Local State Legislator Turns Republican

It’s a multi-million dollar plan to give Dixie Highway a new look and make the area safer and the city plans to use federal dollars to help make it happen. [WDRB]

Louisville Fraternal Order of Police members re-elected President Dave Mutchler late Tuesday evening, reaffirming the controversial union leader’s defense of police officers this summer by more than a two-thirds vote. [C-J/AKN]

Sam Padilla and his fiancée Megan stopped by their newest JP’s Napa Auto Care location in Fairdale. It is not even open yet to the public yet, but they were making sure Wednesday’s rain wasn’t damaging anything. [WHAS11]

It’s always the rich white guys who fight minimum wage increases. Lexington Mayor Jim Gray declined to say Wednesday if he would sign an ordinance raising the minimum wage in Fayette County to $10.10 an hour over the next three years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! You can’t even go to Walmart these days without being injured. [WLKY]

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed tougher new limits on Tuesday on smokestack emissions from nearly two dozen states that burden downwind areas with air pollution from power plants they can’t control. [HuffPo]

Who could have predicted! A lawsuit filed against Louisville Metro Animal Services points out an issue that could cost the city millions of dollars. [WAVE3]

Kentucky Democrats just didn’t want to listen. Now all good old boy hell is breaking loose. [House Republicans]

A Lexington-based nonprofit is using its share of a $2.6 million grant from JPMorgan Chase as leverage to garner millions more in new investments in Louisville’s Russell neighborhood. [WFPL]

There’s a scientific consensus that by 2050, the United States can expect to see an increase in flooding, heat waves, droughts and wildfires due to climate change. Now, scientists at Climate Central and ICF International have produced the first Preparedness Report Card for the United States, highlighting how states are preparing for the projected disasters. Spoiler alert: Kentucky is ill-prepared. [Vocativ]

You’ll have a bigger water bill in 2016 but at least you won’t have a LWC CEO DUIing all over the place. [Business First]

A Floyd County-based court program that serves veterans going through the criminal justice system is widening its reach thanks to partnerships with neighboring counties. [News & Tribune]

UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

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Stumbo Lackey Wants To Be Pretzeldent

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The Centers for Disease Control is in Scott County, Indiana, testing hundreds of people for HIV. [WDRB]

This should be an awkward Greg Stumbo-style disaster. David Yates is jumping into the race for Metro Council president next year in an effort to unify Louisville Democrats, suggesting incumbent David Tandy is losing support among the splintered majority caucus. [C-J/AKN]

The search is on for a murder suspect police say shot and killed a man near a Valley Station business Tuesday evening. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s police department hopes to have its officers equipped with body cameras by June. [H-L]

A pedestrian was struck and killed by an LMPD wrecker in the 4900 block of Southside Drive. [WLKY]

As friends and family gathered Tuesday at the funeral of Tyshawn Lee — one of the youngest Chicago residents lost to gun violence this year — to mourn and remember the boy, Father Michael Pfleger delivered a fiery eulogy indicting the city over the execution of a 9-year-old child. [HuffPo]

Here comes the positive media spin from Chad Carlton and crew about tolls. And whattya know, they couldn’t even get the facts straight about when the area last saw tolls. [WAVE3]

The last time Kentucky elected a Republican governor he ran into trouble with the Democratic attorney general. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

In its ongoing Failure Factories series, the Tampa Bay Times is investigating the disastrous effects of the Pinellas County School Board’s 2007 decision to abandon school integration in favor of “neighborhood schools.” Schools in high-poverty black communities were promised additional funding and resources. Then the promises weren’t met, and performance at the schools has plummeted. [ProPublica]

An organization led by Louisville’s high-profile rehabilitation king Gill Holland has recently received $250,000 in private funding. [Business First]

New police body camera video shows a struggle during an arrest in Clarksville for which a local business owner was later found not guilty. [News & Tribune]

Hype Isn’t Gonna Help JCPS Improve

We love to hate on Donna Hargens and Jefferson County Public Schools but come on. This is the dumbest thing yet from WDRB about JCPS and it’s being used by the racist anti-busing crowd. The insinuation (watch them try to claim otherwise in 3, 2…) that all teachers who resign do so because they feel unsafe is dangerous and based in teabagger delusion land. Remember that there are something like 6,000 teachers when they try to claim that a dozen resignations = harbinger of doom. [WDRB]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer refused to sign an ordinance Thursday shielding area community centers for needy residents from his administrative changes after an overwhelming margin of Metro Council members passed the measure. Instead of vetoing the legislation, which was approved by a 20-3 vote last month, Fischer has asked the state attorney general to weigh in, launching the city’s two branches of government into a legal joust over who has final say about a potential overhaul at Neighborhood Place sites. [C-J/AKN]

Three people have been arrested and a man continues to recover in the hospital after a shooting in the Chickasaw neighborhood Friday night. [WHAS11]

Kip Cornett said he and his wife were at an airport in June when he read on his cellphone a column by Barry Weisbord, president and co-publisher of Thoroughbred Daily News. [H-L]

A 27-year-old Louisville man became the city’s latest homicide victim on Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

The medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders released its internal report on Thursday about the October attack on its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The report also revealed that pilots shot at staff members fleeing the hospital. [HuffPo]

The Americana Community Center, Inc. held its annual fundraiser Saturday night. The center strives to provide a spectrum of services to the diverse individuals and families of the Louisville Metro area, including refugees, immigrants and those born in the United States. [WAVE]

By most accounts, Kentucky’s implementation of President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare reform was a success. Tuesday’s elections in the state could mean big changes are coming, however – with ominous portents for the future of the president’s signature legislative achievement. [BBC]

The fallout continues from Halloween, when University of Louisville President James Ramsey and his staff posed for a photograph at a U of L party wearing stereotypical “Mexican” costumes. The photo went viral, and a few written apologies were issued, but they’ve been lacking. [WFPL]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Wait, people are surprised this is happening? Its been quite a ride, but the Velocity Indiana entrepreneurial accelerator and co-working space is effectively closing shop. [Business First]

In another plea for the state’s help on Clark County’s diminishing revenue stream, County Attorney Lisa Glickfield is drafting a letter of support from board members to legislators to raise the tax levy. [News & Tribune]

UofL Loves Flushing Cash Down The Drain

Here’s a lesson in stupid lawsuits that draw even more attention to a scandal you wish would go away. [WDRB]

With Halloween approaching, the mansion for the University of Louisville president in the Cherokee Triangle is once again decorated for the holiday, and President James Ramsey and his wife, Jane, may hand out treats to trick-or-treaters on Halloween night Saturday as they have in the past. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 and the Center for Women and Families are teaming up for a new challenge. [WHAS11]

Lexington could be poised to become the second city in Kentucky to increase the minimum wage. [H-L]

The attorney for the woman at the center of Louisville basketball’s recruitment sex scandal answered questions on local radio. [WLKY]

Tuberculosis has joined HIV/AIDS as the top infectious disease killer on the planet, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The downtown bridge project is one step closer to being completed. The bridge is officially connected from river bank to river bank across the Ohio. [WAVE3]

A group of nearly 40 representatives, from the Congressional Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses, wrote to Attorney General Loretta Lynch Wednesday morning, requesting that the Department of Justice do more to address gun violence in minority communities across the country. [Mother Jones]

The Louisville Water Company has finished the phase-out of two hazardous chemicals that were stored at both of the company’s water treatment plants. [WFPL]

A panel of medical experts said on Friday the prices of prescription medicines in the United States need to be brought in line with the value they bring to patients instead of continuing to let drugmakers set any price they choose. [Reuters]

The U.S. Department of Justice says AB Electrolux is stonewalling it in its fight over the GE Appliances merger, according to a report by legal site Law360. [Business First]

Construction on the renovated Jeffersonville marina — now called Fisherman’s Wharf — is complete, according to an announcement. [News & Tribune]

Another Deadly Weekend As Greg Fischer Pushes His Compassionate City Fallacy

If you missed it late Friday, a human trafficking task force has offered to train the University of Louisville in the wake of its latest scandal. [Page One]

Three people are dead after two separate shootings in Louisville took place Saturday morning. [WDRB]

A Jefferson district court judge on Friday ruled that the traffic school program that has generated more than $1.2 million in revenue for County Attorney Mike O’Connell’s office is unconstitutional. [C-J/AKN]

One man is dead after a shooting in the Lake Dreamland neighborhood Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

The city of Lexington might be paying the new 21c Museum Hotel more than $200,000 to replace sidewalks and put in other improvements on North Upper Street. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Family and friends surrounded police tape in the 800 block of West Evelyn Avenue on Saturday morning, while they waited to learn if their loved one was killed in a shooting on Saturday around 12:30 a.m. Two men died as a result of the shooting. [WLKY]

Targeting one of education’s most divisive issues, President Barack Obama on Saturday called for capping standardized testing at 2 percent of classroom time and said the government shares responsibility for turning tests into the be-all and end-all of American schools. [HuffPo]

Two Louisville families lost brothers and sons to gunfire near Churchill Downs early Saturday morning. [WAVE3]

The mayor of Lousville crossed the Atlantic to pay a a visit to Rotherham’s Advanced Manufacturing Park. Mayor Greg Fischer — the Kentucky city’s 50th mayor — paid a visit to the state-of-the-art research facility last Wednesday (21). [Click the Clicky]

An assistant University of Missouri-Kansas City basketball coach has resigned, saying he can’t do his job while battling what he called “false allegations” that he hired dancers to strip and have sex with recruits while he was a coach at Louisville. [WFPL]

Rufus Scales, 26 and black, was driving his younger brother Devin to his hair-cutting class in this genteel, leafy city when they heard the siren’s whoop and saw the blue light in the rearview mirror of their black pickup. Two police officers pulled them over for minor infractions that included expired plates and failing to hang a flag from a load of scrap metal in the pickup’s bed. But what happened next was nothing like a routine traffic stop. [NY Times]

Members of the Louisville-based Independent Pilots Association, a union that represents pilots for United Parcel Service Inc., has voted to authorize a strike against the Atlanta-based shipping giant. [Business First]

Two police agencies in Clark County have been awarded more than $50,000 for crime prevention and policing initiatives. [News & Tribune]

Miss The Goober Debate? Don’t Worry

As winter approaches, there’s good news for Louisville Gas and Electric customers. If approved by the Kentucky Public Service Commission, the utility’s residential natural gas customers can expect to see a decrease of nearly 15 percent on an average heating bill. [WDRB]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Well, that sounds more fun than prostitutes. University of Louisville police said a person was hurt in a small explosion in the Shumaker Research Building. [WHAS11]

Guess we should be glad we’re not dealing with what Lexington is dealing with. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Community services and volunteers came together to cater to Louisville’s homeless community. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act’s chief aim is to extend coverage to people without health insurance. One of the 2010 law’s primary means to achieve that goal is expanding Medicaid eligibility to more people near the poverty level. But a crucial court ruling in 2012 granted states the power to reject the Medicaid expansion. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky School for the Blind has been a part of the community since 1842. Its mission is provide comprehensive education services to all Kentucky students who are blind and visually impaired. But three mothers say that is not happening.

If the prevailing judgment about the 2015 gubernatorial race is that no one is excited about it, then Tuesday evening’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway probably didn’t set any fires under prospective voters. [Ronnie Ellis]

What the hell is wrong with all these backward-ass gun nuts these days? We love us some guns but come on, people, enough with the bigotry. Louisville Metro Police officials say they are monitoring developments in the days leading up to a rally planned for this weekend outside the Islamic Center on River Road. [WFPL]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

The University of Louisville men’s basketball team is highly decorated: Multiple Final Four appearances and three national titles, the most recent in 2013. [Business First]

If you’re pleased with the city’s progress over the last four years, Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore thinks he’s the obvious pick for Jeffersonville mayor come Nov. 3. [News & Tribune]