Pay Attention To The Homeless Count!

For more than a decade, elected leaders in Louisville and Southern Indiana have urged Norfolk Southern Corp. to consider opening part of the K&I Bridge over the Ohio River to walkers and cyclists. [WDRB]

Every year, hundreds of volunteers bundle up and head to hotels, emergency shelters, camps and soup kitchens, determined to answer two questions: how many people are homeless in the Louisville area and who are they? [C-J/AKN]

If you didn’t know, your new governor is a hot garbage fire. [WHAS11]

A problem in the solicitation to build a high-speed broadband network across Kentucky has jeopardized funding for the project, a top administration official said Thursday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! He was a pioneer: A civil rights lawyer who became Jefferson County’s first African-American Circuit Court judge. Benjamin Shobe died Friday at a local hospital. []

Both the Democratic and Republican races are close contests in Iowa, and pollsters say surprises are likely. [HuffPo]

A trial date has been set for a former gun shop owner who is charged with murder after two brothers were shot in a Valley Station parking lot. [WAVE3]

Most of the time when we talk about homelessness, big cities come to mind. But about seven percent of homeless people live in rural areas, where access to help is much harder to come by. [NPR]

Former Kentucky state Sen. Georgia Powers has died. Powers was the first African-American and first woman elected to the Kentucky Senate, where she served for 21 years beginning in 1968. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

We got to talking about lots of different economic development topics this morning at The Pointe in Butchertown. [Business First]

Attorney Amy Wheatley can’t help but laugh at her newfound reputation as being the first attorney to use the Clark County Clerk’s new e-filing system. As only one of two counties in Indiana to switch to electronic filing, Clark County and Wheatley share a similar claim to fame. [News & Tribune]

Another Week of Messy UofL Scandals

As a cold snap reaches Kentuckiana this weekend one group is doing its best to keep the area’s homeless warm. [WDRB]

It’s almost like Jim Ramsey is being purposefully more terrible than usual in order to set Jerry Abramson up to take over. Ramsey is making Abramson look less terrible. [C-J/AKN]

According to Chief Rick Sanders, police found a 35-year-old man unconscious and unresponsive at the Red Carpet Inn on Hurstbourne Parkway. Jeffersontown officers who had received and been trained on how to use Naloxone were able to inject the man and get him to the hospital, saving his life. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s chief justice has denied a motion to remove a judge from all criminal cases but referred the case to a state disciplinary commission. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It has been a year and a half since a mother found her son killed and no one has been held accountable. [WLKY]

While the vast majority of Americans now have access to the Internet and mobile devices, regional and economic disparities persist for wired broadband access in the largest 100 American cities. [HuffPo]

The Center for Women and Families, a local non-profit organization that helps victims of domestic violence and abuse, needs help for the holidays with its Holiday Gift Card Drive. [WAVE3]

ICYMI: Matt Bevin took false equivalency to new levels this weekend when he used the sad situation in Johnson County to try to justify his special brand of Islamophobia. Unity and respect? Not so much. Empty words. [Page One]

The new head of the state’s Energy and Environment Cabinet, Charles Snavely, has been on the job for a little more than a week. It’s also been about that long since he served as an official on the state’s coal association governing board. [WFPL]

New calculations show that our already sizeable water footprint is 18% bigger than we thought. [BBC]

The University of Louisville and Norton Healthcare Inc. have reached a settlement agreement in their dispute surrounding Kosair Children’s Hospital. [Business First]

If the opening of the Big Four Bridge in Jeffersonville proved one thing, it’s that people want to get outdoors and exercise. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Brown Puts Her Money Where Her Mouth Is And Other Wealthy Scions In The City Should Follow Her Dang Lead

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

The transformation of a former public housing complex in Louisville is almost finished. Construction is continuing at the renovated Sheppard Square in Smoketown. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Board of Education Chairman David Jones Jr. said he wants to hear more information on the idea of bringing in an outside operator to run some of the district’s lowest-performing schools. [C-J/AKN]

The Judge Stevens slap fight is getting out-of-control crazy. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics will receive a $12 million gift from Papa John’s Pizza founder and CEO John Schnatter and the Charles Koch Foundation, officials announced Tuesday. [H-L]

Seriously, Tom Wine is in teabagger meltdown mode. What on earth? How dare anyone bring up race in Possibility City! A legal battle between a local judge and a top prosecutor is heating up again, and the prosecutor is asking for the judge’s removal. [WLKY]

ICYMI: Bill sits down with former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear to discuss his time in office and his plans for the future. [KET]

The hotel will bring 140 more hotel rooms to Louisville and will be in one of the city’s trendiest neighborhoods. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission (KSNPC) has presented its Biological Diversity Protection Award to Christy Lee Brown of Louisville. The annual award is given to an individual or organization that has made a significant contribution to the knowledge and protection of Kentucky’s biodiversity. “Brown is truly an international leader promoting a holistic understanding and appreciation of the earth and its environs,” said Don Dott, executive director of the KSNPC. “She leads and inspires others in the fields of sustainable food production, environmental quality and its fundamental role in human health, the interrelatedness of our natural systems, and of biodiversity protection and the conservation of land.” [Press Release]

Horrible walrus Jim Gooch has returned to embarrass the Commonwealth. A bill pre-filed in the General Assembly would declare Kentucky a “sanctuary state” for people and companies who don’t want to follow federal environmental laws that will restrict carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC) has affirmed its earlier approval of combustion waste landfills at power plants operated by the state’s two largest electric utilities, despite sharp increases in the cost of the facilities. But the PSC, in an order issued today, declined requests by Kentucky Utilities Co. (KU) and Louisville Gas & Electric Co. (LG&E) to extend that approval to future expansions of the landfills. The landfills are at the Trimble County Generating Station and at the Ghent Generating Station in Carroll County. [Press Release]

LG&E and KU Energy LLC wants to get much more involved in the solar energy world. To make this happen, the utility company plans to offer individual, renewable solar-generation facilities to industrial and business customers. [Business First]

The possibility of arming a trained teacher in a school was discussed at West Clark Community Schools board meeting this week. [News & Tribune]

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Yay! Some Positive West End News!

Papaw Beshear responds to questions of cronyism protecting owners of failing sewage companies. The owner of a failing sewer company who polluted public water and then left the mess is trying to do it again, and now new communities are scrambling for a fix. [WDRB]

AT&T said Monday that it plans to offer ultra-fast gigabit Internet speeds to customers in the Louisville area, perhaps as early as in a year or so. Holding your breath? [C-J/AKN]

On Monday, Dec. 7, Judge Olu Stevens returned to the bench for the first time since Commonwealth Attorney Tom Wine filed a motion to remove Stevens from all criminal cases. [WHAS11]

Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear has appointed his wife to an unpaid position on the Kentucky Horse Park Commission in one of his final acts as governor. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The balance of power could shift in Jeffersonville after some challenges to this year’s elections results. [WLKY]

The Sierra Club on Wednesday released a report on the final text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, concluding that the landmark trade deal would be a significant setback in efforts to combat climate change and protect the environment. [HuffPo]

The J.B. Speed School of Engineering and the West End School are working together. On Monday, the two announced a special partnership for students and cut the ribbon on a new space called a maker space. [WAVE3]

When Republicans like Andy Barr try to tell you they’re for the people? Remember that they’re full of shit. House Republicans are hoping a back door legislative maneuver will successfully block the Federal Communications Commission from enforcing Net Neutrality and regulating or banning data caps. [Stop the Cap!]

Maurice Mousty doesn’t have to look far to see his neighborhood changing. In the 50 years since he settled in to his modest home on West Maple Street in Jeffersonville, many of the familiar families have moved on. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a challenge by gun rights activists to a Chicago suburb’s ordinance banning assault weapons and large-capacity magazines, handing a victory to gun control advocates amid a fierce debate over the nation’s firearms laws. [Reuters]

Just a few weeks after the River Ridge Development Authority’s board of directors authorized a negotiation that could bring a 1.5 million-square-foot warehouse to Jeffersonville, the board announced Monday it is pursuing another mega deal. [Business First]

The universe got a little bit bigger, not necessarily because of him, but his discoveries helped scientists realize that space is always expanding. At least for a while, he taught at New Albany High School. [News & Tribune]

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Louisville Already Cringing Over Bevin

Louisville Metro Police say they’ve arrested two drug traffickers in southwest Louisville. [WDRB]

A coalition of social justice organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky and the Fairness Campaign, on Tuesday called on the Cordish Cos. to end dress codes at 4th Street Live! and acknowledge past racial profiling there. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Judge Denise Clayton says there is a better understanding of the racial makeup of Jefferson County jury pools although it’s impossible to know exactly the diversity of jury summons. [WHAS11]

Homeless two-parent families in Fayette County will soon have more housing options thanks to a new program designed to address a gap in Lexington’s homeless shelter system. [H-L]

The largest beer and wine wholesaler in Indiana is asking a state appeals court to find a law unconstitutional that prohibits beer wholesalers from seeking a permit to also distribute liquor. [WLKY]

With all the roadblocks thrown up by the Supreme Court, should school systems still try to pursue diversity? One district in North Carolina said yes and, as a new study shows, reaped solid rewards for the kids. [HuffPo]

When is it okay to go inside a stranger’s house and gawk at their furnishings and decorations? During the Old Louisville Holiday Home Tour, that’s when. [WAVE3]

Republican Gov.-elect Matt Bevin Tuesday named the head of a Louisville accounting firm as his budget director and said John Chilton will have much work to “get Kentucky’s financial crisis resolved.” [Ronnie Ellis]

A decision on whether pork processor JBS Swift can continue to use a Butchertown parking lot for truck staging has been pushed back once again. [WFPL]

As soon as Donald Trump announced that he’d gained the endorsement of 100 black ministers from across the country, there were skeptics. [NPR]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says it will create 2,000 jobs and invest $1.3 billion in its Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville. [Business First]

State Rep. Ed Clere, R-New Albany, has been removed as chairman of the Indiana House of Representatives Public Health Committee. [News & Tribune]

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Another Sword Attack! It’s Been A Bit

Possibility City! Picture it: A city — the most compassionate city ever — two downtown bridges. Both named after assassinated presidents. Makes sense and sends the message that it’s possible here… possible to be murdered. [Deep Bridge Thoughts]

Police say a suspect tried to assault a man with a sword on Thanksgiving night — but the victim also had a weapon. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has authorized engineering work on two underground basins to hold a combination of rain and raw sewage during wet weather. [C-J/AKN]

An attorney fighting the release of the book, Breaking Cardinal Rules, is working to find out how many copies were sold in Kentucky. [WHAS11]

When Gloria Maldonado was still at Bryan Station High School, she remembers college reps coming to talk about the University of Kentucky. The first in her family to plan to go to college, “I didn’t even know what an alumni was,” she recalled. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Protesters from the Black Lives Matter movement are camped out in front of the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office in Louisville. [WLKY]

World leaders are meeting in Paris this month in what amounts to a last-ditch effort to avert the worst ravages of climate change. Climatologists now say that the best case scenario — assuming immediate and dramatic emissions curbs — is that planetary surface temperatures will increase by at least 2 degrees Celsius in the coming decades. [HuffPo]

Saturday night, as Louisville added another murder to its yearly total, more than 50 people gathered in the Russell neighborhood to hold a vigil for peace. [WAVE3]

Governor Steve Beshear [yesterday] presented a ceremonial check representing $1.5 million in federal funding for a project to improve conditions in downtown Louisville for pedestrians and people with disabilities, among others. [Press Release]

A group of 13 protesters on Monday attempted to occupy Jefferson County Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine’s office at Sixth and Liberty streets in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

“We’re not gonna take it anymore,” a crowd of thousands sang as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump entered a South Carolina convention center on Tuesday night as a 1980s heavy metal song by the band Twisted Sister blared from speakers. The billionaire real-estate developer’s packed rallies have been among the liveliest events in the long build-up to the November 2016 U.S. presidential election. But they are increasingly becoming known for their undercurrent of aggression, which escalated into a physical altercation over the weekend when white Trump supporters attacked a black protester at his rally, to the candidate’s approval. [Reuters]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says labor costs will increase by 1.5 percent annually during the next four years as a result of a new labor agreement with the United Auto Workers union. [Business First]

Animal control services were immediately restored to Floyd County on Friday, but neither the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Control Authority, the city nor the county are closer to resolving disagreements on funding. [News & Tribune]

At Least Fischer Isn’t A Xenophobe/Bigot

Good grief, you can’t even hide in the ceiling these days without getting arrested. [WDRB]

This story originally ran in late January. Twenty-one Syrian refugees will arrive in Louisville over the next two weeks, a figure expected to increase in Kentucky and beyond as the U.S. begins to take in an expanded number of refugees fleeing Syria’s bloody civil war. [C-J/AKN]

A week after the deadly terrorist attacks that rocked Paris, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is urging the community to stand in solidarity with refugees and those affected by the horrific acts. [WHAS11]

The American Civil Liberties Union says a Kentucky county clerk’s office should reissue altered marriage licenses even though the governor has promised to recognize them as valid. [H-L]

Your tax dollars are paying for Jerry Abramson’s pals to conduct media boat tours. [WLKY]

The nation’s capital is receiving a wonderful gift this holiday season. Atlanta’s Homeward Choir, a group of men from the city’s Central Night Shelter, have been invited to perform at the White House Open House Holiday Celebration on Dec. 21. [HuffPo]

As temperatures drop back into the 20s, homeless shelters across Louisville are starting Operation White Flag. [WAVE3]

First-hand accounts like this won’t deter pandering bigots like Rand Paul and Matt Bevin. Until last year, I was one of 4.3 million people at the mercy of the legal immigration system, waiting for the chance to stay in the U.S. for good. [BuzzFeed]

A group of about 80 people gathered on Friday afternoon to call on the Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney to cease his efforts to have Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens removed from all criminal cases pending before him. [WFPL]

NPR’s Rachel Martin speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, about the screening process refugees go through before entering the United States. [NPR]

The Louisville Arena Authority has a new member and a new chairman after the resignation earlier this month of chairman Larry Hayes. [Business First]

Sheriff Frank Loop said he had no idea the Floyd County Animal Control Board voted Thursday to suspend services to residents living outside the city limits for the rest of 2015. [News & Tribune]

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