Road’s Messed Up, East Enders Freak

Is this soccer thing going to stick? In the team’s first road game, Louisville City FC drew 1-1 with the veteran USL side Richmond Kickers. The teams played to a very physical draw that ended with seven bookings. [WDRB]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken the Louisville area off its list of cities that fail to meet the latest clean-air standard for soot. But the federal agency did not go as far as saying Louisville complies with the standard, either. [C-J/AKN]

A spectacle in its own right, the degradation has steadily increased over the past two days, but what makes for a “cool” picture also makes for a mess for drivers. If people complained as much about hunger or homelessness as they do about this East End road damage, Louisville really would be Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Lexington is trying to get in on Louisville’s Hit A Pedestrian game again. [H-L]

The Run for the Roses is a few weeks away yet, but the solid gold trophy already awaits the owner of the horse that wins the 141st running of the Kentucky Derby on May 2 at Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

Rand Paul briefly appears in a new documentary that argues gay rights are a threat to Christianity. “I don’t think I’ve ever used the word gay rights, because I don’t really believe in rights based on your behavior,” he said in the video. [HuffPo]

Just look at how much they’re hyping this mess. [WAVE3]

Lowering a city’s homeless population by forcing the homeless out. Sounds like a story out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. [NPR]

The University of Louisville is expected to increase both in-state and out-of-state undergraduate tuition by 3 percent for the next academic year. [WFPL]

Rand Paul wants to change the GOP from the inside by becoming the party’s standard-bearer in 2016. The Kentucky Republican poised to launch a presidential bid on Tuesday thinks he can capture the Oval Office prize that eluded his father by pulling the GOP in a more libertarian direction. [The Hill]

Sypris Solutions Inc. stands to lose nearly $200 million in revenue this year because of a dispute with what had been its largest customer. [Business First]

Scott County residents can exchange used needles with immunity through at least April 25, as state and local officials are hoping to curb what has been labeled as the largest outbreak of drug-spread HIV in Indiana history. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is In The National Spotlight Again

It has been 10 years since the exterior of Louisville’s U.S. Marine Hospital in the Portland neighborhood was restored, but the inside remains unfinished. [WDRB]

Violent crime in Louisville was up about 10 percent in 2014, breaking a downward trend the city had seen since 2012, police data shows. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out… President Barack Obama will be coming to Louisville April 2. [WHAS11]

“I’m going to move on my casino bill and ask for hearings on it during the interim. It’s part of my personal agenda,” Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said after the 2015 session ended. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Fifteen people have been charged as the result of a major securities fraud investigation conducted by the Indiana Securities Commission and announced Monday by Floyd County prosecutor Keith Henderson. [WLKY]

A new Virginia law may put PETA’s high-kill animal shelter out of the euthanasia business. [HuffPo]

Police are investigating a homicide after a man was found shot to death in a car. [WAVE3]

Ever since a court forced them to integrate in the 1970s, the city of Louisville and surrounding Jefferson County have tried to maintain diverse schools. [The Atlantic]

The Louisville Metropolitan Service Area’s population has increased by 2.8 percent since 2010, according to U.S. Census data released Thursday. “Most of the growth is happening on the periphery,” he said. “If you were in, what we call, the city, you’re not seeing any change at all.” [WFPL]

Democrats are apparently seething over this one. A Louisville woman has been appointed to serve on the newly created National Women’s History Museum Commission. Bridget Bush, a lawyer, was appointed by Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell. [WLEX18]

$2.1 billion. That’s how much revenue Louisville-based Humana Inc. garnered from provider services — that is, services provided by doctors or other health care professionals —in 2014, according to its latest financial statement. [Business First]

“Get your bearings, Marine.” It’s the only phrase that can steady Cpl. Jerry Rochefort when he is on the verge of a psychogenic seizure, borne from the military service that causes his episodes. [News & Tribune]

Bonus: Another day, another JCPS school bus accident. [More WLKY]

Everyone Has A Sports Thing Hangover

Big blue nation has undoubtedly descended on downtown Louisville. While some may call them crazy, the rest of the sports world isn’t — and that world is taking notice of the city. [WDRB]

The Economy Inn, 3304 Bardstown Road near Goldsmith Lane, has long harbored a reputation as a haven for drug addicts and prostitutes. Would this be on anyone’s radar if wealthy Highlands residents didn’t have to drive by on their way to Target? [C-J/AKN]

After the games, droves of fans have to go somewhere and many choose to stay in town and keep on celebrating. [WHAS11]

Earlier this winter, the folks at Bernheim Arboretum noticed a majestic golden eagle spending time in the forested hills of Bernheim Forest in Bullitt County. [H-L]

Three of the so-called misidentified four are facing a lawsuit. Less than two weeks ago the four men held a news conference to talk about their $1.5 million settlement with metro Louisville. [WLKY]

Indiana is expected to pass a religious freedom bill that could legalize discrimination against LGBT citizens. The legislation has language that is similar to a bill that was vetoed by Arizona’s former Republican governor last year after a national outcry. [HuffPo]

Investigators say a fire at a vacant building that displaced 13 people from a neighboring home on Saturday is “suspicious.” [WAVE3]

The Prince of Wales has described how the world faces the challenges of an economic system with enormous shortcomings, and an environmental crisis that threatens us all. His words of warning came yesterday at the end of his four-day tour of America when he gave a speech on health and the environment following a symposium in Louisville, Kentucky. [Daily Mail]

For Louisville’s homeless residents, case managers are counselors, teachers and movers. They can help people who have lived on the streets—sometimes for decades—adjust to life in a home. [WFPL]

Brooke Barzun explains how she is trying to re-invent the rules of diplomacy by asking the great and the good to relax. [Belfast Telegraph]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will be ceasing its scares in Southern Indiana. Todd Moore, who owns the roughly 50,000-square-foot property, plans to relocate the haunted house south into Louisville and sell the Jeffersonville location to New Hope Services Inc. for redevelopment into an income-based housing community for people ages 55 and older. [Business First]

Officials remain tight-lipped on the reasons for Jeffersonville Police Department Lt. Chris Grimm’s removal as chief, beyond Mayor Mike Moore’s explanation that it’s “time for a new direction” in the force. [News & Tribune]

How Many Will Be Shot Dead This Week?

LMPD responded to the scene of a shooting at 26th and Chestnut Streets in the Russell neighborhood. Police Chief Steve Conrad says a male in his 20s was shot by an LMPD officer during a narcotics investigation. [WDRB]

A half-dozen faculty members speaking before the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on Wednesday denounced large deferred compensation packages that have been given to the university’s top executives. Several speakers said that while the packages for President James Ramsey, Provost Shirley Willihnganz and Chief of Staff Kathleen Smith might be legal, they are not ethical, given tuition hikes and low pay for faculty. [C-J/AKN]

Protesters were out in force in Louisville Saturday night, echoing a common cry across the country: Black lives matter. [WHAS11]

About 45 minutes before Comer’s remarks began, the latest Bluegrass Poll was released showing the state commissioner of agriculture trailing former Louisville councilman Hal Heiner by 8 points and tied with Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, who lost a primary challenge to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell last spring. Hours before that, Comer’s campaign faced a minor embarrassment when the PageOneKentucky blog revealed that the parents and brother of Holly Harris Von Luehrte, Comer’s former campaign manager, were hosting a fundraiser for Heiner. [H-L]

Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when the car they were riding in was struck by a train in the West Buechel area. [WLKY]

The share of unemployed Americans who receive unemployment insurance benefits has dwindled to its lowest point in decades, thanks in part to benefit cuts in Republican-led states. Just 23.1 percent of unemployed workers received state unemployment benefits at the end of 2014. [HuffPo]

“I heard the shot,” Pamela Vethel recalled. She saw when police pulled up at an apartment building on the corner of 26th Street and Chestnut. She didn’t expect what would happen next, just as two officers entered the stairwell. [WAVE3]

Johnathan Masters admits he’s not exactly the ideal running mate – he’s got a string of charges on his record, and pending court appearances on the calendar — but he is absolutely puzzled by his latest arrest in Kenton County, Kentucky. Apparently, he was told by police on Wednesday he failed to return a library book from 11 years ago. [Umm]

PharMerica Corp., the nation’s second-largest operator of institutional pharmacies, has agreed to settle two federal healthcare fraud lawsuits, one of which accuses the Louisville-based company of taking kickbacks to help expand the misuse of an anti-seizure drug in nursing homes during an 11-year period. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell says there’ll be no vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general until Republicans and Democrats resolve a dispute over a human trafficking bill. [Politico]

Wait for it, wait for it… Claudia Coffey, executive director of the Louisville Apartment Association, said the city’s rental boom is infused by job growth. Couldn’t possibly have anything to do with no one being able to afford to buy. [Business First]

J.P. can see the end of the road to his journey out of homelessness. The 42-year-old Jeffersonville resident lives in a shipping container near some railroad tracks. [News & Tribune]

How Much Time Has He Spent Raising Taxes?

Another day, another JCPS bus accident. They’re almost as plentiful as shootings or pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Can you imagine how much better off Louisville would be if Greg Fischer spent the amount of time he’s spent trying to raise your taxes on holding people like Sadiqa Reynolds accountable? With hours left for the local option sales tax to advance in the state Senate, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made a push Tuesday to rally support for the bill. [C-J/AKN]

A single vote upheld the decision to prevent James Helinger from returning to his post as a Buechel Police Lieutenant. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission will discuss the decline of important natural pollinators like bees and butterflies. The meeting Thursday in Frankfort will be open to the public. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City! One person was rushed to the hospital after an early morning shooting in Okolona. Was apparently a teen who was found shot in the groin. [WLKY]

This man helps American cities hide their homeless populations. His tactics are being put to use in Louisville by Greg Fischer. But no one wants to talk about it because how dare anyone question puppies and rainbows. [HuffPo]

Parents within West Clark Community Schools are voicing concerns over school conditions and overcrowding at Silver Creek High School in Clark County. [WAVE3]

Louisville businessman Hal Heiner leads the crowded race for the Republican party’s nominee for Kentucky’s next governor who would then likely take on Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [WKYT]

John Schnatter’s long-running, multi-generational ties to the University of Louisville just grew $4.64 million deeper. [WFPL]

A new study has found that when transgender young people are allowed to fully identify with their gender and take steps toward transition, it significantly improves their depression and anxiety. [Think Progress]

When Lily DeRosia read about the mandatory overtime and long shifts forced on workers at the Louisville company that makes Girl Scout cookies, she was inspired to try to do something about it. [Business First]

Floyd County is in the process of hiring a public works director. [News & Tribune]

Holding Our Breath For An End To The Death

Louisville police say the city’s latest murder victim was robbed and kidnapped before he was murdered. [WDRB]

Maybe we can try arresting our way out of yet another nightmare. After a deadly start to 2015, leaders of the Metro Council’s Public Safety Committee asked top city officials, including Police Chief Steve Conrad, to speak during a specially called Monday meeting to talk about recent violence and increase in homicides. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian. [WHAS11]

Lexington is pushing forward with its efforts to increase Internet speeds. [H-L]

Before the latest bout of snow, crews were working on repairing the roads, but the weather brought those plans to a halt. Now officials estimate there are nearly 10,000 potholes across Louisville. [WLKY]

A New York judge ordered a Papa John’s pizza restaurant franchise and its owner to fork over more than $2 million after short-changing hundreds of delivery workers and shaving hours from their paychecks, prosecutors said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Everybody is losing their mind over an upcoming Prince concert. [WAVE3]

On Monday, the city council of Indianapolis passed a “Homeless Bill of Rights” to protect its population without housing, one of the first cities to do so. [ThinkProgress]

Braving temperatures in the 30s on a recent Wednesday morning, the 25 or so people bunched in the Kroger parking lot in west Louisville had plenty of grounds for complaint. [WFPL]

The United States government on Friday urged the Supreme Court to strike down bans on same-sex couples’ marriages across the country, concluding, “There is no adequate justification for such a discriminatory and injurious exercise of state power.” [BuzzFeed]

It might come as little surprise that Kentucky, home to Papa John’s International Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc., has the highest number of fast-food restaurants per capita. [Business First]

A request to seek bids on a partial repaving of the district’s service center was contested at Greater Clark County Schools board of trustees meeting and passed by a thin margin. [News & Tribune]

No Crime Here, Move Along, Nothing To See

Louisville’s Police Chief is calling on help from other law enforcement agencies after a surge of violent crime this year in the city. [WDRB]

Sam Connally, who was fired in December by the University of Louisville as its vice president for human resources, has filed a lawsuit against U of L’s board of trustees. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police have formally charged a man in connection with a shooting death on Interstate 71 Southbound Wednesday. [WHAS11]

After turning down a request to ban tolls for a new Brent Spence Bridge in Northern Kentucky, the Kentucky House overwhelmingly approved a bill Wednesday night to allow state government to partner with private sources on building projects. [H-L]

Keeneland has announced that tickets for this fall’s Breeders’ Cup World Championships will go on sale Wednesday, three months earlier than usual due to high demand for the event’s debut at the storied Lexington track. [WLKY & Press Release]

Former Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) said earlier this month that members of the Congressional Black Caucus opposed war because they wanted to spend money on food stamps instead. [HuffPo]

To address what he called the “shocking” number of homicides that “tear the fabric of our community,” Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad announced on Thursday the formation of a new task force. [WAVE3]

A bill that would essentially “cap the co-pay” for those buying medications heard emotional testimony from both sponsor Sen. Tom Buford, R-Nicholasville, and a Glasgow woman with epilepsy. [Ashland Independent]

On many days, Kenny Winfield found comfort in alcohol—typically tall cans of Olde English. He’d drink just about anything, said his sister, Arleathiea Winfield. [WFPL]

Economists usually worry about a “wage-price spiral” taking hold. That’s when workers are earning more, but losing buying power as prices rise. [NPR]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. is opening a new location in downtown Louisville — well, sort of. You won’t be buying cars there, but students can learn a bit about the auto giant and its manufacturing careers. [Business First]

New Albany is fighting to keep one portion of the city eligible for federal funding improvements, and residents will be asked to help with the dispute. [News & Tribune]