Another Gag-Worthy Week For UofL

A job listing just posted online for Louisville Metro Police Department has some wondering if the city’s police force is short on officers. [WDRB]

It’s hilarious that Rick Pitino is defending Jim Ramsey, as if they’re both victims of things they can’t help. Both of these men are the worst of the worst in higher education. Pitino, with sex scandal after sex scandal. Ramsey, with financial corruption mess after financial corruption mess. Both should be relieved of their duties instead of allowing a bunch of kids to take the blame for crap that those two are ultimately supposed to take responsibility. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees member has resigned following months of questions surrounding its racial imbalance. [WHAS11]

Just eight years ago, most of the domestic violence deaths in Louisville were from strangulation. Today, more than 71 percent are from guns. [H-L]

How excited are you that the shootings are spreading to Southern Indiana? [WLKY]

Health care got some attention in Saturday night’s GOP presidential debate. And when it was Texas Sen. Turd Cruz’s turn to speak, he started by cataloging the alleged evils of “socialized medicine.” [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WAVE3]

Noting their excitement about “the energy that exists across campus,” Maribeth and Louis Berman, of Louisville, have pledged $1 million to Eastern Kentucky University to support a combination of academic and student-focused initiatives. [Richmond Register]

The Louisville Metro Council will soon consider measures to streamline the process for bringing ultra-fast Internet access, including a plan to condense the franchise-granting authority of Jefferson County’s suburban cities for communication services into one entity. [WFPL]

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ campaign has reportedly raised $3 million since Monday night’s Iowa caucuses. [The Hill]

A new study shows that Kentucky and Arkansas had the sharpest decline in the percentage of adult residents without health insurance from 2013 to 2015. [Business First]

Voters on both sides of the aisle will have options for the Clark County Council race, as 10 people signed up to run for the three At-large seats up for election in each party in May’s primary. [News & Tribune]

If GLI Backs It, It’s Bad News Bears

More than 600 well-paying jobs could be coming to Louisville as an out-of-state company partners with a local non-profit to form a Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WDRB]

David Keith thought the fight to save his neighborhood was over. [C-J/AKN]

If GLI backs something, you know it’s the worst thing on earth. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt says that if Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget is approved by the General Assembly, the Department of Education will face $72 million in reductions over the next two years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville-based Passport Health Plan is partnering with Virginia-based Evolent Health to create the Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WLKY]

The FBI is joining a U.S. investigation into Flint, Michigan’s water contamination crisis, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

The Falls of the Ohio, a state park covered in fossils, is a perfect place to take pictures – expect for one thing. [WAVE3]

Legislation that would prohibit the General Assembly from diverting state lottery funds away from Kentucky’s need- and merit-based scholarship programs has cleared a House committee. [Press Release]

Jerome Perry doesn’t have many white neighbors. There are so few, in fact, that Perry can list the houses around him where white families live. Even the homes that are blocks away from his tidy yellow brick home on 45th Street in Louisville’s Westover neighborhood. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

Get ready to roll your eyes really hard at all the hype over this Omni hotel mess… [Business First]

After a little more than an hour of discussion Wednesday, the committee tasked with finding a possible compromise to the current weapons ban at the town’s municipal building came to some amicable starting points. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Pay Attention To The Homeless Count!

For more than a decade, elected leaders in Louisville and Southern Indiana have urged Norfolk Southern Corp. to consider opening part of the K&I Bridge over the Ohio River to walkers and cyclists. [WDRB]

Every year, hundreds of volunteers bundle up and head to hotels, emergency shelters, camps and soup kitchens, determined to answer two questions: how many people are homeless in the Louisville area and who are they? [C-J/AKN]

If you didn’t know, your new governor is a hot garbage fire. [WHAS11]

A problem in the solicitation to build a high-speed broadband network across Kentucky has jeopardized funding for the project, a top administration official said Thursday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! He was a pioneer: A civil rights lawyer who became Jefferson County’s first African-American Circuit Court judge. Benjamin Shobe died Friday at a local hospital. []

Both the Democratic and Republican races are close contests in Iowa, and pollsters say surprises are likely. [HuffPo]

A trial date has been set for a former gun shop owner who is charged with murder after two brothers were shot in a Valley Station parking lot. [WAVE3]

Most of the time when we talk about homelessness, big cities come to mind. But about seven percent of homeless people live in rural areas, where access to help is much harder to come by. [NPR]

Former Kentucky state Sen. Georgia Powers has died. Powers was the first African-American and first woman elected to the Kentucky Senate, where she served for 21 years beginning in 1968. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

We got to talking about lots of different economic development topics this morning at The Pointe in Butchertown. [Business First]

Attorney Amy Wheatley can’t help but laugh at her newfound reputation as being the first attorney to use the Clark County Clerk’s new e-filing system. As only one of two counties in Indiana to switch to electronic filing, Clark County and Wheatley share a similar claim to fame. [News & Tribune]

All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Breathe. The Air Might Not Kill You.

Former Jefferson County Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Matt Conway was charged with felony assault Wednesday night after allegedly attacking his wife, according to a police report. Remember when his brother was covering up his police investigation(s)? [WDRB]

Everything is so corrupt in West Buechel that they’ve started some kind of watchdog organization. [C-J/AKN]

Just what Louisville needs – another stadium/arena. [WHAS11]

The red steel shipping container was once used to transport toothbrushes and bras. By May, it and another container will be transformed into a one bedroom, one-bathroom, 640-square-foot home that will be part of a new live-work community on York Street spearheaded by the North Limestone Community Development Corp. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A team of physicians, surgeons and nurses are creating an advanced heart failure program at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

When Donald Trump first watched his new TV ad that began airing this week, he said, “Play it again. I love the feel of it.” I, too, had to play it again, not because I too loved the feel, but out of amazement that this is what the front runner for the Republican nomination had chosen to put in his first TV ad of the campaign. [HuffPo]

A man is charged with wanton endangerment after setting himself on fire in the parking lot of a busy downtown convenience store. Maybe instead of jailing this man, Possumbilly City could get him some help? [WAVE3]

The FBI now tracks animal abuse like it tracks homicides. It was more than 10 years ago that Mary Lou Randour realized she couldn’t answer what should have been a simple question: Was cruelty against animals on the rise or in decline? [WaPo]

About a dozen people filed into a Jeffersontown gun shop shortly after noon on Tuesday, just after President Barack Obama wrapped up a live address outlining details of his executive actions designed to bolster gun control and curb gun violence. [WFPL]

Time Warner Cable said late Wednesday that hackers may have stolen up to 320,000 customers’ email passwords. [The Hill]

Craig Richard, the former CEO of Greater Louisville Inc. who left the chamber of commerce in 2014 to become CEO of Invest Atlanta, will resign from his position Jan. 18, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed announced Wednesday. Part of a pattern. These folks leave after screwing up in Louisville and eventually get figured out, forced resignations occur, blah blah blah. [Business First]

Nonprofits looking to do some good for youth in Clark and Floyd counties have a chance to bolster their budgets with grants from the Community Foundation of Southern Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Go To The Falls Visitor Center! It’s A Hidden Gem In The Metro

It seems the fight is over for a seat on Jeffersonville’s City Council, but that hasn’t stopped one candidate from throwing some verbal punches. [WDRB]

Oh, god, Lynn Winter is at it again. It’s time for Louisville to move on. Living in the past is not working. [C-J/AKN]

The warm winter that we have been seeing is bad for business in Paoli, Indiana. [WHAS11]

Fewer people in the state are getting their GED because of more rigorous standards and the move to a computer-based test, according to a report released Tuesday by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [H-L]

Thursday marks the third anniversary of the fatal Christmas Eve attack on a young man in west Louisville. [WLKY]

The federal government’s case against the man suspected of helping the San Bernardino shooters would be weaker if the NRA and other gun rights groups had their way in court. [HuffPo]

It’s absolutely terrible that this guy got shot. But his claim not to know why he was shot? Really? Sure, it could be an accident here in Compassionate City because there’s a new gun murder every five seconds. Just unlikely the son of a high-profile attorney doesn’t know why he got shot. [WAVE3]

With all that’s going on in the world — from record-breaking warm spells to rapidly melting ice sheets — it’s easy to ignore something so seemingly mundane as dirt. But scientists at the University of Sheffield’s Grantham Center for Sustainable Futures suggest that we ignore dirt at our own peril. [ThinkProgress]

Norton Healthcare and the University of Louisville have released the details of the agreement the parties reached Friday to settle an ongoing dispute over Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WFPL]

The Pittsburgh City Council on Monday voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, falling in line with a growing number of municipalities that have taken similar actions in recent years, city officials said. Meanwhile, Kentucky twiddles its thumbs. [Reuters]

The city of Louisville has green-lighted a contract with CTC Consultants in order to chart how to best connect Louisville to the KentuckyWired fiber optic Internet cable network. [Business First]

Visitors to the new Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at and after its grand reopening Jan. 8 can expect an immersive learning experience as they travel through the history of the falls and the affects and relation to the region. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Another Compassionate Holiday Murder (Maybe)

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found dead in the 2100 block of Dahlia Avenue, near the intersection of Bardstown Road and Lancashire Avenue, early Monday. [WDRB]

In a unanimous vote, the Louisville Metro Council moved to hold a significant chunk of Louisville’s $18.9 million surplus on Thursday in order to consider other uses for the funds. The decision came after members from both parties complained Mayor Greg Fischer’s office was not forthcoming with the full surplus amount and didn’t give council members much say over how the money should be allocated. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) is on Winter Break until classes resume on January 4. For many in our community who are busy during this time, school is not something at the forefront of their planning calendar. [WHAS11]

Some in Lexington may have Internet access about 22 times faster than their neighbors. Cable and Internet provider Windstream announced a 1-gigabit-per-second Internet service trial in Lexington on Friday, with the potential for a full launch during the first half of 2016, according to a company press release. [H-L]

Guess Cordish was desperate for some positive press? No, really, this is a good thing. Donated food and supplies were handed out to military and families in need Monday morning as part of the 11th annual Christmas Angel Program at Fourth Street Live. [WLKY]

The latest report on the Arctic by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration finds dwindling sea ice and temperatures as much as 3 Celsius (5.4 Fahrenheit) above average are disrupting walrus and fish populations and having major impacts on the ecosystem. [HuffPo]

Less than two weeks before the end of one of the deadliest years in Louisville’s history, roughly 100 people marched to remember the city’s murder victims Sunday afternoon. The Louisville Urban League hosted the walk. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama urged Americans to remain vigilant against the potential threat of homegrown Islamic State militants on Friday, acknowledging the difficulty of tracking “lone wolf” attackers like those who went on a shooting spree in California. [Reuters]

A Louisville state representative wants to tax electronic cigarette equipment and the liquid nicotine that the devices turn into smokeable vapor. [WFPL]

The Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the first time in nine years Wednesday. NPR’s Audie Cornish talks to Megan Greene, chief economist at John Hancock, about what this means for consumers. [NPR]

A Utah company has expanded in the Louisville market with the purchase of two senior-care facilities, effective Dec. 2. [Business First]

A meeting designed to answer questions about the 2015 Floyd County budget shortfall only created more Tuesday afternoon at the Pine View Government Center. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]