Who Is Worse? Tom Wine Or Jim Ramsey? Possibility City!

Their homes were bombed, lives threatened, and they nearly starved to death. Now the newest Syrian refugee families have found a safe-haven right here in Louisville. [WDRB]

Tom Wine. MLK parade. Shenanigans. Read all about it. [C-J/AKN]

This is what local media has become. An “exclusive” interview in the “crime” section with the kid who crashed a drone in Lexington. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Housing Corp. is looking for volunteers to help count Kentucky’s homeless population. The count will begin at sunrise on Jan. 27 and continue for 24 hours. The point-in-time count is known as the K-Count. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Members of The Stand Up Louisville Coalition began planning a protest in recent days, after learning that Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine would be a grand marshal in the 44th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Motorcade. Now Wine has withdrawn his name from the list of grand marshals. [WLKY]

General Electric Co agreed to sell its appliances business to China’s Qingdao Haier Co Ltd for $5.4 billion in cash, the companies said on Friday. The move comes weeks after GE abandoned a $3.3 billion deal with Sweden’s Electrolux following months of opposition from U.S. antitrust regulators. [HuffPo]

Didn’t this happen just a couple years ago? Late November 2013, maybe? [WAVE3]

The nation’s cities are at the frontlines of a food system that sickens and impoverishes millions of Americans every year. Local communities where people live, shop, work, and receive healthcare bear the brunt of this system’s unhealthy, unjust outcomes, which disproportionately affect communities of color and low-income Americans. The five cities chosen—Oakland, Memphis, Louisville, Baltimore, and Minneapolis—all have populations between 400,000 and 700,000, and in all of them, the percentage of residents living below the federal poverty line is higher than the national average. [Click the Clicky]

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is launching a new program to provide a long-acting, reversible contraceptive arm implant to women in Louisville. [WFPL]

The Obama administration on Friday said it would announce the next steps in its planned overhaul of how the United States manages coal development on federal land, which sources have said includes freezing new leases. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Senate passed a measure Thursday that’s aimed at allowing the state’s bourbon tourism industry to reach its full potential. [Business First]

Even though he won a recount, Jeffersonville City Councilman Steve Webb is challenging the lawfulness of November’s general election, requesting a trial that could result in a special election. [News & Tribune]

Out-Of-Control Local Media Hype

There was a definitely-not-rare shooting in Louisville yesterday and everyone at WDRB lost their damn mind. Education reporter Toni Konz was there with bells on, scaring the shit out of her teenage followers. All because it was a slow news day. [WDRB]

Congress has effectively lifted the nation’s longstanding ban on federal funding for needle exchange programs, which allow intravenous drug addicts to trade dirty syringes for clean ones in the hopes of preventing disease. [C-J/AKN]

The folks at WHAS11 weren’t quite as bad when it came to freaking out over the shooting. That station is no longer run by a delusional teabagger, so it’s the least hype-y station in town. [WHAS11]

A proliferation of threats at schools across the state has officials working with police to determine best responses and prevention techniques. [H-L]

WLKY was also beside itself with the shooting coverage. Just not quite as insane as WDRB. [WLKY]

The economy generated almost 300,000 jobs last year and cut the nominal unemployment rate to five percent. But family incomes for most people are still deeply depressed. [HuffPo]

Don’t worry, WAVE3 also got in on the shooting hype action. The tea people in charge there made sure they hyped it up plenty. [WAVE3]

Swedish home appliance maker Electrolux said on Monday its CEO Keith McLoughlin would retire and be replaced by senior executive Jonas Samuelson, just a month after the biggest deal in the company’s history collapsed. [Reuters]

This is what happens when people like WDRB’s education reporter hype the hell out of something, keeping people scared. Sure, she and her colleagues freak out when their actions are questioned, but they’re still to blame. CALM DOWN BEYONCE! [WFPL]

In 10 months, Americans will go to the polls to pick the next U.S. president. When they cast their ballots, those votes will likely hinge on how they feel about the issues most important to them. But what are those issues? [NPR]

A pair of creditors is looking to force the troubled Bullitt Utilities Inc. into Chapter 7 bankruptcy, claiming it is their best hope of getting paid what they’re owed. [Business First]

Indiana politics are just as dumb as Kentucky politics. The first meeting the New Albany City Council in 2016 had little drama, except for one announcement from the councilman who is beginning his fifth term. [News & Tribune]

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Frankfort Will Ruin Your Wednesday

Median household income was flat or declined in all but four of Kentucky’s 120 counties in the years following the Great Recession, according to new Census Bureau data. [WDRB]

Kentucky State Reformatory was overcrowded and hazardous for inmates and staff before inmates’ federal lawsuit. [C-J/AKN]

Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. [WHAS11]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

A program that allows Lexington parking ticket recipients to cover their fines with canned goods for the hungry has collected 5 tons of food during the holidays. [WLKY]

The Obama administration on Monday defended its deportation tactics and confirmed it has begun raids on families, despite Democratic candidates and immigrant advocates saying officials could be sending mothers and children to their deaths. [HuffPo]

Twenty-eight bottles of the most sought-after bourbon will be available to the public, after it is released from the court. [WAVE3]

Or will they? Franklin County’s sheriff says the bourbon will be destroyed. [H-L]

Mega road fund cuts were initiated by Matt Bevin and almost no one noticed. But we did. [Page One]

A pair of community groups are hosting a forum next week that aims to discuss the state of race relations in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. manufacturing contracted further in December as lower oil prices undercut spending in the energy sector while construction spending fell in November for the first time in nearly 1-1/2 years, suggesting the economy ended 2015 with less momentum. [Reuters]

Springhurst Health and Rehab is undergoing a $5.2 million expansion project that should be done by mid-2016. [Business First]

Patti Hall saw a need in her Sellersburg community that wasn’t being fulfilled, so about two years ago, she decided to fill it. [News & Tribune]

Local Media Has Lost Its Damn Mind

Yep, local teevee folks are still freaking out. Sadly, people like Toni Konz have no idea how much damage their hyping is causing. Gotta keep meemaw afraid, of course. [WDRB]

Local media is still shitting the floor over misbehaving kids. Based on the reaction from teevee news readers and a select few current/former C-J reporters, you’d think this is the first time in history teenagers have behaved as unruly heathens. [C-J/AKN]

Okay, so maybe local teevee folks aren’t just freaking out – they’re *this close* to pooping in the floor. [WHAS11]

America’s newest family of Syrian refugees flew in late at night, and Sarhan Aldobai, 36, looked down from the plane at the distant lights of his new home. His wife was nursing their baby in the next seat. His five other children had fallen asleep. Sarhan took out the small world map he had carried since leaving Syria in 2012 and tried to trace the plane’s path. [H-L]

A southern Indiana official is refusing to certify election results for the Jeffersonville City Council, saying he has reason to believe at least one recount team did not accurately count returns. [WLKY]

The seven children had just crossed the river, shoes still caked with mud, when U.S. Border Patrol agents stopped them. [HuffPo]

Losing. Their. Damn. Minds. Exacerbated by the hype pushed by WDRB that 100% of JCPS kids are out-of-control devils. [WAVE3]

A Lexington couple is trying to raise thousands of dollars for a way to help their eight-year-old son. Jo and Donnie Grayson’s son, Thatcher, has autism. As he gets older, they worry more about him. [WKYT]

Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District is beginning work on a new air monitoring system that is designed to help pinpoint the causes of ozone pollution. [WFPL]

As soon as next year, a driver’s license may no longer be enough for airline passengers to clear security in some states, if the Department of Homeland Security has its way. [NY Times]

Loganberry Court in Louisville is the most expensive street in Kentucky. The average home price for Loganberry Court, which is off of Mockingbird Gardens Drive and near the Crescent Hill Golf Course, is $2,208,300. [Business First]

I sat in a rocker on Trish Roehm’s porch, between a dog bowl and a water bucket both as big as last spring’s potholes. When Bandit was not in my face, Flash or Otisco or Bonnie or Carmel or Trigger was. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Quick, Freak Out Over Unruly Kids!

Mall St. Matthews on Shelbyville Road was shut down Saturday night after police say they had to respond to several disturbances involving teens. [WDRB]

Calls from customers who said they were shoved or knocked down during a Saturday night disturbance at the Mall St. Matthews started filtering into the St. Matthews Police Department early Sunday morning, while officers continued to investigate what exactly caused up to 2,000 people – mostly juveniles – to start fights that forced the mall to close early. [C-J/AKN]

Basically, teenagers are the worst. Also, RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! On Sunday police and security presence was heightened at Mall St. Matthews after it was shut down early Saturday night. Police responded to multiple disturbances involving thousands of young people. [WHAS11]

America’s newest family of Syrian refugees flew in late at night, and Sarhan Aldobai, 36, looked down from the plane at the distant lights of his new home. His wife was nursing their baby in the next seat. His five other children had fallen asleep. Sarhan took out the small world map he had carried since leaving Syria in 2012 and tried to trace the plane’s path. [H-L]

This can’t be hyped up enough and you should definitely go. A museum at a southern Indiana state park is about to reopen after undergoing a $6 million facelift over the past year. [WLKY]

Leaders of the church-based Sanctuary Movement vowed on Friday to offer their places of worship as refuge for immigrants facing deportation under an Obama administration crackdown on Central American families who entered the United States illegally. [HuffPo]

Forty minutes of scanner traffic explains why more than four dozen law officers from three neighboring departments descended on Mall St. Matthews Saturday night amid unfounded rumors of looting and gunfire. [WAVE3]

Canadian gaming company Amaya Inc has been ordered by a Kentucky court to pay $870 million in penalties to cover alleged losses by the state’s residents who played real-money poker on PokerStars’ website between 2006 and 2011. [Reuters]

The drug epidemic and absent-minded motorists are driving up the number of motor vehicle thefts in Louisville, police say. [WFPL]

The Republican Party is divided over whether to attack the science of climate change when opposing liberal policies. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s award-winning advertising campaign for Kynect, the state health insurance exchange, has ended. [Business First]

The Floyd County Council is planning on balancing the 2015 general fund budget Tuesday. The amount the council members will have to find or take from other accounts to make that happen is still under debate. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Not Even She Can’t Fix Donna’s Problem

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens has named Allison Gardner Martin as the district’s Chief of Communications and Community Relations, effective Jan. 14, 2016. [WDRB]

Amid intensifying fears of terrorism and political calls to halt Syrian refugee resettlement, Louisville faith leaders gathered Tuesday to oppose those calls and show support for refugees. [C-J/AKN]

Isn’t it fun that both Kentucky and Indiana have extremist governors who aren’t afraid to put their racism and xenophobia on full display? [WHAS11]

Lexington is moving forward with repealing its taxi regulations as part of an effort to make cab companies competitive with the ride-sharing companies Lyft and Uber. [H-L]

The Community Foundation of Louisville plans to award up to $1 million in college scholarships, and it is taking applications now. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s plan to ban Muslims from entering the United States is shoving the Republican Party to the edge of chaos, abruptly pitting GOP leaders against their own presidential front-runner and jeopardizing the party’s longtime drive to attract minorities. [HuffPo]

Quoting song lyrics from Burt Bacharach, Kentucky State Representative Bob DeWeese announced his retirement, saying “Knowing when to leave is the smartest thing anyone can learn.” [WAVE3]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has said he will never leave the 2016 race despite increasing calls for him to step aside. [BBC]

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that the rate of HIV diagnoses has declined nationally, but not among all groups of people. [WFPL]

In America, our food options are remarkably unaffected by the changing seasons. We just keep eating salad greens and tomatoes without regard to the onset of winter. [NPR]

Time to pay up. Earlier this week, we reported that Fairfield, Conn.-based General Electric Co. pulled the plug on a deal to sell its GE Appliances division to Sweden-based AB Electrolux. At the time, GE said it was owed a $175 million breakup fee as a result of the deal falling through. [Business First]

Despite some unanswered questions, the Charlestown City Council voted Monday to adopt an interlocal agreement that requires the city to pay more than $26,000 annually toward the J.B. Ogle Animal Shelter’s operating costs. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]