Insanity. Is There A Full Moon Or What?

Didn’t link to any of these stories yesterday because they’re all so horrifically sad. [WDRB]

The Independent Pilots Association, the collective bargaining unit for UPS pilots, is turning up the heat on the shipping giant by opening a strike operations center in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another person dead from a gunshot in Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

Tim Longmeyer, a former secretary of the state Personnel Cabinet under former Gov. Steve Beshear, pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to bribery. [H-L]

A Jefferson County judge answered to charges of misconduct Tuesday. Judge Sheila Collins is accused of improperly jailing a victim of domestic violence who recanted her story last June. [WLKY]

Tea people just don’t like it when elected officials actually do their jobs. [HuffPo]

Decision-makers at Moore Traditional School decided not to appeal Vicki Lete’s removal as Principal of Moore Traditional School. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Lottery has launched into online gambling, becoming the third state to offer lottery sales online after Michigan and Georgia. Minnesota implemented then banned online sales in 2015 after faith-based groups protested scratch-off sales. [More H-L]

When Aetna announced its move to buy Louisville born-and-bred insurer Humana last year, more than a few antitrust sirens sounded. [WFPL]

Former U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres has credited faith groups for helping to advance the Paris Climate Agreement by supporting “holistic, equitable, but above all, ambitious climate action.” [ThinkProgress]

Don’t expect to see Papa Johns International Inc. introduce its own pizza delivery vehicle the way Domino’s did last year. [Business First]

It’s sometimes hard for people to grasp, but New Albany is ranked in the top three in the state on a list that has nothing to do with basketball. [News & Tribune]

Another Compassionate Pedestrian Death

Another day, another pedestrian death in Compassionate City. Louisville Metro Police say a woman was killed after being hit by an SUV on Zorn Avenue. [WDRB]

Louisville Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens has been suspended from the bench as a state judicial disciplinary body considers misconduct charges against him. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! An agreement has been reached. Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens will be suspended with pay while both sides settle their differences. [WHAS11]

Luxco, the St. Louis-based liquor company that markets Rebel Yell, Blood Oath and Ezra Brooks bourbons, announced Monday that it will build a $35 million, 18,000-square-foot distillery in Nelson County that is expected to be fully operational by late 2017. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway in Jennings County after a body was found in a lake. [WLKY]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) appeared to offer a thinly veiled rebuke of liberal economist Paul Krugman on Wednesday by highlighting a “scary” too-big-to-fail ruling from federal bank regulators. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating after someone opened fire at an apartment that is across the street from where a child was hit and killed Friday. [WAVE3]

The Turd Cruz-Mitch McConnell slap fight is getting crazier by the minute. [The Hill]

Louisville Metro Councilwoman Jessica Green wants police officers to spend more time patrolling on foot and bike in an effort to build better relationships with communities. [WFPL]

Twelve state attorneys general have asked the federal Department of Education to revoke the recognition of the much-criticized Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. [ProPublica]

The Old Forester Distillery project will give a fresh look to some very old structures on Main Street in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

Gathered in the Nolan Solar Building, the former art students met with their teacher, chatted for a while and marveled at their finished product, a mural spanning an entire wall along a staircase. [News & Tribune]

All The News Is About Shootings & Such

Located about a mile from each other, Roosevelt-Perry and Byck elementary schools have long served the children of the Russell neighborhood – the majority of whom come from low-income families. [WDRB]

Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has filed a federal suit alleging the state’s Judicial Conduct Commission, which is considering possible disciplinary action against the judge, has violated his First Amendment rights. [C-J/AKN]

If you live in Louisville, you’re going to get shot dead or run over by a car. Or maybe hit by a train or school bus. Right? That’s the sense one gets by watching local news. [WHAS11]

Windstream announced Monday that it is launching one-gigabit Internet service in Lexington, as Windstream and Time Warner continue to battle for area customers. In a news release, Windstream said it was the first provider to bring the service to residential and small business customers in Fayette County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man is dead following a shooting at the intersection of 32nd and Kentucky streets. [WLKY]

But Matt Bevin, your half-wit governor, would have! Republican presidential candidate John Kasich said Sunday that he wouldn’t have signed a North Carolina law that banned cities in the state from passing anti-discrimination measures and mandated that transgender people use the public bathrooms for the gender they were assigned at birth. [HuffPo]

Another day, another shooting on Compassionate City. This time involving a juvenile. [WAVE3]

Here’s more of the University of Kentucky just TRYING to make you hate it. Moonshine packs a punch in this corner of Appalachia, where making hooch is steeped in local lore. But when Colin Fultz, the grandson of a bootlegger, opened a gourmet distillery here last fall, he ran afoul of a spirit even more potent than white lightning: University of Kentucky basketball. [NY Times]

Louisville’s planning commission is calling a public hearing to get input on proposed zoning regulations for short-term rentals. [WFPL]

It is only April, but some on Wall Street are already predicting a rotten 2016 for U.S. banks. [Reuters]

Kevin Cogan, who is battling to build a high-rise condominium in Cherokee Triangle, said the ease with which people can appeal rulings could start sinking big projects. [Business First]

Angela Renfro promised herself that if she ever escaped her life in prostitution and human trafficking, she would help every woman and child she could. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Watch John Yarmuth Speak Some Truth

In the summer of 2008, David Kaelin attended a series of meetings on the future of land along the Floyds Fork creek, which flows about two miles from his eastern Jefferson County farm. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville’s Faculty Senate is set to discuss its views on the fate of embattled President James Ramsey behind closed doors. [C-J/AKN]

While police continue to investigate who shot and killed a UofL student, her friends and family at a local church are responding to her death. [WHAS11]

For the first time, the Kentucky Revenue Department this year is asking taxpayers to wait. Kentucky and other states are becoming more forthright, telling taxpayers they’ll have to be patient and allow time for verification before refunds are sent. [H-L]

A Jefferson County judge is asking the state to dismiss ethics charges against him. Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has thrown out jury panels that lack diversity. [WLKY]

Landlords and property owners who exclude people with criminal records from renting or buying may be violating the law, according to new guidance released by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. [HuffPo]

Kentucky voters rarely have had clout in determining who the Democratic and Republican parties will nominate in the race for president. The Commonwealth has too few people and too few delegates at stake for a May primary to do little more than reinforce or contradict a result already reached. [WAVE3]

Even after years of education, training and experience as an obstetrician/gynecologist, I am never prepared to deliver the news that a pregnancy is abnormal. There is no good way to tell a pregnant woman — a woman who may already be wearing maternity clothes, thinking about names and decorating the nursery — that we have identified a fetal anomaly that can lead to significant, lifelong disability or even her baby’s death. [WaPo]

Like many folks, Louisvillians can be rebellious nostalgists, railing against the churn of urban change. [WFPL]

Few people are thanking the president for low unemployment. Instead, many discouraged workers are attracted to Donald J. Trump’s economic message. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville board of trustees and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin reached a settlement last month in Franklin Circuit Court with the Kentucky Justice Resource Center Inc. regarding a racial imbalance on the board. [Business First]

An agreement for a development at 10th and Spring streets that’s been in the works since May has finally been signed. [News & Tribune]

Anti-Jim Ramsey Chorus Getting Louder

The University of Louisville basketball team won’t play in either the Atlantic Coast or NCAA basketball tournaments. But that doesn’t mean there is a lack of news surrounding the program. [WDRB]

When will the Jefferson County Board of Education act to hold Donna Hargens accountable? Never, most likely. David Jones and his pals can’t see the forest for the trees. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possumbility Compassionate City! [WHAS11]

After reading about peaceful protesters being cursed and assaulted at Donald Trump rallies, I went online to watch videos of his appearance in Louisville last week. They reveal much about the Republican candidate, the followers he attracts and his effect on them. [Tom Eblen]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Remember stories like this the next time you complain about first responders. They save your lives and the lives of your pets. [WLKY]

Twenty million previously uninsured people have gained health coverage since the Affordable Care Act became law in 2010, President Barack Obama said during a speech in Milwaukee Thursday. [HuffPo]

A well-respected professor emeritus and surgeon who’s spent much of his life helping build the reputation of the University of Louisville is now weighing in on the ongoing controversy surrounding UofL President Dr. James Ramsey. [WAVE3]

The GOP presidential race has been brutal and often vulgar. So how do you talk to kids about it? [NPR]

Proposed regulations saying where short-term rental units may be located in Louisville will go before a city planning committee later this week. [WFPL]

Gov. Matt Bevin took to social media Monday, the day before four critical special House elections, to pressure House Democrats to pass a budget. [Ronnie Ellis]

John Schnatter, along with the Charles Koch Foundation, has awarded a $3.25 million grant to Schnatter’s alma mater, Ball State University, in order to fund the new John H. Schnatter Institute for Entrepreneurship and Free Enterprise. [Business First]

Judge Vicki Carmichael was not one of three finalists selected for the Indiana Supreme Court on Friday. [News & Tribune]

Fun New JCPS Scandal Just Exploded

JCPS has continued to accept about $500,000 a year in state money for the program. But instead of using the money for reading-related costs, JCPS has quietly diverted the funding to pay for school nurses since the 2008-09 school year — a fact that surprised officials at the Kentucky Department of Education, several Louisville-area lawmakers and a member of the JCPS board. [WDRB]

Jim Ramsey, who still cowardly says off-the-record that Robert Felner was innocent, thinks it’s a good idea to attack the newsmedia. Smooth move, Jimbo! [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is still freaking out about the East End Bridge crane collapse. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s Supreme Court has set some conditions on what types of political comments judicial candidates can make when running for judgeships. [H-L]

You already know Compassionate City loves it some pedestrian accidents so here’s another. [WLKY]

Donald Trump comfortably defeated his Republican presidential rivals on Saturday in South Carolina’s GOP primary. [HuffPo]

The controversial tell-all memoir that rocked the UofL basketball program is required reading for at least one course at the school. [WAVE3]

Suck it, Time Warner & AT&T. Glad we turned down your ad revenue even though we wanted/need it. [Tech Dirt]

Years of neglecting to fund infrastructure repairs is setting the city up for a “day of reckoning,” according to Democratic Councilman Brent Ackerson. [WFPL]

Six months after Kentucky borrowed millions to build a 3,400-mile broadband network, the state is having to rethink one of the revenue sources it had expected to be available to pay off the bonds. [Bloomberg]

You know you love watching Jim Ramsey deny reports that he held a secret meeting. [Business First]

Mechanical failure combined with strong winds brought down a crane late Friday morning at the site east-end bridge construction, a spokeswoman for the Ohio River Bridges Project said. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Needs About A Billion Dollars

The long-awaited opening of a new elementary school this summer will come at the same time Jefferson County Public Schools is expected to unveil a plan to deal with a growing problem – more than $880 million in facility needs scattered across the district. [WDRB]

Conversations about alleged drug activity on the nextdoor.com social network site for Crescent Hill are increasing, and residents were urged to report such incidents to the police at a recent gathering. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It will apparently take a second resignation from the UofL Board of Trustees before Governor Matt Bevin can act to replace Paul Diaz. [WHAS11]

More than a dozen states have strengthened laws over the past two years to keep firearms out of the hands of domestic abusers, a rare area of consensus in the nation’s highly polarized debate over guns. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian accident. [WLKY]

U.S. employment gains slowed more than expected in January as the boost to hiring from unseasonably mild weather faded, but surging wages and an unemployment rate at an eight-year low suggested the labor market recovery remains firm. [HuffPo]

Hundreds turned out to say goodbye to local civil rights pioneer, Benjamin Shobe, Sunday at his visitation. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder if you haven’t yet read this. How do you stop states and cities from forcing more disclosure of so-called dark money in politics? Get the debate to focus on an “average Joe,” not a wealthy person. Find examples of “inconsequential donation amounts.” Point out that naming donors would be a threat to “innocents,” including their children, families and co-workers. And never call it dark money. “Private giving” sounds better. [ProPublica]

On the corner of Breckenridge and Logan streets, at the edge of Smoketown, there’s a giant hole in the ground. It’s an active construction site, with trucks and heavy machinery working behind a barbed-wire fence. [WFPL]

There are some subtle indications Republicans may be rethinking the wisdom of trying to make right-to work-an issue in this year’s legislative elections. [Ronnie Ellis]

The International Boat Builders’ Exhibition & Conference (known as IBEX) is leaving Louisville for Florida. [Business First]

In the May primary election, two familiar faces will vie for a judge’s seat on opposite sides of the aisle. [News & Tribune]