Local State Legislator Turns Republican

It’s a multi-million dollar plan to give Dixie Highway a new look and make the area safer and the city plans to use federal dollars to help make it happen. [WDRB]

Louisville Fraternal Order of Police members re-elected President Dave Mutchler late Tuesday evening, reaffirming the controversial union leader’s defense of police officers this summer by more than a two-thirds vote. [C-J/AKN]

Sam Padilla and his fiancée Megan stopped by their newest JP’s Napa Auto Care location in Fairdale. It is not even open yet to the public yet, but they were making sure Wednesday’s rain wasn’t damaging anything. [WHAS11]

It’s always the rich white guys who fight minimum wage increases. Lexington Mayor Jim Gray declined to say Wednesday if he would sign an ordinance raising the minimum wage in Fayette County to $10.10 an hour over the next three years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! You can’t even go to Walmart these days without being injured. [WLKY]

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed tougher new limits on Tuesday on smokestack emissions from nearly two dozen states that burden downwind areas with air pollution from power plants they can’t control. [HuffPo]

Who could have predicted! A lawsuit filed against Louisville Metro Animal Services points out an issue that could cost the city millions of dollars. [WAVE3]

Kentucky Democrats just didn’t want to listen. Now all good old boy hell is breaking loose. [House Republicans]

A Lexington-based nonprofit is using its share of a $2.6 million grant from JPMorgan Chase as leverage to garner millions more in new investments in Louisville’s Russell neighborhood. [WFPL]

There’s a scientific consensus that by 2050, the United States can expect to see an increase in flooding, heat waves, droughts and wildfires due to climate change. Now, scientists at Climate Central and ICF International have produced the first Preparedness Report Card for the United States, highlighting how states are preparing for the projected disasters. Spoiler alert: Kentucky is ill-prepared. [Vocativ]

You’ll have a bigger water bill in 2016 but at least you won’t have a LWC CEO DUIing all over the place. [Business First]

A Floyd County-based court program that serves veterans going through the criminal justice system is widening its reach thanks to partnerships with neighboring counties. [News & Tribune]

Stumbo Lackey Wants To Be Pretzeldent

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

The Centers for Disease Control is in Scott County, Indiana, testing hundreds of people for HIV. [WDRB]

This should be an awkward Greg Stumbo-style disaster. David Yates is jumping into the race for Metro Council president next year in an effort to unify Louisville Democrats, suggesting incumbent David Tandy is losing support among the splintered majority caucus. [C-J/AKN]

The search is on for a murder suspect police say shot and killed a man near a Valley Station business Tuesday evening. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s police department hopes to have its officers equipped with body cameras by June. [H-L]

A pedestrian was struck and killed by an LMPD wrecker in the 4900 block of Southside Drive. [WLKY]

As friends and family gathered Tuesday at the funeral of Tyshawn Lee — one of the youngest Chicago residents lost to gun violence this year — to mourn and remember the boy, Father Michael Pfleger delivered a fiery eulogy indicting the city over the execution of a 9-year-old child. [HuffPo]

Here comes the positive media spin from Chad Carlton and crew about tolls. And whattya know, they couldn’t even get the facts straight about when the area last saw tolls. [WAVE3]

The last time Kentucky elected a Republican governor he ran into trouble with the Democratic attorney general. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

In its ongoing Failure Factories series, the Tampa Bay Times is investigating the disastrous effects of the Pinellas County School Board’s 2007 decision to abandon school integration in favor of “neighborhood schools.” Schools in high-poverty black communities were promised additional funding and resources. Then the promises weren’t met, and performance at the schools has plummeted. [ProPublica]

An organization led by Louisville’s high-profile rehabilitation king Gill Holland has recently received $250,000 in private funding. [Business First]

New police body camera video shows a struggle during an arrest in Clarksville for which a local business owner was later found not guilty. [News & Tribune]

Who’ll Get Rich Off The Dixie Highway $?

A Bullitt County District Court Judge has dismissed all charges against a man who shot down a drone he said was flying over his property. [WDRB]

She’s great but Donna Hargens probably won’t listen to her at all. Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens has taken her first step to refill her decimated cabinet, naming Dena Dossett as the district’s new chief of data management. [C-J/AKN]

A safer, better Dixie Highway is in the works thanks to a nearly $17 million grant awarded to the city. It will be used for the Transforming Dixie Highway project which will ease congestion and make the area safer for both drivers and pedestrians from Broadway to the Gene Snyder Freeway. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is going to break with tradition when the General Assembly convenes in January — instead of asking for money for new buildings, UK is going to ask for funding to fix up older ones in the campus core. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro police are investigating two weekend shootings that left three men dead. [WLKY]

This is worth remembering as Amazon does all of its temporary hiring here in the metro area. [HuffPo]

Why do we, as a city, keep acting as if these neighborhood meetings over murders are going to solve everything? It’s admirable and all but… seriously. Nothing’s gonna change until our elected leadership changes. The Oakdale Neighborhood Association announced an emergency meeting in response to early Saturday morning’s double homicide. [WAVE3]

The US Ambassador to the UK has told Sky News that his country’s gun violence problem is the number one issue for the British people he has met in his two years in the London embassy. [Sky]

Housing, legal and data experts will be on hand for two events next week aimed at examining the impact a Supreme Court ruling earlier this year will have on fair housing in Louisville. [WFPL]

University students have less privacy for their campus health records than they would have if they sought care off campus. Schools say they are trying to seek the right balance between privacy and safety. [ProPublica]

Sweden-based AB Electrolux says it will likely spend about $64.6 million in integration costs related to the purchase of Louisville-based GE Appliances. [Business First]

Clark County has started steps to secure a grant to assess potential redevelopment spots for environmental contamination issues. [News & Tribune]

Powell’s The Devil & Not Athletics Honchos?

A Missouri company has dropped plans to buy land near Louisville International Airport viewed as a potential site for one of the city’s largest industrial buildings. [WDRB]

Facing a gauntlet of questions from western Louisville residents, the head of the Metropolitan Sewer District said his agency favors putting a proposed 20 million gallon underground waste basin in Shawnee Park’s Great Lawn rather than a more intrusive maintenance site closer to neighbors’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Katina Powell said she has no problems admitting to her involvement in the alleged strip shows and sex acts she said happened at UofL Minardi’s Hall from 2010-2014. [WHAS11]

The owner of KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell plans to spin off its China business into a separate, publicly traded company. [H-L]

With U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell urging a boycott of a federal rule to cut carbon emissions from power plants, a Kentucky citizen’s group is coming up with its own plan. And it’ll get absolutely nowhere because this is Kentucky, not the real world. [WLKY]

After a recent federal report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration called for an end to conversion therapy for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth, survivors of the practice joined HuffPost Live last week to discuss their traumatic experiences. [HuffPo]

What? WAVE slut-shaming someone for revealing what goes on at the University of Louisville? SURELY NOT! [WAVE3]

Civil rights lawyers are using a new strategy to change a common court practice that they have long argued unfairly targets the poor. At issue is the way courts across the country sometimes issue arrest warrants for indigent people when they fall behind on paying court fees and fines owed for minor offenses like traffic tickets. [NPR]

Jefferson County is vying for part of a huge pot of federal money meant to make communities more resilient during natural disasters. [WFPL]

The myth of welfare’s corrupting influence on the poor. Does welfare corrupt the poor? Few ideas are so deeply ingrained in the American popular imagination as the belief that government aid for poor people will just encourage bad behavior. [NY Times]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will close its doors after Halloween wraps up at the end of this month, and construction could start on the next phase for the property by January. The owners of Industrial Terrorplex, Todd Moore and Terry Campbell, agreed to sell the property last year to Jeffersonville-based New Hope Services Inc., which planned to renovate the building into a senior housing facility. [Business First]

Stemming from two outstanding payments from the County Council, the option of suspending services to parts of the county will come to the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter at the Animal Control Authority meeting next month. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun Humana Things Happening…

Wait, 448 square feet is tiny? In May, WDRB took you to Louisville’s very first permanent tiny house, which had just broken ground. Five months later, we take you inside now that the house is finished. [WDRB]

In her first comments to a reporter since the publication of her book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” Katina Powell said in a brief interview Friday that her daughters support the book in which she claims she provided them as escorts for University of Louisville players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

After months of community meetings discussing the site for the proposed West Louisville FoodPort, organizers held an event to celebrate the season as well share more information about the project Saturday. [WHAS11]

Democrat Andy Beshear and Republican Whitney Westerfield are the men publicly running to be Kentucky’s next attorney general. But behind the scenes, scores of corporations, wealthy businessmen, lawyers, lobbyists and labor unions have given several million dollars to two independent groups loosely affiliated with the Democratic and Republican parties, which are spending that money on a barrage of attack ads meant to influence voters. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A triple shooting in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood leaves two dead and one injured. [WLKY]

Migrants streaming across the Balkans reached Slovenia on Saturday, diverted overnight by the closure of Hungary’s border with Croatia in the latest demonstration of Europe’s disjointed response to the flow of people reaching its borders. [HuffPo]

Of all the things that are hard to understand, shots fired at a visitation are near the top of the list. Especially, when it was gun fire that claimed the life of the 22-year-old in the casket. [WAVE3]

Maybe we’ll take homelessness this seriously in Louisville some day. Hawaii’s governor has signed an emergency proclamation to deal with the problem of homelessness, saying the state faces the country’s highest per capita rate of homelessness and more needs to be done to house the indigent. [Reuters]

West Louisville residents are organizing against a proposed biodigester plant, where organic waste would be converted into methane gas. The efforts come as Louisville Metro officials — including Mayor Greg Fischer — and the energy company behind the proposal work to educate the community about the technology. [WFPL]

It used to be a given: When your kids reached school age, they’d strap on their backpacks and head for the neighborhood elementary school. Or, you’d pay a hefty tuition to send them to private school. In the last two decades, a third option has emerged. Today, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the country. And lately, they’ve been the subject of passionate and often acrimonious debate about the right way to fix public education in America. [NPR]

The guests have arrived, the band is playing and bride and groom are meeting at the altar. Then the chaplain asks, “does anyone object?” That’s the question Monday for insurers Humana Inc. and Aetna Inc., as shareholders of both companies vote on whether to approve a merger that would combine Humana’s growing Medicare business with Aetna’s portfolio to create the second-largest managed-care company in the United States. [Business First]

Legislation, its effects on funding public schools and the advent of major changes in public education are the discussion table for a meeting of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education on Wednesday, Oct. 21. [News & Tribune]

Latest UofL Dumpster Fire Rages On

Louisville Metro Fire needs your help identifying someone it calls a person of interest in a fire that killed three people. [WDRB]

The veteran journalist who co-authored a book filled with explosive allegations against the University of Louisville men’s basketball program said Monday that the escort he wrote with is “pretty damn credible.” [C-J/AKN]

University of Louisville announced on Tuesday, Oct. 6, it is reviewing allegations regarding the men’s basketball program. [WHAS11]

Eleven employees in the Jefferson County public school district have filed a lawsuit saying they shouldn’t be forced to pay union fees if they don’t want to be part of the union. [H-L]

You should probably go to this pumpkin thing. The third annual Jack-O-Lantern Spectacular will be held Oct. 8 through Nov. 1 at Iroquois Park. [WLKY]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

Changes could be coming to the Original Highlands. The Board of Zoning adjustments gave the green light for Edwards Communities Development Company to build 194 apartments on the site where Mercy Academy sits empty on East Broadway. [WAVE3]

Girls, many of whom have suffered a range of trauma at home, make up a growing share of children arrested and detained across the country. [ProPublica]

An academic conference on the environmental history of the Ohio River Valley kicks off in Louisville later this week. [WFPL]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

American Commercial Lines Inc., which is based in Jeffersonville, announced Thursday that it has agreed to acquire AEP River Operations LLC from American Electric Power Co. Inc. AEP River Operations is a commercial inland barge company that delivers about 45 million tons of products each year. The company is based in Chesterfield, Mo., and has operations in Paducah, Ky., and Convent, Algiers and Belle Chasse, La., the News and Tribune reports. [Business First]

Victims of domestic violence in need of immediate legal protection in Floyd County now have a place to turn to after regular business hours. [News & Tribune]

Death Murder Death Murder Death

Authorities have released the name of a woman who was found murdered near Churchill Downs. [WDRB]

Immigration and criminal defense lawyer Daniel Alvarez has gained the endorsement of Citizens for Better Judges in the highly contested Jefferson District Court race. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating a stabbing that happened in the 5100 block of Crafty Drive located in the Lynnview neighborhood. [WHAS11]

New ribbon advertising boards have been installed around the second tier of Rupp Arena, the first part of a two-year, $15 million technology upgrade for Lexington’s most recognized landmark. [H-L]

This got a lot less buzz than we expected. Particularly in light of the double-dipping. Louisville has a new chief of community building. Mayor Greg Fischer named Yvette Gentry to lead the department. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School personnel action document reveals 30 of the districts bus drivers and substitute bus drivers resigned, retired or were terminated from early August to the middle of September. [WAVE3]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

Home repairs can be a frightful burden for Louisville residents who live in poverty or on fixed incomes. [WFPL]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

An empty elementary school in downtown Jeffersonville will soon be torn down to make way for a 93-room upper mid-scale hotel. [Business First]

Telling stories of epidemics and disasters through the eyes of those who lived — and died — in them, “Stories Behind the Stones: Disease, Disasters and the Downtrodden” offered tours of Fairview Cemetery over the weekend. [News & Tribune]