Yay! Some Positive West End News!

Papaw Beshear responds to questions of cronyism protecting owners of failing sewage companies. The owner of a failing sewer company who polluted public water and then left the mess is trying to do it again, and now new communities are scrambling for a fix. [WDRB]

AT&T said Monday that it plans to offer ultra-fast gigabit Internet speeds to customers in the Louisville area, perhaps as early as in a year or so. Holding your breath? [C-J/AKN]

On Monday, Dec. 7, Judge Olu Stevens returned to the bench for the first time since Commonwealth Attorney Tom Wine filed a motion to remove Stevens from all criminal cases. [WHAS11]

Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear has appointed his wife to an unpaid position on the Kentucky Horse Park Commission in one of his final acts as governor. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The balance of power could shift in Jeffersonville after some challenges to this year’s elections results. [WLKY]

The Sierra Club on Wednesday released a report on the final text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, concluding that the landmark trade deal would be a significant setback in efforts to combat climate change and protect the environment. [HuffPo]

The J.B. Speed School of Engineering and the West End School are working together. On Monday, the two announced a special partnership for students and cut the ribbon on a new space called a maker space. [WAVE3]

When Republicans like Andy Barr try to tell you they’re for the people? Remember that they’re full of shit. House Republicans are hoping a back door legislative maneuver will successfully block the Federal Communications Commission from enforcing Net Neutrality and regulating or banning data caps. [Stop the Cap!]

Maurice Mousty doesn’t have to look far to see his neighborhood changing. In the 50 years since he settled in to his modest home on West Maple Street in Jeffersonville, many of the familiar families have moved on. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a challenge by gun rights activists to a Chicago suburb’s ordinance banning assault weapons and large-capacity magazines, handing a victory to gun control advocates amid a fierce debate over the nation’s firearms laws. [Reuters]

Just a few weeks after the River Ridge Development Authority’s board of directors authorized a negotiation that could bring a 1.5 million-square-foot warehouse to Jeffersonville, the board announced Monday it is pursuing another mega deal. [Business First]

The universe got a little bit bigger, not necessarily because of him, but his discoveries helped scientists realize that space is always expanding. At least for a while, he taught at New Albany High School. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

JCPS-LMPD Mess Blown Outta Proportion

Time Warner constantly sucks and constantly gets to take more of your money with little to no competition. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! Louisville has a top-25 basketball team with a high ceiling, but the Cardinals aren’t ranked yet this season because of ongoing investigations into a book making major allegations against the program, coach Rick Pitino said. [C-J/AKN]

Supporters of Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens met with Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine on Monday afternoon, Nov. 30, urging him to withdraw his request to remove Stevens from criminal court cases. [WHAS11]

Before Gov. Steve Beshear leaves office and Gov.-elect Matt Bevin can reconstitute the racing commission, the regulatory body will take up some key business on Tuesday: a request for a gambling parlor at Turfway Park in Florence and Keeneland’s plan to open a quarter horse track and gambling parlor in Corbin. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department chief is reminding Jefferson County Public Schools exactly what officers can and cannot do when it comes to safety and security at schools. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama spoke out on Planned Parenthood following what appears to be a politically motivated shooting at one of the health care provider’s clinics in Colorado last week that left three people dead and nine others injured. [HuffPo]

After more than three months of meetings with local officials and community leaders, Clark County’s health officer, Dr. Kevin Burke, is gearing up to formally petition the state to set up the exchange program. [WAVE3]

One of the most prominent stains on the reputation of the much-mythologized Reagan administration was its response, or lack of response, to the AIDS crisis as it began to ravage American cities in the early and mid-1980s. President Reagan famously (though, not famously enough) didn’t himself publicly mention AIDS until 1985, when more than 5,000 people, most of them gay men, had already been killed by the disease. Filmmaker Scott Calonico’s new documentary short, When AIDS Was Funny, exclusively debuting on VF.com, shows how the Reagan administration reacted to the mounting problem in chilling fashion. Not even Reagan’s appointed mouthpiece, notorious press secretary Larry Speakes, had much to say about the crisis beyond derisive laughter. [Vanity Fair]

The future of Louisville’s bicycling infrastructure will be the topic of discussion at a pair of public meetings set for this week. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday said the United States has power to do more to prevent gun homicides like last week’s shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Hillsdale Furniture LLC has based its distribution operations in Bullitt County since 2008, but those services are returning home. [Business First]

Officials are looking at ways to make the Clark County Government Building more secure. [News & Tribune]

Hype Isn’t Gonna Help JCPS Improve

We love to hate on Donna Hargens and Jefferson County Public Schools but come on. This is the dumbest thing yet from WDRB about JCPS and it’s being used by the racist anti-busing crowd. The insinuation (watch them try to claim otherwise in 3, 2…) that all teachers who resign do so because they feel unsafe is dangerous and based in teabagger delusion land. Remember that there are something like 6,000 teachers when they try to claim that a dozen resignations = harbinger of doom. [WDRB]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer refused to sign an ordinance Thursday shielding area community centers for needy residents from his administrative changes after an overwhelming margin of Metro Council members passed the measure. Instead of vetoing the legislation, which was approved by a 20-3 vote last month, Fischer has asked the state attorney general to weigh in, launching the city’s two branches of government into a legal joust over who has final say about a potential overhaul at Neighborhood Place sites. [C-J/AKN]

Three people have been arrested and a man continues to recover in the hospital after a shooting in the Chickasaw neighborhood Friday night. [WHAS11]

Kip Cornett said he and his wife were at an airport in June when he read on his cellphone a column by Barry Weisbord, president and co-publisher of Thoroughbred Daily News. [H-L]

A 27-year-old Louisville man became the city’s latest homicide victim on Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

The medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders released its internal report on Thursday about the October attack on its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The report also revealed that pilots shot at staff members fleeing the hospital. [HuffPo]

The Americana Community Center, Inc. held its annual fundraiser Saturday night. The center strives to provide a spectrum of services to the diverse individuals and families of the Louisville Metro area, including refugees, immigrants and those born in the United States. [WAVE]

By most accounts, Kentucky’s implementation of President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare reform was a success. Tuesday’s elections in the state could mean big changes are coming, however – with ominous portents for the future of the president’s signature legislative achievement. [BBC]

The fallout continues from Halloween, when University of Louisville President James Ramsey and his staff posed for a photograph at a U of L party wearing stereotypical “Mexican” costumes. The photo went viral, and a few written apologies were issued, but they’ve been lacking. [WFPL]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Wait, people are surprised this is happening? Its been quite a ride, but the Velocity Indiana entrepreneurial accelerator and co-working space is effectively closing shop. [Business First]

In another plea for the state’s help on Clark County’s diminishing revenue stream, County Attorney Lisa Glickfield is drafting a letter of support from board members to legislators to raise the tax levy. [News & Tribune]

More Puppies & Rainbows For Metro Govt

Another day, another pedestrian hit in Possibility Compassionate City. [WDRB]

Western Louisville residents will have an opportunity to question the Metropolitan Sewer District about building a massive storage basin beneath Shawnee Park at a public meeting next Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

On Election Day people in southern Indiana decided they liked the direction their cities are going. Both New Albany and Jeffersonville decided to re-elect their current mayors for another term. [WHAS11]

There was no shortage of story lines in the Fasig-Tipton sales pavilion Sunday evening, from the bittersweet parting a couple of years in the making to the family who, once again, wasn’t that upset to leave some money on the table and take one of its favorite girls back home. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In Jeffersonville, Mike Moore will serve another term as mayor. [WLKY]

Law enforcement officers accused of sexual misconduct have jumped from job to job — and at times faced fresh allegations that include raping women — because of a tattered network of laws and lax screening that allowed them to stay on the beat. [HuffPo]

Residents are concerned Germantown is becoming too populated with bars and restaurants that will disrupt the neighborhood. [WAVE3]

President Obama on Monday mocked Republican presidential candidates as thin-skinned for lashing out at CNBC over the network’s handling of last week’s primary debate. [The Hill]

Economy Inn, the troubled motel on Bardstown Road, has passed its latest inspection by the Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, a Republican political novice, wealthy Louisville businessman and Tea Party favorite, was elected Kentucky’s next governor on Tuesday, a victory that could herald a new era in a state where Democrats have held the governor’s mansion for all but four of the last 44 years. The Associated Press declared Mr. Bevin the winner shortly after 8 p.m. [NY Times]

This is in an alternate universe, right? Louisville Metro Government has earned the rank of the second best digital city in the U.S., according to a new survey released by e.Republic’s Center for Digital Government. [Business First]

Comments collected at five public workshops are coming together to provide a vision for Clarksville’s future. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Jim Ramsey Did A Stupid Thing

It has made headlines for crime and health violations, but Saturday brought a different view of a controversial Louisville hotel. The Economy Inn held a Halloween party. [WDRB]

The former principal of Buechel Metro High School says Jefferson County Public Schools leaders have created a false perception of his tenure as a way to demonstrate a need to merge two alternative schools and create the new Minor Daniels Academy. [C-J/AKN]

Metro Police are investigating a shooting that happened just south of downtown. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton Jr. has stepped in, after months of back-and-forth between Jefferson District and Family courts over which would take on the additional workload of new Emergency Protective Orders meant to protect dating couples from an abusive partner. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police are conducting a death investigation after a was body found Saturday morning near Frost Middle School. [WLKY]

Triple Crown champion American Pharoah took charge out of the gate, winning the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic by 6 1/2 lengths Saturday in his final race before retirement. [HuffPo]

On Tuesday New Albany voters will decide who should lead the city. There will be three names to chose from – the incumbent, a real estate developer or a businessman. [WAVE3]

I applaud the Democrats and Republicans who came together [Friday] morning to pass a responsible, long-term budget agreement that reflects our values, grows our economy and creates jobs. This agreement will strengthen the middle class by investing in education, job training, and basic research. It will keep us safe by investing in our national security. It protects our seniors by avoiding harmful cuts to Medicare and Social Security. It is paid for in a responsible, balanced way – in part with a measure to ensure that partnerships like hedge funds pay what they owe in taxes just like everybody else. It locks in two years of funding and should help break the cycle of shutdowns and manufactured crises that have harmed our economy. This agreement is a reminder that Washington can still choose to help, rather than hinder, America’s progress, and I look forward to signing it into law as soon as it reaches my desk. After that, Congress should build on this by getting to work on spending bills that invest in America’s priorities without getting sidetracked by ideological provisions that have no place in America’s budget process. If we can do that, we’ll help our workers and businesses keep growing the economy and building an America full of opportunity for all. [President Barack Obama]

Everyone keeps begging us to write about Jim Ramsey’s latest racist stunt. If this is what sets everyone on fire over Jimbo and his mess, something’s gone terribly wrong. The man has been in a literal pile of corrupt shit since 2008. Felner and the rest of the folks have thieved, done prison time, gotten away with everything while Ramsey turned a blind eye. Shirley Dubya? She’s currently being paid more than $300,000 to do nothing for a year. The myriad Rick Pitino sex scandals? Just blips on the radar. But the man shows his true colors by dressing in a demeaning and racist way? That’s what sets fire to him and causes rage to bubble to the surface? We’re tired. [WFPL]

Amid the recent pressure on police to wear body cameras, one thing is often overlooked: Not all cameras are created equal. In fact, cameras vary a lot — and the variations — some contentious — can have a profound effect on how the cameras are used and who benefits from them. [NPR]

The U.S. Justice Department has rejected a settlement offer from AB Electrolux that would have allowed the company to move ahead with its acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. [Business First]

While candidates for Charlestown’s city council come from different parts of the area and different political parties, they all envision a growing Charlestown. That’s because with the River Ridge Commerce Center and the east-end bridge, the city can’t escape changes. But how the city can take advantage of those changes is where the candidates from the city’s four districts differ. The most talked about issues include the future of the Pleasant Ridge Subdivision and they city’s battle with brown water. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Administration Just Needs To Go

Louisville Metro Police found a body in a box in southern Jefferson County Tuesday afternoon, according to a spokesperson. [WDRB]

Two Humana Inc. shareholders have filed suit to block Aetna’s purchase of the Louisville-based health care giant, contending that the $37 billion acquisition isn’t a good deal for stockholders who stood to benefit from the company’s bright future. [C-J/AKN]

Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore has issued an executive order to put more firefighters on the streets. [WHAS11]

The most celebrated jockey in Lexington this month won’t be riding in Keeneland’s fall meet, or afterward at the Breeders’ Cup. In fact, he died 119 years ago. [H-L]

The college basketball season tips off in about four weeks, but for the University of Louisville the focus is on what did or didn’t happen off the court. [WLKY]

Appalachia struggles with a disproportionate disease burden, and poor sleep is part of it. [HuffPo]

Jefferson County Public School leaders met on Monday for the first time since one of their key administrators ended his employment with the district. [WAVE3]

Jennifer Lawrence has written an essay expressing her anger at getting paid less than her male co-stars. [BBC]

Louisville’s electric vehicle enthusiast group will cut the ribbon this weekend on the group’s first public vehicle charger. [WFPL]

Earlier this month, Wal-Mart trumpeted that it had beaten a goal it set five years ago: to open at least 275 stores in food deserts by 2016. That targeted expansion into “neighborhoods without access to fresh affordable groceries” came as part of the retailer’s “healthier food initiative,” lauded by — and launched with — First Lady Michelle Obama in 2011. Wal-Marts have been popping up in lower-income urban areas where grocery stores are scarce ever since. [NPR]

The Louisville-Lexington area’s economy is currently firing on all cylinders, blowing by the nation at large, according to a new study from The PNC Financial Services Group. And the good news is expected to continue through the end of the year and into 2016, according to PNC. [Business First]

Clarksville residents should soon see more police patrols in their neighborhoods thanks to a $250,000 grant awarded to the Clarksville Police Department. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! JCPS Wants To Spend More $

Attorney General Jack Conway’s office has ruled that Gov. Steve Beshear’s office violated the state law that requires racial balance on the University of Louisville’s board of trustees when he removed its only African American. [C-J/AKN]

Shepherdsville’s mayor, accused in a sex scandal, is refusing to take a plea deal. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is hoping to push through a new contract to make greater use of the public relations firm that has been handling the district’s media issues. [More C-J/AKN]

A homeless woman who spent her nights in Central Park is now getting a permanent home. Metro Councilman David James met the woman earlier this year and said she left a powerful impact on his life. [WHAS11]

Freedom of religion isn’t reason enough to deny any American their constitutional rights, President Barack Obama said Sunday as he addressed members of the LGBT community, one of his major sources of political and financial support. [H-L]

Five schools in Louisville are being honored by the U.S. Department of Education. St. Gabriel, St. Mary Academy, St. Albert, St. Margaret Mary and Christian Academy were the Louisville schools honored Tuesday. [WLKY]

The U.S. plans to increase the number of refugees it takes from 70,000 to 100,000 over the next two years. New York, Los Angeles and 16 other cities have urged President Barack Obama to accept even more refugees from Syria. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Government has reached an agreement to settle the final pending claim related to the June 1, 2009 train accident at the Louisville Zoo, according to a news released issued by the office of Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell. [WAVE3]

Just in case you were wondering why Hillview has gone bankrupt? Andy Beshear was involved, apparently. [CN|Toot]

Mary Campbell steps over a pile of old bricks and squeezes into a hallway heaped with the remnants of a long life — burnt out lamps, discarded boxes, busted chairs. [WFPL]

The nation’s largest mortgage lenders are violating the terms of a punitive 2012 settlement that was meant to prevent unfair and unnecessary foreclosures that destroyed communities and pushed working families from their homes. [Politico]

Looking for the next American Pharoah? The place to be is at the annual Keeneland September Yearling Sale in Lexington, Kentucky, which ended this weekend. More than 2,700 yearlings were sold at this year’s Thoroughbred yearling auction, which is a cornerstone of the $39 billion horse industry. [Business First]

The empty Rose Hill Elementary School in downtown Jeffersonville will be torn down soon, and in its place will rise a 93-room upper-mid scale hotel. [News & Tribune]