John Yarmuth Running For Re-Election

Despite the deluded dreams of a handful of Republicans, Congressman John Yarmuth is running for re-election.

So said Yarmuth a moment ago at a press conference on Lower Brownsboro.

That’s fun and… wait for it… not surprising.

UPDATE —

If you want the press release, here it is:

LOUISVILLE, KY – Today, at his campaign headquarters, Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3) announced that he will seek a 6th term as Louisville’s U.S. Representative in 2016.

“As the lone progressive voice in Kentucky’s federal delegation, I take very seriously my responsibility to fight for our community’s values in Washington. The Republican Leadership has become more extreme, and they have increasingly pursued an agenda that threatens the livelihoods and opportunities of families in Louisville and throughout the nation,” Congressman Yarmuth said. “I believe the work of changing the priorities of the next Congress is critically important, and that’s why I’m running for reelection in 2016.”

Kentucky candidates for federal office are not able to file for 2016 campaigns until November, but Yarmuth didn’t want speculation about his race to distract from the issues in campaigns for statewide offices.

The second ranking Democrat on the Budget Committee, Congressman Yarmuth has advocated for a budget that prioritizes investments in communities, families, and businesses. While most now agree that income inequality is a major problem, the Congressman said the Republican budget would cut funding for job training, education and infrastructure, while trying to take health insurance away from millions of Americans. He has become a vocal and persistent opponent of the gimmicks in the current budget proposal that hide the massive costs of greater tax breaks to the well-off and well connected.

As a member of the Ways and Means Committee in the 111th Congress, Yarmuth was active in the development of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, which has helped more than 500,000 Kentuckians gain health insurance and cut Louisville’s uninsured rate by 81%. He remains a strong national advocate for the law and plans to continue working on improvements to ensure all Americans in need of medical attention get the care they need when they need it.

In the last Congress, Yarmuth served as part of the bipartisan group of 8, helping to craft a compromise comprehensive immigration reform bill that received wide support but was not brought up for a vote. He pledged to continue working for a law that promotes humane enforcement, provides a path to citizenship, and keeps families together.

Long before he was elected to Congress, Yarmuth was a strong advocate for equality for women and minorities, and he reaffirmed that commitment today . “America should be a place where, partners have the freedom to marry, prayer is personal, and no one ever loses their job, home, or life based on how they look, whom they love, or where they were born,” he said.

His platform was decidedly progressive but hardly partisan. Among numerous issues that receive broad, bipartisan support nearly everywhere but within the halls of Congress, Yarmuth singled out gun safety. Initiatives such as background checks and limits on magazine capacity have garnered favor from voters in both parties in poll after poll. But, amidst a plague of shooting deaths and calls for action by Yarmuth and numerous colleagues, Congressional Leadership has failed to act.

He addressed another topic that is taboo on Capitol Hill despite near universal support: campaign finance reform. The lead sponsor of a Constitutional Amendment to overturn Citizens United, Yarmuth stated, “Until we get the big money out of politics, our elections will never be honest, and our government will never be responsive to the priorities of the American people.

“As long as our laws say money equals speech, speech will not be free,” Yarmuth added. “That’s just common sense.”

Crime, Murder, More FOP Shenanigans

Rapper Master P made a special stop while he was in Louisville this weekend. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police officers and area youths held a frank conversation following a recent police shooting at a forum in the California Community Center on Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

A news release that Congressman John Yarmuth “will announce his intentions for the 2016 campaign” on Monday triggered a buzz among Kentucky Democrats this weekend speculating whether he will seek a sixth term in the U.S. House and, if not, who might step up to replace him. [WHAS11]

The Metropolitan Sewer District quietly paid a $228,000 fine earlier this year for illegal sewage discharges as part of its ongoing program to curb overflows into local waterways. [H-L]

Two pedestrians were hit by a car late Friday night in Louisville, police said. [WLKY]

A substantial share of America’s youth remains economically disconnected, even as the economy continues to recover. [HuffPo]

People in the South End have been freaking out over the cancellation of this festival. [WAVE3]

Community members have both a constitutional right and a responsibility to question authority. They have a right to understand the policies employed by police, the parameters for deciding when deadly force is appropriate, and the training received on de-escalation techniques. It is unjust to equate the upholding of these rights as “anti-law enforcement” or “race baiting.” [ACLU]

Under certain scenarios, a large percentage of Americans could subsist on a diet made up of mostly local food, according to a new study. [WFPL]

The Confederate flag was adopted to represent a short-lived rebellion to extend and protect white supremacy and black slavery. [Vox]

Discover Financial Services said it plans to lay off 460 workers as it closes its mortgage origination business to focus on its profitable direct banking products, where the company sees greater growth opportunities. [Business First]

Some residents asked New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey Thursday to apologize for remarks he made earlier this month that they felt were offensive to gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]