Council Holding Fischer Accountable

A bipartisan group of Louisville Metro Council members wants more information about how Mayor Greg Fischer nominates people to scores of city boards and commissions. But not David Yates — he cowardly removed his name as a sponsor. [WDRB]

How do people even have kids knowing this crap can happen? Too terrifying to think about. [C-J/AKN]

For the first time the public is seeing a second incident where a school resource officer appears to punch a middle school student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is calling for a 140-mile extension of the Mountain Parkway from Prestonsburg to Beckley, W.Va., at a cost of $8 billion to $10 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood that left one man hospitalized. [WLKY]

College graduates, brace yourselves for some disappointing news. Wages for university grads are 2.5 percent lower than what they were 15 years ago, according to the latest edition of the Economic Policy Institute’s annual report on the labor market prospects of new workers. [HuffPo]

A New Albany councilman referred to a colleague as a “lying piece of (expletive)” during a debate over public prayer on Monday. Councilman Dan Coffey made the comment into an open microphone, yet denied using the curse word during a brief, tense interview after the meeting. [WAVE3]

On Wednesday, when President Barack Obama spoke at the US Coast Guard Academy’s commencement ceremony, he called climate change “an immediate risk to our national security.” In recent months, the Obama administration has repeatedly highlighted the international threats posed by global warming and has emphasized the need for the country’s national security agencies to study and confront the issue. [Mother Jones]

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced more than $54 million in grant funds to clean up contaminated brownfields sites around the country, and one of the projects getting funding is in Louisville. [WFPL]

The lawyer for the man who alleges that Ahmed Zayat has not paid a $2 million gambling debt filed a $10 million libel suit on Monday against Zayat, the owner of American Pharoah. [NY Times]

Cecilia Henderson, the 71-year-old widow of Angel’s Envy bourbon creator Lincoln Henderson, is suing her son, saying that Wesley Henderson has “effectively stolen” her share of proceeds from a recent sale to Bacardi Ltd. [Business First]

A community that successfully addresses homelessness is a united one, according to Michael Stoops, the director of community organizing at the National Coalition for the Homeless. [News & Tribune]

Glad A Local Will Be Your Governator?

Portland neighbors say they’re drowning in water bills that are twice the normal cost. The problems on one block uncovered a bigger issue for Louisville Water Company customers. [WDRB]

Which David Jones crony will get the job this time? Weeks after Superintendent Donna Hargens informed Helene Kramer that her contract was not being renewed, Jefferson County Public Schools has posted the position for its chief communications and community relations officer. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters, police and Animal Control entered a home in the 2200 block of Beargrass Avenue just off Bardstown Road after hearing from multiple neighbors Tuesday. Neighbors were concerned after finding pet abandonment notices on the door, overgrown weeds in the yard and hearing constant barking inside the home. [WHAS11]

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five greater Clark County schools may close as part of a plan the superintendent believes will help the district. [WLKY]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

Some people are just the absolute worst. [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering what really happened to Jamie Comer in the gubernatorial primary? It’s much more simple than he would have you believe. [Page One]

Once again, Louisville has ranked poorly on the annual ranking of city park systems from a national group. [WFPL]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

Too many tables and too little kitchen space — that’s been a pain point for Big Four Burgers & Beer in Jeffersonville since it opened in December 2013. [Business First]

Samuel pointed to tattoos on his forearms and chest to count how many times he’s been incarcerated in Clark County jail. [News & Tribune]

Will JCPS Have A Scandal-Free Week?

It appears Jefferson County Public Schools wants to move forward with plans to centralize the district’s application and acceptance process for its magnet schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Supreme Court has never ruled on whether public schools could force all students to submit to random drug testing, as Louisville’s private Trinity High School has decided to do. But constitutional experts say it is unlikely the court would allow such testing at public schools, unless there was a suspicion that individual students were using drugs. [C-J/AKN]

Almost a week after an incredible Derby race, another amazing event took place at Churchill Downs Friday afternoon. Just before Race 7, a mile-long turf race, a horse broke out of the starting gate and managed to dump it’s jockey. [WHAS11]

Things started changing in the 1980s with “pro-business” policies and “trickle-down” economic theories that resulted in the highest level of wealth inequality in nearly a century, not to mention the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and a slow, uneven recovery. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Police say a worker at an aluminum plant has been killed in an accident. [WLKY]

The urban poor in the United States are experiencing accelerated aging at the cellular level, and chronic stress linked both to income level and racial-ethnic identity is driving this physiological deterioration. [HuffPo]

A local mother is fired up after she says her rights were violated when she was told she couldn’t breastfeed in an Academy Sports and Outdoors store in Louisville. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Sunday defended his support for a measure in the USA Patriot Act that has anchored a National Security Agency program to collect Americans’ phone data. [Reuters]

The total number of homeless residents in Louisville decreased about 14 percent in the past year, according to the 2014 Louisville Homeless Census. [WFPL]

A heron lifted off from a branch overhanging the Little Sandy River and it immediately reminded Chuck Chambers of the time he watched a similar bird on the Elk River in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

Kentucky boasts four automobile assembly plants — two in Louisville and one each in Bowling Green and Georgetown. State leaders estimate that Kentucky is home to more than 400 auto-related businesses, when you count suppliers and other supporting businesses. [Business First]

As the number of HIV cases in Southeastern Indiana continues to grow, Gov. Mike Pence signed an act meant to combat the IV drug use problem underlying the epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Fischer? Playing Favorites? Surely Not!

Should the East End bridge be a hazmat route? In Indianapolis, trucks carrying hazardous materials are banned from passing through downtown. A similar prohibition quietly took effect last year for the main northern Kentucky interstate into Cincinnati. [WDRB]

A lawsuit contends Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s office gave preferential treatment to prominent developer Bill Weyland, awarding his company a multi-million dollar contract for office space when it could have rented more space for less under an alternate deal. The lawsuit against the city, filed in Jefferson Circuit Court late Monday by real estate investors Mac Sawyers and Bill Lerner, contends the deal with Weyland was rigged and cost taxpayers more. [C-J/AKN]

Three people are recovering at the hospital after two shootings in Louisville Monday night. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Derby contenders Bolo, International Star, American Pharoah, Dortmund are featured in Tuesday’s report of activity and horses on the backside of Churchill as race preparations kick up a notch. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after human remains were found in a burned car in the 5000 block of KY 393, near US 42, outside Buckner. [WLKY]

In a new survey, more than half of self-identified Republicans said they didn’t think the Affordable Care Act is increasing the number of people with health insurance, with a fifth of respondents saying it has actually reduced the number of people with coverage. For the record, the evidence suggests these people are flat-out wrong. [HuffPo]

Several homeowners on East Riverside Drive plan to file a lawsuit against the Metropolitan Sewer District because they said they were unaware of a Metro Louisville flood ordinance that will force them to move from their home. [WAVE3]

If you were wondering about Greg Fischer being the most milquetoast and ineffective mayor in the country? You’d be mistaken. She’s actually in Baltimore, home of Cordish. [The Hill]

A Kentucky proposal to study the background levels of certain chemicals in urban soil has gotten funding from the federal government. [WFPL]

Want to hear audio of yesterday’s Supreme Court hearing on gay marriage? Transcript will be there, as well. [Part One & Part Two]

Here’s a non-shocker for ya: Greg Heitzman, executive director of the Louisville-Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District, announced during an MSD board meeting that he will retire later this year. [Business First]

Victoria Bennett had a plan. In 2010, realizing that she needed to follow her dream of graduating with an Indiana University degree, Bennett — then a political science student at Kennesaw State University near Atlanta — sold her house, gathered up her savings and prepared to move. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Name Changes & Buzzwords Are The Only Thing Greg Fischer Pushes. Other Than Official Coverups, Of Course.

Louisville’s emergency alert system has a new name. It will now be called LENS, which stands for Louisville Emergency Notification System. [WDRB]

A resident who lives near General Electric Appliance Park has filed a lawsuit claiming the company was negligent in storing flammable material in its warehouse. [C-J/AKN]

Community activists in west Louisville are reacting to two new murder cases that happened during the weekend. [WHAS11]

Democrats took little time Tuesday to blast U.S. Sen. Rand Paul’s presidential ambitions. [H-L]

Thunder Over Louisville officials on Tuesday announced the lineup for this year’s air show. [WLKY]

The lawmakers behind a recent congressional amendment protecting medical marijuana operations in states where the drug is legal strongly rebuked the Department of Justice for trying to continue to crack down on some medical marijuana businesses. [HuffPo]

This happened in your city yesterday. U.S. Sen. Rand Paul announced on his website Tuesday morning that he is running for president. [WAVE3]

State Rep. Sannie Overly, a Democrat, is fighting to keep what she knows about harassment and retaliation in Frankfort a secret. [Page One]

A new partnership between the Louisville Metro Housing Authority and the Coalition for the Homeless aims to help more homeless residents find permanent housing. [WFPL]

Will you be going to Governor Bigot Beshear’s Kentucky Derby celebration in Frankfart? [Click the Clicky]

Louisville-based Humana Inc. says it expects a funding increase of about 0.8 percent for its Medicare Advantage patients in 2016. The company had been expecting a decrease of 1.25 percent. [Business First]

The relationship between Mayor Jeff Gahan’s administration and the police union appears to be strained. A police officer is under investigation for a Facebook post and questions have arisen regarding apparent attempts to cease pay for embattled officer Laura Schook. [News & Tribune]

Road’s Messed Up, East Enders Freak

Is this soccer thing going to stick? In the team’s first road game, Louisville City FC drew 1-1 with the veteran USL side Richmond Kickers. The teams played to a very physical draw that ended with seven bookings. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken the Louisville area off its list of cities that fail to meet the latest clean-air standard for soot. But the federal agency did not go as far as saying Louisville complies with the standard, either. [C-J/AKN]

A spectacle in its own right, the degradation has steadily increased over the past two days, but what makes for a “cool” picture also makes for a mess for drivers. If people complained as much about hunger or homelessness as they do about this East End road damage, Louisville really would be Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Lexington is trying to get in on Louisville’s Hit A Pedestrian game again. [H-L]

The Run for the Roses is a few weeks away yet, but the solid gold trophy already awaits the owner of the horse that wins the 141st running of the Kentucky Derby on May 2 at Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

Rand Paul briefly appears in a new documentary that argues gay rights are a threat to Christianity. “I don’t think I’ve ever used the word gay rights, because I don’t really believe in rights based on your behavior,” he said in the video. [HuffPo]

Just look at how much they’re hyping this mess. [WAVE3]

Lowering a city’s homeless population by forcing the homeless out. Sounds like a story out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. [NPR]

The University of Louisville is expected to increase both in-state and out-of-state undergraduate tuition by 3 percent for the next academic year. [WFPL]

Rand Paul wants to change the GOP from the inside by becoming the party’s standard-bearer in 2016. The Kentucky Republican poised to launch a presidential bid on Tuesday thinks he can capture the Oval Office prize that eluded his father by pulling the GOP in a more libertarian direction. [The Hill]

Sypris Solutions Inc. stands to lose nearly $200 million in revenue this year because of a dispute with what had been its largest customer. [Business First]

Scott County residents can exchange used needles with immunity through at least April 25, as state and local officials are hoping to curb what has been labeled as the largest outbreak of drug-spread HIV in Indiana history. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is In The National Spotlight Again

It has been 10 years since the exterior of Louisville’s U.S. Marine Hospital in the Portland neighborhood was restored, but the inside remains unfinished. [WDRB]

Violent crime in Louisville was up about 10 percent in 2014, breaking a downward trend the city had seen since 2012, police data shows. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out… President Barack Obama will be coming to Louisville April 2. [WHAS11]

“I’m going to move on my casino bill and ask for hearings on it during the interim. It’s part of my personal agenda,” Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said after the 2015 session ended. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Fifteen people have been charged as the result of a major securities fraud investigation conducted by the Indiana Securities Commission and announced Monday by Floyd County prosecutor Keith Henderson. [WLKY]

A new Virginia law may put PETA’s high-kill animal shelter out of the euthanasia business. [HuffPo]

Police are investigating a homicide after a man was found shot to death in a car. [WAVE3]

Ever since a court forced them to integrate in the 1970s, the city of Louisville and surrounding Jefferson County have tried to maintain diverse schools. [The Atlantic]

The Louisville Metropolitan Service Area’s population has increased by 2.8 percent since 2010, according to U.S. Census data released Thursday. “Most of the growth is happening on the periphery,” he said. “If you were in, what we call, the city, you’re not seeing any change at all.” [WFPL]

Democrats are apparently seething over this one. A Louisville woman has been appointed to serve on the newly created National Women’s History Museum Commission. Bridget Bush, a lawyer, was appointed by Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell. [WLEX18]

$2.1 billion. That’s how much revenue Louisville-based Humana Inc. garnered from provider services — that is, services provided by doctors or other health care professionals —in 2014, according to its latest financial statement. [Business First]

“Get your bearings, Marine.” It’s the only phrase that can steady Cpl. Jerry Rochefort when he is on the verge of a psychogenic seizure, borne from the military service that causes his episodes. [News & Tribune]

Bonus: Another day, another JCPS school bus accident. [More WLKY]