Sadly, There Won’t Be 40 Days Of Peace

The 2015 Dirt Bowl Championship was held Sunday at Shawnee Park, but basketball wasn’t the only reason for the event. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other community leaders helped announce a 40 Days of Peace Campaign, which will start Thursday. [WDRB]

When Jefferson County Public Schools launched a contest in 2013 for its “Schools of Innovation,” the plan was to find ideas for helping students so out-of-the-box that they could “make bureacrats gasp.” [C-J/AKN]

School starts on Wednesday for students in Jefferson County and officials are continuing the annual tradition of helping parents with making the bus commute smoother. [WHAS11]

More than 93 percent of teachers and 89 percent of education leaders who were evaluated have been rated “exemplary” or “accomplished” in the first year of statewide implementation of Kentucky’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness System. [H-L]

An area festival showcased the wide variety of hemp – a crop many are hoping to bring back to the Bluegrass. [WLKY]

Asked if his flat tax plan would further separate the haves from the have-nots, GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-WTF) said Sunday that income inequality is the result of some Americans working harder than others, rather than economic policies. [HuffPo]

A Kentucky non-profit organization is pushing for the legalization of medical marijuana. [WAVE3]

Robert Freeman has been helping people extract public information from New York state agencies for four decades. He is the executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government, a division of the New York Department of State that advises the public on the Freedom of Information Law — the state statute authorizing access to public records. [ProPublica]

Louisville home buyers and sellers interested in environmentally friendly elements and technology have a new way to identify those features on their homes. [WFPL]

Rand Paul in an interview Sunday called Donald Trump, who refused to rule out a third-party run during the first GOP debate, a “fake conservative.” [The Hill]

Nashville, Tenn., gets called a boomtown so frequently these days that it borders on cliche. Yet it’s clear that the city just three hours away down Interestate 65 has seen significant growth in the past several years. [Business First]

Options available for the city to address blighted commercial buildings, some of which have been shuttered for years, will be a topic during the next New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Weekly KYTC $-Wasting Video Thing

The Transportation Cabinet buttcramps have released another video and this one is somewhat useful, though probably still a waste of taxpayer time and taxpayer dollars.

The release says, in red: NOTE: Train tracks are private property. Pedestrians walking on or along tracks are not only trespassing, they’re putting their lives in jeopardy.

This is the kind of stuff you get when Bill Nighbert’s people are in charge. They probably spend five hundred million dollars a month producing videos that no one watches. Then they lose their shiz when we call them out.

Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]

Never-Ending No Kill Lou Huckstering

Just when you thought the No Kill Louisville hucksters couldn’t stoop lower…

About that fancy award:

The Better Business Bureau is warning small businesses and consumers to be wary of a new vanity awards program linked to the notorious US Commerce Association.

The program, operating locally as the Louisville Award Program, notifies businesses via emails that they have been selected to receive a Best of Louisville Award for their “exceptional marketing success.” The award program honors “the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Louisville area.” BBB believes the program’s actual purpose is to persuade businesses to spend $80 to $180 for an award plaque or hand-polished crystal trophy.

So that’s fun.

Grifters getting taken for a ride by some other grifters.

That’s some real Possibility City goodness.

Will Jimbo’s House Of Cards Tumble?

Over the last several months, University of Louisville President James Ramsey has insisted that multi-million-dollar deferred compensation packages he and his top aides have received from the school’s $1.1 billion foundation were implemented with the full knowledge and consent of U of L’s Board of Trustees. [WDRB]

University of Louisville President James Ramsey last year was paid 2 ½ times more than the average of the Atlantic Coast Conference’s other 14 presidents and chancellors — all of whose universities are ranked far higher academically than U of L. [C-J/AKN]

Really, why in the piss is this news? Just an attempt to embarrass the man? What? This bullshit of eating each other alive in the local media has got to stop at some point. [WHAS11]

Last spring, Marc H. Morial, the president of the National Urban League, found himself in a place he has come to know well over the years, across a desk from Sen. Mitch Mc-Connell, the majority leader, talking about public policy. [H-L]

If it’s not terrifying weather or water main break, it’s a gas line rupture. [WLKY]

It’s no secret that Jennifer Lawrence loves food, and by now, everyone should be familiar with her thoughts on dieting (“If anybody even tries to whisper the word ‘diet,’ I’m like, ‘You can go fuck yourself'”). [HuffPo]

The new bridge being constructed in downtown Louisville to carry I-65 traffic is expected to be open to drivers in less than six months. [WAVE3]

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took swipes at Wall Street and her Republican rivals on Monday, promising to impose tougher regulations on banks and raise the wages of ordinary Americans if she wins the 2016 White House race. [Reuters]

Louisville Public Media announced on Monday that Stephen George has been named the organization’s executive editor. Does this mean the sexist mess that’s caused everyone else to quit will be out the door soon? [WFPL]

House leaders are considering sweeping changes to Congress’ reimbursement requirements in the wake of the Aaron Schock scandal, including forcing lawmakers to provide more detailed documentation about how they spend taxpayer money and disclosing those details to the public. [Politico]

Mid City Mall’s look is outdated, but planned upgrades are aimed at bringing the Highlands shopping center’s look into the 21st century. [Business First]

Fun in the sun doesn’t have to end when school begins. The Clarksville Aquatic Center might be getting a $3.5 million revamp that would allow the facility to stay open longer, change and keep some of its features and cut down on operational costs. [News & Tribune]

Best Everything Puppies Rainbows Fun

Greg Fischer says everything is rosy in Louisville.


From the Washington Post:

A new study has identified 10 large cities where the most substantial shares of the population live in economically distressed communities. It also shines a spotlight on the major and midsize cities where the gaps between those struggling and those doing well have grown largest.


And here’s a map of the big and midsize cities in which the people who are struggling the most also happen to live in close proximity — in the same city — with those who are doing well. Call them the most unequal cities.


The group’s researchers created an index of economic distress and inequality based on seven metrics. That list includes: the share of people age 25 or older who have a college degree, the portion of the city’s livable housing stock that’s vacant, the unemployment rate and changes in the labor-force participation rate, the percentage of the population that lives on incomes below the federal poverty line, how a Zip code’s median income compares to that same figure statewide and what share of the area’s businesses have closed. In each of those categories, the index relies on Zip-code level, five-year averages of census data to account for one-time big events and economic flukes.

The map referenced?




Everything is rosy. Magical. Compassionate. Possible. EVERYTHING IS PERFECT AND TRANSPARENT AND AWESOME!

Really, we all love Louisville. But we definitely need a reality check when it comes to the fluff Greg Fischer is throwing out. Even the Brown Family has woken up to that reality.