County Attorney’s Office Sounds Fun

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has reprimanded a prosecutor and ordered him to go to sensitivity training for making “insensitive and derogatory” comments about the family that owns Hwang’s Martial Arts Academy. [WDRB]

Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer will be called to testify before a Kentucky legislative committee this month over allegations that his office is not physically examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

You might have to dig a little deeper to pay for your college degree as the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is set to vote on a tuition hike Thursday. [WHAS11]

Ahmed Zayat spends big money buying and betting on horses, and brags about how successful he’s been at everything he’s set out to accomplish. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just days into a pilot program for police body cameras, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has gone on the record to address concerns from the public. [WLKY]

The leaders of six of Europe’s largest oil producers are calling for a plan to price planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, citing climate change as “a critical challenge for our world.” [HuffPo]

For the third consecutive year Ford Motor Company says it will shorten the annual summer shutdown at some of its plants in order to meet the demand by consumers for vehicles. [WAVE3]

New York City, Baltimore and other major cities have seen a recent rise in gun violence. The uptick has raised the alarm for many police departments that worry the summer months may make the problem worse. [NPR]

Louisville transportation officials are offering bus passes to young people this summer at a discounted rate. [WFPL]

More than 150 people in southeast Indiana have been diagnosed with HIV, the largest outbreak in state history. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. has completed the sale of its Concentra Inc. subsidiary for $1.06 billion in cash. [Business First]

Section 8 housing voucher system, social security income, food stamps — Kelli Orman wishes she didn’t have to rely on any of these low-income assistance services. [News & Tribune]

Council Holding Fischer Accountable

A bipartisan group of Louisville Metro Council members wants more information about how Mayor Greg Fischer nominates people to scores of city boards and commissions. But not David Yates — he cowardly removed his name as a sponsor. [WDRB]

How do people even have kids knowing this crap can happen? Too terrifying to think about. [C-J/AKN]

For the first time the public is seeing a second incident where a school resource officer appears to punch a middle school student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is calling for a 140-mile extension of the Mountain Parkway from Prestonsburg to Beckley, W.Va., at a cost of $8 billion to $10 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood that left one man hospitalized. [WLKY]

College graduates, brace yourselves for some disappointing news. Wages for university grads are 2.5 percent lower than what they were 15 years ago, according to the latest edition of the Economic Policy Institute’s annual report on the labor market prospects of new workers. [HuffPo]

A New Albany councilman referred to a colleague as a “lying piece of (expletive)” during a debate over public prayer on Monday. Councilman Dan Coffey made the comment into an open microphone, yet denied using the curse word during a brief, tense interview after the meeting. [WAVE3]

On Wednesday, when President Barack Obama spoke at the US Coast Guard Academy’s commencement ceremony, he called climate change “an immediate risk to our national security.” In recent months, the Obama administration has repeatedly highlighted the international threats posed by global warming and has emphasized the need for the country’s national security agencies to study and confront the issue. [Mother Jones]

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced more than $54 million in grant funds to clean up contaminated brownfields sites around the country, and one of the projects getting funding is in Louisville. [WFPL]

The lawyer for the man who alleges that Ahmed Zayat has not paid a $2 million gambling debt filed a $10 million libel suit on Monday against Zayat, the owner of American Pharoah. [NY Times]

Cecilia Henderson, the 71-year-old widow of Angel’s Envy bourbon creator Lincoln Henderson, is suing her son, saying that Wesley Henderson has “effectively stolen” her share of proceeds from a recent sale to Bacardi Ltd. [Business First]

A community that successfully addresses homelessness is a united one, according to Michael Stoops, the director of community organizing at the National Coalition for the Homeless. [News & Tribune]

Bob Hill Seems Frustrated These Days

From the end of his driveway, Bob Hill can hear the hum of construction work. He lives close enough to the four-lane highway taking shape that he can see it when a line of trees thins for the winter. [WDRB]

An assault case in Jefferson Circuit Court was dismissed Tuesday by a judge who ruled an assistant commonwealth’s attorney “altered” evidence that was “deliberately not disclosed and concealed” from the defense counsel. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner American Pharoah will retire and breed here in Kentucky. [WHAS11]

If Matt Bevin’s ignorance and code words leave you with a bitter taste in your mouth, you’re not alone. [H-L]

In newly released audio statements, an Olmsted Academy North student told police that he was choked so hard by a school resource officer that he could barely breathe and had blurry vision. [WLKY]

It wasn’t that the intelligence community was giving the administration wholesale faulty intelligence. It was that the administration was lying to the American people about what the intelligence actually showed. [HuffPo]

The mayor of Goshen has resigned, a city representative said Wednesday. Earlier in the day, an email apparently from Mayor Bob Thacker was sent to residents saying that members of a neighborhood watch Facebook group – which the email referred to as “The Disease” – had crossed a line, mentioning the mayor’s wife and children in online posts. [WAVE3]

States lack accurate statistics on widespread heroin use. [NPR]

The Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness is conducting the 2015 Community Health Needs Assessment survey to help the department and local hospitals determine which programs, policies and services will lead to a healthier Louisville. [WFPL & Survey]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Wednesday announced the results of a four-state crackdown aimed at stopping illegal distribution of addictive prescription medicines, such as opioid painkillers, that yielded 280 arrests. [Reuters]

Work on The Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass’s expansion is well under way, but just how much will the 53,400-square-foot addition cost? [Business First]

The preliminary $119 million plan to revamp, rebuild and realign several Greater Clark County Schools would result in an additional $13.74 cents per $100 of assessed property valuation for 2016 property taxes, the district superintendent told school board members Tuesday night. [News & Tribune]

Oldham Co. Should Embrace The Booze

There are only a few places in all of Oldham County where people can buy packaged alcohol like wine or a case of beer. But with more petitions going out this week, there’s a possibility that may soon change. [WDRB]

Downtown leaders tried to calm some jittery nerves Friday by predicting their hard work should minimize any loss of business from the impending two-year closure of the Kentucky International Convention Center. [C-J/AKN]

Watching Donna Hargens mangle this bus incident was almost as terrifying as hearing about a child being dragged. [WHAS11]

A Lawrence County school bus full of students on their way to school started on fire Friday, authorities said. [H-L]

Kentucky recently became one of the first states to let pharmacists dispense without prescription a drug that can reverse a heroin overdose. [WLKY]

Lorca Henley of Bowling Green, Ohio, said her family’s dinners on different nights this week included taco salads, tuna casserole with mashed potatoes, spaghetti with meat sauce and hamburgers they fried on the stove because they were out of propane. [HuffPo]

The mother of the girl dragged by a Jefferson County Public Schools bus said Sunday night that her daughter had been discharged from Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WAVE3]

This is not bourbon and the story will likely cause you to pop a vein. [NPR]

Apryll Buege spent much of her youth in the foster care system. She said she got in some trouble, made some mistakes, but soon realized she needed to pull her life together. [WFPL]

Duke Energy Corp. pleaded guilty Thursday to criminal pollution charges and agreed to $102 million in federal penalties stemming from a February 2014 spill of coal ash waste. [The Hill]

A record crowd turned out to see American Pharoah capture the second jewel of the Triple Crown at Saturday’s Preakness Stakes. [Business First]

Former Democratic congressman Baron Hill plans to join Indiana’s U.S. Senate race to replace retiring Republican Dan Coats. [News & Tribune]

Flood Gates Opened Against Norton

They may only stand a couple feet off the ground, have four legs and wet noses, but their lives might save the life of a veteran. [WDRB]

A man says in a lawsuit that Norton Healthcare lost a piece of his brain. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering just how terrible Donna Hargens’ communication skills are? Just check out this latest mess. A Louisville neighborhood remains shaken following a horrific accident Friday evening involving a young elementary student and her school bus. [WHAS11]

One wants to abolish the state office he is trying to win. Another started her own business at age 9. Four have state legislative experience, and two are Louisville businessmen. [H-L]

Police are investigating a fatal crash at Dr. W.J. Hodge and Magazine streets early Sunday morning. [WLKY]

If Flint, Michigan can run a pig for mayor, surely Louisville can run something similar. [HuffPo]

FEMA will soon open a second office in Jefferson County to help those recovering from spring flooding. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah is the king of the nation’s horse races this month: in a driving rain, the Kentucky Derby winner took home top prize at the Preakness Stakes Saturday. [NPR]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

For thousands of years, religious people have gathered together in houses of worship to sing songs, celebrate sacred rituals, and lift up prayers to God(s) on high. And on July 1, a new religious group in Indiana intends to do just that — but with a lot more emphasis on the “high” part. [ThinkProgress]

Expect to see Norton Healthcare Inc. and the University of Louisville back in court on June 10. That’s as a long-running legal dispute between the two organizations continues to play out. [Business First]

Former Indiana state schools Superintendent Tony Bennett won’t face any criminal charges after an investigation into whether he misused state resources for his 2012 re-election campaign. [News & Tribune]

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]



How’ll That Waterfront Property End Up?

Have you seen this puppies and rainbows b.s. with Donna Hargens? Giving this woman a free pass is the last thing Louisville needs right now. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Police Department has ordered 988 body cameras from Arizona-based TASER International ahead of its upcoming body camera pilot program, the department confirmed Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

It’s a building and a company that dominates the downtown Louisville skyline and the city’s business community. For more than five decades, the healthcare giant Humana and its employees have remained an important piece of this area’s economic fabric. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader endorsed Hal Heiner over Jamie Comer, which is likely to push Comer over the edge behind closed doors. [H-L]

Researchers say children in Louisville are being sold for sex. The KristyLove Foundation is a first-of-its-kind shelter in Louisville created by a woman who escaped the sex trade and turned her heartbreak into healing. [WLKY]

Faith in humanity, restored. A worker in a Qdoba fast food restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky was caught on video feeding a customer who was unable to feed herself. [HuffPo]

A Louisville police chief says there’s a lot of work to be done to ease tensions between law enforcement and the community. He believes body cameras could be part of the answer. [WAVE3]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Waterfront Development Corp. wants two of its downtown properties just south of Waterfront Park to be developed. The agency asked on Thursday for development proposals for the properties. [WFPL]

Ha! Daniel Grossberg has an ad highlighting Jacob Conway’s blackmail/extortion/threat attempt. [Click the Clicky]

American Pharaoh strolled out of his trailer and into the stables with ease when he arrived at Pimlico Race Course Wednesday afternoon. [Business First]

The Floyd County Council voted 5-2 last week to cut $150,000 from the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter budget to help balance the county’s 2015 general fund. That won’t end well. [News & Tribune]

Will JCPS Have A Scandal-Free Week?

It appears Jefferson County Public Schools wants to move forward with plans to centralize the district’s application and acceptance process for its magnet schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Supreme Court has never ruled on whether public schools could force all students to submit to random drug testing, as Louisville’s private Trinity High School has decided to do. But constitutional experts say it is unlikely the court would allow such testing at public schools, unless there was a suspicion that individual students were using drugs. [C-J/AKN]

Almost a week after an incredible Derby race, another amazing event took place at Churchill Downs Friday afternoon. Just before Race 7, a mile-long turf race, a horse broke out of the starting gate and managed to dump it’s jockey. [WHAS11]

Things started changing in the 1980s with “pro-business” policies and “trickle-down” economic theories that resulted in the highest level of wealth inequality in nearly a century, not to mention the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and a slow, uneven recovery. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Police say a worker at an aluminum plant has been killed in an accident. [WLKY]

The urban poor in the United States are experiencing accelerated aging at the cellular level, and chronic stress linked both to income level and racial-ethnic identity is driving this physiological deterioration. [HuffPo]

A local mother is fired up after she says her rights were violated when she was told she couldn’t breastfeed in an Academy Sports and Outdoors store in Louisville. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Sunday defended his support for a measure in the USA Patriot Act that has anchored a National Security Agency program to collect Americans’ phone data. [Reuters]

The total number of homeless residents in Louisville decreased about 14 percent in the past year, according to the 2014 Louisville Homeless Census. [WFPL]

A heron lifted off from a branch overhanging the Little Sandy River and it immediately reminded Chuck Chambers of the time he watched a similar bird on the Elk River in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

Kentucky boasts four automobile assembly plants — two in Louisville and one each in Bowling Green and Georgetown. State leaders estimate that Kentucky is home to more than 400 auto-related businesses, when you count suppliers and other supporting businesses. [Business First]

As the number of HIV cases in Southeastern Indiana continues to grow, Gov. Mike Pence signed an act meant to combat the IV drug use problem underlying the epidemic. [News & Tribune]