The UofL Prostitution Scandal Rages On

There was a time, I now can admit, when I was really good at writing book reports on books I had not read. This is not the time for that. In evaluating the allegations soon to be brought forth in detail by a woman who says she was hired by former University of Louisville director of basketball operations Andre McGee to provide sexual services for men’s basketball recruits and players from 2010 to 2014, we can look at the smoke, we haven’t yet seen the fire. But it smells like something is burning. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday tightened the nation’s smog standard by nearly 7 percent, choosing a number that puts the Louisville area on the bubble for continued compliance. [C-J/AKN]

The Jeffersontown Police Chief spoke out Saturday and said gun violence in his town will not be tolerated. Sounds like Rick Sanders is back to pounding his chest? [WHAS11]

Dick Pitino may not read the new sexytime book but you know he’ll be listening to the audiobook! [H-L]

Things nearly turned deadly Thursday night in Jeffersontown as a father tried to buy a cellphone for his daughter. [WLKY]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Louisville has long been referred to as the River City, mainly due to its history as a flatboat and steamboat port carrying people and goods to and from the heartland from the city’s conception. But a big part of riverboat history that you may not know about lies right across the mighty Ohio River in Jeffersonville, Indiana. [WAVE3]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Here’s hoping Greg Fischer doesn’t ruin Louisville’s chances at Google Fiber. Hopefully Google will rely on people like Ambassador Matthew Barzun and others. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer will join the city’s chief innovation officer, Ted Smith, on Monday to talk Google Fiber. [WFPL]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

More than 360 local charities received donations Thursday as part of the Community Foundation of Louisville Inc.’s annual Give Local Louisville campaign. [Business First]

Several issues were brought to the stage, but Tuesday’s New Albany mayoral debate was bookended by who was missing from the discussion. [News & Tribune]

Take Your Cancer Sticks Elsewhere, Park Goers

Louisville Metro Police are giving out free moped and scooter locks as part of an effort to reduce thefts in the Metro area. [WDRB]

Before facing allegations of standardized test violations at Male High School, former Principal David Mike led struggling Western High to a celebrated turnaround. [C-J/AKN]

Is J-town the worst part of Louisville? A family took a piece of land they considered run down, and started a garden. They filled it with different prairie grasses and wild flowers and wanted them to grow naturally. Now, Jeffersontown residents said those plants are causing problems for the neighbors and the size of the plants violate city code. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s unemployment rate for June 2014 dropped to 7.4 percent from a revised 7.7 percent in May 2014, according to the state Office of Employment and Training. [H-L]

Louisville metro parks and the Department of Public Health unveiled a new milestone in the effort to get our community healthier. The Parks Department is politely asking people to keep their cigarettes away from places where children might play. [WLKY]

Certain life factors make a big difference for students as they start their first year of school. A new analysis from Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit group behind Sesame Street, looked at how four risk factors impacted the abilities of kindergarten students right as they entered school. [HuffPo]

Fire chiefs say that Greg Fischer low-balled them for medical service. Which surprises absolutely no one. [WAVE3]

Statistics show that since the initial rollout of President Barack Obama’s controversial health-care law, the Patient Protection-Affordable Care Act, Kentuckians have taken advantage of the opportunity to get covered. [Ashland Independent]

Louisville Metro Housing Authority officials are considering taking part in a study that, in theory, would eliminate some financial burdens that come with living in public housing. [WFPL]

Are you a generous person or someone who loves animals? Help Jackson the Dachshund out ASAP, as he needs surgery! Jessica has been a tireless advocate for years and has definitely given more than she’s received. Let’s all pitch in. [Go Fund Me!]

University of Louisville officials are considering how to expand and focus the school’s research efforts. [Business First]

What are the most dangerous intersections and roads in New Albany, and how can they be improved? [News & Tribune]

What? Greg Fischer Cares About The West End?

Haven House is trying to stretch its resources so they don’t have to turn anyone away. But they say the bridges project isn’t the only problem. [WDRB]

You know we love the West End and always push the positives there but let’s get real a moment. It’s time to rain on Greg Fischer’s parade again. Nothing he proposes is going to work. Fluffy, flowery language means absolutely nothing. People of the West End know it’s a load of horse dookey. He cares about the West End about as much as he cares about Metro Animal Services. [C-J/AKN]

Kentuckians against the U.S.’s support for Israel made their presence known in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Kingdom says it will allow women to feed their babies publicly in any manner they see fit, a policy shift stemming from a social media outcry following a woman’s claim she was asked to breast-feed privately at the theme park. Who the heck is doing public relations for Ed Hart? He needs to some help over there. [H-L]

Three new gorillas made their debut Saturday at the Louisville Zoo. [WLKY]

As the political world grapples with how to respond to the current crisis on the nation’s border, several Republicans have begun warning fellow party members that doing nothing but opposing the president carries substantial political risks. [HuffPo]

Kentucky finds itself in one of the most contentious races in the country. “They are not going to roll over,” Senator Mitch McConnell told a crowd Saturday. “This is going to be a big, big race.” [WAVE3]

Alison Lundergan Grimes, Kentucky’s Democratic Secretary of State who is challenging Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell in this fall’s elections, went after the five-term incumbent in a speech here to a convention of local county officials. [Ronnie Ellis]

University of Louisville President James Ramsey will be getting a significant increase in pay this year, coming in the form of a bonus that boosts his annual compensation to about $1.2 million. [WFPL]

The Federal Highway Trust Fund is expected to run out of money in August. So, naturally, Congress is debating a temporary fix that involves letting corporations underfund their pension systems. [NY Times]

Are there more acquisitions in Humana’s future? Perhaps. [Business First]

A more colorful sight will be greeting visitors of the historic downtown district by next spring. Jeffersonville Main Street, Inc., received a $10,000 Downtown Enhancement Grant through the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs that will be used for one or two murals painted on the side of downtown buildings. [News & Tribune]

JCTA Finally Noticed The Big Pension Mess

Bill Lamb may just be one of the most self-entitled people in all of Louisville media. Interesting to see him continue pushing the myth of entitled welfare queens. [WDRB]

Jeffersontown officials hope a revised tax break proposal will attract new businesses to the city as well as encourage existing ones to expand. The City Council introduced it last week after it had undergone several changes since being voted down in December. [C-J/AKN]

No matter how the Louisville Water Company attempts to spin this, it’s not making anyone comfortable. Especially not after all the times algae blooms have caused their tap water to stink. [WHAS11]

Democrat Bill Hollander is officially announcing his candidacy for Tina Ward-Pugh’s 9th District Metro Council Seat. Hollander is a former managing partner of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs, former president of the Crescent Hill Community Council and the immediate past chair of Leadership Louisville. [Press Release]

Police released surveillance pictures from two different Chase Bank robberies. [WLKY]

Kentucky State Police have launched a poster contest that targets missing children. [Press Release]

Detectives running an investigation in Valley Station late Tuesday morning called in a SWAT team after something suspicious caught their eye, but their suspicion did not pan out, according to a Louisville Metro Police Department spokeswoman. [WAVE3]

Teeing off on Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s opposition to extending unemployment insurance benefits, Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes’ campaign accused McConnell Tuesday of “laughing” at Kentucky’s unemployed. [Sam Youngman]

Thang Lian is a resettled Burmese refugee student who attends Jefferson County Public Schools’ Newcomer Academy. In March, he turns 21, which means the district can no longer financially support his education. [WFPL]

Clark County’s Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative may be in line for some grant funds from the Indiana Department of Correction, but conflicting information caused the Clark County Council to decline taking action at its meeting Monday. [News & Tribune]

Guessing the Jefferson County Teachers Association has finally started paying attention to the pension disaster in Frankfort. []

The business world was buzzing on the news that Osaka, Japan-based Suntory Holdings Ltd. would purchase Beam Inc., the parent of Jim Beam and Maker’s Mark. [Business First]

Looked Under An Overpass Lately, Louisvillians?

It is being called a life-saving groundbreaking. On Friday, Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3), Metro Councilman David Tandy and the Family Health Centers (FHC) Board of Governors broke ground on the East Broadway Community Health Center, the largest expansion project in the 37-year history of the nonprofit agency. [WDRB]

Six-year-old Sheylin Christian sat on the hotel room bed in her Snoopy pajamas playing a computer game as her mom recounted the desperate night they searched for a place to sleep under an overpass. [C-J/AKN]

Of course Jerry Abramson had to insert himself into the Nelson Mandela news. [WHAS11]

This is why more people need to be stepping up to the plate at Metro Animal Services and taking that disaster seriously. Scholars explore Christian perspectives on animal rights. [NY Times]

The Indiana Department of Homeland Security has declared states of emergency in Floyd, Orange and Crawford counties, urging drivers to stay off the roads. [WLKY]

Bourbon is more of a commodity than many realize. Say you want to start your own bourbon label. How would you do it? [H-L]

A week after trash collectors found the body of 26-year-old Andrea Arnold shot to death in an alley, rapper Master P is teaming with Arnold’s family. Probably because locals are afraid to offer rewards in murder cases that don’t occur St. Matthews. [WAVE3]

It’s pretty nice to see a bunch of positive press outside the metro area when it comes to stuff like this. [Al Jazeera America]

The Jeffersontown City Council [last] week defeated a proposed incentive program that would have allowed some companies expanding there to receive a refund of up to 50 percent of the city occupational tax for five years if they met certain criteria. [Business First]

A key state legislator doesn’t expect the [Indiana] General Assembly to make many changes to Indiana’s casino laws during its upcoming session. [News & Tribune]

What separates a healthy and unhealthy diet? Just $1.50 per day. If you want to eat a more healthful diet, you’re going to have to shell out more cash, right? (After all, Whole Foods didn’t get the nickname “Whole Paycheck” for nothing.) [WFPL]

Another Important Bridges Meeting Is Happening

Louisville Metro Police say a man was arrested on animal cruelty charges after they found injured dogs and paraphernalia used in dog fighting at his home. [WDRB]

By now everyone knows the nitwits running Sunrise Children’s Services aren’t fit to roam the streets. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Call us Bitter Betties but something tells us this new parking application for your smartphone won’t making parking downtown much easier. But it will eventually cost you tons of taxpayer dollars. [WHAS11]

Looky which paper decided to run a story about Sunrise Children’s Home. But they only told you about ten percent of the real story. [C-J/AKN]

In this story about a rat-infested property in J-town, the teevee station’s guy couldn’t get any calls returned from the mayor or city council. Bizarre, really, since other stations got those calls returned. And every single council person – and the mayor’s office – called us back. Is there a J-town-WLKY fued these days? [WLKY]

If the City Council won’t pay for it, the Redevelopment Commission might. Redevelopment commissioner Dan Coffey suggested reviving the idea of a traffic study in New Albany to see the impact of bridge construction and tolls after completion in late 2016. [News & Tribune]

This means you’re stuck with Greg Fischer and his inability to give a speech for another four years. [WAVE3]

Lexington is trying hard to beat Louisville on the violent gun death front these days. [H-L]

Louisville Gas and Electric and the Air Pollution Control District have reached an agreement over violations at the company’s Cane Run Power Station. Under the deal, LG&E will pay $113,250 to the Air Pollution Control District, as well as continue implementing a compliance plan at Cane Run to prevent future violations. [WFPL]

A Kentucky agency is set to decide this week on the final piece of financing for the Ohio River Bridges Project. [Business First]

Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell on Tuesday called the Affordable Care Act — or Obamacare — “a monstrosity,” demanding its full repeal during a press conference he called specifically to talk about the law. [Ronnie Ellis]

25 Years? Drug Dealers Get Tougher Sentences

The man charged with murdering a Sullivan University student took a plea deal Monday afternoon and was sentenced to 25 years in prison. [WDRB]

The Sellersburg Police Department was involved in a nearly five-hour standoff Sunday night with a man wielding a samurai sword, police reported. Moral of this story: Sellersburg is a hot mess. [News & Tribune]

Go listen to Andrew Compton’s poor mother share her thoughts with the court. Lowly pot dealers have gotten more prison time that that worthless blob. [WAVE3]

Jefferson County Public Schools is raising its dropout age to 18, joining more than 80 school districts across Kentucky and nudging the state closer to making the requirement mandatory for all public schools. [Toni Konz]

Need something related to the Kentucky Retirement Systems to melt your brain today? Strippers and embezzlement should do the trick. [Page One]

Supporters of a U.S. immigration reform bill are launching a push for the legislation this week that includes phone calls to lawmakers from Catholic bishops, visits to Capitol Hill from high-tech lobbyists and an ad blitz sponsored by organized labor. [Reuters]

Kentucky Derby winner Dust Commander reached his final resting place Monday, a few yards from the Churchill Downs track where he earned his greatest victory. [H-L]

A Jeffersontown day care worker is facing a charge of child abuse after police said she was caught on video grabbing a 5-year-old and dragging her across the floor. [WHAS11]

A plan by the Louisville Metro Council to bring back a pair of junk pickup and street sweepings in the Urban Services District will go forward despite reports that a “budget glitch” made restoration impossible. [WFPL]

Major interstate closures are on the way as the Ohio River Bridges Project takes another step forward. Commutes will definitely be a bit more challenging and drivers will need to be prepared for delays for the duration of the project. [WLKY]

Humana Inc., which vacated its space in The 515 Building in downtown Louisville at the end of May, purchased the nearly empty office tower [yesterday]. [Business First]