Best Everything Puppies Rainbows Fun

Greg Fischer says everything is rosy in Louisville.

Right?

From the Washington Post:

A new study has identified 10 large cities where the most substantial shares of the population live in economically distressed communities. It also shines a spotlight on the major and midsize cities where the gaps between those struggling and those doing well have grown largest.

-SNIP-

And here’s a map of the big and midsize cities in which the people who are struggling the most also happen to live in close proximity — in the same city — with those who are doing well. Call them the most unequal cities.

-SNIP-

The group’s researchers created an index of economic distress and inequality based on seven metrics. That list includes: the share of people age 25 or older who have a college degree, the portion of the city’s livable housing stock that’s vacant, the unemployment rate and changes in the labor-force participation rate, the percentage of the population that lives on incomes below the federal poverty line, how a Zip code’s median income compares to that same figure statewide and what share of the area’s businesses have closed. In each of those categories, the index relies on Zip-code level, five-year averages of census data to account for one-time big events and economic flukes.

The map referenced?

Here:


FROM THE WASHINGTON POST

Yep.

Everything is rosy. Magical. Compassionate. Possible. EVERYTHING IS PERFECT AND TRANSPARENT AND AWESOME!

Really, we all love Louisville. But we definitely need a reality check when it comes to the fluff Greg Fischer is throwing out. Even the Brown Family has woken up to that reality.

Fischer: Your White Privilege Is Showing

Officials have released the names of two people who were recently killed in separate incidents. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell and District Court Judge Stephanie Pearce Burke are again butting heads, this time over Burke’s handling of a case originally set for trial this week. If you haven’t kept up with this, it’s crazy. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer says that if you aren’t doing anything illegal, you’ve got nothing to worry about. Which should ring hollow for just about anybody with the ability to think on their own. Those 150+ shootings are super-compassionate. Nothing to see here, puppies and rainbows. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray applauded the work of the Urban County Council in its deliberation of his proposed $323 million budget on Tuesday but declined to say if he would veto any changes council made to the budget. [H-L]

State officials plan to keep an outreach center open for one more year in a southern Indiana county that’s facing the largest HIV outbreak in state history. [WLKY]

Don’t call Chris Christie rich. The Clintons say they still have bills to pay. And Mike Huckabee? Despite his wealth, he was born “blue collar, not blue blood.” [HuffPo]

This white lady assaulted a police officer by allegedly grabbing her throat. She wasn’t arrested or shot. [WAVE3]

Roughly half of deaths from 12 smoking-related cancers may be linked directly to cigarette use, a U.S. study estimates. [Reuters]

Some would-be homebuyers in Louisville are facing tough conditions. New figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors show that the number of homes available for sale is down 17 percent from last year. [WFPL]

Two years ago in the Netherlands, artist Paul de Kort designed an 81-acre park near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. His assignment? To use nothing but landscaping to dampen the noise of airplanes. Such a project had never been attempted—and the science behind his design was discovered almost by accident. [Gizmodo]

Commercial real estate developer William P. Butler intends to purchase Lexington, Ky.-based American Founders Bank and move its headquarters to Louisville, according to a news release from the bank. [Business First]

Contractual issues between the city and the New Albany police union could be ruled upon soon. [News & Tribune]

The TV Folks Love Scaring Meemaws

Instead of scaring the absolute living shit out of the elderly people watching television, maybe start educating the community about needle exchanges? Maybe do something about educating folks on the proper way to discard used needles? [WDRB]

After working into the early hours of last Wednesday morning, paramedic Jon Tyson wheeled into his garage, plugged a large black power cord into his electric-powered Nissan Leaf and hit the sack. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe if we keep killing people we won’t have to worry about the poor or the sick. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul led a successful effort to block renewal of the Patriot Act early Saturday morning, followed by a deeply divided Senate leaving Washington without taking action on the National Security Agency’s soon-to-expire power to collect Americans’ phone records. [H-L]

The Indiana attorney general’s office says the state had to pay more than $1.4 million in fees to plaintiffs’ attorneys in its unsuccessful attempt to maintain its ban on same-sex marriages. [WLKY]

With more and more U.S. states facing public transit funding cuts despite record-breaking commuter demand, many transit systems are being forced to consider service cuts or fare hikes, both of which disproportionally impact low-income riders and neighborhoods. [HuffPo]

A family who lost their son has spent years turning their personal tragedy into a community event to spread positivity. [WAVE3]

The sleepy United States senators thought they were done voting. But then, around 1 a.m. on the Saturday before Memorial Day, Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky and presidential candidate, marched spryly to the Senate floor to let it be known that, no, he would not agree to extend the federal government’s bulk collection of phone records program. Not even for one day. [NY Times]

Louisville residents use public transportation at one of the lowest rates among the nation’s largest cities, according to new research from the University of Michigan. [WFPL]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

It’s time for a reminder about Adam Edelen and educational audits. An audit is NOT a forensic accounting investigation. It’s typically a random sampling that gets reviewed unless specific concerns are brought to light. Or, in the case of Montgomery County, not. Because specific concerns were deliberately ignored by Edelen’s team. When he says there was no fraud discovered? Remember: not a forensic accounting, not an in-depth investigation of every nook and cranny. [Business First]

Michael Crone asked who in the room knew a bully or a victim or a witness to bullying. Only a few hands raised. Crone knew better. [News & Tribune]

Road’s Messed Up, East Enders Freak

Is this soccer thing going to stick? In the team’s first road game, Louisville City FC drew 1-1 with the veteran USL side Richmond Kickers. The teams played to a very physical draw that ended with seven bookings. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken the Louisville area off its list of cities that fail to meet the latest clean-air standard for soot. But the federal agency did not go as far as saying Louisville complies with the standard, either. [C-J/AKN]

A spectacle in its own right, the degradation has steadily increased over the past two days, but what makes for a “cool” picture also makes for a mess for drivers. If people complained as much about hunger or homelessness as they do about this East End road damage, Louisville really would be Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Lexington is trying to get in on Louisville’s Hit A Pedestrian game again. [H-L]

The Run for the Roses is a few weeks away yet, but the solid gold trophy already awaits the owner of the horse that wins the 141st running of the Kentucky Derby on May 2 at Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

Rand Paul briefly appears in a new documentary that argues gay rights are a threat to Christianity. “I don’t think I’ve ever used the word gay rights, because I don’t really believe in rights based on your behavior,” he said in the video. [HuffPo]

Just look at how much they’re hyping this mess. [WAVE3]

Lowering a city’s homeless population by forcing the homeless out. Sounds like a story out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. [NPR]

The University of Louisville is expected to increase both in-state and out-of-state undergraduate tuition by 3 percent for the next academic year. [WFPL]

Rand Paul wants to change the GOP from the inside by becoming the party’s standard-bearer in 2016. The Kentucky Republican poised to launch a presidential bid on Tuesday thinks he can capture the Oval Office prize that eluded his father by pulling the GOP in a more libertarian direction. [The Hill]

Sypris Solutions Inc. stands to lose nearly $200 million in revenue this year because of a dispute with what had been its largest customer. [Business First]

Scott County residents can exchange used needles with immunity through at least April 25, as state and local officials are hoping to curb what has been labeled as the largest outbreak of drug-spread HIV in Indiana history. [News & Tribune]

It’s Groundhog Day With Fischer & Trees

Some pretty horrific news rolled out this week about Louisville losing eleven billion trees a day.

That’s despite all the hype Greg Fischer has attempted to generate the past couple years over trees. Attempted and failed because… trees. Only a handful of us get excited about trees.

So what’s he do when there’s negative news?

Rushes out and tries to hype all the puppies and rainbows up to confuse the public. Complete with headlines like:

  • New nonprofit sees major tree planting push [C-J/AKN]
  • Mayor outlines strategy for more trees [WAVE3]

Heaven forbid there be something Fischer and his team of communications hacks (Really? He’s still using Margaret Brosko on his comms team!) not use your tax dollars to spin into oblivion.

Maybe this time all the trees won’t die? Unlike the last time Fischer planted a bunch.

And remember this headline from not too long ago?

Leaders of Louisville’s fledgling tree commission are accusing Mayor Greg Fischer of cutting them off at the roots — saying the mayor has ignored their advice in his grand plan to restore the city’s shrinking tree canopy. [C-J/AKN]

Apparently not much has changed.

Note to those who aren’t paying attention: Fischer usually holds tree pressers to distract from scandals or bad press. Sometimes to combat bad press about trees, which seems to happen frequently.

It’s real life Groundhog Day with this. Good grief.

Don’t Worry, Everything Is Puppies & Rainbows!

Just in case you were wondering why Greg Fischer doesn’t have time to actually do the job he’s paid to do? Here you go. Here’s the latest publicity stunt. [WDRB]

By all accounts eighth-grader Stephen Patton was cheerful and well-liked by most of his classmates at Floyd County’s Allen Central Middle School. But a few of them, his family says they discovered, repeatedly abused, taunted and bullied the 13-year-old gentle giant, who stood 6 foot 3, weighed 196 pounds and had a stutter. [C-J/AKN]

The Centers for Disease Control is setting up shop in Southern Indiana to help manage the growing outbreak of positive HIV cases. The Scott County Health Department reports 55 confirmed cases of the virus with 12 more preliminary positives. However heath workers believe this is just the tip if the iceberg. [WHAS11]

The friendly rivalry for the hearts and throats of bourbon lovers is about to get more interesting, particularly in Louisville where major distilleries are focusing their tourism efforts. [Janet Patton]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police say their latest murder arrest, in a case that was growing cold, is thanks to part to tips from the public. [WLKY]

California Gov. Jerry Brown said Sunday that it is a “disgrace” that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trying to thwart the Obama administration’s plan to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. [HuffPo]

This is just the kind of the puppies and rainbows thing that exacerbates Louisville’s problems. Sure, feel happy about it because it’s pretty and fun to watch on the teevee. But get over it quickly. [WAVE3]

Soon after the U.S. and other major powers entered negotiations last year to curtail Iran’s nuclear program, senior White House officials learned Israel was spying on the closed-door talks. The spying operation was part of a broader campaign by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government to penetrate the negotiations and then help build a case against the emerging terms of the deal, current and former U.S. officials said. [WSJ]

Most Kentucky parents believe their child receives a nutritious lunch at school, according to a Kentucky Health Issues Poll released Thursday. [WFPL]

The tech startup bubble has America’s retirement funds — like Kentucky Retirement Systems — chasing unicorns. [Zero Hedge]

The new addition at the north end of Fourth Street Live is bright orange, made of steel and has a giant iPhone-like touch screen. It’s called AirBare, and it’s an interactive kiosk at the corner of Fourth and Liberty streets that displays the local air quality. [Business First]

March 30 will be a public arts blowout for Jeffersonville. The events begin with the dedication of the “Jeff” sculpture created by R. Michael Wimmer on the berm, at Mechanic and 10th streets, at 4:30 p.m. Immediately following the dedication is a public art masterplan kick-off at Jeffersonville City Hall, 500 Quartermaster Court, from 5 to 7 p.m., according to a news release. [News & Tribune]