Can We Just All Focus On The West End? Just For Once? Please?

Oldham County voters may soon decide whether to expand alcohol sales. The Oldham County Chamber of Commerce says it now has enough signatures to ask for a special election. [WDRB]

Members of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, have scheduled a series of meetings with Jefferson County legislators in early September to discuss business-related issues as well as legislation expected to come up during the 2016 General Assembly convening in January. [C-J/AKN]

On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded Thursday morning, Aug. 27, with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham. [WHAS11]

Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Arrests were made Thursday morning at the annual ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair. [WLKY]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

The goal to bring 43 new homes to the Russell neighborhood started a decade ago, and Thursday, Mayor Greg Fischer announced a plan to make good on that promise. [WAVE3]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

Jim Wathen has been selling military merchandise at the Kentucky State Fair for nearly a decade. By noon on a recent weekday, he had already restocked a rack of Confederate flags. He said the 3-by-3-inch Confederate flag, his top seller, is a piece of military history. [WFPL]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

A study released Wednesday shows that congested roads are costing the typical Louisville metro area driver more than 40 hours in delays annually and almost $1,050 in lost time and burned fuel. [Business First]

Former New Albany Police Department Officer Laura Schook is proceeding with a federal case against the city as well as an appeal of the decision to fire her in May, and she’s doing so without an attorney. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun(?) Educational Roundup Things

Eastern High School staff physically and verbally harassed a football player over accusations of smoking marijuana, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. [WDRB]

Amid growing protests claiming the building of a methane plant in western Louisville continues a legacy of environmental racism, Mayor Greg Fischer says the Fort Wayne, Ind.-based company behind the project will spend the next two months listening to community concerns before seeking construction approval. [C-J/AKN]

The Highlands Neighborhood Association is encouraging Councilmen David Tandy and Tom Owen to permanently revoke the license of Cahoots which is located on Bardstown Road. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to move five candidates forward in the search for the next state education commissioner. The candidates, who have not been named, are in-state and out-of-state educators. However, the board did not preclude adding finalists when it meets Friday in Lexington, before the start of second-round interviews. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews are quickly restoring Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home, with big plans for it to attract visitors from around the world. [WLKY]

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. [HuffPo]

With its largest-ever incoming class starting school Monday, Spalding University celebrated the growth by rebranding and renaming its new Kentucky College of Art and Design. [WAVE3]

Applications for U.S. home mortgages edged up last week as interest rates declined, an industry group said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

A neighborhood group is hoping concerns about public health and the environment will factor into a city board’s decision to grant a conditional use permit to pork producer JBS Swift. [WFPL]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

Students at Mount Tabor Elementary in New Albany can now use a finger scanning system from Horizon Software to pay for school meals, but some parents are worried about the new technology. [Business First]

Community Montessori High School senior Nick Vaughn narrowly lost in the May New Albany City Council District 6 Republican Party primary. He had a plan to start a work program to benefit disadvantaged residents, and though it won’t be implemented yet in a governmental platform, Vaughn has launched a nonprofit aimed at ushering low-income families out of poverty. [News & Tribune]

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People Still Freaking Out About FoodPort

The maker of Fireball Cinnamon Whisky is putting the heat on a North Carolina brewer over packaging that allegedly too closely resembles its red-capped liquor bottles adorned with a fire-breathing creature. [WDRB]

One of the candidates calls it the “basement level of the practice of law,” but 22 lawyers are vying to take up residence there. [C-J/AKN]

The former president of the local Teamsters Union, James Vincent Jr. pleaded guilty to embezzlement. [WHAS11]

Someday in the not-too-distant future, fans of great Thoroughbreds might look out on a Bluegrass pasture and think they are seeing double. And they might be. [H-L]

GE showed off its new top-loading washing machine and manufacturing line on Tuesday morning. [WLKY]

Two Pennsylvania-based nonprofits that have funded everything from a super PAC supporting Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) to education privatization efforts across the country are likely connected to the operators of the global investment firm Susquehanna International Group. [HuffPo]

In an effort to set the record straight, Louisville Metro Councilwoman Cheri Bryant Hamilton made the West Louisville FoodPort, the topic of her community meeting Monday night. [WAVE3]

Attorney General Jack Conway announces a joint effort to bring state-level voices to a national debate on how best to help students victimized by Corinthian Colleges and other predatory for-profit schools. [Yesterday], 11 state attorneys general called on the U.S. Department of Education to cancel federal student loans in cases where schools have broken state law and provide clear processes for students seeking relief. Attorney General Conway joined the multistate effort making several recommendations to the U.S. Department of Education on the structure of its newly-formed debt relief program. [Press Release]

George Palmer pays a lawn service company to fertilize his grass. He keeps his shrubs neatly trimmed. And sitting on his front porch last week, he could rattle off the names of his neighbors. [WFPL]

A few times a year, Anna Lucio leaves her office and heads back to her roots. “Everybody’s got their own way of seeing it,” she said. Lucio grew up on a piece of land in Kentucky that welcomed the shade needed for Ginseng. “The first time we went in the woods- It’s that excitement that you can be able to find it, and even if you’ve seen a million, you’d be like, ‘Oh! I found one!'” [WKYT]

Home sales in the Louisville area remained strong in July, according to a report from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors. [Business First]

The Indiana State Department of Health has identified West Nile Virus in a sample of mosquitoes from Clark County. [News & Tribune]

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Yes, Tolls Are Still The Local Devil

And you thought people in Indiana wouldn’t get screwed. About three times as many residents of Clark County, Ind., travel to Louisville to work than do people commuting in the opposite direction, new data shows. [WDRB]

If you missed it last week, another Fischer official jumped ship. [C-J/AKN]

People are still the absolute worst. Metro Parks is dealing with a second case of vandalism at Algonquin Park in a little over a month. [WHAS11]

A Louisville woman who authorities say admitted to setting a series of fires throughout the city has been sentenced to 20 years in prison. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A JCPS student is home safe after being left at the wrong bus stop Thursday, and not being located until nearly 2 a.m. Friday. [WLKY]

Your tax dollars at work — all so Jack can score a few extra political points. Fifteen state attorneys general petitioned a federal court in Washington on Thursday to block new U.S. rules to curb carbon emissions from power plants, in the first of several expected legal challenges to the Obama administration measure. [HuffPo]

Gas prices at dozens of Louisville gas stations plummeted 50 cents overnight, less than two days after they spiked by the same amount amid speculation that problems at a Chicago-area refinery would cause shortages. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Department of Justice says that banning people from sleeping in public could be a violation of their constitutional rights. [Time]

For the first time, Kentucky State Fair-goers who take a TARC bus will pay half-price adult admission and, of course, not pay the $8 parking fee. [WFPL]

It should be easy to come up with a weekly column during a governor’s race, but the 2015 election between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway is unlike any I’ve ever seen. [Ronnie Ellis]

An Ohio development company plans to buy the former Mercy Academy property and build a four-story apartment complex on the East Broadway site. [Business First]

With just over two weeks until applications for the $84 million, statewide Regional Cities Initiative must be submitted, the board that’s required to submit the application locally has yet to be formed. [News & Tribune]

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Tough To Believe Sadiqa’s Leaving

The University of Louisville will honor boxing legend Muhammad Ali with the inaugural Grawemeyer Spirit Award. [WDRB]

The investigation began with a single phone call. A donor to Sen. Mitch McConnell called his campaign office last year and asked why he hadn’t gotten the customary “thank you” note for his contributThe investigation began with a single phone call. [C-J/AKN]

The Century Foundation released a report that puts Louisville as the tenth worst city in the US for concentrated black poverty. [WHAS11]

Lgzelijizi, who said she lost faith in Obama when he wouldn’t admit he is Muslim and who thinks Osama bin Laden is alive, said she likes Paul because she “can tell by his face he’s speaking from the heart.” She’s probably one of those ladies who gets on YouTube talking about how she sees lizard people. [H-L]

We still can’t stop laughing over Sadiqa Reynolds heading the Urban League. Maybe she’ll last longer than three months. [WLKY]

Public health agencies and drug treatment centers nationwide are scrambling to battle an explosive increase in cases of hepatitis C, a scourge they believe stems at least in part from a surge in intravenous heroin use. [HuffPo]

Gender identity has been a focus of national conversation all summer long. Now, as the school year ramps up the discussion is headed to the classroom. [WAVE3]

A Washington Post reporter who was arrested at a restaurant last year while reporting on protests in Ferguson, Mo., has been charged in St. Louis County with trespassing and interfering with a police officer and ordered to appear in court. [WaPo]

Gary and Malissa Wright have rented apartments to nearly a dozen homeless veterans in Louisville. [WFPL]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) attracted another huge crowd at a rally for his presidential campaign in Los Angeles on Monday night. [The Hill]

It looks like Jim Beam Distillery is getting close to finishing its Urban Stillhouse attraction at Fourth Street Live. [Business First]

Clark Memorial Hospital is now under new ownership, less than two weeks after Clark County officials approved the acquisition. [News & Tribune]

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Sadly, There Won’t Be 40 Days Of Peace

The 2015 Dirt Bowl Championship was held Sunday at Shawnee Park, but basketball wasn’t the only reason for the event. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other community leaders helped announce a 40 Days of Peace Campaign, which will start Thursday. [WDRB]

When Jefferson County Public Schools launched a contest in 2013 for its “Schools of Innovation,” the plan was to find ideas for helping students so out-of-the-box that they could “make bureacrats gasp.” [C-J/AKN]

School starts on Wednesday for students in Jefferson County and officials are continuing the annual tradition of helping parents with making the bus commute smoother. [WHAS11]

More than 93 percent of teachers and 89 percent of education leaders who were evaluated have been rated “exemplary” or “accomplished” in the first year of statewide implementation of Kentucky’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness System. [H-L]

An area festival showcased the wide variety of hemp – a crop many are hoping to bring back to the Bluegrass. [WLKY]

Asked if his flat tax plan would further separate the haves from the have-nots, GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-WTF) said Sunday that income inequality is the result of some Americans working harder than others, rather than economic policies. [HuffPo]

A Kentucky non-profit organization is pushing for the legalization of medical marijuana. [WAVE3]

Robert Freeman has been helping people extract public information from New York state agencies for four decades. He is the executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government, a division of the New York Department of State that advises the public on the Freedom of Information Law — the state statute authorizing access to public records. [ProPublica]

Louisville home buyers and sellers interested in environmentally friendly elements and technology have a new way to identify those features on their homes. [WFPL]

Rand Paul in an interview Sunday called Donald Trump, who refused to rule out a third-party run during the first GOP debate, a “fake conservative.” [The Hill]

Nashville, Tenn., gets called a boomtown so frequently these days that it borders on cliche. Yet it’s clear that the city just three hours away down Interestate 65 has seen significant growth in the past several years. [Business First]

Options available for the city to address blighted commercial buildings, some of which have been shuttered for years, will be a topic during the next New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

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Watch Matt Bevin Just Fall Apart

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A historic building formerly occupied by the Louisville Water Company will be going into storage. According to a letter to the citizens of Louisville sent by Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, the vacant Water Company building located near the corner of 2nd Street and Liberty Street will be dismantled and placed into storage to make way for the $289 million Omni hotel and apartment building. [WDRB]

Myliah Rose Davis slept on a blanket in her mother’s lap, her tiny hands moving every now and then, as if orchestrating a dream. [C-J/AKN]

A friendly game of hula hoop or interaction with a police horse – it’s the simple activities Louisville Metro Police say break down some often uncomfortable barriers. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin’s love-hate-love-hate relationship with the annual Fancy Farm picnic this last weekend was confusing, contradictory and likely ill-advised. As if there’s anything the man does that isn’t ill-advised. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A railroad crossing accident at Buechel and Crawford avenues this week was the second incident there in four months. [WLKY]

A hard-to-watch video, filmed in 2012 by undercover investigators with Mercy for Animals, shows Idaho dairy farm workers viciously abusing cows. [HuffPo]

Weeks after the Louisville Metro Council allocated $5 million in additional funding for roadwork, progress on the roads was moving slower than some had hoped. [WAVE3]

On Tuesday, Allan Kauffman (D), mayor of Goshen, Indiana, posted a statement announcing that the City Council would not be voting on a proposed LGBT nondiscrimination ordinance that night. “Despite several attempts to tweak the ordinance amendment to respond to concerns expressed, they have not been enough to gain good consensus from City Council members,” he wrote. [ThinkProgress]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s political figures decried the long awaited carbon emission regulations announced Monday by President Barack Obama. [Ronnie Ellis]

A Cincinnati company last week purchased an 88-unit apartment complex off Preston Highway and could start on a substantial renovation as early as this month. [Business First]

Mayor Mike Moore is tired of waiting for the 10th Street medians to be maintained on a regular basis. So he made an executive decision during Wednesday night’s Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission meeting to take care of overgrown weeds — and then some. Just in case anyone needed another reason to think this guy is a sad excuse of a mayor. [News & Tribune]