How Many Will Be Shot Dead This Week?

LMPD responded to the scene of a shooting at 26th and Chestnut Streets in the Russell neighborhood. Police Chief Steve Conrad says a male in his 20s was shot by an LMPD officer during a narcotics investigation. [WDRB]

A half-dozen faculty members speaking before the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on Wednesday denounced large deferred compensation packages that have been given to the university’s top executives. Several speakers said that while the packages for President James Ramsey, Provost Shirley Willihnganz and Chief of Staff Kathleen Smith might be legal, they are not ethical, given tuition hikes and low pay for faculty. [C-J/AKN]

Protesters were out in force in Louisville Saturday night, echoing a common cry across the country: Black lives matter. [WHAS11]

About 45 minutes before Comer’s remarks began, the latest Bluegrass Poll was released showing the state commissioner of agriculture trailing former Louisville councilman Hal Heiner by 8 points and tied with Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, who lost a primary challenge to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell last spring. Hours before that, Comer’s campaign faced a minor embarrassment when the PageOneKentucky blog revealed that the parents and brother of Holly Harris Von Luehrte, Comer’s former campaign manager, were hosting a fundraiser for Heiner. [H-L]

Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when the car they were riding in was struck by a train in the West Buechel area. [WLKY]

The share of unemployed Americans who receive unemployment insurance benefits has dwindled to its lowest point in decades, thanks in part to benefit cuts in Republican-led states. Just 23.1 percent of unemployed workers received state unemployment benefits at the end of 2014. [HuffPo]

“I heard the shot,” Pamela Vethel recalled. She saw when police pulled up at an apartment building on the corner of 26th Street and Chestnut. She didn’t expect what would happen next, just as two officers entered the stairwell. [WAVE3]

Johnathan Masters admits he’s not exactly the ideal running mate – he’s got a string of charges on his record, and pending court appearances on the calendar — but he is absolutely puzzled by his latest arrest in Kenton County, Kentucky. Apparently, he was told by police on Wednesday he failed to return a library book from 11 years ago. [Umm]

PharMerica Corp., the nation’s second-largest operator of institutional pharmacies, has agreed to settle two federal healthcare fraud lawsuits, one of which accuses the Louisville-based company of taking kickbacks to help expand the misuse of an anti-seizure drug in nursing homes during an 11-year period. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell says there’ll be no vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general until Republicans and Democrats resolve a dispute over a human trafficking bill. [Politico]

Wait for it, wait for it… Claudia Coffey, executive director of the Louisville Apartment Association, said the city’s rental boom is infused by job growth. Couldn’t possibly have anything to do with no one being able to afford to buy. [Business First]

J.P. can see the end of the road to his journey out of homelessness. The 42-year-old Jeffersonville resident lives in a shipping container near some railroad tracks. [News & Tribune]

How Much Time Has He Spent Raising Taxes?

Another day, another JCPS bus accident. They’re almost as plentiful as shootings or pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Can you imagine how much better off Louisville would be if Greg Fischer spent the amount of time he’s spent trying to raise your taxes on holding people like Sadiqa Reynolds accountable? With hours left for the local option sales tax to advance in the state Senate, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made a push Tuesday to rally support for the bill. [C-J/AKN]

A single vote upheld the decision to prevent James Helinger from returning to his post as a Buechel Police Lieutenant. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission will discuss the decline of important natural pollinators like bees and butterflies. The meeting Thursday in Frankfort will be open to the public. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City! One person was rushed to the hospital after an early morning shooting in Okolona. Was apparently a teen who was found shot in the groin. [WLKY]

This man helps American cities hide their homeless populations. His tactics are being put to use in Louisville by Greg Fischer. But no one wants to talk about it because how dare anyone question puppies and rainbows. [HuffPo]

Parents within West Clark Community Schools are voicing concerns over school conditions and overcrowding at Silver Creek High School in Clark County. [WAVE3]

Louisville businessman Hal Heiner leads the crowded race for the Republican party’s nominee for Kentucky’s next governor who would then likely take on Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [WKYT]

John Schnatter’s long-running, multi-generational ties to the University of Louisville just grew $4.64 million deeper. [WFPL]

A new study has found that when transgender young people are allowed to fully identify with their gender and take steps toward transition, it significantly improves their depression and anxiety. [Think Progress]

When Lily DeRosia read about the mandatory overtime and long shifts forced on workers at the Louisville company that makes Girl Scout cookies, she was inspired to try to do something about it. [Business First]

Floyd County is in the process of hiring a public works director. [News & Tribune]

Holding Our Breath For An End To The Death

Louisville police say the city’s latest murder victim was robbed and kidnapped before he was murdered. [WDRB]

Maybe we can try arresting our way out of yet another nightmare. After a deadly start to 2015, leaders of the Metro Council’s Public Safety Committee asked top city officials, including Police Chief Steve Conrad, to speak during a specially called Monday meeting to talk about recent violence and increase in homicides. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian. [WHAS11]

Lexington is pushing forward with its efforts to increase Internet speeds. [H-L]

Before the latest bout of snow, crews were working on repairing the roads, but the weather brought those plans to a halt. Now officials estimate there are nearly 10,000 potholes across Louisville. [WLKY]

A New York judge ordered a Papa John’s pizza restaurant franchise and its owner to fork over more than $2 million after short-changing hundreds of delivery workers and shaving hours from their paychecks, prosecutors said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Everybody is losing their mind over an upcoming Prince concert. [WAVE3]

On Monday, the city council of Indianapolis passed a “Homeless Bill of Rights” to protect its population without housing, one of the first cities to do so. [ThinkProgress]

Braving temperatures in the 30s on a recent Wednesday morning, the 25 or so people bunched in the Kroger parking lot in west Louisville had plenty of grounds for complaint. [WFPL]

The United States government on Friday urged the Supreme Court to strike down bans on same-sex couples’ marriages across the country, concluding, “There is no adequate justification for such a discriminatory and injurious exercise of state power.” [BuzzFeed]

It might come as little surprise that Kentucky, home to Papa John’s International Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc., has the highest number of fast-food restaurants per capita. [Business First]

A request to seek bids on a partial repaving of the district’s service center was contested at Greater Clark County Schools board of trustees meeting and passed by a thin margin. [News & Tribune]

No Crime Here, Move Along, Nothing To See

Louisville’s Police Chief is calling on help from other law enforcement agencies after a surge of violent crime this year in the city. [WDRB]

Sam Connally, who was fired in December by the University of Louisville as its vice president for human resources, has filed a lawsuit against U of L’s board of trustees. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police have formally charged a man in connection with a shooting death on Interstate 71 Southbound Wednesday. [WHAS11]

After turning down a request to ban tolls for a new Brent Spence Bridge in Northern Kentucky, the Kentucky House overwhelmingly approved a bill Wednesday night to allow state government to partner with private sources on building projects. [H-L]

Keeneland has announced that tickets for this fall’s Breeders’ Cup World Championships will go on sale Wednesday, three months earlier than usual due to high demand for the event’s debut at the storied Lexington track. [WLKY & Press Release]

Former Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) said earlier this month that members of the Congressional Black Caucus opposed war because they wanted to spend money on food stamps instead. [HuffPo]

To address what he called the “shocking” number of homicides that “tear the fabric of our community,” Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad announced on Thursday the formation of a new task force. [WAVE3]

A bill that would essentially “cap the co-pay” for those buying medications heard emotional testimony from both sponsor Sen. Tom Buford, R-Nicholasville, and a Glasgow woman with epilepsy. [Ashland Independent]

On many days, Kenny Winfield found comfort in alcohol—typically tall cans of Olde English. He’d drink just about anything, said his sister, Arleathiea Winfield. [WFPL]

Economists usually worry about a “wage-price spiral” taking hold. That’s when workers are earning more, but losing buying power as prices rise. [NPR]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. is opening a new location in downtown Louisville — well, sort of. You won’t be buying cars there, but students can learn a bit about the auto giant and its manufacturing careers. [Business First]

New Albany is fighting to keep one portion of the city eligible for federal funding improvements, and residents will be asked to help with the dispute. [News & Tribune]

About Having Compassion For The Homeless…

The Jefferson County Board of Education is being asked by its teachers union to hold off extending the contract of Superintendent Donna Hargens to allow time for “stakeholder involvement.” [WDRB]

The animal-rights group PETA is continuing its push for federal regulators to take action against Tim Stark, a Charlestown man who has run the nonprofit organization Wildlife in Need on his property since 1999. [C-J/AKN]

Cracked and dripping ceilings – buckets litter every room. This is how Patrick Christner and Megan Tate have been spending their week post President’s Day snowstorm. [WHAS11]

Last fall, Pike County school board chairman Charles Johnson made a motion for the district to set what’s known as a “compensating” tax rate, which means property taxes would be adjusted to produce the same revenue as the year before. [H-L]

The parents of a toddler who was accidentally killed hope to build a community park in his honor. [WLKY]

The World Food Program is confronting its worst challenge since World War II in trying to tackle five top-level humanitarian crises at the same time, the head of the U.N. agency said Friday. [HuffPo]

A group of firefighters is hoping to spark a movement and inspire warm acts of kindness in the recent cold temperatures. [WAVE3]

When the season’s first cold snap hit in November, Kenneth Winfield arrived at Louisville’s St. John Center for Homeless Men — his hands icy cold after sleeping outdoors. [USA Today]

All eyes are on Kentucky’s state senators to see if they’ll move on the House’s proposed statewide smoking ban. [WFPL]

It was a short week for the Kentucky General Assembly, which canceled three days of meetings because of a severe winter storm. But while the House decided to forgo its scheduled Thursday and Friday meetings, the Senate was in session those two days. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Kentucky Retail Federation, Kentucky Restaurant Association and Louisville-based company Packaging Unlimited have filed a lawsuit that seeks to prevent Louisville from hiking its minimum wage. [Business First]

After weeks of debate and discussion, the Floyd County Election Board got exactly what it wanted. [News & Tribune]

Suck At Your Job? Get Rewarded At JCPS

The Jefferson County Board of Education is looking to extend Superintendent Donna Hargens’ contract by four years. Louisville’s wealthy electeds always reward those who bumble along. [WDRB]

A jury has awarded nearly $5 million to a courier for a Louisville law firm who suffered a traumatic brain injury when he was hit by a TARC bus. [C-J/AKN]

There was no woe on Louisville’s amazing Walnut Street in the 1950’s and early 60’s. [WHAS11]

Ann Parrish remembers trying to wrangle and bundle her two toddlers during last winter’s cold snap so they could get on a bus to find another place to stay. [H-L]

Another day, another pedestrian hit by a vehicle in Possibility City. [WLKY]

James Risen reiterated on Tuesday a warning about the White House that he delivered nearly one year ago. [HuffPo]

From digging out driveways to checking on area seniors Good Samaritans have been out and about performing good deeds despite the cold. [WAVE3]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits fell more than expected last week, offering fresh evidence that the labor market was gathering steam. [Reuters]

It was about noon on Wednesday and Kenneth Williams hadn’t eaten breakfast. In fact, he hasn’t eaten since Tuesday afternoon–a peanut butter sandwich. [WFPL]

Google is warning that the government’s quiet plan to expand the FBI’s authority to remotely access computer files amounts to a “monumental” constitutional concern. [National Journal]

A Missouri real-estate developer is planning to build one of the largest industrial buildings in Jefferson County on land that it’s buying near Louisville International Airport. [Business First]

More students at Greater Clark County Schools are starting to take advantage of the state’s 21st Century Scholars program, and administrators hope to get more seventh- and eighth-graders to sign up early. [News & Tribune]

Ethics Aren’t A Thing Here In Possibility City

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. [WDRB]

Because of course they dropped the ethics charges. The Metropolitan Sewer District ethics charges that were shedding light on the inner workings of the agency were dropped Friday by the agency’s Audit Committee, clearing former chairman James Craig and current board member Lonnie Calvert. [C-J/AKN]

Joseph Cambron’s denial lasted more than five hours during an interrogation with police, claiming he had nothing to do with a 12-year-old boy’s murder the day before. It wasn’t until the end of that police interview on Oct. 1, 2014, that Cambron confessed, for the first time, to the crime. [WHAS11]

A highly invasive fish commonly called Asian carp is proliferating in the Ohio River at Louisville. Wildlife officials say they have a spawning area below the McAlpine Locks and Dam. [H-L]

Another day, another senseless murder in Possibility City. A man was shot and killed early Sunday morning in front of a Louisville home. [WLKY]

Voters in three key battlegrounds support tax hikes on the rich. [HuffPo]

Investments in downtown Louisville continue. Friday night, word that the historic Starks Building may be renovated to include a 200 room hotel and 100 rental apartments was posted on a company’s website. [WAVE3]

Wanna see an entitled school board member act like a WATB because WFPL didn’t bow at his feet? Here’s David Jones doing just that. Sure, Ryan could have put in more than five minutes of effort on the story but this sanctimonious bullshit from Jones takes the cake. It’s worse than that silly front page spread featuring he and his wife wherein they pretend to be champions of education with a reach-around from Greg Fischer. [Guilty Dog Barks First]

Steve Haag, a spokesman for the Louisville Metro Council Republican Caucus, said Republican council members question the language within the investigation’s findings. “They used the term ‘willingly’ and ’intentionally’ — but what they don’t use is the work knowingly,” he said. “Yes, maybe nobody wanted to hurt this dog, but did they know the dog was hurt?” [WFPL]

The homeless face many challenges, but one is basic: it’s difficult to get clean. Even if they go to a shelter, those shelters don’t usually have laundry services and may not even have a shower. [Think Progress]

The Ports of Indiana handled more than 10.4 million tons of cargo in 2014, and have set a record in annual shipments. [Business First]

Floyd County Clerk Christy Eurton was asked by the New Albany City Council when additional voting machines needed to be purchased for the city’s primary election in May. [News & Tribune]