How Will The Fischer Crew Ruin It?

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How will Greg Fischer’s people ruin it this time? As the shock waves continue to reverberate from Wal-Mart’s decision not to build a store in west Louisville, there are efforts on several fronts to lure the company back, and prevent similar situations in the future. [WDRB]

Struggling to provide for themselves and their growing family, George and Katrina Ellis found themselves on the brink of homelessness several years ago when they lost their rental home and couldn’t find another they could afford. [C-J/AKN]

Metro Police are trying to determine what led to a man’s death after he was shot and taken to the hospital Saturday night. [WHAS11]

The only thing more frustrating than being a Democrat these days is being a journalist. The Gallup Poll shows that public trust in the news media is at an historic low, although we still have higher ratings than Congress. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Council members have introduced an ordinance to protect the environment. [WLKY]

The House of Representatives’ Science Committee sent out a Twitter message Thursday afternoon that appears to mock “climate alarmists,” an odd and disconcerting move considering the group is tasked with overseeing the government’s role in scientific research. [HuffPo]

Six people have been killed since Thursday in Louisville. On Monday morning, Louisville Metro Police addressed the city’s latest cases. [WAVE3]

In the back reaches of the Dakota Access Pipeline protest camp, U.S. military veterans, armed with saws, hammers and other tools, are quietly building barracks, an infirmary and a mess hall. [Reuters]

At a Kentucky Farm Bureau event on Saturday, Sen. Mitch McConnell thanked rural voters for helping Republicans take control of the state House of Representatives and White House during elections last month. [WFPL]

Donald Trump has called climate change a “hoax” and said he plans to unburden American industries from Obama-era requirements to limit emissions of carbon dioxide and the other greenhouse gases causing the planet to warm. [ProPublica]

The University of Louisville’s chief financial and administration officer, Harlan Sands, will leave the university, effective Jan. 6. [Business First]

While Floyd Memorial Hospital was sold to Baptist Health Louisville several months ago, the saga surrounding the proceeds from that sale has been far from settled. That could soon change. [News & Tribune]

Fight The Urge To Roll Your Eyes At The UofL Foundation…

As LMPD Chief Steve Conrad met with neighbors at a peace walk in the California neighborhood Tuesday night, some of the rank and file met with their union. [WDRB]

Promising a “new era of harmony” between the University of Louisville and its foundation, the foundation’s new chairwoman has announced she’s formed a committee to review its governance and create “a structure of which the entire community can be proud.” [C-J/AKN]

The University of Louisville Foundation will meet for the first time Friday with its newly elected chairwoman. [WHAS11]

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission wants more time to complete its environmental review of a proposed conversion of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline that runs through Kentucky. [H-L]

The Louisville Water Company has scheduled another public meeting on a controversial power generator. [WLKY]

The entire full-time University of Kentucky journalism faculty is calling for UK President Eli Capilouto to drop his suit against the school’s student newspaper and apologize for criticism leveled at the paper and its editor at a Board of Trustees meeting last Friday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro police are investigating whether someone with a weapon followed a Jefferson County Public School bus on its after school route. [WAVE3]

Police in Florida and other states are building up private DNA databases, in part by collecting voluntary samples from people not charged with — or even suspected of — any particular crime. [ProPublica]

A new report says some Kentuckians could be drinking a cancer-causing chemical called chromium-6. [WFPL]

If you’re a voter who cares about stopping climate change, you really need to read Donald Trump’s newest economic policy plan. [ThinkProgress]

Developers of the $60 million South Pointe Commons in Fern Creek are wasting no time after winning a major court battle last month. [Business First]

Legislation up for consideration could cause budget headaches for Greater Clark County Schools — and other districts across the state — as it prepares to finalize 2017 budgets next month. [News & Tribune]

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Everyone’s In A Big Jim Ramsey Froth

University of Louisville interim President Neville Pinto expressed “deep concern” just one hour before a board committee of the U of L Foundation had been scheduled to meet Monday and award a rumored payout to Foundation President James Ramsey. [WDRB]

The plaintiffs who have blocked a Wal-Mart superstore in western Louisville for more than a year agreed to end their litigation two months ago, but the deal deteriorated amid a fight between attorneys over the negotiating process. [C-J/AKN]

Really, it was tons and tons of hype for nothing. A special meeting of the Executive Committee of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees was cancelled just an hour and a half before it was scheduled. [WHAS11]

UK is the worst these days. After weeks of national publicity, the University of Kentucky proceeded this week with a lawsuit against its independent student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This made for a fun Labor Day. Police are investigating after a teen was shot on Beuchel Bank Road. [WLKY]

When Congress gets back from recess, one of the first items on Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton’s (D-DC) agenda will be salary histories. [ThinkProgress]

Can you believe there was this much hype? The executive committee of the University of Louisville Foundation canceled a special meeting that was set to take place on Labor Day. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama snorkeled on Thursday in the electric-blue water off Midway Atoll, a remote coral reef that serves as a reminder of both modern global climate challenges and the United State’s dominance in the Pacific since its World War Two victory there. [Reuters]

In a single night in Louisville, more than 20 people arrived in emergency rooms for suspected heroin overdoses. One of them died. [WFPL]

Despite yet more evidence of trouble with the Red Cross’ disaster response — this time to floods in Louisiana — Apple, Amazon, T-Mobile, and many others have made the venerable charity the exclusive conduit for helping victims. [ProPublica]

The list of new hotels in downtown Louisville continues to grow. [Business First]

Health officials in Indiana are moving forward with actions needed to implement the needle exchange that was approved Monday, and in the works for nearly a year. [News & Tribune]

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Really, Indiana? The Lewis & Clark Bridge?

This is silly, Indiana. We already have a Clark-named bridge. [WDRB]

Citing self-dealing, thefts, conflicts of interests and other embarrassments and scandals, dissident members of the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees called for a vote of no-confidence Tuesday in embattled President James Ramsey. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder. Another day, another murder. Another day, another murder. [WHAS11]

Here’s your chance to redirect tax dollars to backward-ass religious “schools” that discriminate and focus on profit over education. As expected, Republican state lawmakers have introduced legislation that would allow public charter schools in Kentucky, including a pilot program in Fayette County. [H-L]

New numbers show February was a big month for automakers. Ford Motor Company said its sales rose 20 percent from one year ago. [WLKY]

Voters in 13 states and one U.S. territory made their presidential picks on Super Tuesday 2016. Just a reminder in case you got drunk and blanked out for a day or so. [HuffPo]

After nearly four hours, the Bullitt County Fiscal Court tabled the decision on the budget for the Bullitt County Sheriff. [WAVE3]

Unlike many films about reporters, “Spotlight” accurately depicts the frustrations and joys of breaking a big story, from the drudgery of spreadsheets to the electric thrill of revelatory interviews. [ProPublica]

Kentucky Auditor Mike Harmon will charge the University of Louisville as much as $125,000 for an audit examining its governance structure, he said in a recent letter to U of L President James Ramsey. [WFPL]

The United States has the most advanced health care in the world. There are gleaming medical centers across the country where doctors cure cancers, transplant organs and bring people back from near death. [NPR]

Why did Jeff Ruby “ban” Donald Trump from his Louisville restaurant? Publicity. [Business First]

After 30 years of serving summer treats at the corner of Country Club Drive and Graybrook Lane in New Albany, Mom & Pop’s Cone Corner looks like it is closing for good. [News & Tribune]

Suck At Your Job? Get Rewarded At JCPS

The Jefferson County Board of Education is looking to extend Superintendent Donna Hargens’ contract by four years. Louisville’s wealthy electeds always reward those who bumble along. [WDRB]

A jury has awarded nearly $5 million to a courier for a Louisville law firm who suffered a traumatic brain injury when he was hit by a TARC bus. [C-J/AKN]

There was no woe on Louisville’s amazing Walnut Street in the 1950’s and early 60’s. [WHAS11]

Ann Parrish remembers trying to wrangle and bundle her two toddlers during last winter’s cold snap so they could get on a bus to find another place to stay. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian hit by a vehicle in Possibility City. [WLKY]

James Risen reiterated on Tuesday a warning about the White House that he delivered nearly one year ago. [HuffPo]

From digging out driveways to checking on area seniors Good Samaritans have been out and about performing good deeds despite the cold. [WAVE3]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, offering fresh evidence that the labor market was gathering steam. [Reuters]

It was about noon on Wednesday and Kenneth Williams hadn’t eaten breakfast. In fact, he hasn’t eaten since Tuesday afternoon–a peanut butter sandwich. [WFPL]

Google is warning that the government’s quiet plan to expand the FBI’s authority to remotely access computer files amounts to a “monumental” constitutional concern. [National Journal]

A Missouri real-estate developer is planning to build one of the largest industrial buildings in Jefferson County on land that it’s buying near Louisville International Airport. [Business First]

More students at Greater Clark County Schools are starting to take advantage of the state’s 21st Century Scholars program, and administrators hope to get more seventh- and eighth-graders to sign up early. [News & Tribune]

Some Journo Ethics Would Be Great For Louisville

Folks wonder why everyday people are distrustful of media?

Check this out from a WDRB reporter:


Her job is to objectively cover things like LMPD.

We all make mistakes, sure. Every day. But she snapped when asked if she’d be reimbursing the police to avoid any perception of ethics issues. Rather than seize the moment to say, “Ooh, good call, right on top of that.” Straight to defense and snapping. In addition to previous scuffles over police coverage in the past (like the time she raised red flags while covering a murder near Phoenix Hill Tavern), this is… Not that great.

WDRB should at the very least offer to reimburse LMPD to fix this. If they can’t afford to or don’t want to, surely the local journo community will chip in to help avoid the appearance of impropriety.

Everyone from Joe Gerth to the folks at my hometown newspaper in Eastern Kentucky refuse even the appearance of an ethical dilemma. I’ve seen Gerth turn down water from people he’s covering — despite water being pretty much acceptable on all journalistic fronts. Chuck Olmstead often paid for bottles of water. Francene wouldn’t even let another journalist (which she barely was) buy her coffee.

Good grief. No wonder people have given up on trust. Something that’s sorely needed today.

WDRB trolls will start attacking in 3, 2, 1 instead of doing the right thing…

But kudos to the cops for being great in this situation. Even though they wouldn’t do this for just any random person on the street unless they’re elderly or in dire straits.

Why jump on WDRB? Because WDRB sure loves attacking people like Phillip Bailey for daring to say and do what no one else in this town will. And this isn’t the first time something like this has occurred with the station’s reporters.

They spent the better part of two days attacking Bailey for daring stand up to the asshats he worked for at WFPL — going so far as to insinuate he was unethical, biased, blah blah blah.

Every week it seems like there’s someone else in Louisville media these folks want to jump. When it comes to them? We’re not allowed to ask questions or raise concerns because we get personally attacked. Even Eric Flack is better than that (he, too, turns things like this down).

More Of That Epic Greg Fischer Transparency

Just in case you needed more proof that Greg Fischer is so out-of-touch with the average citizen it’s painful. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer says he has concerns about the proposal to increase the minimum wage in Louisville. [WDRB]

Because that’ll make his already incompetent team function better with all those distractions? Mayor Greg Fischer is moving his office to the Kentucky Center during IdeaFestival next week. [C-J/AKN]

Whiskey Row is already home to several bars and restaurants. Owners and managers are reacting to the news of Brown-Forman’s plans to build an Old Forester distillery at 117 and 119 Main Street. [WHAS11]

Way to go, Kentucky! Substantiated reports of child abuse and neglect in Kentucky continued to increase last fiscal year, with substance abuse remaining a leading cause of the problem, according to the latest state report on the issue. [H-L]

Can you imagine? What a horrible way to die. A person is dead after becoming trapped in a septic tank Thursday evening in the 14000 block of Potter Road in southeastern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

The U.S. has more low-paying jobs than any other country in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, an economic group of 34 developed countries. [HuffPo]

General Electric signaled plans to make a major investment at Appliance Park in Louisville even as it sells the appliance division to Electrolux. [WAVE3]

Remember that time we broke a big story about Greg Fischer’s corrupt administration and he tried to cover everything up? Then an investigative committee was formed to tan his hide? And a criminal investigation was launched? Yeah? Now there’s a whistleblower law being created to combat Greg Fischer’s nonsense and it’s going to be called SADIE’S LAW. It’s the biggest F.U. to a mayor in Louisville in decades. The scandal he tried to cover up will now haunt him forever in the form of a law. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Louisville Metro Council candidates Bill Hollander and Laura Rice jousted in a debate Monday night over a variety of issues, including a proposed wage hike. [WFPL]

Eighteen years after it was published, “Dark Alliance,” the San Jose Mercury News’s bombshell investigation into links between the cocaine trade, Nicaragua’s Contra rebels, and African American neighborhoods in California, remains one of the most explosive and controversial exposés in American journalism. [The Intercept]

The Louisville Bats could have a new majority owner within the next month. [Business First]

The mayor and some council members are changing marina plans just in time for Wednesday’s redevelopment meeting, hoping this version will have the most support from all decision makers. [News & Tribune]

You Are Already Drunk For Oaks At 8:00 A.M.

Yum! Brands is about to get a new CEO. David Novak, who has served in the top spot since 1999, is stepping down to become the executive chairman. [WDRB]

Twelve days before the Kentucky Derby, trainer Steve Asmussen pointedly started a conversation with reporters with a query of his own: “Any PETA questions?” [C-J/AKN]

After nearly 12 hours of deliberation a jury sided with the Louisville Metro Police Department in the case of Richard Pearson. [WHAS11]

Vinceremos, which means to conquer or overcome in Latin, is the name of a Derby contender and of a therapeutic riding center for disabled kids and adults in Florida. [H-L]

You can’t even call yourself Jessica Rabbit and give “massages” in Louisville these days without getting arrested. [WLKY]

Here’s the latest thing the horsey set in Kentucky is freaking out about. [Fox Hill Farm]

As Derby Day nears Kentucky’s signature sport faces greater competition from other states that lure horses and trainers with bigger purses. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky State Police, in partnership with the U.S Drug Enforcement Agency, collected 1,200 pounds of prescription medications in the Eighth National Prescription Drug Take Back Day event held Saturday, April 26. [Press Release]

The Nieman Foundation for Journalism has selected 24 journalists as members of the 77th class of Nieman Fellows. Gabe Bullard is one of them. [Press Release]

This guy should not be allowed at the Kentucky Derby or anywhere near the Commonwealth of Kentucky. But he visits the state on a regular basis. Giving gays the death penalty? That sounds like something Frankfort would love. [Unreal]

If you order a mint julep at the track this week, you might notice that the mint sprigs are a bit shorter than usual. [WFPL]

The University of Louisville’s vice president of student affairs, Tom Jackson Jr., has been named president of Black Hills State University. [Business First]

Now that contractors have finished installing straight portions of lighted handrails on the Big Four Bridge ramp, all that remains before its opening is the curved sections and stair tower sections. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Singled Out For Pedestrian Death Rate

This should be hugely embarrassing/troubling. Louisville is receiving money from the government to help prevent pedestrian deaths. Louisville, Philadelphia and New York City are the three recipients. [WDRB]

Louisville is getting ready to monitor air pollution on a micro-level, potentially shedding light on city “hot spots” that could be damaging people’s health. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s junior Senator will be visiting Louisville on Monday. The event will take place at the Louisville Plate Glass Company on West Broadway. [WHAS11]

Hillary Rodham Clinton’s faith in God was shaped by her grandmother’s hymns and the bedtime prayers from her gruff Navy father, the former secretary of state told thousands of Methodist women Saturday. [H-L]

Just the kind of horrific news Louisville needs. Louisville Metro Police are investigating reports that a 4-year-old boy shot himself in the face. [WLKY]

UofL has selected Southern Illinois University administrator Kimberly Kempf-Leonard as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. [Press Release]

For the unemployed in Kentuckiana, a sure bet for a career with benefits and excellent pay comes from a new collaboration of groups in town. [WAVE3]

One idea floated in the aftermath of the string of violence by young people last month in downtown Louisville is strengthening the city’s curfew law. [WFPL]

The Obama Administration is urging the Supreme Court not to take up New York Times reporter James Risen’s plea to consider overturning a ruling that he must testify about his confidential sources for his reporting about a Central Intelligence Agency effort to undermine Iran’s nuclear program. [Politico]

Despite a local push to bring higher-speed Internet service to Louisville, at least one large telecommunications company won’t be looking to add upgraded service here — or in any part of Kentucky — in the near future. Warning: silly auto-play video. [Business First]

Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore’s recent public clash with the Indiana Department of Transportation over the opening date for the Big Four Bridge has caused Clark County officials to worry that future projects could be jeopardized if the city is involved. [News & Tribune]

Jere Downs Hit The Nail On The Head Again

Kentucky taxpayers have already spent a half-million dollars – and could spend much more in coming weeks – in a court fight to keep a nonprofit Louisville mental health agency from fleeing the state’s troubled pension system. [WDRB]

Go read this story from Jere Downs and take 100% of it to heart. This is Louisville. Not some out-of-touch hype. Not some rich guy endorsement. Real. Honest. Everyday. We need to see more people speaking up like this. [C-J/AKN]

Welcome to the metro area, where this sort of discrimination against children still occurs. [WHAS11]

Greg Fischer endorsed the big business rich guy for Metro Council District 9 over about a dozen other people. After all these years among the commoners, Greg’s still erring on the side of the wealthy. Ignoring those who truly fuel his city. Here’s hoping someone without a silver spoon in their mouth wins that race. [Metro Council Mess]

Nearly 37,000 violent offenses occurred in Kentucky in 2012. On Saturday youth and adults joined together to learn more about the battle against violence and what they can do to help. [WLKY]

Two bills scheduled for action in the Senate Thursday demonstrate the political and strategic sides of legislating. [Ronnie Ellis]

After being pulled over by police, a man shot himself. This does not need to become a trend in Louisville. [WAVE3]

Of course Louisville powers that be will scoff at this look at power line messes. [AJ]

State funding for Quality and Charity Care Trust Inc., a fund that helps cover hospital care services to economically disadvantaged patients at University of Louisville Hospital, is being cut by more than half in Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear’s proposed budget for the next biennium. [Business First]

Henry A. Tandy was one of many newly freed slaves who moved to Lexington at the end of the Civil War. He would leave marks on this city that are still visible, and his son would do the same in New York. [Tom Eblen]

A quarter of Americans surveyed could not correctly answer that the Earth revolves around the sun and not the other way around, according to a report out Friday from the National Science Foundation. [WFPL]

It started five years ago in a seeming act of generosity by Pleasure Ridge Park High’s longtime head baseball coach, whose company offered to build a new turf infield at the school for free. [C-J/AKN]

Drew Salamone spends his days preparing slow-smoked ribs and brisket, but in the back of his mind is the prospect of Charlestown undergoing significant growth that will broaden his customer base at Bare Shoulder BBQ restaurant in the city’s downtown square. [News & Tribune]