Will TV Folks Leave Russell Alone Now?

From Autism to Alzheimer’s, music is healing what medicine can’t. In some cases, patients and students both are hearing the benefits of music therapy. [WDRB]

After losing the battle to keep the old Water Co. building intact, preservationists are now circulating petitions as a first step in trying to get the Odd Fellows Building in the Omni target block designated as a historic landmark. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Will Russell has only had to deal with this publicly because local television shysters made it a public matter, a spectacle, treated him as a carnival barker. [WHAS11]

A 10-year-old boy injured in a drive-by shooting is now helping to combat gun violence in Louisville that has reached its highest level in decades. [H-L]

A group called I Am Scott County is working on a second commercial to change perceptions about the southern Indiana county following an HIV outbreak. [WLKY]

Colorado Springs, the town where three people were killed and nine injured in an attack on a Planned Parenthood facility on Friday, is a hub for Christian evangelicals who are opposed to abortion. [HuffPo]

Attorneys representing 11 women went to court Monday to make Katina Powell pay for what they say are false allegations in her tell-all book ‘Breaking Cardinal Rules. [WAVE3]

Kentucky has the third highest rate of female incarceration in the world, imprisoning women nearly twice the rate of Thailand — the highest rated country in the world — and nearly twice the national average, according to a new report released by the non-profit group Prison Policy Initiative. [Richmond Register]

Federal health officials want to help Louisville deal with and prevent violence in the city and particularly in western neighborhoods, where gun violence has been a growing problem. [WFPL]

Of COURSE Mitch McConnell has sneakily attached a campaign finance rider to the spending bill! He wants to expand the amount of cash political parties can spend in coordination with candidates. [Politico]

In today’s weekly edition of Louisville Business First, you’ll find a package called “Where the Money Lives,” in which we look at various measures of affluence across the Louisville region. [Business First]

It’s no secret to anyone looking that the United States is in the midst of a real estate boom — and Southern Indiana is enjoying particularly low housing costs. [News & Tribune]

Revisiting Ramsey’s Big Reality Disconnect

You may have to watch your step more closely when crossing at least one downtown street. A pedway allowing easy access to the convention center will be going away. [WDRB]

How many scandalous hires does this make for Greg Fischer? The man has no concept of vetting new hires. Where are the liberal hand-wringers now? Every time a shitty hire is revealed, they freak out and attack. Every. Time. But suddenly they’re quiet. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! School time horror stories. “I had a chair thrown across the room and the kid looked at me–this is second grade–and said “what the f*** did I do b****,” Lucretia Gue, a former first grade teacher at Frayser Elementary School said. [WHAS11]

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

Local teevee folks are still freaking out about a white lady married to a preacher. When was the last time they freaked out like this over a person of color? Or over someone not tied to some random church? [WLKY]

Here’s one more indication that American teachers work really, really hard — and don’t make nearly enough. An analysis released Tuesday by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development looks at the state of education around the world, examining everything from intergenerational mobility in education to graduation rates to teacher pay. [HuffPo]

The YMCA of Louisville and the YMCA of Southern Indiana are merging, organization leaders announced during the 25th annual YMCA Mayor’s Thanksgiving Breakfast. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, R-Cookie Tree, said after a town hall at the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center he is in conversations with the CEO of AK Steel about how to keep hundreds of jobs at Ashland Works afloat. [Ashland Independent]

James Ramsey has been thinking a lot lately about stepping down from his role as president of the University of Louisville. That’s all it took for him to think about resigning? Not the myriad scandals, people going to prison, tens of millions of dollars swindled?! [WFPL]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

Electrolux announced plans to buy General Electric Co.’s Louisville-based appliance division for $3.3 billion last year. But the government sued to block the deal in July, citing concerns that it would suppress competition. [Business First]

A bill to include LGBT people in existing anti-discrimination laws is on the slate for the State Senate’s upcoming legislative session. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

Really, WDRB? It Just Turned Racial?

Just outta the blue? Some scary black people made it all scary and racial and OH GOD THE RACE CARD?

What the actual fuck?

It’s always been about race:


Really. It’s always been about race. It’s always been about wealthy white people pushing something onto the West End. And if you live in the West End? It appears to be happening because wealthy white people are behaving as if they know what’s best for the West End. Hipsters are getting up in arms, claiming the West End is shooting itself in the foot. The same upper middle class white people who tried to stall construction of a Walmart store because of a parking lot (or, really, because they hate Walmart.) A store they’ll never, ever visit, of course. Not just because it’s Walmart but because it’s beyond Ninth Street.

Let’s quit acting as if this comes as a surprise. Let’s quit acting as if there’s no racial divide in Louisville. Let’s quit acting like dumb headlines like this aren’t both a provocation and an example of white privilege in action. Particularly when the story references race once, loosely, with the term “African Americans”, insinuating that people of color are making this about something it’s not.

Wondering how it might be possible to cover something like the biodigester without ridiculous headlines? Maybe without encouraging the white flight bigots?


There you go.

Lest anyone think what WDRB has done isn’t inciting bigots? Just a taste of the more tame comments they’re receiving:

The same sort of thing happened with the station’s most recent hype over JCPS.

Possumbilly City.

More Puppies & Rainbows For Metro Govt

Another day, another pedestrian hit in Possibility Compassionate City. [WDRB]

Western Louisville residents will have an opportunity to question the Metropolitan Sewer District about building a massive storage basin beneath Shawnee Park at a public meeting next Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

On Election Day people in southern Indiana decided they liked the direction their cities are going. Both New Albany and Jeffersonville decided to re-elect their current mayors for another term. [WHAS11]

There was no shortage of story lines in the Fasig-Tipton sales pavilion Sunday evening, from the bittersweet parting a couple of years in the making to the family who, once again, wasn’t that upset to leave some money on the table and take one of its favorite girls back home. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In Jeffersonville, Mike Moore will serve another term as mayor. [WLKY]

Law enforcement officers accused of sexual misconduct have jumped from job to job — and at times faced fresh allegations that include raping women — because of a tattered network of laws and lax screening that allowed them to stay on the beat. [HuffPo]

Residents are concerned Germantown is becoming too populated with bars and restaurants that will disrupt the neighborhood. [WAVE3]

President Obama on Monday mocked Republican presidential candidates as thin-skinned for lashing out at CNBC over the network’s handling of last week’s primary debate. [The Hill]

Economy Inn, the troubled motel on Bardstown Road, has passed its latest inspection by the Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, a Republican political novice, wealthy Louisville businessman and Tea Party favorite, was elected Kentucky’s next governor on Tuesday, a victory that could herald a new era in a state where Democrats have held the governor’s mansion for all but four of the last 44 years. The Associated Press declared Mr. Bevin the winner shortly after 8 p.m. [NY Times]

This is in an alternate universe, right? Louisville Metro Government has earned the rank of the second best digital city in the U.S., according to a new survey released by e.Republic’s Center for Digital Government. [Business First]

Comments collected at five public workshops are coming together to provide a vision for Clarksville’s future. [News & Tribune]

Powell’s The Devil & Not Athletics Honchos?

A Missouri company has dropped plans to buy land near Louisville International Airport viewed as a potential site for one of the city’s largest industrial buildings. [WDRB]

Facing a gauntlet of questions from western Louisville residents, the head of the Metropolitan Sewer District said his agency favors putting a proposed 20 million gallon underground waste basin in Shawnee Park’s Great Lawn rather than a more intrusive maintenance site closer to neighbors’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Katina Powell said she has no problems admitting to her involvement in the alleged strip shows and sex acts she said happened at UofL Minardi’s Hall from 2010-2014. [WHAS11]

The owner of KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell plans to spin off its China business into a separate, publicly traded company. [H-L]

With U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell urging a boycott of a federal rule to cut carbon emissions from power plants, a Kentucky citizen’s group is coming up with its own plan. And it’ll get absolutely nowhere because this is Kentucky, not the real world. [WLKY]

After a recent federal report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration called for an end to conversion therapy for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth, survivors of the practice joined HuffPost Live last week to discuss their traumatic experiences. [HuffPo]

What? WAVE slut-shaming someone for revealing what goes on at the University of Louisville? SURELY NOT! [WAVE3]

Civil rights lawyers are using a new strategy to change a common court practice that they have long argued unfairly targets the poor. At issue is the way courts across the country sometimes issue arrest warrants for indigent people when they fall behind on paying court fees and fines owed for minor offenses like traffic tickets. [NPR]

Jefferson County is vying for part of a huge pot of federal money meant to make communities more resilient during natural disasters. [WFPL]

The myth of welfare’s corrupting influence on the poor. Does welfare corrupt the poor? Few ideas are so deeply ingrained in the American popular imagination as the belief that government aid for poor people will just encourage bad behavior. [NY Times]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will close its doors after Halloween wraps up at the end of this month, and construction could start on the next phase for the property by January. The owners of Industrial Terrorplex, Todd Moore and Terry Campbell, agreed to sell the property last year to Jeffersonville-based New Hope Services Inc., which planned to renovate the building into a senior housing facility. [Business First]

Stemming from two outstanding payments from the County Council, the option of suspending services to parts of the county will come to the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter at the Animal Control Authority meeting next month. [News & Tribune]

Come On, Just Ask Some Questions, Maybe?


The mainstream media just blindly regurgitates this “compassion” nonsense without so much as asking a single question?


LOUISVILLE (WDRB) – For the fourth year in a row, the Charter for Compassion International has named Louisville as its Model Compassionate City.

The Charter for Compassion is a cooperative effort to restore compassionate living to the center of community life. It is based in Seattle, Washington.

Rev. Dr. Joan Brown Campbell, chair of the Board of Trustees and the Global Compassion Council, presented the award to Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday, Oct. 16, during a reception at the 2015 Parliament of the World’s Religions in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Mayor Fischer attended the Parliament as a speaker and panelist, along with Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad. Tom Williams, of Stoll Keenon Ogden PLLC is co-host of Compassionate Louisville and was a panel moderator at the Parliament.

“It is an honor to be recognized for a trait that comes so naturally to the citizens of Louisville,” Mayor Fischer said of the Model City designation. “Our citizens have a deep and profound instinct to help one another and to give.”

When the Mayor took office in 2011, he set three goals for Louisville – pillars of community life. He said we must be a city of lifelong learning, of health, and of even greater compassion. Louisville was the seventh city to sign on to the Compassion Charter, and Mayor Fischer created Compassionate Louisville to help develop and implement a city-wide campaign to nurture and champion the growth of compassion.

One of its signature events is the annual Mayor’s Give a Day Week, in which the entire city makes time for volunteering, service and compassion. This year, the city broke its own world record, with more than 166,000 volunteers and acts of compassion.

Copyright 2015 WDRB Media. All rights reserved.


LOUISVILLE, Ky. —Louisville has been named a model city for compassion for the fourth year in a row.

The Charter for Compassion International handed out the award at a ceremony in Salt Lake City.

One of the signature, compassionate Louisville events is the mayor’s Give a Day week.

This year, Louisville broke its own record with more than 166,000 volunteers and acts of compassion.

Surely not.

Surely that wouldn’t happen here in Possibility City.