Breathe. The Air Might Not Kill You.

Former Jefferson County Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Matt Conway was charged with felony assault Wednesday night after allegedly attacking his wife, according to a police report. Remember when his brother was covering up his police investigation(s)? [WDRB]

Everything is so corrupt in West Buechel that they’ve started some kind of watchdog organization. [C-J/AKN]

Just what Louisville needs – another stadium/arena. [WHAS11]

The red steel shipping container was once used to transport toothbrushes and bras. By May, it and another container will be transformed into a one bedroom, one-bathroom, 640-square-foot home that will be part of a new live-work community on York Street spearheaded by the North Limestone Community Development Corp. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A team of physicians, surgeons and nurses are creating an advanced heart failure program at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

When Donald Trump first watched his new TV ad that began airing this week, he said, “Play it again. I love the feel of it.” I, too, had to play it again, not because I too loved the feel, but out of amazement that this is what the front runner for the Republican nomination had chosen to put in his first TV ad of the campaign. [HuffPo]

A man is charged with wanton endangerment after setting himself on fire in the parking lot of a busy downtown convenience store. Maybe instead of jailing this man, Possumbilly City could get him some help? [WAVE3]

The FBI now tracks animal abuse like it tracks homicides. It was more than 10 years ago that Mary Lou Randour realized she couldn’t answer what should have been a simple question: Was cruelty against animals on the rise or in decline? [WaPo]

About a dozen people filed into a Jeffersontown gun shop shortly after noon on Tuesday, just after President Barack Obama wrapped up a live address outlining details of his executive actions designed to bolster gun control and curb gun violence. [WFPL]

Time Warner Cable said late Wednesday that hackers may have stolen up to 320,000 customers’ email passwords. [The Hill]

Craig Richard, the former CEO of Greater Louisville Inc. who left the chamber of commerce in 2014 to become CEO of Invest Atlanta, will resign from his position Jan. 18, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed announced Wednesday. Part of a pattern. These folks leave after screwing up in Louisville and eventually get figured out, forced resignations occur, blah blah blah. [Business First]

Nonprofits looking to do some good for youth in Clark and Floyd counties have a chance to bolster their budgets with grants from the Community Foundation of Southern Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Local Media Mall Freak Out Continues

UofL can’t go a dang week without SOME sort of scandal. And this guy potentially put peoples’ lives at risk. [WDRB]

Really? The mall needs a parental escort policy? Kids have been going to the mall since it opened but people are only now freaking out about it? Get a damn grip, Louisville. Enough with the panic. [C-J/AKN]

Ready for the Christian Taliban (Hal Heiner and his wife, Frank Simon, Jerry Stephens) to take over education in Kentucky? [WHAS11]

In 1970, a female couple filed a lawsuit in Louisville that may have been a precursor of the 2015 Supreme Court decision to strike down the limitations on gay marriage. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new Fund for the Arts program called Arts for Kosair Kids is giving local children opportunities they wouldn’t normally have. [WLKY]

The National Catholic Reporter has named two of the men at the heart of the Supreme Court’s landmark same-sex marriage case its “persons of the year.” Greg Bourke and Michael DeLeon were two of the several dozen plaintiffs in the case Obergefell v. Hodges. In June, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of these couples and legalized marriage equality nationwide. [HuffPo]

An LMPD officer is recovering from injuries at UofL Hospital following a crash while on duty early Tuesday morning. [WAVE3]

For the poor in the Deep South’s cities, simply applying for a job exposes the barriers of a particularly pervasive and isolating form of poverty. [WaPo]

“We’re afraid that with the implementation of a plan like the Indiana plan, we will see a reduction in the number of those who have Medicaid coverage and an increase in the number of uninsured and an increase in the uncompensated care that we provide,” Wagner said. [WFPL]

The Kentucky attorney general’s office has issued an opinion stating that the state racing commission cannot delegate rule-making authority to private companies like racetracks, putting in jeopardy a plan by Keeneland to write races in which the race-day administration of the regulated medication Lasix would be prohibited. The Kentucky attorney general, Jack Conway, is the son of a racing commissioner, Thomas Conway, who has supported race-day Lasix use. Jack Conway is leaving office in January, to be replaced by Andy Beshear, the son of Steve Beshear, who said in a recent speech that he supports restrictions on medication use. [DRF]

Oh, look, now Business Fart is getting in on the Mall St. Matthews hype! It’s like WDRB’s print counterpart. [Business First]

After months of waiting, Floyd County officials received information they requested regarding finances of the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Not Even She Can’t Fix Donna’s Problem

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens has named Allison Gardner Martin as the district’s Chief of Communications and Community Relations, effective Jan. 14, 2016. [WDRB]

Amid intensifying fears of terrorism and political calls to halt Syrian refugee resettlement, Louisville faith leaders gathered Tuesday to oppose those calls and show support for refugees. [C-J/AKN]

Isn’t it fun that both Kentucky and Indiana have extremist governors who aren’t afraid to put their racism and xenophobia on full display? [WHAS11]

Lexington is moving forward with repealing its taxi regulations as part of an effort to make cab companies competitive with the ride-sharing companies Lyft and Uber. [H-L]

The Community Foundation of Louisville plans to award up to $1 million in college scholarships, and it is taking applications now. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s plan to ban Muslims from entering the United States is shoving the Republican Party to the edge of chaos, abruptly pitting GOP leaders against their own presidential front-runner and jeopardizing the party’s longtime drive to attract minorities. [HuffPo]

Quoting song lyrics from Burt Bacharach, Kentucky State Representative Bob DeWeese announced his retirement, saying “Knowing when to leave is the smartest thing anyone can learn.” [WAVE3]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has said he will never leave the 2016 race despite increasing calls for him to step aside. [BBC]

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that the rate of HIV diagnoses has declined nationally, but not among all groups of people. [WFPL]

In America, our food options are remarkably unaffected by the changing seasons. We just keep eating salad greens and tomatoes without regard to the onset of winter. [NPR]

Time to pay up. Earlier this week, we reported that Fairfield, Conn.-based General Electric Co. pulled the plug on a deal to sell its GE Appliances division to Sweden-based AB Electrolux. At the time, GE said it was owed a $175 million breakup fee as a result of the deal falling through. [Business First]

Despite some unanswered questions, the Charlestown City Council voted Monday to adopt an interlocal agreement that requires the city to pay more than $26,000 annually toward the J.B. Ogle Animal Shelter’s operating costs. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Water Company Is Maybe A Giant Sewer

Told ya there was more coming on the Water Company. This story has been shopped to me for AT LEAST a year with lurid stories of affairs and all kinds of shenanigans and legal maneuvers. The Water Company folks are just plain old corrupt. [WDRB]

This isn’t the only big legal problem facing folks from the Water Company. James Brammell, president and chief executive of the Louisville Water Co., pleaded guilty Wednesday to charges of speeding and aggravated driving under the influence. [C-J/AKN]

An explosion has been reported at LG&E’s Mill Creek plant, located at 14660 Dixie Highway. It is now being reported that two contractors were injured in a contained fire while welding. [WHAS11]

Ultimately, less than half of Kentucky’s voters are satisfied with their choices for governor this year, but that number is slightly worse for Bevin than it is for Conway. [H-L]

Halloween is a couple of days away, but there was a different type of spirit at the Frazier History Museum. [WLKY]

Both the Democratic and Republican National Committees have agreed to give their blessing to a presidential town hall set up by activists in the Black Lives Matter movement. But organizers within the network have said that gesture isn’t enough. They want the parties to devote one of their official — and more high-profile — debates to racial justice issues. [HuffPo]

You should read the lawsuit because it’s pretty damning. A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of a woman who claims she was sexually assaulted by a former Louisville Metro Department of Corrections officer. [WAVE3]

Their lips are moving. They’re lying: Ben Carson, Rand Paul and the right-wing’s truthiness problem. When Rand Paul, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz start citing history and “facts,” best double-check them right away. [Salon]

Few pieces of legislation drew as much attention this year as the bill addressing Kentucky’s recent surge in heroin abuse and overdose-related deaths. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) is now viewed negatively by a majority of Republicans, a new poll says. [The Hill]

United Parcel Service Inc. will triple the size of its Louisville ground package-sorting facility, known as Centennial Hub. [Business First]

Name recognition won’t be a problem for voters when choosing three New Albany City Council At-large candidates next month. [News & Tribune]

Death & Destruction In The “Compassionate City”

A Rowan County man has been arrested in connection with a body that was found inside a wooden box in Louisville. [WKYT]

Giving up on the West End is the last thing the West End needs right now. A well-known West Louisville pastor — who has spent the last 10 plus years trying to help reduce the crime and violence — is leaving the neighborhood. [WDRB]

The former principal of Louisville Male High School, fired last year amid investigations finding standardized testing improprieties, has filed a lawsuit against Jefferson County Public Schools claiming he was wrongfully fired and defamed. [C-J/AKN]

“Fifty feet from my front door, I saw a corpse.” And that shocking scene prompted dozens of people to pack into a small room in the Salvation Army on Beecher Street. [WHAS11]

In their last debate before voters go to the polls next Tuesday, Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway continued to trade jabs, but in the end, one candidate did manage to compliment the other. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jeffersonville has seen a lot of growth over the past few years, and the two candidates for mayor said they’re the best choice for continued growth. [WLKY]

The White House on Monday slammed FBI Director James Comey’s notion that pervasive cellphone footage featuring police actions has led to an uptick in violent crime. [HuffPo]

Monday evening the Jefferson County Public School board voted to hire two search firms. You can thank Donna Hargens for this unnecessary spending. [WAVE3]

A new report reveals multiple errors and hundreds of cases missing from federal data on fatal police shootings. [Mother Jones]

Residents of Louisville Metro Council District 10 — which includes parts of the Highlands, Germantown, Camp Taylor and Buechel — will elect a new council member next week. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, the Republican running for governor who’s been called a “pathological liar” in ads by his opponent, Democrat Jack Conway, told Conway to “stop lying to people” during a contentious debate Sunday evening at Eastern Kentucky University. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville’s Power Creative advertising agency is preparing to spin off a new business, which will be led by Power Creative CEO David Power, and it could be open for business as early as Dec. 1. [Business First]

Eight local manufacturers, service companies and trucking companies have filed suit against the city of New Albany, New Albany Mayor Jeff Gahan, the Floyd County Commissioners, Indiana Department of Transportation and other government agencies alleging that a recent redesign of East Main Street has negatively affected their right to safely access the street. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Era: Nothing But Scandals & Sex

What this means is Mark Hebert (haha, just kidding/trying to get a rise out of Hebert) is prolly spilling the hooker tea. A former University of Louisville basketball player has given investigators a version of events that indicates strippers were in the players’ dorm on at least one occasion, a source close to the investigation told WDRB News. [WDRB]

You already knew Donna Hargens is as bad as the previous two heads of JCPS. None of this will come as a surprise to you, as it apparently does to education reporters. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, please, no one is shocked someone with integrity jumped ship from JCPS. [WHAS11]

Aww, lookit, Jimbo Ramsey has another sex scandal on his hands. And this one will probably cost him more than Robert Felner and the rest of the bunch combined. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s Intergovernmental Affairs Committee received an update on the city’s Needle Exchange Program. So far, after almost four months, the program has had more than 800 participants, and more than 300 of them have come back more than once. [WLKY]

If you want to stop violence against people, stop violence against animals. [HuffPo]

A vegetable garden along Southwestern Parkway in the Shawnee neighborhood is sowing more than seeds. [WAVE3]

Some prominent Northern Kentucky Republicans have told the Enquirer they support Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. The bitterness among many Republicans against the tea party, which has challenged many in leadership recent years, might catch up to Republican candidate Matt Bevin, often seen as an outsider candidate who has heavy tea party support. []

21st Century Parks is scheduled to open the third of four parks next week. The quartet will eventually make up the Parklands of Floyds Fork — a donor-supported public park system near I-265 in eastern Jefferson County. [WFPL]

The lack of accurate information about police-involved shootings is roiling the nation’s law enforcement community, leaving officials unable to say whether high-profile killings are isolated events or part of an alarming trend, FBI Director James B. Comey said Wednesday. [WaPo]

Louisville’s Republic Bancorp Inc. has expanded its reach in Florida with the $32.3 million purchase of St. Petersburg, Fla.-based Cornerstone Community Bank. [Business First]

If you’ve ever seen an elderly person or a child in need and couldn’t resist lending a helping hand, then you might know how Jeffersonville police officer Amber Tharp feels every moment of every day. [News & Tribune]

Death Murder Death Murder Death

Authorities have released the name of a woman who was found murdered near Churchill Downs. [WDRB]

Immigration and criminal defense lawyer Daniel Alvarez has gained the endorsement of Citizens for Better Judges in the highly contested Jefferson District Court race. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating a stabbing that happened in the 5100 block of Crafty Drive located in the Lynnview neighborhood. [WHAS11]

New ribbon advertising boards have been installed around the second tier of Rupp Arena, the first part of a two-year, $15 million technology upgrade for Lexington’s most recognized landmark. [H-L]

This got a lot less buzz than we expected. Particularly in light of the double-dipping. Louisville has a new chief of community building. Mayor Greg Fischer named Yvette Gentry to lead the department. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School personnel action document reveals 30 of the districts bus drivers and substitute bus drivers resigned, retired or were terminated from early August to the middle of September. [WAVE3]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

Home repairs can be a frightful burden for Louisville residents who live in poverty or on fixed incomes. [WFPL]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

An empty elementary school in downtown Jeffersonville will soon be torn down to make way for a 93-room upper mid-scale hotel. [Business First]

Telling stories of epidemics and disasters through the eyes of those who lived — and died — in them, “Stories Behind the Stones: Disease, Disasters and the Downtrodden” offered tours of Fairview Cemetery over the weekend. [News & Tribune]