How Many Will Die This Weekend?

A new project will transform Dixie Highway into a state-of-the-art roadway. [WDRB]

Jim Ramsey and his crew have been pulling these corrupt open records stunts for a decade. Want to find out former University of Louisville President James Ramsey’s new phone number and email address at the university’s foundation? Hope you have better luck than we did. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The FoodPort is no longer and now West Louisville community members are moving full speed ahead and not looking back. [WHAS11]

Investors in Brown-Forman, parent of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey, may need a stiff drink — the Louisville-based company reported Wednesday that net sales fell 5 percent to $661 million for the first quarter. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a reminder that there’s nothing Compassionate about all the killing in Possibility City. [WLKY]

It can be difficult to see any bright side when it comes to the water challenges facing the western U.S. [HuffPo]

The combination of two Louisville utilities will save taxpayers more than $9 million this year. [WAVE3]

The planet is warming at a pace not experienced within the past 1,000 years, at least, making it “very unlikely” that the world will stay within a crucial temperature limit agreed by nations just last year, according to Nasa’s top climate scientist. [The Guardian]

Airbnb has proven to be a serious side hustle for Louisvillians. The city ranked No. 2, just after Chicago, among the 14 largest sharing cities in the Midwest for number of hosts, a recent study by the company found. [WFPL]

The United States admitted its 10,000th Syrian refugee this week in a resettlement program announced by President Obama last fall, according to The White House. [NY Times]

Two faculty members with the University of Louisville’s School of Medicine were named editors in chief at two different medical journals. [Business First]

The National Main Street Center has designated Jeffersonville Main Street Inc. an accredited Main Street America Program. [News & Tribune]

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Jim Ramsey & The High Road? What?

Global Game Changers and the Muhammad Ali Center invited kids and their families to discover their superpowers Sunday. [WDRB]

You know, like Jim Ramsey took the high road when attacking ON TELEVISION anyone questioning Robert Flener, who went to prison. “Chairman Benz needs to keep his comments on the high road and work with all of the UL staff, its affiliated boards and their leadership, and the media to promote harmony,” said Hughes, who also serves on the Board of Trustees. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are looking for answers after a child was accidentally shot and killed by another child Sunday. [WHAS11]

How do you document Kentucky history that has been mostly hidden and, until 1992, was technically illegal? [Tom Eblen]

This leg situation has got to be the creepiest story of the month. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s new campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, found herself in the unenviable position Sunday morning of having to defend one of the candidate’s most despicable tweets ever. [HuffPo]

A man is recovering after being shot early Sunday morning. The victim was transported to Norton Suburban Hospital by private vehicle and was then transported to University Hospital for further evaluation. [WAVE3]

Donald Trump made a direct pitch to Iowa’s farmers in a speech here Saturday — and then pivoted back to his appeal for support from African-Americans, even though there were virtually none in the audience. [Politico]

Surprise! The cityfolk are shocked that vote-buying is still going on in rural Eastern Kentucky. [WFPL]

The U.S. Department of Justice announced that it would phase out its use of private prisons. While significant, the move will not put an end to the booming immigrant detention industry. Private prison companies will continue to receive millions in government contracts to detain unauthorized immigrants. [ProPublica]

Louisville-based GE Appliances, part of the Haier Group, plans to close a water heater manufacturing line that it launched in 2012 at Appliance Park. [Business First]

A few more candidates rounded out the list of school board contenders across Clark and Floyd counties as the deadline to file ended at noon Friday. [News & Tribune]

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Jim Ramsey-UofL Funtimes Just Won’t Quit, Now Involves Fun Foundation Construction Shenanigans

What this story doesn’t tell you is that one guy is paying for everything out of his own pocket. That means he’s making massive campaign contributions to Trump in violation of FEC limits. [WDRB]

James Ramsey, who was forced to resign last month as president of the University of Louisville, apparently plans to stay awhile at its foundation, where he is still president. The foundation is constructing new offices at its building at 215 Central Ave., for Ramsey and Kathleen Smith, his chief of staff, according to a university official and several tradesmen who were busy working Friday on the space. [C-J/AKN]

Surprise! TARC is making cuts/alterations/changing routes again. Just what Compassionate Possibility City needs – more (bad) transportation changes for the working poor. [WHAS11]

We’ve been yelling about it for years and here you go. Many people in Lexington who see doctors at University of Kentucky HealthCare write checks to the Kentucky Medical Services Foundation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Muhammad Ali tribute hanging at Spalding University has disappeared. [WLKY]

The Justice Department plans to stop using privately run prisons that typically house undocumented federal inmates following a report finding they are less safe than those that are federally run, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates said Thursday. [HuffPo]

A man was arrested after a three-hour standoff with police in the Shawnee neighborhood Saturday afternoon. [WAVE3]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 8 percentage points among likely voters, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Friday. [Reuters]

Over the past decade, the news about Kentucky’s coal industry has been reliably bad. The latest numbers show the state is mining the smallest amount of coal since about 1934, and there are fewer coal miners employed here than anytime in the 20th century. [WFPL]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made a direct appeal to African-American voters, saying “What do you have to lose?” [BBC]

University of Louisville Hospital is back in compliance after concerns were raised about patient safety. [Business First]

The Tri-County Health Coalition, based in New Albany, has opened its doors to homeless community members to come in and cool off in the summer heat. [News & Tribune]

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Google Fiber Can’t Happen Quickly Enough In Possibility City

At least four other JCPS schools have similar hair policies in place to the one that was temporarily suspended by Butler High last week — and one school has called a special meeting to address it this week. [WDRB]

Louisville’s largest cable and internet provider says the city is giving Google Fiber an unfair advantage, and it wants Mayor Greg Fischer to step in and ease key regulations in the coming weeks. [C-J/AKN]

He was once Louisville’s most high profile charity leader and a top stockbroker. Presidents, Mayors and A-list celebrities appeared at his events when he asked. But for the past year and a half he’s been in a Federal Prison. [WHAS11]

It didn’t take long for a Kentucky school to suspend a dress code policy after significant outcry, both in person and on social media. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A father-to-be was gunned down inside his Pleasure Ridge Park apartment early Monday morning. [WLKY]

Khizr Khan delivered one of the most moving speeches at the Democratic National Convention, captivating viewers with his story about losing his son, a U.S. service member who died in the Iraq War saving his fellow soldiers. [HuffPo]

He once ran for mayor an now he’s challenging citations in a high-profile case, involving his bicycle. [WAVE3]

Six Michigan state workers have been charged with hiding data that showed that drinking water was unsafe in the city of Flint. [BBC]

Revelations about lucrative perks doled out to former University of Louisville president James Ramsey’s top deputies brought outrage Friday from faculty members and taxpayers, but was of no concern to two top trustees. [WFPL]

He walked onto the convention stage Thursday night with his wife beside him, the Constitution to guide him and the pride of a father who knows he has a story to tell. [Politico]

Former University of Louisville president James Ramsey, who resigned Wednesday evening, released a statement Thursday about his status with the U of L Foundation, the school’s nonprofit organization that oversees the school’s endowment. [Business First]

Figuring out how much to spend out of the first few payments of the Floyd Memorial Hospital sale caused some eventful discussion, but the Floyd County Commissioners and Floyd County Council made an agreement at Thursday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

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Weekend Of Compassionate Shootings

Louisville Metro Police are investigating after Stepfon R. Harris, 28, was found dead in the rear parking lot of the Hampton Inn in downtown Louisville. [WDRB]

Former Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson has less than six months before the Obama administration is over and he is out of a job. While he isn’t exactly sure what he’s going to do, Abramson knows one thing: “I’m coming home.” [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Fire Department is crediting working smoke detectors with likely saving a woman’s life Saturday. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd has granted Attorney General Andy Beshear’s request to temporarily block Gov. Matt Bevin’s overhaul of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A homicide investigation is underway after an early-morning shooting Sunday. [WLKY]

In 1968, Hillary Clinton, known at the time as Hillary Rodham, was taking in the excitement of the Republican National Convention in Miami. The young Republican had jumped at the chance to volunteer for Nelson Rockefeller’s last-minute effort to take the nomination from Richard Nixon and attend her first political convention. [HuffPo]

Police are investigating a shooting in Southwest Louisville. Officers were called to The Landing apartments in the 7100 block of Schneble Circle at about 5:45 a.m. on Monday. [WAVE3]

A federal judge on Friday struck down a string of Wisconsin voting restrictions passed by the Republican-led legislature and ordered the state to revamp its voter identification rules, finding that they disenfranchised minority voters. [Reuters]

The University of Louisville’s next president will be saddled with more than just baggage from James Ramsey’s tenure. The new president will inherit Ramsey’s top deputies, many of whom were given lucrative compensation packages and perks that experts say go far beyond the norm. Ramsey’s own buyout is $690,000, but the cost of his pledges to top executives could be millions more from school coffers. [WFPL]

As he crisscrossed Philadelphia this week for the Democratic National Convention, Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) couldn’t walk far without being recognized. [The Hill]

It’s deja vu all over again for the University of Louisville board of trustees. On Friday, a judge in Franklin County filed an injunction that temporarily blocked Gov. Matt Bevin’s order that abolished the board and recreated it with new members. [Business First]

Voters casting straight-party ballots in this November’s general election will have an added step not seen before, and some election officials are concerned the changes will present unnecessary challenges. [News & Tribune]

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Jim Ramsey Finally Got Kicked Out

Throw back to that time everyone told me it was pointless to cover UofL and Jim Ramsey… James Ramsey’s 14-year tenure as president of the University of Louisville came to an abrupt end after about six hours of closed-door negotiations with the Board of Trustees on Wednesday. [WDRB]

The fire in Old Louisville was the most dangerous fire in the city in seven years. In 2009, a fire at 1249 S. Clay St. claimed the lives of six, including four children and two adults. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Second incident in a week? Jeffersontown police continue to monitor the area around a local gun shop after a pickup truck rammed into the entrance early Thursday morning. The suspect remains at large. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes used her speech Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia to paint Hillary Clinton as caring and inquisitive and “a fighter for every single thing Donald Trump is against.” [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police are in the process of hiring 122 new recruits. [WLKY]

A quarter-century after winning his party’s nomination for the presidency, Bill Clinton took the Democratic National Convention stage to tell a story on the night his wife officially won it herself… [HuffPo]

As Tim Stark of Wildlife in Need faces a litany of accusations recently filed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, an administrative law officer has upheld a ruling that allows the Charlestown animal refuge to keep its license. [WAVE3]

Under the Freedom of Information Act, ProPublica requested letters closing HIPAA complaint investigations. Here’s what we’ve received so far. [ProPublica]

Canceled meetings are the norm for the Louisville Metro Council’s recently established committee on vacant properties. [WFPL]

Work that involves complex thinking and interaction with other people seems to help protect against the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to research presented Sunday at the Alzheimer’s Association’s International Conference in Toronto. [WaPo]

A downtown Louisville hotel that was named the best hotel in Kentucky by Business Insider magazine for 2015 will be sold by its out-of-state owner. Annapolis, Md.-based Thayer Lodging Group — a hotel investment group that owns hotels in several U.S. states and Mexico — told Louisville Business First it plans to sell the Seelbach Hilton Hotel in downtown Louisville at the corner of Muhammad Ali Boulevard and South Fourth Street. [Business First]

A real estate company previously focused in the Louisville and Lexington markets has expanded to Southern Indiana, and in a big way. [News & Tribune]

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The UofL Scandals Just Won’t Quit

A third recent appointee to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees has a business connection to the university’s nonprofit foundation. [WDRB]

As Southern Indiana schools’ student population becomes increasingly diverse, its pool of teachers remains overwhelmingly white. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In a room full of people–Denita Wright made her opinion very clear. From the moment she stepped through the door at the California Neighborhood Community Center, she passed out signs that read, “We don’t want it.” [WHAS11]

The best part of this – or maybe the most terrifying – is that Republicans in Frankfort have worked hard to fight needle exchanges that prevent this sort of thing. Kentucky saw a dramatic increase in the rate of hepatitis C infections among women ages 15-44 in recent years, according to a new federal report that offers further evidence of growing problems in the state from intravenous drug use. [H-L]

University of Louisville trustees have postponed a meeting to decide the status of school President James Ramsey. [WLKY]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

Now that a Court has determined Metro government has the right to remove the monument, the Commission on Public Art must recommend where and why. [WAVE3]

Kevin Green’s lawyers were pleading with the governor for mercy. It was spring 2008, and Mr. Green, a 31-year-old who had shot and killed a grocery owner, was on Virginia’s death row. His woes, his lawyers said, dated to childhood; he was born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, repeated three years of elementary school and never learned to tie his shoes. [NY Times]

A new board to develop strategies for agricultural water use in Kentucky is closer to its first meeting. [WFPL]

After a lengthy debate and a deal between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Democratic Party’s rules committee voted to created a “unity commission” that would dramatically limit the role of convention “superdelegates,” binding roughly two-thirds of them to the results of state primaries and caucuses. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Republic Bancorp Inc. announced second-quarter net income of $8.3 million and a diluted earnings per common share of $0.40, which was a 2 percent increase compared to the company’s second quarter in 2015. [Business First]

Clark County voters may be using new machines for the November election, but clerk Susan Popp said this won’t change the way voting happens on their end. [News & Tribune]