie and, most recently, garlic knots. [Business First]

Democratic incumbent Jeff Gahan defeated challenger David White by almost 700 votes, or 60 percent to 39 percent, in the New Albany mayoral primary Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Tolling Secrecy Is SOP In Possibility City

If you missed it last night, Jamie Comer’s career officially ended. [Page One from C-J/AKN]

A Louisville lawmaker has asked Attorney General Jack Conway to decide if the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet followed public records law when it refused to release a study on easing bridge tolls on low-income drivers. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro police are investigating separate fatal shootings from Saturday, both involving men in their 20s. [C-J/AKN]

The HIV public awareness campaign, You Are Not Alone, is now being expanded to include messages aimed at reaching travelers and truck drivers along Interstate-65 between Louisville and Indianapolis. The messages encourage drivers to know their HIV status and to protect themselves by avoiding risky sexual behavior. [WHAS11]

Blake Johnson, 16, who identifies as gay, said when he attended last year’s Pride Prom, an annual event for high school students, “I was surrounded by people like me.” [H-L]

Three people have been arrested and charged in connection with a homicide on Derby night. [WLKY]

Famously animal-loving Jon Stewart is said to have bought a farm in New Jersey, for purposes of giving home to rescued farm animals. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? [WAVE3]

“It’s a lot of fun,” House Speaker Greg Stumbo said of the four-way GOP primary. Gov. Steve Beshear added: “They’re having a good time it looks like among the four of them going back and forth.” [CN|Toot]

Here’s your political duh moment. Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul’s efforts to appeal to minority voters hit a rough patch over the past week. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left intact New Jersey’s ban on counseling intended to change the sexual orientation of gay children. [Reuters]

Fresh off a record attendance at the Kentucky Derby on Saturday, a new report has found that the state’s tourism industry continues to grow. [Business First]

Questions surrounding the legality of a signage campaign against the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s referendum may end with a complaint filed with the state Election Division. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City: Come For The Bourbon & Secrecy, Stay For The Shootings

Louisville loves a good shooting — especially if it involves a police officer. [WDRB]

Oh, look, Martha read something on The ‘Ville Voice and wrote about it again. [C-J/AKN]

If they have to ruin perfectly good bourbon with mint and sugar, at least it’s for charity. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s mayor is spending money to save buildings from the 1960s and Louisville has Greg Fischer. [H-L]

See? Another fun shooting in Possibility City! Police are investigating a shooting that sent two people to the hospital on Monday evening. [WLKY]

U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Katie Higgins’ dream as a little girl was to follow in her family’s footsteps and become a pilot. Her dream came true in 2011, when she received her wings. But last weekend, she flew even higher when she became the first female pilot with the prestigious Blue Angels. [HuffPo]

They said “Hooker Hotel” in the headline, so that’s pretty much all you need to know. Though, if they can bulldoze historic downtown properties, the least the city could do is bulldoze this joint. [WAVE3]

What, you thought merely the handful of wingnut extremists in the presidential race was enough? [The Hill]

A bad break-up about a year ago put Jewel Owens in a situation she’d never been before. [WFPL]

A mega company’s bid to change the product and flow direction of an existing natural gas pipeline is drawing the attention and concern of citizens and environmental groups across Kentucky. [The Morehead News]

Investigators say that the cost of replacing GE Appliances’ building that was destroyed by fire could reach $400 million, and they say that the fire destroyed $60 million worth of parts. [Business First]

Mayor Bob Hall says concerns about the scope of a steering committee aimed at improving the Pleasant Ridge neighborhood have given him pause in accepting an invitation to the board. [News & Tribune]

Road’s Messed Up, East Enders Freak

Is this soccer thing going to stick? In the team’s first road game, Louisville City FC drew 1-1 with the veteran USL side Richmond Kickers. The teams played to a very physical draw that ended with seven bookings. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken the Louisville area off its list of cities that fail to meet the latest clean-air standard for soot. But the federal agency did not go as far as saying Louisville complies with the standard, either. [C-J/AKN]

A spectacle in its own right, the degradation has steadily increased over the past two days, but what makes for a “cool” picture also makes for a mess for drivers. If people complained as much about hunger or homelessness as they do about this East End road damage, Louisville really would be Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Lexington is trying to get in on Louisville’s Hit A Pedestrian game again. [H-L]

The Run for the Roses is a few weeks away yet, but the solid gold trophy already awaits the owner of the horse that wins the 141st running of the Kentucky Derby on May 2 at Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

Rand Paul briefly appears in a new documentary that argues gay rights are a threat to Christianity. “I don’t think I’ve ever used the word gay rights, because I don’t really believe in rights based on your behavior,” he said in the video. [HuffPo]

Just look at how much they’re hyping this mess. [WAVE3]

Lowering a city’s homeless population by forcing the homeless out. Sounds like a story out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. [NPR]

The University of Louisville is expected to increase both in-state and out-of-state undergraduate tuition by 3 percent for the next academic year. [WFPL]

Rand Paul wants to change the GOP from the inside by becoming the party’s standard-bearer in 2016. The Kentucky Republican poised to launch a presidential bid on Tuesday thinks he can capture the Oval Office prize that eluded his father by pulling the GOP in a more libertarian direction. [The Hill]

Sypris Solutions Inc. stands to lose nearly $200 million in revenue this year because of a dispute with what had been its largest customer. [Business First]

Scott County residents can exchange used needles with immunity through at least April 25, as state and local officials are hoping to curb what has been labeled as the largest outbreak of drug-spread HIV in Indiana history. [News & Tribune]

Crisis In Southern Indiana Highlights Importance Of Needle Exchanges

Officials are now calling the HIV outbreak in southern Indiana an epidemic. [WDRB]

Are you excited for the beginning of the Kentucky Derby Festival? Get ready. It’s almost here. [C-J/AKN]

The area’s first organized walk to end discrimination and bullying took place Wednesday evening at Louisville’s Big Four Bridge. [WHAS11]

Members of the NAACP in Lexington are raising questions about how Fayette County Public Schools distributes money to individual schools and about the district’s minority hiring rates. [H-L]

Sounds like these kids need to be in charge of UofL’s actual finances. Maybe they could stop the unbelievable swindling of tens of millions of dollars right under Jim Ramsey’s knowing nose. Some business students from the University of Louisville are participating next month in the national level of a global financial analysis competition. [WLKY]

Gary Fury was working at a Simonton Windows factory in West Virginia in July 2012 when a large two-window unit slipped to the floor. [ProPublica]

It’s not the picture of Louisville many people want to see – garbage and litter lining the interstates and expressways into town. [WAVE3]

Kentucky is apparently the 8th-worst state for retirement. Which shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. [Bankrate]

Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District Board has voted to change the way the agency disposes of surplus property. The board voted unanimously to adopt the modifications to MSD’s policies on Monday. [WFPL]

The Early Childhood Profiles, produced by the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics (KCEWS), are compiled to help community leaders, Community Early Childhood Councils and school districts with data to assist in developing local strategies for helping every child in their community arrive at kindergarten ready to do kindergarten work. [Click the Clicky]

A $30 million upscale student housing complex is slated to open by fall 2016 at the northwest corner of South Floyd Street and East Brandeis Avenue near the University of Louisville. [Business First]

Donors are still being sought, but statewide, community foundations have reached the halfway point in a funding drive to match a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant worth up to $66 million. [News & Tribune]

Ford Motor Co said on Wednesday it is recalling more than 220,000 vehicles in North America for potential issues with door handles, vacuum pump relays and sensors. [Reuters]

Holding Our Breath For An End To The Death

Louisville police say the city’s latest murder victim was robbed and kidnapped before he was murdered. [WDRB]

Maybe we can try arresting our way out of yet another nightmare. After a deadly start to 2015, leaders of the Metro Council’s Public Safety Committee asked top city officials, including Police Chief Steve Conrad, to speak during a specially called Monday meeting to talk about recent violence and increase in homicides. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian. [WHAS11]

Lexington is pushing forward with its efforts to increase Internet speeds. [H-L]

Before the latest bout of snow, crews were working on repairing the roads, but the weather brought those plans to a halt. Now officials estimate there are nearly 10,000 potholes across Louisville. [WLKY]

A New York judge ordered a Papa John’s pizza restaurant franchise and its owner to fork over more than $2 million after short-changing hundreds of delivery workers and shaving hours from their paychecks, prosecutors said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Everybody is losing their mind over an upcoming Prince concert. [WAVE3]

On Monday, the city council of Indianapolis passed a “Homeless Bill of Rights” to protect its population without housing, one of the first cities to do so. [ThinkProgress]

Braving temperatures in the 30s on a recent Wednesday morning, the 25 or so people bunched in the Kroger parking lot in west Louisville had plenty of grounds for complaint. [WFPL]

The United States government on Friday urged the Supreme Court to strike down bans on same-sex couples’ marriages across the country, concluding, “There is no adequate justification for such a discriminatory and injurious exercise of state power.” [BuzzFeed]

It might come as little surprise that Kentucky, home to Papa John’s International Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc., has the highest number of fast-food restaurants per capita. [Business First]

A request to seek bids on a partial repaving of the district’s service center was contested at Greater Clark County Schools board of trustees meeting and passed by a thin margin. [News & Tribune]