JCPS Outrage Reaching Fever Pitch

Some Jefferson County Public Schools board members are raising questions about the district potentially misusing Every 1 Reads funds. Surprise! David Jones doesn’t think it’s a big deal because $420,000 to him is like $420 to you. And Allison Martin blaming someone else? No surprise there. [WDRB]

No amount of positive spin stories like these getting shopped around by people like Mark Hebert will improve UofL’s scandal-ridden mess of a leadership debacle. The University of Louisville produced 10 Fulbright scholars this school year — the same number as Stanford — and ranking it among the 42 highest universities in the United States. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Flashing red and blue lights and police choppers were all creating quite a scene at the Big Four Bridge on Saturday. [WHAS11]

An affidavit filed in federal court says the shooting of a U.S. postal worker in Louisville was the result of a drug deal. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents on both sides of the gun debate showed up at a committee meeting Tuesday to voice their opinion on whether guns should be allowed inside Town Hall. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell draws a fine line between their nefarious calls for delay and his wise calls for delay. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian struck on the streets of Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s troubled public pension funds are fighting a bill requiring them to disclose performance fees paid to outside asset managers and use more transparent methods when selecting those managers. [Reuters]

The attorney hired to represent Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky in a lawsuit over abortion services says he’ll ask a judge to dismiss the case. [WFPL]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

We at Louisville Business First often report about programs to encourage entrepreneurs in the area, and now those efforts are gaining broader attention. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman gave a shout-out to Louisville’s startup community in his Feb. 17 column. [Business First]

There was only one winner Thursday night at the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s Teacher of the Year recognition dinner. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Admin An Extension Of Frankfort

Gossip started more than a week ago that Allison Martin was bringing Daniel Kemp with her to JCPS. Because that’s apparently how things work these days – government jobs are handed out to friends, not the person who is best for the job. Screw what’s best for the school district. Konz, along with other local reporters, were under an embargo not to mention it until Monday. [WDRB]

A federal judge last month denied a request by Karen Cunagin Sypher to be placed in a halfway house for the final 12 months of her sentence for attempting to extort University of Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino. [C-J/AKN]

It’s the most important time of year! Girl Scout cookie season! [WHAS11]

A 22-year-old man had been living on the streets less than a month when he was found unresponsive outside a Lexington Taco Bell and later died, his wife said Friday. [H-L]

Greater Clark County Schools students enjoyed another day off Monday, but many are talking about the humorous way the message was delivered. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act is nearly six years old, and over that time it’s made real headway accomplishing some of its key goals. [HuffPo]

Always exciting when there’s a story that doesn’t involve pedestrian deaths, shootings, Donna Hargens or Jim Ramsey. Louisville’s Joe Autry got first place in the professional division of the 16th International Snow Sculpting Competition Japan Cup, which took place Feb. 9-13, in Nayoro, Japan. [WAVE3]

Most students in the U.S. are learning about climate change in schools, according to a new survey. But the quality of that climate science education is, for many students, questionable. [ThinkProgress]

A panel to review deaths and near-deaths in Kentucky’s correctional facilities would be created by legislation introduced Thursday in the state House of Representatives. [WFPL]

Landowners who had opposed efforts to put a natural gas pipeline across 13 counties have been victorious in the Kentucky Supreme Court. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

A Bardstown business found its Facebook page shut down Thursday over what the social networking site first said were “policy violations.” [Business First]

After one member questioned some of the processes for budget changes and how grants are distributed, the Clark County Special Education Cooperative may review some of their practices at a meeting in March. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

ZIKA IS COMING OH NO GET SCARED

Kentucky and Indiana officials have missed self-imposed goals for finalizing details that will govern RiverLink, the toll network on three Ohio River bridges set to start this year. [WDRB]

Remember that Jefferson County Public Schools story we covered that everyone else ignored? The Office of the Attorney General said JCPS broke the law. Who could have known??? [C-J/AKN]

An employee with the Kentucky Juvenile Justice center tells WHAS 11 that Commissioner Bob Hayter is no longer with the department. [WHAS11]

Any business person knows that when costs are rising faster than revenue, you should raise revenue and not just cut costs. [Tom Eblen]

OH GOD WE’RE ALL GONNA GET THE ZIKA! [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton is concerned for the future of women’s reproductive rights. [HuffPo]

Kentucky’s new Governor Matt Bevin nixed a request to restore the $420,000 per year contribution in his bare-bones FY 2017 and 2018 budget proposal. [WAVE3]

President Obama will release his final budget proposal on Tuesday, in which he’ll call for $11 billion in funding over the next decade to address homelessness among families. [ThinkProgress]

Way to go go, Metro Council, for leading the way to suck town. A Louisville Metro Council committee is considering a multi-year effort aimed at reworking the city’s 800-page land development code, but one of the big issues before it — affordable housing — will not be examined until at least this spring. [WFPL]

The billionaire former mayor of New York, Michael Bloomberg, has confirmed he is considering running as an independent candidate for the US presidency. [BBC]

The Louisville division of Computershare Inc. is looking to hire lots of new employees in a variety of roles. [Business First]

Jeffersonville High School freshman Johnathan Woodward laughed at the prospect of becoming a firefighter one day, but admitted he was imagining what it would be like. [News & Tribune]

Pay Attention To The Homeless Count!

For more than a decade, elected leaders in Louisville and Southern Indiana have urged Norfolk Southern Corp. to consider opening part of the K&I Bridge over the Ohio River to walkers and cyclists. [WDRB]

Every year, hundreds of volunteers bundle up and head to hotels, emergency shelters, camps and soup kitchens, determined to answer two questions: how many people are homeless in the Louisville area and who are they? [C-J/AKN]

If you didn’t know, your new governor is a hot garbage fire. [WHAS11]

A problem in the solicitation to build a high-speed broadband network across Kentucky has jeopardized funding for the project, a top administration official said Thursday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! He was a pioneer: A civil rights lawyer who became Jefferson County’s first African-American Circuit Court judge. Benjamin Shobe died Friday at a local hospital. []

Both the Democratic and Republican races are close contests in Iowa, and pollsters say surprises are likely. [HuffPo]

A trial date has been set for a former gun shop owner who is charged with murder after two brothers were shot in a Valley Station parking lot. [WAVE3]

Most of the time when we talk about homelessness, big cities come to mind. But about seven percent of homeless people live in rural areas, where access to help is much harder to come by. [NPR]

Former Kentucky state Sen. Georgia Powers has died. Powers was the first African-American and first woman elected to the Kentucky Senate, where she served for 21 years beginning in 1968. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

We got to talking about lots of different economic development topics this morning at The Pointe in Butchertown. [Business First]

Attorney Amy Wheatley can’t help but laugh at her newfound reputation as being the first attorney to use the Clark County Clerk’s new e-filing system. As only one of two counties in Indiana to switch to electronic filing, Clark County and Wheatley share a similar claim to fame. [News & Tribune]

Homeless Count: Compassionate City Needs More Compassion

The Coalition for the Homeless completed its 2016 homeless count and here are the details, from a press release:

During the early morning hours of January 28th, more than 280 volunteers divided into 4-person teams to search known homeless locations all over the county to complete the 2016 Homeless Street Count. Conducted each year in January by the Coalition for the Homeless, the goal of the Street Count is to verify the number of people sleeping outdoors in Metro Louisville. This year, 112 individuals were counted – 14 females, 94 males, and 4 unknown.

The 2016 count number is up from last year’s total of 71, an increase that could be attributed to a variety of factors. One being the milder weather this year, which means more people were sleeping outside verses sleeping in a shelter. Additionally, there was a significant increase in volunteers who participated this year (up from 230 volunteers last year), which means they were able to cover more areas than in previous years.

It is important to note that whether or not this count reflects a true increase in the overall homeless population cannot be determined until the total point in time numbers are tallied. Those living in shelters will be counted on the same night in order to create a total one night count of the homeless in Louisville. The full report announcing the total homeless numbers on a single night and the 2015 Census will be released in the spring.

It’s also important to note that this count doesn’t include families living in vehicles that cannot be easily identified and obviously doesn’t include those living with friends and family.

Who Is Worse? Tom Wine Or Jim Ramsey? Possibility City!

Their homes were bombed, lives threatened, and they nearly starved to death. Now the newest Syrian refugee families have found a safe-haven right here in Louisville. [WDRB]

Tom Wine. MLK parade. Shenanigans. Read all about it. [C-J/AKN]

This is what local media has become. An “exclusive” interview in the “crime” section with the kid who crashed a drone in Lexington. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Housing Corp. is looking for volunteers to help count Kentucky’s homeless population. The count will begin at sunrise on Jan. 27 and continue for 24 hours. The point-in-time count is known as the K-Count. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Members of The Stand Up Louisville Coalition began planning a protest in recent days, after learning that Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine would be a grand marshal in the 44th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Motorcade. Now Wine has withdrawn his name from the list of grand marshals. [WLKY]

General Electric Co agreed to sell its appliances business to China’s Qingdao Haier Co Ltd for $5.4 billion in cash, the companies said on Friday. The move comes weeks after GE abandoned a $3.3 billion deal with Sweden’s Electrolux following months of opposition from U.S. antitrust regulators. [HuffPo]

Didn’t this happen just a couple years ago? Late November 2013, maybe? [WAVE3]

The nation’s cities are at the frontlines of a food system that sickens and impoverishes millions of Americans every year. Local communities where people live, shop, work, and receive healthcare bear the brunt of this system’s unhealthy, unjust outcomes, which disproportionately affect communities of color and low-income Americans. The five cities chosen—Oakland, Memphis, Louisville, Baltimore, and Minneapolis—all have populations between 400,000 and 700,000, and in all of them, the percentage of residents living below the federal poverty line is higher than the national average. [Click the Clicky]

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is launching a new program to provide a long-acting, reversible contraceptive arm implant to women in Louisville. [WFPL]

The Obama administration on Friday said it would announce the next steps in its planned overhaul of how the United States manages coal development on federal land, which sources have said includes freezing new leases. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Senate passed a measure Thursday that’s aimed at allowing the state’s bourbon tourism industry to reach its full potential. [Business First]

Even though he won a recount, Jeffersonville City Councilman Steve Webb is challenging the lawfulness of November’s general election, requesting a trial that could result in a special election. [News & Tribune]

You Keeping Up With SoIN Politics?

A dangerous intersection where three teens were killed by a train has new railroad crossing gates. [WDRB]

Acknowledging some furor and confusion over a budget plan that could increase class sizes at some Jefferson County Public Schools, JCPS’ chief business officer has released a statement saying the district’s budget process “will not reduce the number of classroom teaching positions.” [C-J/AKN]

There’s been a cry out to the mayor to abandon the methane plant that’s planned for the California neighborhood and it’s coming from people who do not live in West Louisville. [WHAS11]

The $1.1 trillion spending package passed by both houses of Congress on Friday includes $30 million for Kentucky’s coal producing regions to redevelop abandoned mine sites with an eye toward boosting the economy. [H-L]

Congressman John Yarmuth gave back to the homeless. But leave it to mouth-breathers to freak out like always. [WLKY]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich trolled Republican presidential rival Donald Trump on Saturday after the real estate mogul publicly traded compliments with Russian President Vladimir Putin. [HuffPo]

The man shot after dropping off his son at school on Friday has been identified as Aubrey Williams Jr. [WAVE3]

I grew up in rural Barren County collecting as many characters as I could find. Fortunately God blessed that place and time with an abundance of them. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro Public Health can provide new syringes to people regardless of whether used syringes are exchanged, according to the state Attorney General’s Office. [WFPL]

Seems like only yesterday Mitch McConnell was touting these plans as the savior. Despite facing mounting evidence federal officials were overpaying some Medicare health plans by tens of millions of dollars a year, the government dialed back efforts to recover as much of the money as possible, newly released records show. [NPR]

The Louisville branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis announced a new board member, effective Jan. 1, 2016. That member is Ben Reno-Weber, CEO of Kentucky YMCA Youth Association in Frankfort and project director of the Greater Louisville Project. [Business First]

Heated opposition from landlords led to the tabling of a rental property ordinance at the last meeting of the year for the New Albany City Council. [News & Tribune]

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