Crisis In Southern Indiana Highlights Importance Of Needle Exchanges

Officials are now calling the HIV outbreak in southern Indiana an epidemic. [WDRB]

Are you excited for the beginning of the Kentucky Derby Festival? Get ready. It’s almost here. [C-J/AKN]

The area’s first organized walk to end discrimination and bullying took place Wednesday evening at Louisville’s Big Four Bridge. [WHAS11]

Members of the NAACP in Lexington are raising questions about how Fayette County Public Schools distributes money to individual schools and about the district’s minority hiring rates. [H-L]

Sounds like these kids need to be in charge of UofL’s actual finances. Maybe they could stop the unbelievable swindling of tens of millions of dollars right under Jim Ramsey’s knowing nose. Some business students from the University of Louisville are participating next month in the national level of a global financial analysis competition. [WLKY]

Gary Fury was working at a Simonton Windows factory in West Virginia in July 2012 when a large two-window unit slipped to the floor. [ProPublica]

It’s not the picture of Louisville many people want to see – garbage and litter lining the interstates and expressways into town. [WAVE3]

Kentucky is apparently the 8th-worst state for retirement. Which shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. [Bankrate]

Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District Board has voted to change the way the agency disposes of surplus property. The board voted unanimously to adopt the modifications to MSD’s policies on Monday. [WFPL]

The Early Childhood Profiles, produced by the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics (KCEWS), are compiled to help community leaders, Community Early Childhood Councils and school districts with data to assist in developing local strategies for helping every child in their community arrive at kindergarten ready to do kindergarten work. [Click the Clicky]

A $30 million upscale student housing complex is slated to open by fall 2016 at the northwest corner of South Floyd Street and East Brandeis Avenue near the University of Louisville. [Business First]

Donors are still being sought, but statewide, community foundations have reached the halfway point in a funding drive to match a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant worth up to $66 million. [News & Tribune]

Ford Motor Co said on Wednesday it is recalling more than 220,000 vehicles in North America for potential issues with door handles, vacuum pump relays and sensors. [Reuters]

Holding Our Breath For An End To The Death

Louisville police say the city’s latest murder victim was robbed and kidnapped before he was murdered. [WDRB]

Maybe we can try arresting our way out of yet another nightmare. After a deadly start to 2015, leaders of the Metro Council’s Public Safety Committee asked top city officials, including Police Chief Steve Conrad, to speak during a specially called Monday meeting to talk about recent violence and increase in homicides. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian. [WHAS11]

Lexington is pushing forward with its efforts to increase Internet speeds. [H-L]

Before the latest bout of snow, crews were working on repairing the roads, but the weather brought those plans to a halt. Now officials estimate there are nearly 10,000 potholes across Louisville. [WLKY]

A New York judge ordered a Papa John’s pizza restaurant franchise and its owner to fork over more than $2 million after short-changing hundreds of delivery workers and shaving hours from their paychecks, prosecutors said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Everybody is losing their mind over an upcoming Prince concert. [WAVE3]

On Monday, the city council of Indianapolis passed a “Homeless Bill of Rights” to protect its population without housing, one of the first cities to do so. [ThinkProgress]

Braving temperatures in the 30s on a recent Wednesday morning, the 25 or so people bunched in the Kroger parking lot in west Louisville had plenty of grounds for complaint. [WFPL]

The United States government on Friday urged the Supreme Court to strike down bans on same-sex couples’ marriages across the country, concluding, “There is no adequate justification for such a discriminatory and injurious exercise of state power.” [BuzzFeed]

It might come as little surprise that Kentucky, home to Papa John’s International Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc., has the highest number of fast-food restaurants per capita. [Business First]

A request to seek bids on a partial repaving of the district’s service center was contested at Greater Clark County Schools board of trustees meeting and passed by a thin margin. [News & Tribune]

Watch Greg Pretend He Didn’t Want To Run

Another day, another pedestrian death. Doesn’t matter who is at fault – the victim or the driver – this city is riddled with pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Shots rang out early Tuesday morning in the Beecher Terrace housing project, leaving in their wake the city’s 21st homicide victim of 2015. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer claims he has no intention to try running for U.S. Senate again in 2016. But he absolutely wanted to. He still doesn’t comprehend that he’ll never win statewide office. Ever. And if anyone had enough money, he wouldn’t currently be mayor. [WHAS11]

When I first heard that Alan Stein had agreed to chair the Fayette County Public Schools’ redistricting committee, I thought: Has he lost his mind? [Tom Eblen]

For this year’s 60th Celebration of the Kentucky Derby Festival, KDF has teamed up with the Kentucky Lottery to name someone the 2015 Festival Fanatic. [WLKY]

Darren Wilson, the former police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August, will not face federal civil rights charges in connection with Brown’s death, Justice Department officials said Wednesday. [HuffPo]

A fight among teenagers Monday led to gunfire in the Shawnee neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Here’s Greg Stumbo using Legislative Research Commission staffers to write a column about how he believes he’s a pension genius who saved the pension system. Sadly, everyone old enough to legally think on their own knows all hell is breaking loose on that front. [Floyd County Times]

A voluntary biennial survey for Kentucky teachers that’s meant to measure their opinions of schools, resources, education leadership and community support is now available to take online. [WFPL]

Over the past decade, states have slashed workers’ compensation benefits, denying injured workers help when they need it most and shifting the costs of workplace accidents to taxpayers. [ProPublica]

Is it just us or is this yet another hyped up Fischer stunt that won’t go anywhere? [Business First]

Residents of the 200 and 300 blocks of Pearl Street in downtown Jeffersonville soon will have a designated place to park. [News & Tribune]

Transparency Is Not A Thing In Possibility City

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found with a gunshot wound inside the Hampton Inn on Jefferson Street in downtown Louisville just before 11 o’clock Monday night. [WDRB]

Because there’s no such thing as transparency in Louisville! The question of whether the Metropolitan Sewer District was violating the state’s open records rules from its board members’ use of private email accounts won’t be answered by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway. [C-J/AKN]

People are still freaking out about the murder on Ewing Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Fayette County Public Schools have cancelled classes for the rest of the week, according to the district’s website. [H-L]

There was an open conversation between African-American veterans and Congress Wednesday morning in Louisville. [WLKY]

A federal judge’s ruling halting the president’s executive actions on immigration did little to persuade either party in Congress to publicly back down from a budget standoff. [HuffPo]

Electrolux, the Swedish company buying General Electric’s appliance division, will make Louisville’s Appliance Park a key part of future plans, the company’s leader said Tuesday. [WAVE3]

Louisville is the 11th-poorest city in the United States. But it’s still all puppies and rainbows and whatever else Greg Fischer’s spokesgays can come up with on any given day. [CBS News]

Jefferson County Public Schools is asking parents whether an A letter grade should be based on a 90-100 point scale instead of the 93-100 scale currently used. [WFPL]

Scott Welk, who brought forward the lawsuit on Tuesday in California federal court, accused the Jim Beam Brands of violating California’s False Advertising Law with its handmade claims thus forcing him to pay a premium price for Jim Beam’s white label Bourbon. [The Spirit Business]

The elephant in the room: forcing everyone at the dying newspaper to re-apply for their jobs despite saying that wouldn’t happen. And laying Jim Carroll off because Kentucky doesn’t need to know anything about Washington, D.C., obviously. [Business First]

Two challenges have been filed against Clarksville Town Council candidates — Rick Schafer running for District 2 and Dave Disponett running for District 4. [News & Tribune]

LG&E Set To Screw Environmentally Friendly Folks

Cierra Lewis , 22, died in a house fire early Saturday morning, according to Capt. Salvador Melendez from the Louisville Division of Fire. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric is seeking to get more money from its customers, but a proposed rate structure could discourage people from investing in solar power or energy efficiency, a Louisville engineer warns. [C-J/AKN]

The family of a man arrested in Bardstown, Ky. claims excessive force was used while officers detained him. That suspect is now in critical condition in a Louisville hospital. [WHAS11]

Bigoted undertones are apparent for foes of a proposed Islamic center in Lexington. Don’t want to make it about religion or ethnicity? Here’s a tip: don’t make it about religion or ethnicity. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “She was burned after her death, almost over 70 percent of her body. So not only did they take her from me in life, they took her from me in death and I couldn’t even mourn my beautiful baby,” she said, adding through tears, “I had to have a closed casket.” [WLKY]

For the first time, more than half of U.S. public school students live in low-income households, according to a new analysis from the Southern Education Foundation. [HuffPo]

Police haven’t said who fired the shots that killed 16-month-old Ne’Riah Miller and wounded her mother Cierra Twyman last August. But newly released information, and a review of evidence obtained from prosecutors earlier, points the finger at a fifth man, whom police hadn’t named a suspect until this past Tuesday: 28-year-old Duwan Mason Jr. [WAVE3]

This is a big deal. [Press Release]

Dominique Frierson has wanted to get out of Beecher Terrace since he moved into the Russell neighborhood housing project in 2003. [WFPL]

Greg Bourke and Michael DeLeon have lived together for 32 years and were married in Canada more than a decade ago, but back home in Kentucky, something is missing. [Reuters]

If it wasn’t for Mary Ellen Wiederwohl, the city of Louisville very likely might have a different mayor in office, according to Mayor Greg Fischer. [Business First]

His family lives off Spring Street, he works off East Main Street, and he’s a proponent of two-way streets. John Smith believes people in his situation — downtown residents, business owners and employees of those establishments — should be given the top priority when it comes to public feedback about planner Jeff Speck’s street study. [News & Tribune]