All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]

Breathe. The Air Might Not Kill You.

Former Jefferson County Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Matt Conway was charged with felony assault Wednesday night after allegedly attacking his wife, according to a police report. Remember when his brother was covering up his police investigation(s)? [WDRB]

Everything is so corrupt in West Buechel that they’ve started some kind of watchdog organization. [C-J/AKN]

Just what Louisville needs – another stadium/arena. [WHAS11]

The red steel shipping container was once used to transport toothbrushes and bras. By May, it and another container will be transformed into a one bedroom, one-bathroom, 640-square-foot home that will be part of a new live-work community on York Street spearheaded by the North Limestone Community Development Corp. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A team of physicians, surgeons and nurses are creating an advanced heart failure program at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

When Donald Trump first watched his new TV ad that began airing this week, he said, “Play it again. I love the feel of it.” I, too, had to play it again, not because I too loved the feel, but out of amazement that this is what the front runner for the Republican nomination had chosen to put in his first TV ad of the campaign. [HuffPo]

A man is charged with wanton endangerment after setting himself on fire in the parking lot of a busy downtown convenience store. Maybe instead of jailing this man, Possumbilly City could get him some help? [WAVE3]

The FBI now tracks animal abuse like it tracks homicides. It was more than 10 years ago that Mary Lou Randour realized she couldn’t answer what should have been a simple question: Was cruelty against animals on the rise or in decline? [WaPo]

About a dozen people filed into a Jeffersontown gun shop shortly after noon on Tuesday, just after President Barack Obama wrapped up a live address outlining details of his executive actions designed to bolster gun control and curb gun violence. [WFPL]

Time Warner Cable said late Wednesday that hackers may have stolen up to 320,000 customers’ email passwords. [The Hill]

Craig Richard, the former CEO of Greater Louisville Inc. who left the chamber of commerce in 2014 to become CEO of Invest Atlanta, will resign from his position Jan. 18, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed announced Wednesday. Part of a pattern. These folks leave after screwing up in Louisville and eventually get figured out, forced resignations occur, blah blah blah. [Business First]

Nonprofits looking to do some good for youth in Clark and Floyd counties have a chance to bolster their budgets with grants from the Community Foundation of Southern Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Will Ruin Your Wednesday

Median household income was flat or declined in all but four of Kentucky’s 120 counties in the years following the Great Recession, according to new Census Bureau data. [WDRB]

Kentucky State Reformatory was overcrowded and hazardous for inmates and staff before inmates’ federal lawsuit. [C-J/AKN]

Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. [WHAS11]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

A program that allows Lexington parking ticket recipients to cover their fines with canned goods for the hungry has collected 5 tons of food during the holidays. [WLKY]

The Obama administration on Monday defended its deportation tactics and confirmed it has begun raids on families, despite Democratic candidates and immigrant advocates saying officials could be sending mothers and children to their deaths. [HuffPo]

Twenty-eight bottles of the most sought-after bourbon will be available to the public, after it is released from the court. [WAVE3]

Or will they? Franklin County’s sheriff says the bourbon will be destroyed. [H-L]

Mega road fund cuts were initiated by Matt Bevin and almost no one noticed. But we did. [Page One]

A pair of community groups are hosting a forum next week that aims to discuss the state of race relations in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. manufacturing contracted further in December as lower oil prices undercut spending in the energy sector while construction spending fell in November for the first time in nearly 1-1/2 years, suggesting the economy ended 2015 with less momentum. [Reuters]

Springhurst Health and Rehab is undergoing a $5.2 million expansion project that should be done by mid-2016. [Business First]

Patti Hall saw a need in her Sellersburg community that wasn’t being fulfilled, so about two years ago, she decided to fill it. [News & Tribune]

Local Media Mall Freakout Rages On

Terrible that this kid was injured but HOLY HELL AT THE HYPE! This is being blown way out of proportion. Really? Hyping things up with a headline about god putting them there? This is why Louisville can’t have nice things. [WDRB]

Yes, UofL could have paid her to go away. UofL loves to pay people to go away. Look at Shirley, the former attorney, nearly everyone else who knows something and hasn’t gone to prison. [C-J/AKN]

Linda Lee was convicted of sparking several fires over a period of 18 months. [WHAS11]

Lexington is still trying really hard to be as murderous as Louisville. [H-L]

Didn’t take long for Compassionate City to get back to murder after the start of the new year. [WLKY]

White wingnut terrorists took over a federal building in Oregon and almost no mainstream media covered it. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department’s Traffic Division reports that it responded to almost 30,000 vehicle accidents in 2015. [WAVE3]

U.S. President Barack Obama is expected to announce executive actions expanding background checks on gun sales, media outlets reported on Thursday, citing people familiar with White House proposals and planning. [Reuters]

If you ignore the bullshit mall hype being pushed by WDRB for a minute – the disgusting white flight panic, approved by Bill Lamb and his team as if it is in any way helping this city – you’ll find thoughtful commentary from people who aren’t losing their damn minds. People who were actually there. [WFPL]

Why is Middle America killing itself? The fact itself is probably the most important social science finding in years. It is already reshaping American politics. The Post’s Jeff Guo notes that the people who make up this cohort are “largely responsible for Donald Trump’s lead in the race for the Republican nomination for president.” The key question is why, and exploring it provides answers that suggest that the rage dominating U.S. politics will only get worse. [WaPo]

Rucker Todd, founding partner of the law firm that became Frost Brown Todd LLC, died on Dec. 25 at age 92. [Business First]

After more than three months, the City of New Albany turned over financial records from the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter to the News and Tribune. [News & Tribune]

Local Media Has Lost Its Damn Mind

Yep, local teevee folks are still freaking out. Sadly, people like Toni Konz have no idea how much damage their hyping is causing. Gotta keep meemaw afraid, of course. [WDRB]

Local media is still shitting the floor over misbehaving kids. Based on the reaction from teevee news readers and a select few current/former C-J reporters, you’d think this is the first time in history teenagers have behaved as unruly heathens. [C-J/AKN]

Okay, so maybe local teevee folks aren’t just freaking out – they’re *this close* to pooping in the floor. [WHAS11]

America’s newest family of Syrian refugees flew in late at night, and Sarhan Aldobai, 36, looked down from the plane at the distant lights of his new home. His wife was nursing their baby in the next seat. His five other children had fallen asleep. Sarhan took out the small world map he had carried since leaving Syria in 2012 and tried to trace the plane’s path. [H-L]

A southern Indiana official is refusing to certify election results for the Jeffersonville City Council, saying he has reason to believe at least one recount team did not accurately count returns. [WLKY]

The seven children had just crossed the river, shoes still caked with mud, when U.S. Border Patrol agents stopped them. [HuffPo]

Losing. Their. Damn. Minds. Exacerbated by the hype pushed by WDRB that 100% of JCPS kids are out-of-control devils. [WAVE3]

A Lexington couple is trying to raise thousands of dollars for a way to help their eight-year-old son. Jo and Donnie Grayson’s son, Thatcher, has autism. As he gets older, they worry more about him. [WKYT]

Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District is beginning work on a new air monitoring system that is designed to help pinpoint the causes of ozone pollution. [WFPL]

As soon as next year, a driver’s license may no longer be enough for airline passengers to clear security in some states, if the Department of Homeland Security has its way. [NY Times]

Loganberry Court in Louisville is the most expensive street in Kentucky. The average home price for Loganberry Court, which is off of Mockingbird Gardens Drive and near the Crescent Hill Golf Course, is $2,208,300. [Business First]

I sat in a rocker on Trish Roehm’s porch, between a dog bowl and a water bucket both as big as last spring’s potholes. When Bandit was not in my face, Flash or Otisco or Bonnie or Carmel or Trigger was. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Surprise! More Bad UofL & JCPS News

A lawsuit against “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell may never see the light of day. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer made two key additions to his administration Wednesday in areas dealing with Louisville’s public safety and public assistance. The mayor announced Rashaad Abdur-Rahman will be the new director of the Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods office and Eric Friedlander will serve as acting director of the Community Services department. [C-J/AKN]

Data from Jefferson County Public Schools shows that a new grading scale appears to have increased the number of students getting A grades in classes. [WHAS11]

Glad to see there’s nothing important left to worry about. The University of Kentucky has sometimes been criticized for being a campus of independent units, with academic, athletics and health care divisions operating more separately than together. On a symbolic level, UK officials have decided that will no longer be the case. [H-L]

What the hell is this story about the guy killed in the Highlands? What? No, really, what the hell is that story? [WLKY]

The “Seinfeld” writer who coined “Festivus” wants Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) to stop tweeting about his beloved secular holiday. [HuffPo]

A JCPS bus driver was assaulted and robbed by students. The incident, according to the bus union president, happened on Friday at the Detrick Nichols compound off Taylor Blvd. [WAVE3]

While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky business groups are backing legislation that would expand expungements of some felony convictions. [WFPL]

The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino have put pressure on local authorities to show they’re ready for that kind of violence. Some jurisdictions, such as Los Angeles, are stepping up exercises and terrorism simulations. [NPR]

With truckers in high demand, the online marketplace seeks to connect drivers with carriers that need something hauled. [Business First]

Some of Indiana’s grocery stores and liquor stores say a change in state law that allows alcohol sales on Christmas Day for the first time in decades won’t affect them because their stores are closed on that holiday. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]