Fischer: Your White Privilege Is Showing

Officials have released the names of two people who were recently killed in separate incidents. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell and District Court Judge Stephanie Pearce Burke are again butting heads, this time over Burke’s handling of a case originally set for trial this week. If you haven’t kept up with this, it’s crazy. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer says that if you aren’t doing anything illegal, you’ve got nothing to worry about. Which should ring hollow for just about anybody with the ability to think on their own. Those 150+ shootings are super-compassionate. Nothing to see here, puppies and rainbows. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray applauded the work of the Urban County Council in its deliberation of his proposed $323 million budget on Tuesday but declined to say if he would veto any changes council made to the budget. [H-L]

State officials plan to keep an outreach center open for one more year in a southern Indiana county that’s facing the largest HIV outbreak in state history. [WLKY]

Don’t call Chris Christie rich. The Clintons say they still have bills to pay. And Mike Huckabee? Despite his wealth, he was born “blue collar, not blue blood.” [HuffPo]

This white lady assaulted a police officer by allegedly grabbing her throat. She wasn’t arrested or shot. [WAVE3]

Roughly half of deaths from 12 smoking-related cancers may be linked directly to cigarette use, a U.S. study estimates. [Reuters]

Some would-be homebuyers in Louisville are facing tough conditions. New figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors show that the number of homes available for sale is down 17 percent from last year. [WFPL]

Two years ago in the Netherlands, artist Paul de Kort designed an 81-acre park near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. His assignment? To use nothing but landscaping to dampen the noise of airplanes. Such a project had never been attempted—and the science behind his design was discovered almost by accident. [Gizmodo]

Commercial real estate developer William P. Butler intends to purchase Lexington, Ky.-based American Founders Bank and move its headquarters to Louisville, according to a news release from the bank. [Business First]

Contractual issues between the city and the New Albany police union could be ruled upon soon. [News & Tribune]

Why Is Bullitt County Still So Awful?

Kentucky State Police are now investigating the Bullitt County Animal Shelter.Shelter employee Delsie Williams says Kentucky State Police came to her Mt. Washington home on Monday afternoon with a search warrant. She says they took her cell phone, hard drive, laptops, desktop computers and other items. Her attorney tells WDRB he’s still trying to figure out the reason. [WDRB]

The city’s codes and regulations department hit Louisville metro government with a “public nuisance” violation for a piece of property it owns. In a Jan. 23 notice, a city inspector found the historic Colonial Garden sites in south Louisville had “several rotten structural beams” and that “all exterior surfaces need to be put into good repair.” [C-J/AKN]

A fundraiser will take place Wednesday at Spinelli’s Pizzeria in Downtown Louisville for an employee who was stabbed while delivering pizza to Norton Hospital. [WHAS11]

Kentucky has taken steps to prohibit electioneering on public property within 100 feet of polling places for the May 19 primary election. [H-L]

Visitation will be held Thursday for U.S. District Judge John Heyburn. [WLKY]

Food stamp recipients are more likely to be obese than the general population, according to new research from the federal government. [HuffPo]

The childhood home of Muhammad Ali will be restored, it’s new owner promises. George Bochetto, an attorney from Philadelphia, has bought half of the home and now shares ownership with real estate investor, Jared Weiss, of Las Vegas. [WAVE3]

Last year’s bid to undo Obama’s immigration actions deemed a failure, time to move on to other priorities. [Politico]

The Jefferson County Board of Education is seeking residents’ input on the shaping of the district’s five-year strategic plan. [WFPL]

Parents worry about a child getting a concussion in the heat of competition, but they also need to be thinking about what happens during practices, a study finds. High school and college football players are more likely to suffer a concussion during practices than in a game, according a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. [NPR]

Back in September, Sweden-based AB Electrolux announced plans to acquire GE Appliances, a Louisville-based division of General Electric Co., for $3.3 billion. At the time, officials with both companies speculated that the transaction would close in 2015, after making its way through the regulatory process. [Business First]

With eyes on the six months ahead, Mayor Mike Moore and City Councilman Dennis Julius are poised to battle for the mayor’s seat in November. [News & Tribune]

There’s All Kinds Of Teacher Fun Lately

The Economy Inn on Bardstown Road near the Watterson Expressway has been the center of controversy lately after failing recent inspections. [WDRB]

Olu Stevens may be a jackass sometimes but he said what needed to be said. [C-J/AKN]

Any predictions on how long Thunder Over Louisville will be a thing? [WHAS11]

Polls show former Kentucky Supreme Court Justice Will T. Scott running a distant last in the four-way primary to become the Republican nominee for governor on May 19. [H-L]

More than 200 teams were in Louisville over the weekend looking for a basketball championship. [WLKY]

If the Supreme Court legalizes same-sex marriage this year, it will be largely because of a group of gay Americans who were courageous enough to subject their families to public scrutiny in order to become the faces of a movement. [HuffPo]

A female teacher at Academy @ Shawnee has been suspended while officials investigate claims of inappropriate conduct with a student. [WAVE3]

In the first legal test of the Obama administration’s plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, two of three federal judges hearing a challenge to the regulations on Thursday expressed skepticism about weighing in before they are formally adopted. [Reuters]

Jefferson County Public Schools administrators are asking the Kentucky Board of Education to give schools some leeway on test scores from students learning English. [WFPL]

Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more than 16.5 million people — particularly low-income Americans and people of color — have enrolled in an insurance plan for the first time, giving proponents of the health care law reason to praise it as a tool in protecting marginalized populations. A new study, however, points out that will take much more than Obamacare itself to close the persistent racial and socioeconomic disparities in health care access. [ThinkProgress]

Just days after Norton Commons announced plans for a bourbon-themed bed and breakfast, the 600-acre residential and business development in northeast Jefferson County, unveiled plans Friday for a luxury apartment complex at the corner of Meeting Street and Norton Commons Boulevard. [Business First]

A high school teacher was suspended and is under investigation following allegations of inappropriate electronic communication with a student, according to an email sent to Clarksville Community Schools parents and guardians Thursday. [News & Tribune]

Needle Exchanges Are A Big No-Brainer

The Hertz Investment Group, a California company that owns office buildings around the country, pocketed $14.25 million this month when it sold the Starks building in downtown Louisville, according to a deed filed Friday with the Jefferson County Clerk’s office. [WDRB]

“I am offended. … I am deeply offended that they would be victimized by an individual and express some kind of fear of all black men,” he said. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another Jefferson County Public Schools bus crash. [WHAS11]

Venturing into the epicenter of Kentucky’s fight against heroin addiction, national drug czar Michael Botticelli on Thursday touted needle-exchange programs as effective grassroots initiatives to combat the spread of infectious disease and to steer heroin users into treatment. [H-L]

A new plea deal could mean former Clark County Sheriff Danny Rodden will avoid imprisonment. [WLKY]

When Rand Paul announced his candidacy for president last week, he declared his plans to help America “take our country back.” Singer-songwriter Jill Sobule has an important question for the 2016 contender: “What the fuck do you mean?” [HuffPo]

Louisville is becoming known for pedestrian deaths and school bus accidents. Looks like Indiana/I-65 are gonna become known for bus crashes. [WAVE3]

The Commonwealth of Kentucky has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) seeking competitive proposals from Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) to coordinate the healthcare services provided to more than 1.1 million Kentuckians who have met eligibility requirements and are enrolled in either traditional Medicaid or Medicaid expansion. The current contracts with Anthem, Aetna (Coventry Cares), Humana (CareSource), Passport and Wellcare are set to expire on June 30, 2015. The new contracts will take effect July 1, 2015. [Press Release]

Louisville Metro Council members want to start a needle exchange program in the city. [WFPL]

Look what the Kentucky Baptist Convention bigots are up to these days. Promoting their bigoted Sunrise Children’s Services scam. [Ashland Independent]

Louisville is No. 46 on a list of the most literate cities, according to a recent report that measures literacy based on the number of local bookstores, residents’ educational levels, access to Internet and library resources, and newspaper circulation. [Business First]

It’s “civic prayer” versus the Lord’s Prayer, as the New Albany City Council will be presented with dueling resolutions that call for changes to the moment of reflection at the start of each meeting. [News & Tribune]

Get Ready: Everybody Is Gonna Get Run Over

Good fucking grief. And you wonder why there’s a behemoth of a racial divide in Louisville. [WDRB]

What? Tom Owen has gone against his word to his constituents? Surely not. Dollars to doughnuts he blames it on old age or something shady like that. Several Louisville Metro Council members have proposed a resolution asking Metro Government to stop issuing and enforcing violations against homeowners renting space through websites such as Airbnb as the city weighs new regulations to address such rentals. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Jeffersonville has a new police chief. Mayor Mike Moore has appointed 21-year police veteran Kenny Kavanaugh to the post. Kavanaugh is the first African American to lead the department. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky students from the Bluegrass State will pay 3 percent more for tuition and fees this fall, an increase that brings tuition to $10,780 a year for first-year students. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian struck in Possibility City! An 8-year-old girl was injured Monday evening after being hit by a car. [WLKY]

An obscure item in the president’s new budget would put an end to the longstanding practice of states and cities using tax-exempt bonds to finance professional sports arenas, a practice that costs the U.S. Treasury $146 million, according to a 2012 Bloomberg analysis. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there was another one. Police and an EMS crew are responding after a pedestrian was hit by a vehicle on East Muhammad Ali Boulevard at South Jackson Street. [WAVE3]

A hundred years from now, humans may remember 2014 as the year that we first learned that we may have irreversibly destabilized the great ice sheet of West Antarctica, and thus set in motion more than 10 feet of sea level rise. [WaPo]

The public will have a chance later this month to offer input on the tentative selection of a Virginia company to handle electronic tolling on new Ohio River bridges linking Kentucky and Indiana. [WFPL]

Will T. Scott, the 67-year-old former state Supreme Court Justice running for the Republican nomination for governor, trails three other Republicans in the polls and in fundraising. [Ronnie Ellis]

Growth in Kentucky’s bourbon industry is probably something you’re aware of by now. But that growth has helped fuel an escalation of related services. [Business First]

The Indiana Commission on Judicial Qualifications cut short its investigation of former Clark County Judge Jerry Jacobi, after he agreed to never again seek a judicial office. [News & Tribune]

Do You Want Greg Fischer To Raise Your Taxes?

Plans will move ahead to close the New Albany Pillsbury plant, despite efforts by the mayor and city council to keep the company — and its 400 jobs — from leaving the city, a union representative says. [WDRB]

Carolyn Miller Cooper, executive director of the city’s Human Relations Commission, struggled to sleep Monday night. [C-J/AKN]

On a chilly night in downtown Louisville rainbow colors warmed the night sky as the lights of the Big 4 Bridge officially turned on. [WHAS11]

Requesting help to avoid a “costly and time-consuming legal challenge,” U.S. Sen. Rand Paul is asking members of the Republican Party of Kentucky’s central committee to create a presidential caucus in 2016. [H-L]

A Louisville man is behind bars in connection with a string of home burglaries. [WLKY]

Of course Rand Paul is appearing in a crazy ass anti-gay documentary. The only thing that’s surprising is that it’s not a pro-Jim Crow documentary. [HuffPo]

Police say an inmate escaped from Metro Corrections after taking the place of another inmate at the office for the home incarceration program. [WAVE3]

Louis Brandeis was wrong. The lawyer and Supreme Court justice famously declared that sunlight is the best disinfectant, and we have unquestioningly embraced that advice ever since. [ProPublica]

As an anti-smoking rally descended on the Capitol rotunda on Wednesday, a bill that would ban smoking in public places across Kentucky is still waiting to be heard on the state House floor. [WFPL]

If you missed it yesterday, a Circuit Court judge entered the most remarkable eff you Order of Recusal we’ve ever seen. And it was in the Joshua Powell case in Montgomery County! [Page One]

A new ranking of public universities was a mixed bag for the University of Louisville, which scored high in admissions and has shown growth in diversity, costs and advancement but is still struggling with prestige nationally. [Business First]

Television and radio stations were approved for each of Greater Clark County Schools’ high schools at Tuesday night’s board meeting, with funding to get figured out next month. [News & Tribune]

Do you really want to trust GREG FISCHER to raise your taxes? Of course you don’t. [Ronnie Ellis]

Of Course They’re Going To Dig Up Those Trees

The Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission this week issued the reprimand to Jefferson District Court Judge Sandra McLaughlin for comments that were “unnecessary, undignified and inconsistent with the presumption of innocence,” according to the Dec. 29 order. [WDRB]

A federal judge in Michigan has dismissed a suit filed last summer by Ford Motor Co. hourly employees, several working at the Louisville Assembly Plant, who alleged that the International United Auto Workers had breached a duty of fair representation. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. Police are investigating in the Parkland Neighborhood after a man’s body was found inside a home Tuesday. [WHAS11]

Time Warner Cable holds the bottom two spots in the latest list of companies on the American Customer Satisfaction Index. [H-L]

The coroner has identified a man killed Tuesday in a shooting in the Parkland neighborhood. [WLKY]

While few people say they’ve completely recovered from the recession, many are beginning to notice a change. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet officials plan to dig up trees they say someone mistakenly planted along Brownsboro Road, ending a controversy that will cost taxpayers thousands of dollars. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles gave America the modern street gang. Groups like the Crips and MS-13 have spread from coast to coast, and even abroad. But on Southern California’s streets they have been vanishing. Has L.A. figured out how to stop the epidemic it set loose on the world? [Pacific Standard]

Even before police practices came under national scrutiny, Louisville Metro Police leaders were exploring a new technology that police critics and advocates alike say would improve relations between officers and the public. Body cameras have been under consideration in LMPD for nearly two years, police officials said. [WFPL]

The number of Americans filing new claims for jobless benefits rose more than expected last week, but the trend remained consistent with sustained strength in the labor market. [Reuters]

In recent years, Louisville Water Co. officials have started thinking regionally as a means to take advantage of the company’s vast Ohio River water supply and make money to offset reductions in everyday water usage. [Business First]

The same commission that New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook petitioned in May for help voted unanimously Monday to fire the 20-year veteran of the department for improper conduct. [News & Tribune]