The UofL Prostitution Scandal Rages On

There was a time, I now can admit, when I was really good at writing book reports on books I had not read. This is not the time for that. In evaluating the allegations soon to be brought forth in detail by a woman who says she was hired by former University of Louisville director of basketball operations Andre McGee to provide sexual services for men’s basketball recruits and players from 2010 to 2014, we can look at the smoke, we haven’t yet seen the fire. But it smells like something is burning. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday tightened the nation’s smog standard by nearly 7 percent, choosing a number that puts the Louisville area on the bubble for continued compliance. [C-J/AKN]

The Jeffersontown Police Chief spoke out Saturday and said gun violence in his town will not be tolerated. Sounds like Rick Sanders is back to pounding his chest? [WHAS11]

Dick Pitino may not read the new sexytime book but you know he’ll be listening to the audiobook! [H-L]

Things nearly turned deadly Thursday night in Jeffersontown as a father tried to buy a cellphone for his daughter. [WLKY]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Louisville has long been referred to as the River City, mainly due to its history as a flatboat and steamboat port carrying people and goods to and from the heartland from the city’s conception. But a big part of riverboat history that you may not know about lies right across the mighty Ohio River in Jeffersonville, Indiana. [WAVE3]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Here’s hoping Greg Fischer doesn’t ruin Louisville’s chances at Google Fiber. Hopefully Google will rely on people like Ambassador Matthew Barzun and others. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer will join the city’s chief innovation officer, Ted Smith, on Monday to talk Google Fiber. [WFPL]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

More than 360 local charities received donations Thursday as part of the Community Foundation of Louisville Inc.’s annual Give Local Louisville campaign. [Business First]

Several issues were brought to the stage, but Tuesday’s New Albany mayoral debate was bookended by who was missing from the discussion. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Leadership Is Still The Worst

Everyone pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster that someone with no ties to Greg Fischer runs this program so it stays on track and comes to fruition. Google Fiber announced it was considering bringing its high speed internet service to Louisville earlier this month and now the company is hiring managers for the project. [WDRB]

It looks like Louisville may go another year without a monitoring program for airborne toxic chemicals, as city and state officials keep looking at each other as the future funding source. [C-J/AKN]

Family members of five people who died when a boat capsized on the Ohio River say in federal court documents that the placement and condition of a construction barge caused the tragedy. [WHAS11]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

She’s old enough for that? Jennifer Lawrence is the latest Louisville native to be honored by the Greater Louisville Pride Foundation’s Louisville Hometown Heroes series. [WLKY]

Daniel Suddeath has been hired as editor of the Glasgow Daily Times, effective Tuesday, Sept. 29. Suddeath, a staff writer for the News and Tribune in Southern Indiana for the past seven years, also served as editor for Southern Indiana Business Source magazine during that time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Neighbors who say there has been an increase in crime in their area are frustrated and now they are taking action by starting a neighborhood watch. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called homelessness an “emergency” in the city and proposed spending $100 million to provide permanent housing and shelters for the city’s 26,000 indigent. [Reuters]

State Auditor Adam Edelen says he’s looking into the financial management of the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the university’s $1.1 billion endowment, and the university’s board of trustees as part of an ongoing investigation. [WFPL]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

It looks like another expansion is on the way at Ford Motor Co.’s Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The city’s mayoral candidates did not hold back during Thursday night’s League of Women Voters debate, answering moderated questions and sending accusations the other’s way. [News & Tribune]

Where’s The Condemnation From Your Statewide Candidates Over This Islamophobia?

The Islamic Center in Louisville on River Road has been targeted by vandals and Mayor Greg Fischer is asking the community to help clean it up. [WDRB]

Wait, didn’t everyone determine years ago that the VA overpaid for that site because of shady politics? Let’s all turn a blind eye as our leaders figure out a way to make this disappear. [C-J/AKN]

Proposed changes to a city ordinance could make shutting down businesses that are the source of community complaints a lot easier. [WHAS11]

Watch it happen there before it happens in Louisville. Lexington will announce soon a plan to build a fiber-optic network to increase Internet speeds across the city, Mayor Jim Gray said Thursday. [H-L]

Scandal after scandal went down at Metro Animal Services over the last decade and all the teevee folks can come up with is a story about a stolen puppy. [WLKY]

Louisville is apparently the third most affordable place to live in the country. [HuffPo]

If you want to see privilege in action, watch these people freak out over a golf course. [WAVE3]

A U.S. watchdog office urged Congress on Wednesday to empower regulators to extend a Dec. 31 deadline for freight and passenger railroads to adopt new safety technology that could prevent major derailments and other deadly crashes. [Reuters]

Oh, look, Greg Fischer still thinks he’s going to successfully run for higher office. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer has declined to join other mayors around the country in signing a letter to President Obama supporting stricter national standards for smog. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell acknowledged Wednesday that he and the House Speaker are discussing a short-term government funding bill to avoid a shutdown on Oct. 1. [The Hill]

Plans for major improvements at the Jerry E. Abramson Terminal at the Louisville International Airport have been approved. [Business First]

A Clark County Sheriff’s Department captain agreed to a demotion to lieutenant and a pay reduction in lieu of a merit board hearing concerning allegations of misconduct. [News & Tribune]

Some Schools Treat Kids Like Criminals

This… just…. what? “All Lives Matter”? Every backward white bigot in the city is gonna be pounding their chest on this one because they don’t understand the purpose of the Black Lives Matter movement. A Central High School student is on a mission to promote peace in Louisville and spread the message that ‘All Lives Matter.’ [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is looking for outside help as the search to fill some of its top-level positions drags on. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville police are investigating a homicide in the Hallmark neighborhood that’s just north of Shivley. [WHAS11]

The state has issued a recreational advisory warning people to avoid contact with water in a large swath of the Ohio River because of potentially harmful algae. [H-L]

Staff reorganization of Neighborhood Place Centers across Louisville that was set to get underway in October is put on hold. [WLKY]

Remember when this crap was attempted in Louisville? A community in Alabama is on the verge of banning saggy pants — and one lawmaker said it’s because God doesn’t like the look. [HuffPo]

Students who attend New Albany/Floyd County schools will now be drug tested if the school decides there is individualized reasonable suspicion a student is participating in drug or alcohol use. [WAVE3]

Politicians are suddenly eager to disown failed policies on American prisons, but they have failed to reckon with the history. [The Atlantic]

Louisville is on the verge of joining a select few cities boasting a coveted technology service. Google Fiber representatives will spend the next several months exploring the feasibility of installing ultra-fast fiber Internet connectivity in the city. [WFPL]

President Obama on Saturday abandoned his two-year effort to have the government create a system that explicitly rates the quality of the nation’s colleges and universities, a plan that was bitterly opposed by presidents at many of those institutions. [NY Times]

More than 80 percent of construction companies are having a hard time finding qualified workers, according to a survey of 1,386 companies by Associated General Contractors of America. [Business First]

A project that will continue the transformation of the former Value City Furniture property in Clarksville is nearly complete, and it now has a name. [News & Tribune]

Let’s All Freak Out Over Google Fiber!

Officials at U of L say they are going to make medical care for transgendered persons a priority. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools wants to extend its contract to keep its $190/hour spokeswoman. Way to go, Louisville, for screwing things up again. [C-J/AKN]

Bardstown Police issued a short release Thursday morning saying that one of their officers has been suspended. [WHAS11]

Boy, is this guy in for a real treat. David A. Byerman, who has served two terms as Nevada’s Senate secretary, is the choice of a search committee to be director of the Kentucky Legislative Research Commission. [H-L]

This kind of fluff is why people apparently still turn to this website for Louisville Metro Animal Services news and not the teevee folks. [WLKY]

The 16 NFL stadiums that will host NFL games this weekend have cost taxpayers nearly $3 billion, a new analysis found. [HuffPo]

Family members are desperately searching for answers after a driver hit and killed their loved one and severely injured another woman in Valley Station over Labor Day weekend. [WAVE3]

Maybe this means Louisville is going to get some sweet, sweet GOOGLE FIBER sometime soon. [Click the Clicky]

Mary Cooksey had a tough time getting a pizza delivered to Kingston Park apartments. “They said they won’t come in Kingston,” she said. [WFPL]

Federal immigration officials are issuing far fewer detainer requests, also known as immigration holds, to state and local law enforcement agencies seeking immigrants who are in this country illegally. At the same time, the requests that are issued don’t appear to be targeting serious, or convicted, criminals. [NPR]

If you have driven down Third or Fourth streets south of Broadway lately, you might have noticed a pile of concrete and dirt on Spalding University’s campus. [Business First]

The New Albany police union won portions of its arbitration case against the city, but both sides labeled the decision as essentially a split. [News & Tribune]

Holding Our Breath For An End To The Death

Louisville police say the city’s latest murder victim was robbed and kidnapped before he was murdered. [WDRB]

Maybe we can try arresting our way out of yet another nightmare. After a deadly start to 2015, leaders of the Metro Council’s Public Safety Committee asked top city officials, including Police Chief Steve Conrad, to speak during a specially called Monday meeting to talk about recent violence and increase in homicides. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian. [WHAS11]

Lexington is pushing forward with its efforts to increase Internet speeds. [H-L]

Before the latest bout of snow, crews were working on repairing the roads, but the weather brought those plans to a halt. Now officials estimate there are nearly 10,000 potholes across Louisville. [WLKY]

A New York judge ordered a Papa John’s pizza restaurant franchise and its owner to fork over more than $2 million after short-changing hundreds of delivery workers and shaving hours from their paychecks, prosecutors said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Everybody is losing their mind over an upcoming Prince concert. [WAVE3]

On Monday, the city council of Indianapolis passed a “Homeless Bill of Rights” to protect its population without housing, one of the first cities to do so. [ThinkProgress]

Braving temperatures in the 30s on a recent Wednesday morning, the 25 or so people bunched in the Kroger parking lot in west Louisville had plenty of grounds for complaint. [WFPL]

The United States government on Friday urged the Supreme Court to strike down bans on same-sex couples’ marriages across the country, concluding, “There is no adequate justification for such a discriminatory and injurious exercise of state power.” [BuzzFeed]

It might come as little surprise that Kentucky, home to Papa John’s International Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc., has the highest number of fast-food restaurants per capita. [Business First]

A request to seek bids on a partial repaving of the district’s service center was contested at Greater Clark County Schools board of trustees meeting and passed by a thin margin. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Democrats May Just Be The Worst

By a unanimous vote, Councilman David Tandy (D-4) was elected President of the Louisville Metro Council for the remainder of 2015 during the Council’s regular meeting on Thursday night. Maybe he’ll visit Cordish again and sign a non-disclosure agreement, refusing to reveal what he discovers to the public. Or maybe he’ll use his council staff as a babysitter again. So many opportunities. [Press Release]

Students, staff and alumni at Fern Creek Traditional High School are seeking to rename the school Fern Creek High School. [WDRB]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday delivered a blow to Metropolitan Sewer District management, providing an opinion that there’s no legal reason why the agency’s board could not agree to a contract provision requested by one of its unions. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has joined in the criminal investigation into the troubled Southeast Bullitt Fire Department. [WHAS11]

Food prices across Kentucky continue to rise, increasing 1. 7 percent in the last quarter of 2014. According the Kentucky Farm Bureau Marketbasket Survey, the cost of 40 basic grocery items averaged $129.14 in the last quarter. It’s the seventh consecutive quarter of rising prices and represents an all-time high. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A doctor who practiced in Louisville and southern Indiana was charged Wednesday by a federal grand jury with prescribing pain medications that resulted in the deaths of five patients, health care fraud and unlawful distribution or dispensing of controlled substances. [WLKY]

A bill that would redefine a full-time work week under the Affordable Care Act as 40 hours instead of 30 actually amounts to a break for corporations, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) argued in a hearing Thursday. [HuffPo]

The era of prohibiting alcohol sales on Sundays in Indiana might be over soon. [WAVE3]

Johnny Bell, D-Glasgow, the new state House majority whip, informed his predecessor’s staff Wednesday that they would be replaced – including Yolanda Costner, one of the women suing the legislature over allegations of sexual harassment by former Rep. John Arnold. [Ronnie Ellis]

A majority of Kentuckians think that the state’s domestic violence laws should include unmarried couples who haven’t live together and those who don’t share a child, according to a poll released Thursday. [WFPL]

Prompted by an investigation by ProPublica and NPR, Sen. Charles Grassley asks a Missouri nonprofit hospital to explain why it seizes the wages of thousands of its patients. [ProPublica]

Mayor Greg Fischer announced Tuesday that Louisville’s Office of Sustainability has launched a “green” infrastructure incentive program for businesses. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan has requested Time Warner Cable pursue strategies for Gigabit connections on a trial basis for some areas of New Albany. The city has been exploring a permanent Gigabit connection to provide high-speed Internet options for customers in New Albany. In a press release issued Friday, the city announced the trial areas will include downtown, the Purdue Research Park and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]