You Already Know What JCPS Has Done

Jack Conway’s office says JCPS broke the law with too many redactions. But here’s the deal: Helene Kramer was allegedly trash-talking re: that high-level employee’s sexual orientation and Donna Hargens allowed it to occur. She didn’t stop it. She’s never taken it seriously and refuses to admit that real harm was done. Everyone wants to piss and moan and bicker over whether or not those details should be revealed. I’m not gonna identify the individual until they decide to come forward but let’s get real here. That’s what happened. Several of us in the local media world have had the allegations in our possession for months and months and everyone’s just been sitting on it while trying to find a way to get JCPS to cough up the specifics. And all the mainstream media outlets have been afraid to reveal what the victim claims off-the-record occurred. [WDRB]

The Administration for Children and Families has given Jefferson County Public Schools the all-clear after the agency last year found a deficiency in the school district’s Head Start program. [C-J/AKN]

Where’s the media outrage over this murder? The victim’s life is no less valuable than that of anyone else. [WHAS11]

Under most circumstances, global stock market volatility would be enough to unnerve those in a commercial arena preparing for its bellwether exercise. But both the strength of key indictors and a wave of industry momentum heading into the Keeneland September Yearling Sale make for a positive forecast for the 12-day auction when it begins Monday. [H-L]

Muhammad and Lonnie Ali have made a donation to the University of Louisville Athletics. [WLKY]

More than half of the tax cuts proposed in former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s (R) tax plan would flow to America’s wealthiest citizens, according to a report released by the nonpartisan group Citizens for Tax Justice, which advocates for “requiring the wealthy to pay their fair share.” [HuffPo]

All the WAVE gays freaked out over Cher. Like lost their minds freaked out. It was kind of a big gay deal. [WAVE3]

The Obama administration has said it will allow 10,000 Syrian refugees to resettle in the US over the next year. Is this enough? And are there any risks? [BBC]

The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services released a comprehensive plan to reduce health disparities earlier this week, and efforts are already under way in Louisville that address some of the findings. [WFPL]

Every day in America, mortgage companies attempt to foreclose on homeowners using false documents. It’s a byproduct of the mortgage securitization craze during the housing bubble, when loans were sliced and diced so haphazardly that the actual ownership was confused. [The Incercept]

Earlier this week, I took a tour of Norton Commons, the self-contained urbanist community in northeastern Jefferson County that eventually will extend into Oldham County as it is completed in the next 10 to 15 years. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter has launched a unique fundraising effort to benefit local animals. [News & Tribune]

The Fun Shootings Move To Old Louisville

Louisville Metro Police have a new way for the public to file complaints against it’s officers. [WDRB]

For thousands of people in Jefferson County, the public school system was desegregated 40 years ago simply to fulfill a court order. But for supporters, it was a remedy to inequalities between poor, predominantly black schools in the city of Louisville — where some teachers even had to check out a pair of scissors to use for a couple of hours because there weren’t enough to go around — and the mostly white and wealthy schools in Jefferson County. [C-J/AKN]

A local preservation group has filed to make the old Louisville Water Company building a historic landmark, WHAS has learned. [WHAS11]

If an industry can’t function without the backup of casino-style gambling, maybe it’s time to move on? Horse track operators and breeders are concerned the good times might be trotting to a close as some states move to rein in a lucrative subsidy that’s helped prop up their long suffering-industry. [H-L]

One person was injured in a shooting early Wednesday morning in Old Louisville. The shooting happened shortly before 3 a.m. in the 300 block of East St. Catherine Street. [WLKY]

Sorry, folks, please stop asking, not interested in writing about Kim Davis. A link is about all you’re gonna get. George Steele, mayor of Grayson, said the national spotlight here has been an economic boost to the small town he governs, however, he realizes some residents wish the attention would be directed elsewhere. [Ashland Independent]

If you aren’t on board with this plan, something is wrong with you. Louisville’s Russell neighborhood is about to get connected. [WAVE3]

According to a new report from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, racial bias can affect the likelihood of people pulling the trigger of a gun—even if shooters don’t realize they were biased to begin with. Researchers found that, in studies conducted over the past decade, participants were more likely to shoot targets depicting black people than those depicting white people. [Mother Jones]

The cauldron of Kentucky politics was dramatically exposed this week for the whole world to see. [WFPL]

On Thursday, the U.S. Department of Education issued a progress report for those seeking student debt relief who say they were defrauded by their for-profit colleges, but for many former students, the process may drag out for a long time. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville’s largest auto dealership has been sold for an undisclosed amount. We’re mentioning this again because it’s an opportunity to tell you that Jim Bruggers has jokes and you should try to find them on the Twitter. [Business First]

As part of an ongoing effort to raise awareness of human sex trafficking across the state, Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller visited the Clark County Youth Shelter & Family Services facility in Jeffersonville on Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

People Still Freaking Out About FoodPort

The maker of Fireball Cinnamon Whisky is putting the heat on a North Carolina brewer over packaging that allegedly too closely resembles its red-capped liquor bottles adorned with a fire-breathing creature. [WDRB]

One of the candidates calls it the “basement level of the practice of law,” but 22 lawyers are vying to take up residence there. [C-J/AKN]

The former president of the local Teamsters Union, James Vincent Jr. pleaded guilty to embezzlement. [WHAS11]

Someday in the not-too-distant future, fans of great Thoroughbreds might look out on a Bluegrass pasture and think they are seeing double. And they might be. [H-L]

GE showed off its new top-loading washing machine and manufacturing line on Tuesday morning. [WLKY]

Two Pennsylvania-based nonprofits that have funded everything from a super PAC supporting Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) to education privatization efforts across the country are likely connected to the operators of the global investment firm Susquehanna International Group. [HuffPo]

In an effort to set the record straight, Louisville Metro Councilwoman Cheri Bryant Hamilton made the West Louisville FoodPort, the topic of her community meeting Monday night. [WAVE3]

Attorney General Jack Conway announces a joint effort to bring state-level voices to a national debate on how best to help students victimized by Corinthian Colleges and other predatory for-profit schools. [Yesterday], 11 state attorneys general called on the U.S. Department of Education to cancel federal student loans in cases where schools have broken state law and provide clear processes for students seeking relief. Attorney General Conway joined the multistate effort making several recommendations to the U.S. Department of Education on the structure of its newly-formed debt relief program. [Press Release]

George Palmer pays a lawn service company to fertilize his grass. He keeps his shrubs neatly trimmed. And sitting on his front porch last week, he could rattle off the names of his neighbors. [WFPL]

A few times a year, Anna Lucio leaves her office and heads back to her roots. “Everybody’s got their own way of seeing it,” she said. Lucio grew up on a piece of land in Kentucky that welcomed the shade needed for Ginseng. “The first time we went in the woods- It’s that excitement that you can be able to find it, and even if you’ve seen a million, you’d be like, ‘Oh! I found one!'” [WKYT]

Home sales in the Louisville area remained strong in July, according to a report from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors. [Business First]

The Indiana State Department of Health has identified West Nile Virus in a sample of mosquitoes from Clark County. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Apparently Another Horsey Thing Happened

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

After last month’s fire, stabilization work on Whiskey Row is now on schedule. [WDRB]

When it comes to preventing serious infections that people sometimes get at hospitals, many institutions in the Louisville area and Southern Indiana have some work to do, according to new ratings by Consumer Reports. [C-J/AKN]

Community members joined together at Shelby Park Sunday to bring a new energy to the space. This comes after a week of violence in the area, including two shootings, one ultimately ending in death. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Derby was very good for Churchill Downs, but Big Fish has been even better. The Louisville-based gambling and racetrack company announced late Wednesday that it had record revenue of more than $409 million in the quarter that ended June 30. [H-L]

No arrests have been made in connection with a deadly house fire last month in Old Louisville. [WLKY]

GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee is open to the idea of using federal troops and the FBI to stop women from having abortions. [HuffPo]

American Pharoah took an easy win at the Haskell Invitation on Sunday at Monmouth Park in New Jersey. [WAVE3]

Thursday marks the true opening salvo in the GOP presidential race, as the top 10 candidates are slated to face off in the long-awaited Fox News debate. [The Hill]

The Outskirts Festival, which seeks to highlight female-led or female-driven bands, has announced the lineup for its second year. [WFPL]

Matt Jones, the popular host of a radio sports talk show, stepped on some powerful toes Saturday while playing the part of Fancy Farm political speaking emcee in a non-traditional way. [Ronnie Ellis]

The new owners of the Republic Building in downtown Louisville plan to convert the historic structure into a hotel. [Business First]

How would you define success? Business suits, six figures and mortgages are likely the first answer for most Americans. Or maybe it’s a job that allows for enough free time to spend with loved ones. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]

But We Can’t Come Up With WIC Funds

Aetna Inc., the second-largest U.S. health insurer by market value, is closing in on an acquisition of Humana Inc. and could reach a deal as early as this weekend, several people with knowledge of the matter said. [Bloomberg]

A man is found dead in the middle of the street in a quiet Fern Creek neighborhood. [WDRB]

But we can’t afford WIC programs… Louisville waterfront officials have cobbled together just over $500,000 that will go for major enhancements around the Big Four Bridge on the Kentucky shore. [C-J/AKN]

People are freaking out about the sighting of a bear. [WHAS11]

The U.S. Supreme Court could issue a decision on Kentucky’s same-sex marriage ban as soon as Thursday, but Kentucky officials are staying mum on what, if any, preparations they’ve made if the justices vote to allow gay marriage. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Everybody is freaking out about some clouds. [WLKY]

A former Baltimore police sergeant took to Twitter Wednesday to air a stunning list of acts he said he participated in and witnessed during his 11 years on the city’s force. [HuffPo]

The giant hole in the ground where a couple of old buildings used to stand on Third Street makes it clear: Nothing is getting in the way of the new $300 million Omni Hotel project, not even the historic Louisville Water Company building. [WAVE3]

Racehorses are continuing to get quicker, a study of winning times spanning 165 years of racing indicates. [BBC]

Halfway into its first year, Louisville city officials and residents say a plastic bag ban for yard waste has been met with a surprisingly positive reception. [WFPL]

More Americans are renting — and paying more — as homeownership falls. [NY Times]

Names, birth dates, addresses and Social Security numbers may have been exposed after hackers gained access to classified Clarksville Town Court records Tuesday, a judge says. [Business First]

Less than 48 hours after nine black men and women were murdered inside a house of worship, prayers of encouragement, forgiveness and mercy were offered in the midst of a church that provided slaves safe passage during the Civil War. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Loves Killing People

Two weeks after he took a personal leave of absence, principal at the Academy @ Shawnee Houston Barber has resigned from Jefferson County Public Schools. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Council members want to reallocate up to $5 million from Mayor Greg Fischer’s budget to supplement the city’s “embarrassing” road maintenance. [C-J/AKN]

Really? Killing the guy because he was swinging a flag pole? Way to go, Louisville, you love killing people. How compassionate. [WHAS11]

Bill Mott has conditioned some of the all-time greats in the sport of Thoroughbred racing. Yet last Sunday, he was just another fan on the Belmont Park backstretch, grinning ear to ear while asking fellow trainer Bob Baffert if he could get close to the gleaming bay colt, American Pharoah. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The loved ones of a man found dead in a west Louisville alley made an emotional plea Friday that someone come forward with information that might lead police to his killer. [WLKY]

The Iowa Supreme Court has affirmed the right to be drunk on your front porch. [HuffPo]

A local company hired to do cleanup related to the massive fire at GE Appliance Park is suing the conglomerate, claiming GE is refusing to pay its bill. [WAVE3]

When it comes to the National Security Agency’s recently disclosed use of automated speech recognition technology to search, index and transcribe voice communications, people in the United States may well be asking: But are they transcribing my phone calls? The answer is maybe. [The Intercept]

This seems like it’s worth paying attention to again. Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad on Wednesday asked the Metro Council to approve a near $170-million budget that includes funding for body cameras and more officers. [WFPL]

The state veterinarian has banned the sale of birds at flea markets and swap meets to protect Kentucky’s poultry industry amid an avian flu outbreak. [Glasgow Daily Times]

No. There is no such thing as too much bourbon fun. [Business First]

Though the New Albany Police Merit Commission has twice voted to fire former officer Laura Schook, the city administration and police department again declined Friday to release disciplinary-related documents in her personnel file. [News & Tribune]