Ignoring Fischer In Favor Of Derby Excitement Is Tough To Do

If you haven’t seen it yet, it looks like this is going to be a rough week for Republican Jamie Comer. [Page One]

Nine schools in Jefferson County that have been among the lowest performing in Kentucky may soon shed the stigmatizing label of “priority school,” depending on how students fare on the next round of state tests in a few weeks. [WDRB]

A judge has ruled in favor of the JBS/Swift pork plant in Butchertown in a legal dispute with the neighborhood association over whether the plant should have been allowed to make certain improvements or additions to its facilities. [C-J/AKN]

Dance with Grace studio owner John Gividen is still trying to wrap his head around what happened Thursday night, April 23. His longtime client Lucy Zeh was shot and gravely injured by her estranged husband Frederick Zeh right outside the dance studio. [WHAS11]

A reward for information in the slayings for a Central Kentucky mother and daughter has been increased to $50,000, the victims’ family said. [H-L]

The winners of the marathon, the mini marathon and the wheelchair division have all crossed the finish line. [WLKY]

Progressive Democrats have been hoping to see a showdown between Elizabeth Warren and Hillary Clinton for years. Instead, they’re getting a public feud between the senator from Massachusetts and President Barack Obama. [HuffPo]

Despite the threat of severe weather across Louisville, thousands of people attended opening night festivities at Churchill Downs. [WAVE3]

When will President Barack Obama apologize for all the other innocent victims of drone strikes? [The Intercept]

Milton Engebretson starts his church’s van. He’s in his third week of what has become a daily ritual: driving around Austin, Indiana, transporting people to the town’s Community Outreach Center. [WFPL]

Same-sex marriage is legal in most states but so is discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodation. [NPR]

I’ll come right out and admit it: I’ve never been to the Kentucky Derby. I’ll take it a bit further: I’ve also never been to the Kentucky Oaks, and I’ve always found a way to avoid Thunder. [Business First]

Only two of New Albany’s six district council races feature a contested primary, but those races feature multiple candidates. [News & Tribune]

It’s Possibility Pedestrian Death City!

This should be embarrassing to everyone in Louisville. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other city officials kicked off the “Look Alive Louisville” pedestrian safety program Thursday. [WDRB]

Really, it’s just embarrassing. With Louisville averaging 16 pedestrian deaths during each of the past five years, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Thursday a new safety program called “Look Alive Louisville” that is designed to greatly reduce pedestrian fatalities. [C-J/AKN]

So many questions in West Buechel…and getting answers is proving to be difficult. [WHAS11]

For decades, if not for the past 141 years, racing fans have looked with envy upon a coveted section of seats in the Churchill Downs grandstand, where only 20 sets of lucky horse owners could sit. [H-L]

A loan to finance the East End Crossing section of the Ohio River Bridges Project was announced Thursday U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. [WLKY]

The private prison industry’s growing role in immigrant detention is due in part to Congress’ requiring the federal government to maintain some 34,000 detention beds, according to a report released Wednesday. The report, drafted by Grassroots Leadership, a nonprofit based in Austin, Texas, calls on Congress to eliminate the immigrant detention quota from its 2016 appropriations request. [HuffPo]

The owners of a troubled Bardstown Road hotel, who provided a tour to WAVE 3 News on Wednesday, said they were focused on passing a city inspection next week before renovating the lodge. [WAVE3]

A new strain of dog flu from Asia that started infecting pets in Chicago this January has spread to thousands of dogs in Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio and Indiana and killed six, animal health officials said. [Reuters]

Louisville can’t figure out how to manage a flipping animal shelter. So there’s little chance it can handle a fancy sports team. Advocates of Louisville having a pro sports franchise focused for years on bringing the National Basketball Association to the city. [WFPL]

As a historic constitutional showdown over gay marriage looms this month at the U.S. Supreme Court, attorneys are fighting over another bitterly disputed issue: their fees. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) says it again will pursue a contract to provide Medicaid managed-care services to the state of Kentucky. [Business First]

A group of developers still hopes to market six lots along Bank Street for commercial and residential use, but they want the New Albany Redevelopment Commission to readjust its asking price for the properties. [News & Tribune]

Name Changes & Buzzwords Are The Only Thing Greg Fischer Pushes. Other Than Official Coverups, Of Course.

Louisville’s emergency alert system has a new name. It will now be called LENS, which stands for Louisville Emergency Notification System. [WDRB]

A resident who lives near General Electric Appliance Park has filed a lawsuit claiming the company was negligent in storing flammable material in its warehouse. [C-J/AKN]

Community activists in west Louisville are reacting to two new murder cases that happened during the weekend. [WHAS11]

Democrats took little time Tuesday to blast U.S. Sen. Rand Paul’s presidential ambitions. [H-L]

Thunder Over Louisville officials on Tuesday announced the lineup for this year’s air show. [WLKY]

The lawmakers behind a recent congressional amendment protecting medical marijuana operations in states where the drug is legal strongly rebuked the Department of Justice for trying to continue to crack down on some medical marijuana businesses. [HuffPo]

This happened in your city yesterday. U.S. Sen. Rand Paul announced on his website Tuesday morning that he is running for president. [WAVE3]

State Rep. Sannie Overly, a Democrat, is fighting to keep what she knows about harassment and retaliation in Frankfort a secret. [Page One]

A new partnership between the Louisville Metro Housing Authority and the Coalition for the Homeless aims to help more homeless residents find permanent housing. [WFPL]

Will you be going to Governor Bigot Beshear’s Kentucky Derby celebration in Frankfart? [Click the Clicky]

Louisville-based Humana Inc. says it expects a funding increase of about 0.8 percent for its Medicare Advantage patients in 2016. The company had been expecting a decrease of 1.25 percent. [Business First]

The relationship between Mayor Jeff Gahan’s administration and the police union appears to be strained. A police officer is under investigation for a Facebook post and questions have arisen regarding apparent attempts to cease pay for embattled officer Laura Schook. [News & Tribune]

Obama Visit Will Snarl Traffic Like Woah

Several Louisville Metro Council members have thrown support behind new legislation aimed at regulating large parties in abandoned buildings. [WDRB]

A national traffic-congestion study ranked Louisville as the 36th worst city in the United States, which will probably come as no surprise to Louisville commuters. It’s also the 128th worst on the international list. [C-J/AKN]

A lawsuit over bullying at Ramsey Middle School is expected to be filed against Jefferson County Public Schools Wednesday. [WHAS11]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday shortened the prison sentences of nearly two dozen drug convicts, including eight serving life in prison, in an act the White House said continues Obama’s push to make the justice system fairer by reducing harsh sentences that were handed down under outdated guidelines. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Way to go, JCPS, way to go. [WLKY]

Taxes are a pain. Health insurance is a pain. This year, Americans will suffer both when they file their income taxes. Ouch. [HuffPo]

The 141st Kentucky Derby isn’t until May 2, but the solid gold winner’s trophy arrived at Churchill Downs on Tuesday. [WAVE3]

No one in Louisville is surprised that Commissioner of Education Terry Holliday is tucking tail and running away. [Page One]

Proposed luxury apartments in Butchertown may get some help from the city. Louisville Metro Council’s Labor and Economic Development Committee signed off on a plan last week that would give a tax break for a new building between Main and Clay streets housing 263 luxury apartments. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court delivered a victory to state health departments on Tuesday, ruling that private Medicaid doctors cannot sue states to raise their reimbursement rates. [The Hill]

The Kentucky International Convention Center at 221 S. Fourth St. will be closing from August 2016 to summer 2018 to accommodate work on its $180 million expansion and renovation. [Business First]

Dr. Jerome Adams, Indiana’s state health commissioner, has a message for individuals potentially affected by the HIV outbreak in Scott County: You aren’t alone, and we can help you. [News & Tribune]

This Kid Needs Your Help. Consider Stepping Up.

Indiana and Kentucky have selected a Virginia-based company to oversee the toll system for the Ohio River Bridges Project. The contract, estimated at $39.9 million, includes installing, operating and maintaining the toll equipment for seven years, said Kendra York, Indiana’s public finance director. [WDRB]

Churchill Downs Incorporated announced Churchill Downs, its namesake racetrack, and Yum! Brands, Inc., have signed a five-year agreement that extends Yum!’s role as the presenting sponsor of the $2 million-guaranteed Kentucky Derby, one of America’s most legendary sports and entertainment events. [Press Release]

Local police amass millions in military surplus. Jeffersontown Police Officer Tommy McCann popped the trunk of his cruiser to reveal thousands of dollars worth of military-grade equipment. [C-J/AKN]

WTF? Is there a war coming to Clarksville? [More C-J/AKN]

There was a ribbon cutting Monday afternoon for the new visitor center at the Stitzel-Weller distillery in Shively. The Kentucky Distillers’ Association says Stitzel-Weller will be the newest stop on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. [WHAS11]

Police in Pulaski County recently worked two incidents in a week’s time involving alleged drunk drivers on riding lawn mowers, including one arrested after he ​drove to the drive-through window at a fast-food restaurant, according to the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office. [H-L]

The affidavit said after Oberhansley killed Blanton, he removed parts of her skull and brain, heart and part of a lung. The document said Oberhansley told detectives he cooked and ate the organs. [WLKY]

An astounding 72% percent of Americans say they are unhappy with Republicans in Congress. [HuffPo]

It could be the most important thing you do this week. A Louisville high school sophomore desperately needs a bone marrow match to win the fight he’s battled for three years. [WAVE3]

Was it really only a year ago that we were gearing up for the big unveil of Healthcare.gov where the uninsured could seamlessly go online and shop for health care as they would their vacation travel? [WaPo]

Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District has reached an agreement with the union that represents several of its employees. [WFPL]

Public schools throughout the nation continue to contend with budget shortfalls and insufficient classroom resources, while U.S. test scores remain far behind those of many other developed nations. Here are measures that can be taken to fix America’s troubled education system. [The Onion]

You guessed it — more of the same for the arena shenanigans. [Business First]

Complaints about the termination of a recycling program in Clark County’s unincorporated areas may prompt the county commissioners to bring it back — if the price is right. [News & Tribune]

Nawbny Po-leece Maybe Have A Bit Of A Problem

Parents are calling into question the leadership of Male’s new principal, David Mike, whose first year is mired in an ongoing investigation into accusations of improper protocol on state standardized tests. Parents say he’s also unethical and unprofessional with students and staff and are concerned he’s forcing faculty to leave. Note: JCPS officials told us off-the-record after the last suicide that the principal was a hot mess. [WDRB]

Kosair Charities, which has given more than $6 million annually to Kosair Children’s Hospital, is accusing parent company Norton Healthcare of misusing some of that money to enhance its bottom line and “line the pockets” of its executives. [C-J/AKN]

Another fun weekend in Louisville filled with crazy shootings. Not in the West End, either, mouth-breathers. [WHAS11WHAS11]

Is Andy Beshear just like his homophobic daddy? Only time will tell. Beshear applies these assumptions in a new way: because same-sex couples do not contribute to the birth rate, it’s not economically beneficial for Kentucky to recognize their marriages. [Think Progress]

Wait, yet another shooting, this time ending in death. Again, not in the West End. [WLKY]

Long before Kim Baker became the leader of Kentucky’s biggest arts venue, she was an aspiring 16-year-old flutist studying at the Kentucky Governor’s School for the Arts. [H-L]

An attorney for a New Albany police officer claims a civil suit is in the works against NAPD after allegations of corrupt conduct. Laura Landenwich represents Patrol Officer Laura Schook, a 19-year veteran, who informed New Albany’s Police Merit Commission about corruption, discrimination and misuse of taxpayer money during a meeting May 8. [WAVE3]

Guess it’s safe to assume sports are bigger hits than embezzlement or corruption. This speculative story about the University of Louisville and the Yum Center last week was the most read story — ever — on The ‘Ville Voice. Ouch. [The ‘Ville Voice]

This is an interesting story about crashing Kentucky Derby gates. But it stinks of failure of the governor’s security detail and highlights just how easy it is for crazy people to get close to the him/her. [WFPL]

The University of Louisville has made two appointments for interim deans and another interim appointment to replace its departing vice president of student affairs. [Business First]

The attorney for a New Albany Police Department officer who has asked that alleged corruption at the agency be investigated says legal action will be taken against the department. [News & Tribune]