At Least Fischer Isn’t A Xenophobe/Bigot

Good grief, you can’t even hide in the ceiling these days without getting arrested. [WDRB]

This story originally ran in late January. Twenty-one Syrian refugees will arrive in Louisville over the next two weeks, a figure expected to increase in Kentucky and beyond as the U.S. begins to take in an expanded number of refugees fleeing Syria’s bloody civil war. [C-J/AKN]

A week after the deadly terrorist attacks that rocked Paris, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is urging the community to stand in solidarity with refugees and those affected by the horrific acts. [WHAS11]

The American Civil Liberties Union says a Kentucky county clerk’s office should reissue altered marriage licenses even though the governor has promised to recognize them as valid. [H-L]

Your tax dollars are paying for Jerry Abramson’s pals to conduct media boat tours. [WLKY]

The nation’s capital is receiving a wonderful gift this holiday season. Atlanta’s Homeward Choir, a group of men from the city’s Central Night Shelter, have been invited to perform at the White House Open House Holiday Celebration on Dec. 21. [HuffPo]

As temperatures drop back into the 20s, homeless shelters across Louisville are starting Operation White Flag. [WAVE3]

First-hand accounts like this won’t deter pandering bigots like Rand Paul and Matt Bevin. Until last year, I was one of 4.3 million people at the mercy of the legal immigration system, waiting for the chance to stay in the U.S. for good. [BuzzFeed]

A group of about 80 people gathered on Friday afternoon to call on the Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney to cease his efforts to have Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens removed from all criminal cases pending before him. [WFPL]

NPR’s Rachel Martin speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, about the screening process refugees go through before entering the United States. [NPR]

The Louisville Arena Authority has a new member and a new chairman after the resignation earlier this month of chairman Larry Hayes. [Business First]

Sheriff Frank Loop said he had no idea the Floyd County Animal Control Board voted Thursday to suspend services to residents living outside the city limits for the rest of 2015. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

It’s Frigid. People Are Homeless. Step Up.

Only two years ago, one in every five patients who sought care at University of Louisville Hospital had no health insurance. [WDRB]

Wildlife in Need is again under fire from animal-rights group PETA after a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection revealed abuse of its animals and unsafe conditions for visitors. [C-J/AKN]

There are over $8 million dollars worth of improvement planned scheduled for the Louisville International Airport in 2016. [WHAS11]

Lexington and Louisville are getting out of the taxi cab regulation business. Mostly. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s been more than week since an elderly woman was attacked and carjacked just feet from her front door. [WLKY]

Pushing back against efforts to bar Syrian refugees from resettling in the U.S., President Barack Obama vowed Saturday that his country will be a welcoming place for millions fleeing violence around the world “as long as I’m president.” [HuffPo]

Saturday morning, volunteers took more than 5,000 new, or gently-used, blankets to more than two dozen drop-off points. They’ll hand out equally as many next month. [WAVE3]

We’re looking at you, Rand Paul, and the rest of the bigoted cowards this state sends to Washington. Acutely aware of the consequences to Jews who were unable to flee Nazism, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum looks with concern upon the current refugee crisis. While recognizing that security concerns must be fully addressed, we should not turn our backs on the thousands of legitimate refugees. [United States Holocaust Memorial Museum]

Ford workers across the country have voted in favor of a new four-year contract. The United Auto Workers union said late Friday that the contract passed with a 51.4 percent vote. [WFPL]

It is one of the central political puzzles of our time: Parts of the country that depend on the safety-net programs supported by Democrats are increasingly voting for Republicans who favor shredding that net. [ProPublica]

Two major Louisville developments have received financial backing from state tourism officials. [Business First]

Another Jeffersonville City Council At-large winner’s eligibility to serve has been challenged in a recount petition. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Another Reason To Think Swift Is Gross

If Greg Fischer’s involved in discussing the future of the South End, you know it’s doomed. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority ended its total ban on firearms and agreed Monday to give promoters and booking agents of events at the KFC Yum! Center the right to decide whether ticketed visitors can carry firearms into the downtown arena. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you need another reason to distrust Greg Fischer and his people to protect anything. Quite a fascinating trip down memory lane. [WHAS11]

Veterans and active duty military personnel are invited to visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs free of charge on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day. [H-L]

A case of tuberculosis at the JBS Swift processing plant is being investigated by the health department. [WLKY]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

The UAW says Ford’s investment in U.S. plants of $9 billion will create or keep about 8,500 jobs over the next four years. [WAVE3]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Yum Brands Inc. again is getting negative press for its food-supplier practices. This Washington Post story from today identifies Yum — which owns the KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut brands — as the last major fast food company not to embrace higher-quality food sourcing that takes animal welfare into account. [Business First]

An ordinance to give $75,000 to a local organization aimed at eliminated homelessness advanced at Thursday night’s New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun Humana Things Happening…

Wait, 448 square feet is tiny? In May, WDRB took you to Louisville’s very first permanent tiny house, which had just broken ground. Five months later, we take you inside now that the house is finished. [WDRB]

In her first comments to a reporter since the publication of her book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” Katina Powell said in a brief interview Friday that her daughters support the book in which she claims she provided them as escorts for University of Louisville players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

After months of community meetings discussing the site for the proposed West Louisville FoodPort, organizers held an event to celebrate the season as well share more information about the project Saturday. [WHAS11]

Democrat Andy Beshear and Republican Whitney Westerfield are the men publicly running to be Kentucky’s next attorney general. But behind the scenes, scores of corporations, wealthy businessmen, lawyers, lobbyists and labor unions have given several million dollars to two independent groups loosely affiliated with the Democratic and Republican parties, which are spending that money on a barrage of attack ads meant to influence voters. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A triple shooting in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood leaves two dead and one injured. [WLKY]

Migrants streaming across the Balkans reached Slovenia on Saturday, diverted overnight by the closure of Hungary’s border with Croatia in the latest demonstration of Europe’s disjointed response to the flow of people reaching its borders. [HuffPo]

Of all the things that are hard to understand, shots fired at a visitation are near the top of the list. Especially, when it was gun fire that claimed the life of the 22-year-old in the casket. [WAVE3]

Maybe we’ll take homelessness this seriously in Louisville some day. Hawaii’s governor has signed an emergency proclamation to deal with the problem of homelessness, saying the state faces the country’s highest per capita rate of homelessness and more needs to be done to house the indigent. [Reuters]

West Louisville residents are organizing against a proposed biodigester plant, where organic waste would be converted into methane gas. The efforts come as Louisville Metro officials — including Mayor Greg Fischer — and the energy company behind the proposal work to educate the community about the technology. [WFPL]

It used to be a given: When your kids reached school age, they’d strap on their backpacks and head for the neighborhood elementary school. Or, you’d pay a hefty tuition to send them to private school. In the last two decades, a third option has emerged. Today, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the country. And lately, they’ve been the subject of passionate and often acrimonious debate about the right way to fix public education in America. [NPR]

The guests have arrived, the band is playing and bride and groom are meeting at the altar. Then the chaplain asks, “does anyone object?” That’s the question Monday for insurers Humana Inc. and Aetna Inc., as shareholders of both companies vote on whether to approve a merger that would combine Humana’s growing Medicare business with Aetna’s portfolio to create the second-largest managed-care company in the United States. [Business First]

Legislation, its effects on funding public schools and the advent of major changes in public education are the discussion table for a meeting of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education on Wednesday, Oct. 21. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Administrative Dumpster Fire Part 850

Oldham County voters will soon decide if alcohol will be sold throughout the county. [WDRB]

When will taxpayers have to stop paying Bonnie Hackbarth’s lying ass? [C-J/AKN]

Criticizing teachers probably isn’t the smartest thing for this principal to do. [More C-J/AKN]

Yet another reason Donna Hargens and her shady pal, Bonnie Hackbarth, have got to go. [WHAS11]

In the ever expanding universe of Kentucky bourbon, it can be hard to keep up with new distilleries and new things to sample. But it is so much fun trying. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are still investigating after a body was found inside a box. [WLKY]

A worsening political dispute on the front lines of the fight against the Islamic State group threatens one of the few silver linings for U.S. policy in the Middle East. [HuffPo]

A silent killer may be responsible for taking the lives of a Louisville couple. Deputy Coroner Cindy Thoene said Donald Hayes, 64, Barbara Hayes, 57, and their two dogs were discovered dead inside their home in the 9400 block of Dawson Hill Road around 3:15 p.m. on Oct.12. [WAVE3]

University of Louisville is investigating claims that a former staffer hired escorts to have sex with basketball players and recruits. [NPR]

People living with sickle cell disease may have a new treatment option that can cure them of the blood disorder. [WFPL]

One Texas lawyer is helping companies opt out of workers’ compensation and write their own rules. What does it mean for injured workers? [ProPublica]

A new report from global commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield and its Louisville affiliate, Commercial Kentucky Inc., shows a continual decline in office vacancy while projecting a somewhat rosy outlook for the local economy. [Business First]

The Clarksville Town Council shied away from granting start-up funds to the Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana at Monday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

Miss The Goober Debate? Don’t Worry

As winter approaches, there’s good news for Louisville Gas and Electric customers. If approved by the Kentucky Public Service Commission, the utility’s residential natural gas customers can expect to see a decrease of nearly 15 percent on an average heating bill. [WDRB]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Well, that sounds more fun than prostitutes. University of Louisville police said a person was hurt in a small explosion in the Shumaker Research Building. [WHAS11]

Guess we should be glad we’re not dealing with what Lexington is dealing with. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Community services and volunteers came together to cater to Louisville’s homeless community. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act’s chief aim is to extend coverage to people without health insurance. One of the 2010 law’s primary means to achieve that goal is expanding Medicaid eligibility to more people near the poverty level. But a crucial court ruling in 2012 granted states the power to reject the Medicaid expansion. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky School for the Blind has been a part of the community since 1842. Its mission is provide comprehensive education services to all Kentucky students who are blind and visually impaired. But three mothers say that is not happening.

If the prevailing judgment about the 2015 gubernatorial race is that no one is excited about it, then Tuesday evening’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway probably didn’t set any fires under prospective voters. [Ronnie Ellis]

What the hell is wrong with all these backward-ass gun nuts these days? We love us some guns but come on, people, enough with the bigotry. Louisville Metro Police officials say they are monitoring developments in the days leading up to a rally planned for this weekend outside the Islamic Center on River Road. [WFPL]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

The University of Louisville men’s basketball team is highly decorated: Multiple Final Four appearances and three national titles, the most recent in 2013. [Business First]

If you’re pleased with the city’s progress over the last four years, Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore thinks he’s the obvious pick for Jeffersonville mayor come Nov. 3. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! JCPS Wants To Spend More $

Attorney General Jack Conway’s office has ruled that Gov. Steve Beshear’s office violated the state law that requires racial balance on the University of Louisville’s board of trustees when he removed its only African American. [C-J/AKN]

Shepherdsville’s mayor, accused in a sex scandal, is refusing to take a plea deal. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is hoping to push through a new contract to make greater use of the public relations firm that has been handling the district’s media issues. [More C-J/AKN]

A homeless woman who spent her nights in Central Park is now getting a permanent home. Metro Councilman David James met the woman earlier this year and said she left a powerful impact on his life. [WHAS11]

Freedom of religion isn’t reason enough to deny any American their constitutional rights, President Barack Obama said Sunday as he addressed members of the LGBT community, one of his major sources of political and financial support. [H-L]

Five schools in Louisville are being honored by the U.S. Department of Education. St. Gabriel, St. Mary Academy, St. Albert, St. Margaret Mary and Christian Academy were the Louisville schools honored Tuesday. [WLKY]

The U.S. plans to increase the number of refugees it takes from 70,000 to 100,000 over the next two years. New York, Los Angeles and 16 other cities have urged President Barack Obama to accept even more refugees from Syria. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Government has reached an agreement to settle the final pending claim related to the June 1, 2009 train accident at the Louisville Zoo, according to a news released issued by the office of Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell. [WAVE3]

Just in case you were wondering why Hillview has gone bankrupt? Andy Beshear was involved, apparently. [CN|Toot]

Mary Campbell steps over a pile of old bricks and squeezes into a hallway heaped with the remnants of a long life — burnt out lamps, discarded boxes, busted chairs. [WFPL]

The nation’s largest mortgage lenders are violating the terms of a punitive 2012 settlement that was meant to prevent unfair and unnecessary foreclosures that destroyed communities and pushed working families from their homes. [Politico]

Looking for the next American Pharoah? The place to be is at the annual Keeneland September Yearling Sale in Lexington, Kentucky, which ended this weekend. More than 2,700 yearlings were sold at this year’s Thoroughbred yearling auction, which is a cornerstone of the $39 billion horse industry. [Business First]

The empty Rose Hill Elementary School in downtown Jeffersonville will be torn down soon, and in its place will rise a 93-room upper-mid scale hotel. [News & Tribune]