Miss The Goober Debate? Don’t Worry

As winter approaches, there’s good news for Louisville Gas and Electric customers. If approved by the Kentucky Public Service Commission, the utility’s residential natural gas customers can expect to see a decrease of nearly 15 percent on an average heating bill. [WDRB]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Well, that sounds more fun than prostitutes. University of Louisville police said a person was hurt in a small explosion in the Shumaker Research Building. [WHAS11]

Guess we should be glad we’re not dealing with what Lexington is dealing with. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Community services and volunteers came together to cater to Louisville’s homeless community. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act’s chief aim is to extend coverage to people without health insurance. One of the 2010 law’s primary means to achieve that goal is expanding Medicaid eligibility to more people near the poverty level. But a crucial court ruling in 2012 granted states the power to reject the Medicaid expansion. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky School for the Blind has been a part of the community since 1842. Its mission is provide comprehensive education services to all Kentucky students who are blind and visually impaired. But three mothers say that is not happening.

If the prevailing judgment about the 2015 gubernatorial race is that no one is excited about it, then Tuesday evening’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway probably didn’t set any fires under prospective voters. [Ronnie Ellis]

What the hell is wrong with all these backward-ass gun nuts these days? We love us some guns but come on, people, enough with the bigotry. Louisville Metro Police officials say they are monitoring developments in the days leading up to a rally planned for this weekend outside the Islamic Center on River Road. [WFPL]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

The University of Louisville men’s basketball team is highly decorated: Multiple Final Four appearances and three national titles, the most recent in 2013. [Business First]

If you’re pleased with the city’s progress over the last four years, Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore thinks he’s the obvious pick for Jeffersonville mayor come Nov. 3. [News & Tribune]

Death Murder Death Murder Death

Authorities have released the name of a woman who was found murdered near Churchill Downs. [WDRB]

Immigration and criminal defense lawyer Daniel Alvarez has gained the endorsement of Citizens for Better Judges in the highly contested Jefferson District Court race. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating a stabbing that happened in the 5100 block of Crafty Drive located in the Lynnview neighborhood. [WHAS11]

New ribbon advertising boards have been installed around the second tier of Rupp Arena, the first part of a two-year, $15 million technology upgrade for Lexington’s most recognized landmark. [H-L]

This got a lot less buzz than we expected. Particularly in light of the double-dipping. Louisville has a new chief of community building. Mayor Greg Fischer named Yvette Gentry to lead the department. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School personnel action document reveals 30 of the districts bus drivers and substitute bus drivers resigned, retired or were terminated from early August to the middle of September. [WAVE3]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

Home repairs can be a frightful burden for Louisville residents who live in poverty or on fixed incomes. [WFPL]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

An empty elementary school in downtown Jeffersonville will soon be torn down to make way for a 93-room upper mid-scale hotel. [Business First]

Telling stories of epidemics and disasters through the eyes of those who lived — and died — in them, “Stories Behind the Stones: Disease, Disasters and the Downtrodden” offered tours of Fairview Cemetery over the weekend. [News & Tribune]

Closing Bars At 2:00 A.M. Is Just Silly

Sometimes what’s not your fault becomes your problem. “If they’re going to make these decisions, then they need to be held responsible for them, and not us,” said Wes Stafford, a Hillview resident. “They’re going to cover their tail by passing it off to us. We don’t like that.” [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer is asking community leaders to take a tour of Heaven Hill’s distillery in western Louisville next month to educate them about the organic waste material that will be used at a proposed methane plant. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police investigating a person’s death after a shooting in Old Louisville Sunday evening. [WHAS11]

When visitors descend on Lexington in late October for the Breeders’ Cup, they will be here primarily for the finest Thoroughbreds in the world. But they should stick around after the races to see what else the commonwealth has to offer. And there’s plenty. [H-L]

There will be no layoffs at Neighborhood Place Centers across Louisville. The Community Services Program provides assistance to low-income families. At a special meeting of the Metro Council, council members learned that the proposal to lay off employees has been rescinded. [WLKY]

Louisville can definitely handle a public market like this. For nearly four decades, the Union Square Greenmarket has served as a grand bazaar in Lower Manhattan, where produce, baked goods, flowers and foodstuffs are hauled in from the countryside (or some Brooklyn bakery) four days a week. And almost anyone can afford to shop there. [HuffPo]

A party is creating an uproar on social media for what’s being called a lack of respect for the dead. Pictures of the party’s setup near or in a cemetery have been shared dozens of times on Facebook. People who have worked to keep up the abandoned Eastern Cemetery on Baxter Avenue say it’s the latest insult to the people buried there. [WAVE3]

Some local law enforcement officers wonder why the fund used to provide training and salary supplements has grown but the stipend they receive hasn’t for more than 10 years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Some bar owners in Louisville say the city’s burgeoning bourbon and food scene could take a hit if the Metro Council changes closing times from 4 a.m. to 2 a.m. But leave it to Tom Owen to do something dumb. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says he is “absolutely” in the presidential race for the long haul, despite sagging poll numbers and his early debate struggles. [Politico]

Generation Tux, the startup online tuxedo rental company, could end up bringing more than the 80 jobs originally planned to Louisville, the company’s chief technology officer, Matt Howland, said in an interview with Louisville Business First Thursday. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court upheld a Floyd County court’s decision to sentence a Southern Indiana man to the death penalty Thursday following his conviction for brutally murdering his mother’s friend in April 2012. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Leadership Is Still The Worst

Everyone pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster that someone with no ties to Greg Fischer runs this program so it stays on track and comes to fruition. Google Fiber announced it was considering bringing its high speed internet service to Louisville earlier this month and now the company is hiring managers for the project. [WDRB]

It looks like Louisville may go another year without a monitoring program for airborne toxic chemicals, as city and state officials keep looking at each other as the future funding source. [C-J/AKN]

Family members of five people who died when a boat capsized on the Ohio River say in federal court documents that the placement and condition of a construction barge caused the tragedy. [WHAS11]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

She’s old enough for that? Jennifer Lawrence is the latest Louisville native to be honored by the Greater Louisville Pride Foundation’s Louisville Hometown Heroes series. [WLKY]

Daniel Suddeath has been hired as editor of the Glasgow Daily Times, effective Tuesday, Sept. 29. Suddeath, a staff writer for the News and Tribune in Southern Indiana for the past seven years, also served as editor for Southern Indiana Business Source magazine during that time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Neighbors who say there has been an increase in crime in their area are frustrated and now they are taking action by starting a neighborhood watch. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called homelessness an “emergency” in the city and proposed spending $100 million to provide permanent housing and shelters for the city’s 26,000 indigent. [Reuters]

State Auditor Adam Edelen says he’s looking into the financial management of the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the university’s $1.1 billion endowment, and the university’s board of trustees as part of an ongoing investigation. [WFPL]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

It looks like another expansion is on the way at Ford Motor Co.’s Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The city’s mayoral candidates did not hold back during Thursday night’s League of Women Voters debate, answering moderated questions and sending accusations the other’s way. [News & Tribune]

Where’s The Condemnation From Your Statewide Candidates Over This Islamophobia?

The Islamic Center in Louisville on River Road has been targeted by vandals and Mayor Greg Fischer is asking the community to help clean it up. [WDRB]

Wait, didn’t everyone determine years ago that the VA overpaid for that site because of shady politics? Let’s all turn a blind eye as our leaders figure out a way to make this disappear. [C-J/AKN]

Proposed changes to a city ordinance could make shutting down businesses that are the source of community complaints a lot easier. [WHAS11]

Watch it happen there before it happens in Louisville. Lexington will announce soon a plan to build a fiber-optic network to increase Internet speeds across the city, Mayor Jim Gray said Thursday. [H-L]

Scandal after scandal went down at Metro Animal Services over the last decade and all the teevee folks can come up with is a story about a stolen puppy. [WLKY]

Louisville is apparently the third most affordable place to live in the country. [HuffPo]

If you want to see privilege in action, watch these people freak out over a golf course. [WAVE3]

A U.S. watchdog office urged Congress on Wednesday to empower regulators to extend a Dec. 31 deadline for freight and passenger railroads to adopt new safety technology that could prevent major derailments and other deadly crashes. [Reuters]

Oh, look, Greg Fischer still thinks he’s going to successfully run for higher office. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer has declined to join other mayors around the country in signing a letter to President Obama supporting stricter national standards for smog. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell acknowledged Wednesday that he and the House Speaker are discussing a short-term government funding bill to avoid a shutdown on Oct. 1. [The Hill]

Plans for major improvements at the Jerry E. Abramson Terminal at the Louisville International Airport have been approved. [Business First]

A Clark County Sheriff’s Department captain agreed to a demotion to lieutenant and a pay reduction in lieu of a merit board hearing concerning allegations of misconduct. [News & Tribune]

It’s Time For Some More Bridge Hype

A new Phoenix Hill Distillery has been shut down for illegal production, according to the local Alcoholic Beverage Control. [WDRB]

In case you missed it: Rand Paul’s top guy, Mr. Morality who was “called by God” is all over Ashley Madison. [Page One]

The city is asking residents to help Louisville’s homeless veterans take better care of their feet as more former military service members living on the street come forward. [C-J/AKN]

An elementary student is recovering after a car hit them crossing the street near his school. Possibility City! [WHAS11]

A needle exchange program, designed to combat the spread of blood-borne diseases, will begin taking used needles and distributing clean ones Friday at the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! GLENN DOESN’T REALIZE HOW DUMB THIS IS! But you should for real go to Worldfest this weekend. [WLKY]

In July, Café Art, a U.K.-based arts initiative, gave 100 Fujifilm disposable cameras to homeless people in London with just one instruction: take photographs that capture “My London.” [HuffPo]

It’s expected to open by January and the anticipation is building. Decades in the making, the Downtown Crossing is just about complete. [WAVE3]

With the school year just beginning in many districts, parents at two schools are already expressing outrage that transgender students are being allowed to use the bathrooms that match their identities. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville Metro Council members are taking umbrage at excessively tall grass on vacant lots in the city. [WFPL]

Kim Davis and the anti-gay hate group representing her. Don’t be fooled — the organization representing the woman refusing to give out marriage licenses in Kentucky is no ordinary law firm. They have a history of anti-gay hate and bigotry. [Click the Clicky]

Two Louisville-based development companies, including one that recently helped secure a deal to bring a second Costco Wholesale Corp. store to Louisville, are buying land in Jeffersonville and appear set on adding heavy retail to a corridor between a Meijer store and the River Ridge Commerce Center. [Business First]

Floyd County Council President Matt Oakley sent a letter to New Albany City Council President Pat McLaughlin on June 9 requesting a meeting concerning the agreement governing the joint animal shelter. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Bunch Of Death

A homicide investigation is being conducted by LMPD’s Homicide Unit and the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office in the 4400 block of Blevins Gap Road, near Saw Mill Road. [WDRB]

Maybe it can be hidden away in the Louisville Underground? The long-beleaguered Louisville Clock will be moved Friday from its home on Fourth Street at Theater Square to a warehouse in the Portland neighborhood, where it will rest until a suitable permanent location can be found. [C-J/AKN]

The Courier Journal reported JCPS was following up anonymous complaints and found chips, waters, and other vending machine items came into Waggener, but the amount of money being deposited from vending machine sales was short of what it should have been to the total of $3,900. [WHAS11]

The number of heroin overdoses at five northern Kentucky hospitals has continued to climb, but officials aren’t sure if that’s because more people are calling 911 for help, or more people are using heroin. [H-L]

The reward in the case of a missing Nelson County woman has again increased. [WLKY]

Coming back from its Independence Day vacation, Congress appeared no closer Tuesday to finding a way to avoid yet another government shutdown showdown in the fall. [HuffPo]

They are split-second decisions made by police — choices that can mean the difference between life and death for a suspect. Should officers use force? And how much? Community activists like Chad Golden believe sometimes police go farther than they should. [WAVE3]

Questions have been raised about some statues in downtown Lexington. Now, Mayor Jim Gray wants a city board to take a closer look at the statues. [WKYT]

A case over water pollution from Louisville Gas & Electric’s Cane Run Power Plant is scheduled for a hearing in federal court in Louisville tomorrow. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Harry Reid passed the blame on Wednesday over the Senate’s inability to overhaul the Bush-era No Child Left Behind bill. [The Hill]

Some business organizations have decried President Obama’s proposed changes to overtime pay for salaried employees, but most restaurant and retail companies are still working through how, and whether, the regulations would affect them. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair said he was “surprised” that a $450,000 appropriation for police cars was included on Monday’s agenda. [News & Tribune]