Louisville Loves Cutting TARC Routes

TARC is asking for the public’s opinion about possibly cutting service on three of its busiest routes. [WDRB]

Clarksville Community Schools — which Superintendent Kimberly Knott called “the neediest school district in Southern Indiana” — stands to lose more than $500,000 under Indiana’s new budget, which was signed last week by Gov. Mike Pence and introduces changes to the school funding formula. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway is suing Marathon Petroleum Corp. over high gas prices. The 2015 gubernatorial candidate filed the complaint Tuesday with the United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky – one week ahead of the state’s primary election. [WHAS11]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. Judicial corruption is a big deal in the rest of the state. [H-L]

Following a heated public meeting, the Floyd County Council is holding off on a decision to cut half of the county’s animal control budget. [WLKY]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

People are freaking out because police found marijuana growing at the scene of a shooting. [WAVE3]

Jerry Abramson sends emails to the White House staff. [White House]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Indianapolis-based American Senior Communities LLC plans to build a new facility in Louisville. [Business First]

To downtown Jeffersonville resident McNeil Wynn, TARC is vital in his everyday commute to Louisville. [News & Tribune]

Friday Was An Arena News Dump Day

A Bullitt County official has been taken off the job over accusations that he made racist and sexist remarks, as well as claims that he mistreated employees, and the animals he was supposed to care for. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority that operates the KFC Yum! Center doesn’t have to fork over $7.5 million to the Kentucky State Fair Board to compensate it for business the board lost at Freedom Hall after the new downtown arena opened in 2010. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office released a letter Friday expressing what it termed an informal opinion that the arena authority isn’t obligated to pay that sum. [C-J/AKN]

Police are conducting a death investigation in the Parkland neighborhood after a body was found in a vehicle early Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

State officials approved at or near maximum tuition increases at four state universities Friday amid a heated GOP primary for governor where the candidates have lamented the escalating cost of college. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Mother Nature was smiling as perfect weather allowed hundreds of thousands lined both sides of the Ohio River for Thunder Over Louisville 2015. [WLKY]

An HIV outbreak in southeastern Indiana related to abuse of intravenous prescription drugs has jumped by 24 cases in the past week, an increase attributed to offering more testing resources, state health officials said on Friday. [HuffPo]

All across the country the use of body cameras continues to be a hot topic. In Louisville it will be more than just a conversation, it will be a pilot project beginning in June. [WAVE3]

California resident Gerilynn Aflleje was horrified when her 4-year-old Siberian Husky mix was killed by a local animal shelter over $180 in fees that she couldn’t afford. [CNN Money]

In its first 10 days, more than 40 people used a new needle exchange program in the Southern Indiana county struggling with an HIV crisis linked to intravenous drug use. [WFPL]

On Friday, Steve Beshear appointed Debbie King to replace her husband on the Arena Authority. Which… well… you thought Jim was secretive? Wait til you meet Debbie. Though, she’s super-nice and not even we dislike her. [Press Release]

Hardin County-based Boundary Oak Distillery plans to expand in Radcliff. [Business First]

It was the only invocation spoken aloud, as New Albany resident Melanie Adams offered a prayer during the public comments portion of Thursday’s city council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Democrats May Just Be The Worst

By a unanimous vote, Councilman David Tandy (D-4) was elected President of the Louisville Metro Council for the remainder of 2015 during the Council’s regular meeting on Thursday night. Maybe he’ll visit Cordish again and sign a non-disclosure agreement, refusing to reveal what he discovers to the public. Or maybe he’ll use his council staff as a babysitter again. So many opportunities. [Press Release]

Students, staff and alumni at Fern Creek Traditional High School are seeking to rename the school Fern Creek High School. [WDRB]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday delivered a blow to Metropolitan Sewer District management, providing an opinion that there’s no legal reason why the agency’s board could not agree to a contract provision requested by one of its unions. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has joined in the criminal investigation into the troubled Southeast Bullitt Fire Department. [WHAS11]

Food prices across Kentucky continue to rise, increasing 1. 7 percent in the last quarter of 2014. According the Kentucky Farm Bureau Marketbasket Survey, the cost of 40 basic grocery items averaged $129.14 in the last quarter. It’s the seventh consecutive quarter of rising prices and represents an all-time high. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A doctor who practiced in Louisville and southern Indiana was charged Wednesday by a federal grand jury with prescribing pain medications that resulted in the deaths of five patients, health care fraud and unlawful distribution or dispensing of controlled substances. [WLKY]

A bill that would redefine a full-time work week under the Affordable Care Act as 40 hours instead of 30 actually amounts to a break for corporations, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) argued in a hearing Thursday. [HuffPo]

The era of prohibiting alcohol sales on Sundays in Indiana might be over soon. [WAVE3]

Johnny Bell, D-Glasgow, the new state House majority whip, informed his predecessor’s staff Wednesday that they would be replaced – including Yolanda Costner, one of the women suing the legislature over allegations of sexual harassment by former Rep. John Arnold. [Ronnie Ellis]

A majority of Kentuckians think that the state’s domestic violence laws should include unmarried couples who haven’t live together and those who don’t share a child, according to a poll released Thursday. [WFPL]

Prompted by an investigation by ProPublica and NPR, Sen. Charles Grassley asks a Missouri nonprofit hospital to explain why it seizes the wages of thousands of its patients. [ProPublica]

Mayor Greg Fischer announced Tuesday that Louisville’s Office of Sustainability has launched a “green” infrastructure incentive program for businesses. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan has requested Time Warner Cable pursue strategies for Gigabit connections on a trial basis for some areas of New Albany. The city has been exploring a permanent Gigabit connection to provide high-speed Internet options for customers in New Albany. In a press release issued Friday, the city announced the trial areas will include downtown, the Purdue Research Park and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]

White Flighters Panicked Over Peaceful Protest

FFS, it’s not bourbon if it’s made in Indiana. [WDRB]

In responding to his most recent performance review, Metropolitan Sewer District executive director Greg Heitzman objected to the middle rating that his board gave him, an evaluation that was colored by a bitter union dispute. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police are helping make the holidays brighter for senior citizens in the community. [WHAS11]

Seems like only yesterday Steve Beshear and Jack Conway were pushing this as the second-coming. Like most economic developments Beshear touts, here’s yet another failure. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a look at panicked white flighters freaking out about a peaceful protest. If only more people had the guts Amy Rock has. [WLKY]

Isn’t it fascinating to see a bunch of fat white people freaking out about a scary black guy protesting? Because it’s obviously the best thing to do — to prosecute a protestor instead of bothering to do anything about the slaughter of poor brown people at the hands of wealthy white communities. Almost as fascinating to watch the Louisville Metro Police threaten to arrest peaceful protestors this weekend in a super-white neighborhood because some sheltered kids were scared. [HuffPo]

Six Fern Creek Traditional High School students were taken to the hospital after drinking water tainted with prescription medication. [WAVE3]

Adam Edelen is still in a pissing contest with Bobbie Coleslaw for her shady spending. [External PDF Link]

Amid national attention to police tactics across the U.S., Louisville officials are making an attempt to open up a dialogue between local police and the community. [WFPL]

Charter schools are often promoted as a tool to address educational inequities, but a potential precedent-setting legal case launched this week says the opposite. In filings with the U.S. Department of Education, two Delaware nonprofit groups allege that some of the state’s publicly funded, privately managed schools are actively resegregating the education system — and in a way that violates federal civil rights law. [David Sirota]

For nearly a decade, Maria Hampton has been the face of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in Louisville [Business First]

The lawsuit that Jeffersonville residents filed against MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. has been dropped, but a judge’s ruling Thursday and a new lawsuit against the city mean the fight is far from over. [News & Tribune]

Here’s A Good Morning You-Know-What Sandwich

An LG&E natural gas pipeline that ruptured in Oldham County in September caused $1.3 million in property damage and other costs, according to the utility’s report to federal safety regulators. [WDRB]

Attorney General Jack Conway appointed another special prosecutor to handle the ongoing dispute over whether Louisville Metro Councilman David James is serving in two incompatible public positions. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. Louisville Metro Police are working a fatal shooting on 2100 block of Ratcliffe Avenue just west Dixie Highway. [WHAS11]

Sales of spirits are accelerating into the festive season, according to Brown-Forman. The Louisville-based parent of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey and Woodford Reserve reported that sales for the second quarter were up 5 percent to nearly $1.14 billion. For the first half of the financial year net sales are up 4 percent, the company said. [H-L]

We’re blown away that wingnuts aren’t screaming satanism or whatever. Good Morning Dragons is a yoga program at South Oldham Middle School that has kids bending and twisting into yoga poses before the first bell. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali on Saturday posted a selfie on his Instagram to cheer on Louisville against Kentucky in college football. “#Louisville Game Day! Go Cards!” the caption read. [HuffPo]

This is why Clark County can’t have nice things. She makes decisions that affect thousands of students, but several months ago she made a decision that landed her in jail. Despite admitting to felony theft, Teresa Perkins took her seat on the Greater Clark County School Board Tuesday night and she says she’s not resigning. [WAVE3]

Did UPS discriminate against a pregnant worker by letting her go? Women’s reproductive rights are once again before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Only this time, pregnancy discrimination is the issue and pro-life and pro-choice groups are on the same side, opposed by business groups. [NPR]

James McGaugh is the recipient of the Grawemeyer Award for psychology, the University of Louisville announced Tuesday evening. [WFPL]

A growing number of cable companies are implementing data caps (sorry — “data thresholds”), which put limits on how much data a subscriber could use before facing penalties ranging from warning messages to throttled speeds to overage fees. A new report from the federal Government Accountability Office says that lack of competition in the broadband market could result in these caps being implemented with no one benefiting other than cable companies’ bottom lines. [Consumerist]

Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) recently began cranking out its new aluminum body F-150 trucks. Since then, there’s been plenty of speculation about whether the new body would be carried over to other vehicles, including the F-Series Super Duty Trucks made in Louisville. [Business First]

Another fun scandal is brewing at the University of Louisville. The VP of Human Resources was canned and escorted away by cops. [The ‘Ville Voice]

The legal bills of a Jeffersonville resident who sued MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. and the city of Jeffersonville over a neighboring asphalt plant have been paid by a laborers’ union. [News & Tribune]