Violence & Poverty In Compassionate City? Surely That’s Not Our Reality

Violence and poverty took center stage at a west Louisville forum on Wednesday. [WDRB]

A war between two rival gangs has left several wounded and dead this summer, including a 14-year-old and 21-year-old whose funerals are Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Thursday, August 18 started as a normal day on the job for Metro Parks and Recreation workers’ Ricky Duncan and Bryan Haynes.
“Clean up the park, pick up paper, deliver picnic tables, clean grills,” said Duncan.
[WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky violated the state’s Open Records Act by refusing to disclose documents the Herald-Leader requested concerning a Hazard cardiology practice that UK once owned, the attorney general’s office has ruled. [John Cheves]

Blaine Hudson may be a big deal for some but don’t forget that he allowed – literally – most of what Robert Felner did to occur. He knew it was happening and enabled the shenanigans. [WLKY]

Donald Trump paid the IRS a $2,500 penalty this year, an official at Trump’s company said, after it was revealed that Trump’s charitable foundation had violated tax laws by giving a political contribution to a campaign group connected to Florida’s attorney general. [WaPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Interim University of Louisville President Dr. Neville Pinto sounded off Wednesday over letters from donors threatening to withhold millions of dollars in donations. [WAVE3]

Three federal prisons in California and others nationwide appear to be falling short in preparing inmates for safe release into society, investigators are warning. [McClatchy]

Work is beginning in earnest to develop a plan to take Louisville into the next two decades. [WFPL]

Donnie Gaddis picked the wrong county to sell 15 oxycodone pills to an undercover officer. If Mr. Gaddis had been caught 20 miles to the east, in Cincinnati, he would have received a maximum of six months in prison, court records show. In San Francisco or Brooklyn, he would probably have received drug treatment or probation, lawyers say. [NY Times]

The 11-day Kentucky State Fair attracted an attendance of 564,937 for its 112th outing, held at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville. That’s down slightly from the recorded 2015 attendance of 601,672. [Business First]

Democratic candidate Shelli Yoder, running for the Ninth Congressional District, released the last five years of her tax returns, and she is calling on her opponent, Trey Hollingsworth, to do the same. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Continues To Get Crazy Under Donna Hargens’ “Leadership”

JCPS is getting really fancy these days. An Iroquois High student was arrested after allegedly bringing a loaded handgun to the school on Wednesday. [WDRB]

John Owen has a vision of a streetcar line returning to Market Street to connect West Louisville to downtown and East Louisville, capitalizing on the fact that much of the rail line infrastructure is still intact beneath the pavement. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! By 2020, graduation ceremonies may look different for greater Clark county schools. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky officials will eventually unveil a controversial mural in Memorial Hall that was shrouded last year and will surround it with other works of art and more context, President Eli Capilouto announced Thursday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville has seen as many homicides so far this year as there were in all of 2015. [WLKY]

The James Graham Brown Foundation, which has provided more than $72 million in grants to the University of Louisville and related entities over the past 55 years, has threatened to cut off funding unless the U of L Foundation hires a nationally recognized forensic accounting firm to review its finances. [C-J/AKN]

What should be the criteria for removing a student from the Jefferson County Public Schools’ magnet program? [WAVE3]

The U.S. added 151,000 new jobs in August and the unemployment rate held steady at 4.9 percent, according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. [NPR]

Joann Robinson stands under the trestle on Vine Street and Broadway, looking with admiration at the mural she painted back when the neighborhood was called German Paristown. [WFPL]

In 1988, a small-time drug dealer became the first man charged under a new, harsh drug law signed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Almost 30 years later, President Barack Obama granted a sentence commutation to Richard Van Winrow, a literal posterboy for the history of America’s drug war. [BBC]

When Heaven Hill Distilleries Inc. is finished with a $25 million expansion of its Bernheim Distillery in West Louisville next summer, it will have one of the biggest distilleries in the state, according to Denny Potter, master distiller and plant manager. [Business First]

The Republican challenger of Indiana schools Superintendent Glenda Ritz wants authorities to investigate a contract benefiting a company that hired a Ritz aide. [News & Tribune]

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Jim Ramsey & The High Road? What?

Global Game Changers and the Muhammad Ali Center invited kids and their families to discover their superpowers Sunday. [WDRB]

You know, like Jim Ramsey took the high road when attacking ON TELEVISION anyone questioning Robert Flener, who went to prison. “Chairman Benz needs to keep his comments on the high road and work with all of the UL staff, its affiliated boards and their leadership, and the media to promote harmony,” said Hughes, who also serves on the Board of Trustees. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are looking for answers after a child was accidentally shot and killed by another child Sunday. [WHAS11]

How do you document Kentucky history that has been mostly hidden and, until 1992, was technically illegal? [Tom Eblen]

This leg situation has got to be the creepiest story of the month. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s new campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, found herself in the unenviable position Sunday morning of having to defend one of the candidate’s most despicable tweets ever. [HuffPo]

A man is recovering after being shot early Sunday morning. The victim was transported to Norton Suburban Hospital by private vehicle and was then transported to University Hospital for further evaluation. [WAVE3]

Donald Trump made a direct pitch to Iowa’s farmers in a speech here Saturday — and then pivoted back to his appeal for support from African-Americans, even though there were virtually none in the audience. [Politico]

Surprise! The cityfolk are shocked that vote-buying is still going on in rural Eastern Kentucky. [WFPL]

The U.S. Department of Justice announced that it would phase out its use of private prisons. While significant, the move will not put an end to the booming immigrant detention industry. Private prison companies will continue to receive millions in government contracts to detain unauthorized immigrants. [ProPublica]

Louisville-based GE Appliances, part of the Haier Group, plans to close a water heater manufacturing line that it launched in 2012 at Appliance Park. [Business First]

A few more candidates rounded out the list of school board contenders across Clark and Floyd counties as the deadline to file ended at noon Friday. [News & Tribune]

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Both UofL & UK May Be Terrible

Louisville can’t stop killing everybody. Two vigils were held for three different victims of homicides near Shelby Park this week. [WDRB]

This is the University of Louisville way – retaliate against those attempting to hold them accountable. And when that doesn’t work and people fight back? Try to destroy them in the press. [C-J/AKN]

The University of Kentucky could soon be taking legal action against its own school newspaper. [WHAS11]

The president of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools has expressed concern about “the potential for undue political influence” in Gov. Matt Bevin’s overhaul of the University of Louisville’s governing board. SACS President Belle S. Wheelan said in an Aug. 18 letter to acting University of Louisville President Neville G. Pinto that “there is evidence of significant accreditation-related issues” involving Bevin’s changes at U of L that are being challenged in court by state Attorney General Andy Beshear. [H-L]

A skeletal human leg was found Friday on the riverbank near the Indiana-Kentucky Electric Corporation’s Clifty Creek plant. [WLKY]

The Department of Justice made a landmark decision last week when it announced it would direct the Bureau of Prisons to let its contracts with private prison companies lapse. But last week’s change in policy left the U.S. Marshals Service untouched, even though that agency is also under DOJ control and keeps nearly as many people locked in privatized jails as the Bureau of Prisons. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Sadly, there are people who still believe a disconnected, wealthy white guy is going to solve the murder problem in Louisville. [WAVE3]

North Carolina’s university system must allow two transgender students and a transgender employee to use bathrooms matching their gender identity, a U.S. judge ruled on Friday, in a partial victory for those fighting the state’s restrictive restroom law. [Reuters]

The grass in the vacant lot across from Bill Jones’ West Louisville muffler shop doesn’t get cut too often. [WFPL]

The first guy was believable but Russ Meyer doesn’t carry the same credibility. That’s problematic, sure. His ties to Adam Edelen and the the Cormans also do not help him. But that doesn’t mean what he’s saying is in any way untrue. Thankfully for him, Sinnette’s story went public first, establishing a pattern. It’s clear that the Bevin team is attempting to retaliate against ANYONE holding them accountable. A second Democratic state lawmaker now claims Republican Gov. Matt Bevin tried to persuade him to switch parties and that the governor’s chief of staff threatened to punish him politically when he refused. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools says the University of Louisville appears to be out of compliance with its standards regarding presidential selection, external political influence and board dismissal. [Business First]

Karyn Moskowitz, a Paoli native, is “veggie obsessed.” She moved to Louisville from her rural town to establish farmers markets on the city’s east and west sides, where access to fresh food was sparse. [News & Tribune]

Jim Ramsey-UofL Funtimes Just Won’t Quit, Now Involves Fun Foundation Construction Shenanigans

What this story doesn’t tell you is that one guy is paying for everything out of his own pocket. That means he’s making massive campaign contributions to Trump in violation of FEC limits. [WDRB]

James Ramsey, who was forced to resign last month as president of the University of Louisville, apparently plans to stay awhile at its foundation, where he is still president. The foundation is constructing new offices at its building at 215 Central Ave., for Ramsey and Kathleen Smith, his chief of staff, according to a university official and several tradesmen who were busy working Friday on the space. [C-J/AKN]

Surprise! TARC is making cuts/alterations/changing routes again. Just what Compassionate Possibility City needs – more (bad) transportation changes for the working poor. [WHAS11]

We’ve been yelling about it for years and here you go. Many people in Lexington who see doctors at University of Kentucky HealthCare write checks to the Kentucky Medical Services Foundation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Muhammad Ali tribute hanging at Spalding University has disappeared. [WLKY]

The Justice Department plans to stop using privately run prisons that typically house undocumented federal inmates following a report finding they are less safe than those that are federally run, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates said Thursday. [HuffPo]

A man was arrested after a three-hour standoff with police in the Shawnee neighborhood Saturday afternoon. [WAVE3]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 8 percentage points among likely voters, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Friday. [Reuters]

Over the past decade, the news about Kentucky’s coal industry has been reliably bad. The latest numbers show the state is mining the smallest amount of coal since about 1934, and there are fewer coal miners employed here than anytime in the 20th century. [WFPL]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made a direct appeal to African-American voters, saying “What do you have to lose?” [BBC]

University of Louisville Hospital is back in compliance after concerns were raised about patient safety. [Business First]

The Tri-County Health Coalition, based in New Albany, has opened its doors to homeless community members to come in and cool off in the summer heat. [News & Tribune]

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LG&E + Solar Just Feels Super-Dirty

If there’s one thing Louisville loves as much as a compassionate shooting, it’s a compassionate pedestrian accident. A child was hit by a car Monday night in a south Louisville neighborhood. [WDRB]

State laws have blocked the expansion of grassroots community-led solar power, and now utilities are putting their own stamp on new ways letting customers get their energy from the sun with requests before Kentucky energy regulators. Customers of Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities may get a chance to participate in what’s called “community solar,” where customers pay into a new solar farm and then receive credit on their bills for electricity generated from those solar panels. [C-J/AKN]

A Louisville Metro Corrections officer finds himself out of a job after a 5-month investigation revealed he used racist, derogatory language towards another employee. [WHAS11]

Italian spirits maker Campari, parent of Wild Turkey, on Tuedsay reported that sales for the first six months were down 1.8 percent to $834 million. Excluding the effect of the exchange rate and other factors, the company said organic growth was up 5 percent, boosted in part by gains from Wild Turkey and Aperol. [H-L]

The Kentucky Alliance hosted a panel discussion Monday about gun violence and race relations. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s former campaign manager reignited the long-debunked “birther” conspiracy theory on Tuesday night. Corey Lewandowski, now a CNN analyst/in-house Trump surrogate, suggested that President Barack Obama hadn’t released his Harvard transcripts because they might show he wasn’t a citizen of the United States. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness wants to help people in WAVE Country stop smoking. [WAVE3]

In Syria’s civil war, it’s dangerous to even treat the wounded. Since the beginning of the civil war, the Syrian government has killed hundreds of medical personnel, and dozens of doctors have been assassinated by ISIS. The few doctors who dare to treat the casualties have been forced to work in secret. [ProPublica]

White supporters of the movement have encountered responses (from welcoming to wariness) from some African-American activists. That hasn’t stopped them from leading pro-BLM protests in Louisville. [WFPL]

If you’ve yet to read this story, put on your crazy glasses. A report of a car full of men in body armor with semi-automatic weapons brought Lexington police to the Walmart on Richmond Road on Saturday night. Officers found two men, one in body armor, a 20-year-old woman and a six-month old baby. [More H-L]

The internet is no stranger to debate — just ask anyone who’s read through the comments on a YouTube video or Facebook post. But there also are debates between internet providers, such as those who have a stake in Louisville as Google Inc. considers rolling out its Fiber gigabit internet service here. Some companies already in the market are voicing their concerns through a pending lawsuit and a letter sent to government officials. [Business First]

He’s served in an interim role since July 1, but by about 4:15 p.m. Thursday, Lindon Dodd officially became the director of Clark County Community Corrections. [News & Tribune]

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Your New Governor Has No Ethics

After months of debate over proposed changes to its student code of conduct, Jefferson County Public Schools officials presented a revised student code of conduct to school board members for review on Tuesday. [WDRB]

A giant poop chute has been planned to go under downtown. This is not a drill. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As crime continues to see an uptick in the city, officials with Louisville Metro Corrections are scrambling to make space for an already overcrowded facility. [WHAS11]

Just when you thought Matt Bevin and his people couldn’t get more ignorant? Matt Bevin has signed an executive order that effectively gives him control over all appointments to the Executive Branch Ethics Commission without any input from the state attorney general and state auditor. Almost as funny as the Personnel Secretary, through the RPK’s spokesperson, begging folks to help them dig through Beshear data to uncover corruption because they don’t know anything about Kentucky. HAHAHA. You can’t fix the kind of stupid these people possess. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jefferson County Public Schools released a new Code of Conduct proposal after outrage over a previous version that eliminated some severe penalties.[WLKY]

Donald Trump’s policy agenda would quickly push the national debt to its highest level in history, according to a new report. [HuffPo]

Out with the old, in with the new. To save money on repair and maintenance, Louisville’s public transportation system is rolling out 12 new buses to replace 16 older ones. [WAVE3]

Convicting an elected official on corruption charges just got a lot harder. Government watchdogs say the Supreme Court’s decision on Monday to toss out the conviction and two-year prison sentence of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell (R) will create new hurdles for prosecutors. [The Hill]

Gunshots are ringing through Louisville’s streets at a heightened rate this year. [WFPL]

Who plans to show up and pay for the Trump hate circus at the RNC? Maker’s Mark, for one. While the legendary bourbon house tried to use the excuse that they’re also throwing money at the DNC, it doesn’t change the reality that their money – money you give them by buying their products – is being used to fund white supremacy, Islamophobia, racism in general, attacks on Asian people, attacks on the disabled, attacks on gay people, attacks on sense. [WaPo]

They’re almost at the finish line — now it’s just a matter of shoring things up and signing the final papers. Louisville-based Baptist Healthcare System Inc. has signed a binding agreement to buy Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services in New Albany for $150 million, plus additional investments. [Business First]

It’s been a long time coming, but the Clark County Special Education Co-op is in the process of dissolution. [News & Tribune]

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