Fischer: Your White Privilege Is Showing

Officials have released the names of two people who were recently killed in separate incidents. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell and District Court Judge Stephanie Pearce Burke are again butting heads, this time over Burke’s handling of a case originally set for trial this week. If you haven’t kept up with this, it’s crazy. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer says that if you aren’t doing anything illegal, you’ve got nothing to worry about. Which should ring hollow for just about anybody with the ability to think on their own. Those 150+ shootings are super-compassionate. Nothing to see here, puppies and rainbows. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray applauded the work of the Urban County Council in its deliberation of his proposed $323 million budget on Tuesday but declined to say if he would veto any changes council made to the budget. [H-L]

State officials plan to keep an outreach center open for one more year in a southern Indiana county that’s facing the largest HIV outbreak in state history. [WLKY]

Don’t call Chris Christie rich. The Clintons say they still have bills to pay. And Mike Huckabee? Despite his wealth, he was born “blue collar, not blue blood.” [HuffPo]

This white lady assaulted a police officer by allegedly grabbing her throat. She wasn’t arrested or shot. [WAVE3]

Roughly half of deaths from 12 smoking-related cancers may be linked directly to cigarette use, a U.S. study estimates. [Reuters]

Some would-be homebuyers in Louisville are facing tough conditions. New figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors show that the number of homes available for sale is down 17 percent from last year. [WFPL]

Two years ago in the Netherlands, artist Paul de Kort designed an 81-acre park near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. His assignment? To use nothing but landscaping to dampen the noise of airplanes. Such a project had never been attempted—and the science behind his design was discovered almost by accident. [Gizmodo]

Commercial real estate developer William P. Butler intends to purchase Lexington, Ky.-based American Founders Bank and move its headquarters to Louisville, according to a news release from the bank. [Business First]

Contractual issues between the city and the New Albany police union could be ruled upon soon. [News & Tribune]

Give Thanks For The Needle Exchange

Metro Louisville’s needle exchange program designed to combat the heroin crisis kicks off today. [WDRB]

What’s that? One of Greg Fischer’s “innovation” team members was tazed and arrested after allegedly leaving a child in a hot car? And he works for former Metro Animal Services shyster Donald Robinson? Surely not. [C-J/AKN]

What the hell is wrong with people these days?! [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday told lawmakers Monday that state officials would work with Fayette County staff to develop a plan aimed at closing the achievement gap. [H-L]

Really, what the hell is wrong with people!? Louisville Metro Police investigators were at Ballard Park again Tuesday morning, collecting evidence after a 9-year-old boy was shot Monday night. [WLKY]

Next season’s flu shot will contain two new flu strains that weren’t present in last season’s shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

These data only include base pay and don’t include monstrous payouts from, say, the UofL Foundation. [WAVE3]

The rate of abortions falls across almost all of the US since 2010, a new survey from the Associated Press suggests. [BBC]

Bluegrass musicians played a Kentucky-flavored tune at the graduation ceremony last week for nine graduates, who received their bachelor of fine arts degree. [WFPL]

After watching the biggest donors increasingly shun the major political parties and send their six-figure checks to super-PACs and other outside spending groups, Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress made a sly bid last December to bring billionaires and millionaires back into the party fold. [Mother Jones]

American Pharoah wasn’t a shoo-in to win the Triple Crown. But his prospects for victory appeared more likely than other Thoroughbreds that won both the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes in recent years. [Business First]

A tiny park in the middle of downtown Jeffersonville is now easier to enjoy. [News & Tribune]

Let’s See How Many Compassionate Possibility City Shootings Greg Fischer Can Try To Ignore This Year

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. A shooting in the Parkland neighborhood sent two people to the hospital. [WDRB]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [C-J/AKN]

On any given baseball diamond, you’re likely to find a young boy shine. The pride of a parent means alot, especially if you’re Scott Patrick and you’re parents outnumber your entire team. [WHAS11]

Want a look at what’s going on with Lexington’s school district? A Bryan Station High School teacher has told the Fayette County school board that the district’s failure to provide enough resources for a behavior management plan meant that “disruptions, disengagement and acts of violence and aggression are far too common at our school.” [H-L]

Locust Grove, the 18th century home of the sister and brother-in-law of George Rogers Clark and William Clark, is growing industrial hemp. [WLKY]

At a time of historic economic inequality, it should be a no-brainer to raise a tax on inherited wealth for the very rich. Yet there’s a move among some members of Congress to abolish it altogether. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there were two separate shootings Sunday evening. Police are investigating two separate shootings that happened about an hour apart overnight in Louisville. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is using an online questionnaire to gather additional public input about the future of quail restoration efforts in the state. [Richmond Register]

America’s top sire commands some $300,000 for each of his offspring. That adds up to about $35 million a year — and potentially hundreds of millions over his lifetime. [WFPL]

Science issues aren’t usually hot topics for presidential candidates, whose rhetoric tends to revolve more around jobs and the economy than space exploration and funding for energy research. But one organization wants to change that, and is pushing for 2016 presidential candidates to agree to a full debate on science issues, including climate change. [ThinkProgress]

People pulled out their wallets in a big way for this year’s WHAS Crusade for Children. The 62nd annual event raised nearly $5.7 million for children who have special need. [Business First]

Positive skin tests came back for 48 people tested for tuberculosis at Rock Creek Community Academy on Thursday, Clark County Health Department officials said, but that doesn’t mean 48 people have the disease. [News & Tribune]

JCPS & MSD Want More Of Your Money

The Jefferson County Board of Education may need to seek a 4 percent property tax revenue increase later this summer in order to balance its $1.4 billion budget for the 2015-16 year, according to a tentative budget approved by the board on Monday night. [WDRB]

For the second year in a row, the Metropolitan Sewer District board is looking at a 5.5 percent increase in customers’ rates. [C-J/AKN]

The American Red Cross is hoping you have what it takes to be a hero. Unless you’re gay, then you’re dead to them. [WHAS11]

Jefferson County Public Schools has a budget that’s four times that of the Lexington-Fayette County government. [H-L]

Louisville police are working to identify a woman whose body was pulled from the Ohio River on Tuesday. [WLKY]

North American energy ministers said on Monday they had set up a working group on climate change and energy, a partnership designed to help Canada, the United States and Mexico harmonize policies. [HuffPo]

Terror can he heard in the voices of two women who called 911 and told the operator they were being shot at after leaving a gas station. [WAVE3]

The Distillery Innovation and Excise Tax Reform Act unveiled Tuesday would drop the current tax rate for distilled spirits from $13.50 per proof gallon to $2.70 per proof gallon on the first 10,000 gallons of productions for all distillers and then $9 per proof gallon after that. [The Hill]

A new health ranking of senior citizen health in the U.S. puts Kentucky near the bottom of the list. [WFPL]

One of the most basic facts about the Trans-Pacific Partnership is also the most important: It’s huge. [NPR]

Last week, I wrote about a study that indicated that women-owned businesses in Kentucky were growing more slowly than those in other states. [Business First]

The rows and rows of homemade chocolates nestled behind glass cases at Schimpff’s Confectionery soon will double. [News & Tribune]

Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Will Still Hit Poorest Hardest

Scott County, Indiana, wants its needle exchange program to keep running even after the governor’s executive order expires. [WDRB]

Trinity High officials on Wednesday touted their decision to begin random drug- and alcohol-testing of their 1,200-plus students, saying the move will act as a deterrent and could help keep students from becoming addicted later in life. [C-J/AKN]

Police in Lawrence, Ind. have located a Louisville pizza delivery driver’s car that was stolen May 3. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has approved a plan by Keeneland to move its simulcasting — betting on live horse races run elsewhere — to The Red Mile in Lexington. [H-L]

Officials approved a plan to minimize the effects of bridge tolls on low-income residents. And it won’t do much of that. [WLKY & Press Releases]

About a half-dozen states are considering cutting income taxes and simultaneously increasing sales or excise taxes — sparking debate on whether wealthier taxpayers will benefit disproportionately at the expense of those living on lower incomes. [HuffPo]

Ignore the bit where Connie Leonard snidely uses “Democrat” as an adjective. A lot of taxpayers are up in arms over recent home assessments in Metro Louisville. That’s because in many cases, assessed values jumped much higher than homeowners expected and certain neighborhoods are in more sticker shock than others. [WAVE3]

A federal appeals court panel ruled on Thursday that the NSA’s bulk collection of metadata of phone calls to and from Americans is not authorized by Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act, throwing out the government’s legal justification for the surveillance program exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden nearly two years ago. [The Intercept]

Louisville Metro Council members are scrutinizing new property assessments that, in some neighborhoods, have spiked by as much as 40 or even 150 percent. [WFPL]

Three men campaigning to lead the state of Kentucky faced potential voters Wednesday night in Booth Auditorium at the University of Pikeville. [WYMT]

Over the years, Papa John’s International Inc. has added a few non-pizza foods to its menu, including chicken wings, a giant chocolate chip cookie and, most recently, garlic knots. [Business First]

Democratic incumbent Jeff Gahan defeated challenger David White by almost 700 votes, or 60 percent to 39 percent, in the New Albany mayoral primary Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Tolling Secrecy Is SOP In Possibility City

If you missed it last night, Jamie Comer’s career officially ended. [Page One from C-J/AKN]

A Louisville lawmaker has asked Attorney General Jack Conway to decide if the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet followed public records law when it refused to release a study on easing bridge tolls on low-income drivers. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro police are investigating separate fatal shootings from Saturday, both involving men in their 20s. [C-J/AKN]

The HIV public awareness campaign, You Are Not Alone, is now being expanded to include messages aimed at reaching travelers and truck drivers along Interstate-65 between Louisville and Indianapolis. The messages encourage drivers to know their HIV status and to protect themselves by avoiding risky sexual behavior. [WHAS11]

Blake Johnson, 16, who identifies as gay, said when he attended last year’s Pride Prom, an annual event for high school students, “I was surrounded by people like me.” [H-L]

Three people have been arrested and charged in connection with a homicide on Derby night. [WLKY]

Famously animal-loving Jon Stewart is said to have bought a farm in New Jersey, for purposes of giving home to rescued farm animals. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? [WAVE3]

“It’s a lot of fun,” House Speaker Greg Stumbo said of the four-way GOP primary. Gov. Steve Beshear added: “They’re having a good time it looks like among the four of them going back and forth.” [CN|Toot]

Here’s your political duh moment. Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul’s efforts to appeal to minority voters hit a rough patch over the past week. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left intact New Jersey’s ban on counseling intended to change the sexual orientation of gay children. [Reuters]

Fresh off a record attendance at the Kentucky Derby on Saturday, a new report has found that the state’s tourism industry continues to grow. [Business First]

Questions surrounding the legality of a signage campaign against the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s referendum may end with a complaint filed with the state Election Division. [News & Tribune]