Pay Attention To The Homeless Count!

For more than a decade, elected leaders in Louisville and Southern Indiana have urged Norfolk Southern Corp. to consider opening part of the K&I Bridge over the Ohio River to walkers and cyclists. [WDRB]

Every year, hundreds of volunteers bundle up and head to hotels, emergency shelters, camps and soup kitchens, determined to answer two questions: how many people are homeless in the Louisville area and who are they? [C-J/AKN]

If you didn’t know, your new governor is a hot garbage fire. [WHAS11]

A problem in the solicitation to build a high-speed broadband network across Kentucky has jeopardized funding for the project, a top administration official said Thursday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! He was a pioneer: A civil rights lawyer who became Jefferson County’s first African-American Circuit Court judge. Benjamin Shobe died Friday at a local hospital. []

Both the Democratic and Republican races are close contests in Iowa, and pollsters say surprises are likely. [HuffPo]

A trial date has been set for a former gun shop owner who is charged with murder after two brothers were shot in a Valley Station parking lot. [WAVE3]

Most of the time when we talk about homelessness, big cities come to mind. But about seven percent of homeless people live in rural areas, where access to help is much harder to come by. [NPR]

Former Kentucky state Sen. Georgia Powers has died. Powers was the first African-American and first woman elected to the Kentucky Senate, where she served for 21 years beginning in 1968. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

We got to talking about lots of different economic development topics this morning at The Pointe in Butchertown. [Business First]

Attorney Amy Wheatley can’t help but laugh at her newfound reputation as being the first attorney to use the Clark County Clerk’s new e-filing system. As only one of two counties in Indiana to switch to electronic filing, Clark County and Wheatley share a similar claim to fame. [News & Tribune]

It’s Morning In Our Possumbilly City

A major twist, Monday, in a lawsuit filed against the University of Louisville. The governor’s office has now switched sides. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! In the wake of a public fight between its former chairman and vice chairman, the Metropolitan Sewer District board has proposed adding a loyalty provision to its ethics policy. Oh, and no tweeting during board meetings. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS have launched a bullying tipline which students, parents and others can use to report bulling at their school. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin spoke at a Republican presidential forum in New Hampshire Saturday afternoon, less than 24 hours after declaring a state of emergency and activating the Kentucky National Guard to help residents stranded by a massive snowstorm. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a few years ago he was a local high school basketball star. Now his family wants to know why someone would take his life. [WLKY]

Flint was a failure of government — but it didn’t have to be so. And government wasn’t the root of the problem. It was about the people, and ideas they advocate, who have taken control of governments across the country. [HuffPo]

A former mayoral write-in candidate and bicycling advocate was back in court after being cited by police while riding on a city street. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell made a quiet move [last] week on a sweeping war authorization measure written by one of his most hawkish members — an effort to pressure the White House to craft a war proposal more to the GOP’s liking. [Politico]

The 16-year-old girl who died in a Kentucky juvenile-detention center last week was found unresponsive on a bed in a private room, according to the state Justice and Public Safety Cabinet. [WFPL]

Bourbon is a bigger deal than coal because it brings in gobs of tourism dollars. Tourists our pouring into Kentucky to visit distilleries on Kentucky Bourbon Trail and Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour. [Richmond Register]

A new collection of bank health ratings shows three Louisville-area financial institutions are in excellent financial shape, while three more might want to do some bank-cardio. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court has established six commercial courts throughout the state, and one is in Floyd County. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Continues To Muck Things Up

In November, the University of Louisville Board of Trustees filed a motion in Franklin Circuit Court to dismiss a lawsuit by the Kentucky Justice Resource Center contending the board has too few minority members in violation of state law. [WDRB]

The city must pay former Jefferson County Constable David Whitlock about $33,000 in wages for more than five years of unpaid work, a Jefferson Circuit Court judge has ruled, and may owe other peace officers similar back salaries. [C-J/AKN]

A man whose drone was shot down over a Bullitt County home is now suing that shooter in federal court. [WHAS11]

Really, there aren’t more pressing educational issues to tackle instead of pandering in an election year? A Kentucky Republican state senator from London has introduced a bill that he said could have prevented biblical references from being cut from a presentation of A Charlie Brown Christmas at a Johnson County elementary school. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some southern Indiana families face an uncertain future after city officials in Charlestown revived controversial plans that could lead to tearing down a neighborhood. [WLKY]

The nation’s largest LGBT civil rights organization, Human Rights Campaign, endorsed Hillary Clinton for president on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

A routine appointment vote this month for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board was anything but routine after a Louisville Metro councilman asked to table or postpone a vote to reappoint two people to that board. [WAVE3]

A federal judge on Tuesday ruled President Obama cannot use executive privilege to keep records on the “fast and furious” gun-tracking program from Congress. [The Hill]

Superintendent Donna Hargens says Jefferson County Public Schools is working to ensure that Louisville families are aware of its offerings in anticipation of a new push for state charter school legislation. [WFPL]

One European country can’t seem to stop breaking records when it comes to wind power. [ThinkProgress]

Is your favorite Louisville restaurant making the grade? [Business First]

The Clark County Clerk’s office was granted an $10,800 additional appropriation this week in part to help with transferring the influx of Jeffersonville city court cases that are coming in. [News & Tribune]

Who Is Worse? Tom Wine Or Jim Ramsey? Possibility City!

Their homes were bombed, lives threatened, and they nearly starved to death. Now the newest Syrian refugee families have found a safe-haven right here in Louisville. [WDRB]

Tom Wine. MLK parade. Shenanigans. Read all about it. [C-J/AKN]

This is what local media has become. An “exclusive” interview in the “crime” section with the kid who crashed a drone in Lexington. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Housing Corp. is looking for volunteers to help count Kentucky’s homeless population. The count will begin at sunrise on Jan. 27 and continue for 24 hours. The point-in-time count is known as the K-Count. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Members of The Stand Up Louisville Coalition began planning a protest in recent days, after learning that Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine would be a grand marshal in the 44th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Motorcade. Now Wine has withdrawn his name from the list of grand marshals. [WLKY]

General Electric Co agreed to sell its appliances business to China’s Qingdao Haier Co Ltd for $5.4 billion in cash, the companies said on Friday. The move comes weeks after GE abandoned a $3.3 billion deal with Sweden’s Electrolux following months of opposition from U.S. antitrust regulators. [HuffPo]

Didn’t this happen just a couple years ago? Late November 2013, maybe? [WAVE3]

The nation’s cities are at the frontlines of a food system that sickens and impoverishes millions of Americans every year. Local communities where people live, shop, work, and receive healthcare bear the brunt of this system’s unhealthy, unjust outcomes, which disproportionately affect communities of color and low-income Americans. The five cities chosen—Oakland, Memphis, Louisville, Baltimore, and Minneapolis—all have populations between 400,000 and 700,000, and in all of them, the percentage of residents living below the federal poverty line is higher than the national average. [Click the Clicky]

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is launching a new program to provide a long-acting, reversible contraceptive arm implant to women in Louisville. [WFPL]

The Obama administration on Friday said it would announce the next steps in its planned overhaul of how the United States manages coal development on federal land, which sources have said includes freezing new leases. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Senate passed a measure Thursday that’s aimed at allowing the state’s bourbon tourism industry to reach its full potential. [Business First]

Even though he won a recount, Jeffersonville City Councilman Steve Webb is challenging the lawfulness of November’s general election, requesting a trial that could result in a special election. [News & Tribune]

ANOTHER Week Of Mall Hype???

Of course WDRB has jumped even further into the (paid?) nonsense/pseudoscience realm. Your body doesn’t need a “reset” or a cleanse. Your liver and kidneys do the detoxing. [WDRB]

Frankfort is looking at tougher penalties to fight the appearance of flakka. [C-J/AKN]

A real shame LMAS can’t be trusted to handle things like this and people like Kelly Downard are now turning a blind eye because they’re bored. [WHAS11]

The American Printing House for the Blind in Clifton is trying to raise $95,000 by Jan. 29 to buy one of only six know copies of Louis Braille’s 1829 book introducing the Braille system of reading and writing with raised dots. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Mike Ward’s involved so you know it’s going to fail. Way to go, Mike. Thanks for killing legalization efforts in Kentucky. [WLKY]

According to a comprehensive report from The Washington Post, nearly 1,000 Americans were shot and killed by police in 2015. That startling number aside, another surprising finding from the data is just how little the FBI truly understood the breadth of police shootings in previous years. [HuffPo]

Oh, wait, local teevee shysters are still obsessed with the damn mall story. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell is again confirming he has no plans other than to stand in the way of President Barack Obama. Because his base of support is comprised of racist mouth-breathers who fear brown people. [Salon]

Kentucky’s remaining constitutional officers were sworn in Monday, with all but one of the five posts changing hands. [WFPL]

Inside the backward ideology driving the right-wing terrorists who captured an empty federal building. [ThinkProgress]

The most recent edition of the Federal Reserve’s Burgundy Book for the Louisville Zone provides data that show the region had strong economic growth this year, with noteworthy reductions in unemployment and strong home sales. At the same time, zone residents also took on more debt, perhaps optimistic about the ability to pay off this debt. [Business First]

Jeffersonville City Court Judge Ken Pierce has had a year to prepare for stepping down from the bench, becoming the last judge to preside over the 55-year-old court that city council voted to abolish last year. [News & Tribune]

NYE Dept Of Awful Update Stuff

Louisville International Airport is filling four out of five available airplane seats, the highest rate since at least 2007. [WDRB]

We can’t keep track of all the UofL scandals these days! Two former University of Louisville biosafety employees who lost their jobs last year following federal investigations of biological safety practices have filed a federal lawsuit against the university, claiming repeated violations of health and safety regulations and an attempted cover-up by university officials. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Get a grip, Julie Raque Adams, and quit it with the fear mongering. It’s like you want to lose your state senate seat. [WHAS11]

Kentucky child welfare officials place too many children with mental health problems in institutions for too long when they could be better served by relatives or foster families, according to a leading child advocacy group. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The family of a teenager charged with murder in the death of another teen said they want the truth to come out. [WLKY]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Leave it to Louisville teevee folks to continue the Mall St. Matthews freak out. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

A prominent member of Louisville’s Board of Zoning Adjustment and Planning Commission has resigned his positions. [WFPL]

Open data has contributed to dramatic improvements in a wide array of fields over the past few decades, affecting how we look at astronomy, genetics, climate change, sports and more. But until recently, crime has gone without the open analysis prevalent in other fields because crime data has been closely held by law enforcement agencies and has usually only been released in bulk at monthly, quarterly or annual intervals. [FiveThirtyEight]

When most of the assets of the Sam Swope Auto Group were sold to a Florida company earlier this year, the purchase price was not disclosed. But now we at least know the price of the bulk of the real estate involved. [Business First]

Counties in Southern Indiana are working on securing a grant that would help strengthen partnerships between local manufacturing industries and their workforces. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Go To The Falls Visitor Center! It’s A Hidden Gem In The Metro

It seems the fight is over for a seat on Jeffersonville’s City Council, but that hasn’t stopped one candidate from throwing some verbal punches. [WDRB]

Oh, god, Lynn Winter is at it again. It’s time for Louisville to move on. Living in the past is not working. [C-J/AKN]

The warm winter that we have been seeing is bad for business in Paoli, Indiana. [WHAS11]

Fewer people in the state are getting their GED because of more rigorous standards and the move to a computer-based test, according to a report released Tuesday by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [H-L]

Thursday marks the third anniversary of the fatal Christmas Eve attack on a young man in west Louisville. [WLKY]

The federal government’s case against the man suspected of helping the San Bernardino shooters would be weaker if the NRA and other gun rights groups had their way in court. [HuffPo]

It’s absolutely terrible that this guy got shot. But his claim not to know why he was shot? Really? Sure, it could be an accident here in Compassionate City because there’s a new gun murder every five seconds. Just unlikely the son of a high-profile attorney doesn’t know why he got shot. [WAVE3]

With all that’s going on in the world — from record-breaking warm spells to rapidly melting ice sheets — it’s easy to ignore something so seemingly mundane as dirt. But scientists at the University of Sheffield’s Grantham Center for Sustainable Futures suggest that we ignore dirt at our own peril. [ThinkProgress]

Norton Healthcare and the University of Louisville have released the details of the agreement the parties reached Friday to settle an ongoing dispute over Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WFPL]

The Pittsburgh City Council on Monday voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, falling in line with a growing number of municipalities that have taken similar actions in recent years, city officials said. Meanwhile, Kentucky twiddles its thumbs. [Reuters]

The city of Louisville has green-lighted a contract with CTC Consultants in order to chart how to best connect Louisville to the KentuckyWired fiber optic Internet cable network. [Business First]

Visitors to the new Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at and after its grand reopening Jan. 8 can expect an immersive learning experience as they travel through the history of the falls and the affects and relation to the region. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]