Holding Our Breath For An End To The Death

Louisville police say the city’s latest murder victim was robbed and kidnapped before he was murdered. [WDRB]

Maybe we can try arresting our way out of yet another nightmare. After a deadly start to 2015, leaders of the Metro Council’s Public Safety Committee asked top city officials, including Police Chief Steve Conrad, to speak during a specially called Monday meeting to talk about recent violence and increase in homicides. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian. [WHAS11]

Lexington is pushing forward with its efforts to increase Internet speeds. [H-L]

Before the latest bout of snow, crews were working on repairing the roads, but the weather brought those plans to a halt. Now officials estimate there are nearly 10,000 potholes across Louisville. [WLKY]

A New York judge ordered a Papa John’s pizza restaurant franchise and its owner to fork over more than $2 million after short-changing hundreds of delivery workers and shaving hours from their paychecks, prosecutors said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Everybody is losing their mind over an upcoming Prince concert. [WAVE3]

On Monday, the city council of Indianapolis passed a “Homeless Bill of Rights” to protect its population without housing, one of the first cities to do so. [ThinkProgress]

Braving temperatures in the 30s on a recent Wednesday morning, the 25 or so people bunched in the Kroger parking lot in west Louisville had plenty of grounds for complaint. [WFPL]

The United States government on Friday urged the Supreme Court to strike down bans on same-sex couples’ marriages across the country, concluding, “There is no adequate justification for such a discriminatory and injurious exercise of state power.” [BuzzFeed]

It might come as little surprise that Kentucky, home to Papa John’s International Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc., has the highest number of fast-food restaurants per capita. [Business First]

A request to seek bids on a partial repaving of the district’s service center was contested at Greater Clark County Schools board of trustees meeting and passed by a thin margin. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Democrats May Just Be The Worst

By a unanimous vote, Councilman David Tandy (D-4) was elected President of the Louisville Metro Council for the remainder of 2015 during the Council’s regular meeting on Thursday night. Maybe he’ll visit Cordish again and sign a non-disclosure agreement, refusing to reveal what he discovers to the public. Or maybe he’ll use his council staff as a babysitter again. So many opportunities. [Press Release]

Students, staff and alumni at Fern Creek Traditional High School are seeking to rename the school Fern Creek High School. [WDRB]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday delivered a blow to Metropolitan Sewer District management, providing an opinion that there’s no legal reason why the agency’s board could not agree to a contract provision requested by one of its unions. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has joined in the criminal investigation into the troubled Southeast Bullitt Fire Department. [WHAS11]

Food prices across Kentucky continue to rise, increasing 1. 7 percent in the last quarter of 2014. According the Kentucky Farm Bureau Marketbasket Survey, the cost of 40 basic grocery items averaged $129.14 in the last quarter. It’s the seventh consecutive quarter of rising prices and represents an all-time high. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A doctor who practiced in Louisville and southern Indiana was charged Wednesday by a federal grand jury with prescribing pain medications that resulted in the deaths of five patients, health care fraud and unlawful distribution or dispensing of controlled substances. [WLKY]

A bill that would redefine a full-time work week under the Affordable Care Act as 40 hours instead of 30 actually amounts to a break for corporations, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) argued in a hearing Thursday. [HuffPo]

The era of prohibiting alcohol sales on Sundays in Indiana might be over soon. [WAVE3]

Johnny Bell, D-Glasgow, the new state House majority whip, informed his predecessor’s staff Wednesday that they would be replaced – including Yolanda Costner, one of the women suing the legislature over allegations of sexual harassment by former Rep. John Arnold. [Ronnie Ellis]

A majority of Kentuckians think that the state’s domestic violence laws should include unmarried couples who haven’t live together and those who don’t share a child, according to a poll released Thursday. [WFPL]

Prompted by an investigation by ProPublica and NPR, Sen. Charles Grassley asks a Missouri nonprofit hospital to explain why it seizes the wages of thousands of its patients. [ProPublica]

Mayor Greg Fischer announced Tuesday that Louisville’s Office of Sustainability has launched a “green” infrastructure incentive program for businesses. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan has requested Time Warner Cable pursue strategies for Gigabit connections on a trial basis for some areas of New Albany. The city has been exploring a permanent Gigabit connection to provide high-speed Internet options for customers in New Albany. In a press release issued Friday, the city announced the trial areas will include downtown, the Purdue Research Park and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]

Housing Continues To Be An Afterthought Here

In November 2013, Mayor Greg Fischer formally declared Louisville’s interest in getting the same type of blazing-fast Internet connections that Google is bringing to a few select cities. More than a year later, two companies have expressed interest in bringing a fiber “gigabit” network to Louisville, but no work has begun. [WDRB]

Jefferson County has less public housing assistance than a year ago, long waiting lists and public housing remains heavily concentrated in west Louisville, according to the 2014 State of Metropolitan Housing Report released Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

The WHAS Crusade for Children is able to continue its noble mission of raising money for agencies, schools and hospitals to better the lives of special needs children, thanks to generous donations to the Crusade for Children Endowment fund. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Equine Education Project announced Friday that on Tuesday the board voted unanimously on a resolution stating that for the 2015 session it will not support casino legislation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Hundreds gathered at the Highland Baptist Church to remember the dozens killed this year here in Louisville. [WLKY]

An outgoing Senate Democrat wants to take federal money from low-income college students to pay student loan contractors, whose tactics toward borrowers have been criticized by consumer advocates, federal regulators and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. [HuffPo]

One week after a teenage girl was killed in Louisville’s West End, a new group is calling for residents to stop the violence and take back their communities. [WAVE3]

Ferguson, Mo., has captured the nation’s attention for the better part of the past four months. But in just a few short days in the national news, Eric Garner has become the political rallying point that Ferguson never has. A new poll shows considerably more unhappiness with the lack of an indictment in Garner’s case than in the one in Ferguson. And, perhaps most important as far as its impact goes, that unhappiness is significantly less connected to a person’s race. [WaPo]

Did anyone expect something less from one of the highest paid people in education? Please. Save the feigned outrage. As Michael McCall winds down his 16-year career as president of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, he will leave behind an operation that ran a budget deficit in his final three years. [WFPL]

Kentuckians have long known that Rand Paul’s outreach in the black community only started because he wants to run for the presidency. [Politico]

More than six months after construction started, Feast BBQ’s second location finally has an opening date. [Business First]

he Clark County Commissioners didn’t take any action on an ordinance that would add a $40 drainage fee to some residents’ property tax bills Thursday, but they heard about how unhappy some residents were about the new fee anyway. [News & Tribune]

When Will The Crazy Shooting Deaths End?

The hits just keep coming for JCPS. Jefferson County Public Schools paid its former public information officer Lauren Roberts $200,000 last fall to settle a dispute over how she left the district. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has scheduled a special meeting on Monday to consider an employee union’s “last, best and final offer” in a bitter labor dispute that’s drawn out for more than two years, leading to a threatened strike. [C-J/AKN]

Bourbon is coming back to Hardin County for the first time in more than one hundred years. [WHAS11]

A new energy efficiency plan for Kentucky Utilities and Louisville Gas & Electric will mean an increase in customers’ bills, an end to free compact fluorescent bulbs mailed to residential customers and a pilot test for “smart” meters. [H-L]

Seriously, when is local television media going to stop giving this guy the attention he wants? [WLKY]

A federal advisory committee on Thursday recommended for the first time that the U.S. soften its ban on blood donations from gay men. [HuffPo]

Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. A cab driver found shot to death inside his car was identified Monday morning shortly after police announced that three juveniles had been charged with murder in the cabbie’s death. [WAVE3]

A day after he won reelection and Republicans retook the Senate, Sen. Mitch McConnell left no doubt that the edge-of-disaster showdowns with President Obama that have marked the past four years would be a relic of the past. [WaPo]

The 2014 election season has come and gone, but the thousands of campaign signs may stick around for months. [WFPL]

Two days after AT&T claimed it has to “pause” a 100-city fiber build because of uncertainty over network neutrality rules, the Federal Communications Commission today asked the company to finally detail its vague plans for fiber construction. [Ars Technica]

GearBrake, an early-stage company that has developed a motorcycle brake light to improve safety, has won $5,000 in a state entrepreneur pitch competition. [Business First]

First impressions matter, according to key players involved in developing standards for the entrance into River Ridge Commerce Center from the future east-end Ohio River bridge. [News & Tribune]

Here’s the petition asking the Supreme Court to hear the Kentucky marriage equality case. [Dan Canon]

Of Course Jim King Opposes A Basic Living Wage

Jerry Abramson is abandoning the insignificant and obscure office to which he was elected — lieutenant governor of Kentucky – for an even more insignificant and obscure office in the White House — deputy assistant to the president and director of intergovernmental affairs. [WDRB]

Residents near Louisville International Airport who don’t qualify for free home insulation work to help protect against air traffic noise could get help from proposed state legislation that would offer up to $3 million annually in tax credits for self-bought insulation. [C-J/AKN]

City leaders are asking the public to weigh in on a complete revamp of a stretch of Dixie Highway. [WHAS11]

These scores aren’t that great for Jefferson County Public Schools… [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another big part of honoring our veterans is taking care of their medical needs, which is why the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is building a new medical center in Louisville. [WLKY]

Kentucky Baptists on Tuesday chose to sever ties with a Louisville church that is open to performing same-sex marriages. [HuffPo]

A wave of business owners, including a well-known restaurateur, presented dire scenarios about a proposed minimum wage hike to Louisville Metro Council on Monday. [WAVE3]

If you’re some kind of jackass like Ted Cruz, you probably need help understanding net neutrality. [The Oatmeal]

Some motorists—namely, people who don’t have a mobile phone or credit card—are being excluded from a new pilot parking program in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

Republicans like Brett Guthrie pocket mountains of telecom cash and are fighting against an open, honest internet. [Gizmodo]

Louisville-based Humana Inc. has agreed to buy $500 million in its stock from Goldman, Sachs & Co. [Business First]

The Tiger Baby Playtime attraction in Charlestown was often a sold-out fundraiser event this summer with patrons paying $25 to play with tiger cubs. For $20 more in cash, they could pose for a photo with one in their arms. What visitors may not have know was that some grown tigers outside the tent were lounging in cages inspectors have deemed inadequate to prevent escape, that Stark pleaded guilty to selling an endangered animal and that he’s boasted he’ll never shut down — no matter what the law says. [News & Tribune]