At Least There’s Good Bourbon News

Check out the spin/excuses from Jack Conway’s former spokesperson. A meeting held Wednesday was supposed to address the JCPS code of conduct. However, JCPS and the Metro Public Safety Committee saw the clock run out on a conversation many are waiting to have. [WDRB]

Louisville’s Coalition for the Homeless announced Monday that the overall number of homeless people in the city has dropped for the third year in a row — but those numbers don’t change local agencies’ disappointment in the federal government’s decision to cut their funds by 11 percent this year. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky bourbon production hit a nearly 50-year high last year. [WHAS11]

The Republican leader in the Senate says most candidates for president have released their tax documents as presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump insists he’ll wait until after an IRS audit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ten years ago a 2-year-old Louisville girl was shot multiple times and her mother was killed. [WLKY]

More than 7 million previously uninsured Americans gained health coverage in 2015, the second full year of the Obamacare coverage expansion, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

While JCPS tries to provide social and emotional support for students in the form of Student Response Teams, Positive Behavior Coaches and other resources, Metro Council members voiced their concern that it is not enough. [WAVE3]

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump said it would take another 9/11 to wake up border security — and predicted refugees would plan the next attack. [The Hill]

Faculty and staff within the Jefferson County Public Schools system continue to call out district administration for potential changes to teacher salary structure and the student code of conduct. [WFPL]

Interviews with dozens of women who have worked for Donald Trump or interacted with him socially reveal a pattern of often unsettling personal behavior by the Republican presidential candidate, The New York Times reported on Saturday. [Reuters]

Kroger isn’t just in the beginning stages of grocery delivery, it’s been testing refining things in Lexington and other markets so it can be rolled out ASAP. [Business First]

Anesthesiologist Jaime Guerrero, who had a practice in Jeffersonville, was sentenced to 100 months in prison Thursday by United States District Judge Greg N. Stevens, and according to the terms of a prior plea agreement, agreed to forfeit his license to practice medicine and real property owned by Guerrero Real Estate Investments, LLC. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is What Louisville Deserves After Decades Of Dumb Abramson Cheerleading And Sitting In Denial

Can you imagine if education reporters focused on the root of problems instead of reporting on scandals after the fact? Maybe they could start with not writing fluff once in a while… like when an education commissioner is being ousted and one particular education reporter fell for his spin. [WDRB]

Louisville’s most vulnerable populations face a big hit this summer after local homeless agencies and service providers announced Monday morning that they will have to make up for an 11 percent cut in federal funding. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Surprise! Everybody is getting shot left and right. [WHAS11]

Kentucky transportation officials have started an online service for people to renew their license plates. [H-L]

Another day, another shooting in Compassionate City. Everything is puppies and rainbows. Don’t worry. There’s no crime in Cherokee Triangle, nothing ever happens in St. Matthews. One person is taken to the hospital after a shooting Saturday in the Shawnee neighborhood. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama says his economic legacy is a lot better than he gets credit for. “I actually compare our economic performance to how, historically, countries that have wrenching financial crises perform,” he told The New York Times recently. “By that measure, we probably managed this better than any large economy on Earth in modern history.” [HuffPo]

The Metro Council primary offers a broad field to replace three veterans who did not seek reelection. [WAVE3]

Nearly half a century after the saga of “Mountain Jane Doe” began, local authorities in the small mining town of Harlan, Kentucky, say they are one step closer to identifying the murder victim first recovered from a remote trail outside of town in 1969. [Reveal]

The upcoming primary elections will likely be the deciding vote for a handful of Louisville Metro Council races. [WFPL]

Hillary Clinton is nearing the end of a long Democratic primary that will almost certainly leave her as the party’s presidential nominee. [The Hill]

How long til Fischer gives everything to Cordish again? You know it’s only a matter of time. [Business First]

The Clark County Election Board officially ruled on the 130 provisional ballots cast in the primary election Friday, with totals not changing any races. [News & Tribune]

Wind Damage Must Sell Lots Of Ads…?

Louisville: Where some trivial roof damage results in 24 hours of wall-to-wall television coverage from all outlets. Never mind all the murders, pedestrian deaths, Metro Government shenanigans and such. [WDRB]

Amid anger and frustration voiced by some Jefferson County Public Schools staff and others over district ideas related to freezing employee pay and revamping the code of conduct, one JCPS parent has begun circulating a petition to oust Superintendent Donna Hargens. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Metro Office for Safe and Healthy Neighborhoods made a call to citizens across Louisville Wednesday evening to be a part of a community March against gun violence. [WHAS11]

A new study by University of Kentucky researchers contends that there is a strong relationship between suspensions and the racial achievement gap between black students and white students. [H-L]

This story’s got hot dog vendors, road rage and murder. What more could you ask for? [WLKY]

This is one of the most disgusting things you’re going to read this week. [HuffPo]

Local media is literally doing stories on chunks of old concrete. Where is Julie Tam with the blue glove? [WAVE3]

While it’s impolite and politically counterproductive, if we want to accurately identify the analytic error that caused so many of us to dismiss Trump, we must return to the idiocy question. The particular idiocy involves both the party’s elites and its voters. [NY Magazine]

A drop in federal funding this year will lead to cuts in some homeless services across Louisville. [WFPL]

Millions of Americans live with the possibility that, at any moment, their wages or the cash in their bank accounts could be seized over an old debt. It’s an easily ignored part of America’s financial system, in part due to a common attitude that people who don’t pay their debts deserve what’s coming to them. [ProPublica]

A recently published academic study shows that Norton Hospital in downtown Louisville is the fourth-most profitable hospital in the U.S., but Norton Healthcare Inc. is disputing the study’s findings and conclusions. [Business First]

A couple of veteran politicians will square off in the November General Election for Floyd County Commissioners District 2. [News & Tribune]

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Huh? Gang Activity? What Gang Activity?

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad says the amount of violent crime in the city has increased 4.4 percent in comparison with 2015, according to the most recent data. [WDRB]

Here’s a story from a week ago that essentially got ignored. Looking to trim labor costs, Ford Motor Co. is offering hourly workers with at least 8 1/2 years of service a $70,000 lump sum payment to take a voluntary retirement or separation this year. [C-J/AKN]

Seven Counties is continuing its fight against addiction specifically with heroin and opioids. [WHAS11]

The state Senate was minutes away from adjourning Tuesday night when Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer announced that a special visitor wanted to address the chamber — Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An urban farm is coming to Louisville’s Hazelwood neighborhood and taking over the former Iroquois housing site. [WLKY]

Republican front-runner Donald Trump said Tuesday he doesn’t plan to honor his pledge to support the party’s nominee for president if it’s not him. [HuffPo]

Seems like only yesterday Jerry Abramson and crew were claiming gangs were not a thing in Possibility Compassionate City. Nothing to see here, move along, puppies and rainbows. [WAVE3]

With homelessness surging and rent prices skyrocketing nationwide, one congresswoman is urging her colleagues to rapidly increase federal funding for affordable housing in hopes of stemming the tide. [ThinkProgress]

Last month, for the first time in about 15 years, Kentucky changed its fish consumption advisories. There are high levels of mercury in most of the commonwealth’s lakes and rivers. But there is a conflict between what state agencies are saying and what they’re doing: On one hand, the state is warning people not to eat large amounts of fish because it contains the toxic chemical. On the other, state agencies are suing the federal government over pollution controls that would keep mercury out of waterways in the first place. [WFPL]

Grassroots Republicans are growing frustrated with their Washington Beltway counterparts, who they think are giving up the fight for the White House. [The Hill]

HOWWWWW much money is KentuckyOne health spending on this ongoing PR campaign? It’s never-ending, apparently. [Business First]

Jim Wathen said two years ago he had an idea to stabilize Floyd County’s fiscal future — sell Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services. That idea didn’t go too far at the time. [News & Tribune]

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Surprise! Local Repubs Love The Racist

Before she retired, Fay Allen regularly drove from her home in Jeffersonville to her job in downtown Louisville. She estimates she now makes about 10 trips a month across the Ohio River, mostly for volunteer work. [WDRB]

A day before his twins’ sixth birthday celebration, Donald Mattingly Jr., 36, was riddled with bullets. Nine months later, his killer remains free, as do those responsible for nearly half of the homicides in Louisville last year. [C-J/AKN]

Landscape awards don’t matter when your administration is a walking disaster. [WHAS11]

Donald Trump won a tight battle with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz in Kentucky’s Republican presidential caucus late Saturday night. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents in one Fern Creek neighborhood are stepping up security after Metro police found a handful of belongings that were stolen. [WLKY]

Talk about breaking barriers in the world of fried chicken. [HuffPo]

Customers inside the Walgreens on the Outer Loop left in shock Thursday after a woman, upset over her transaction, started punching and biting the clerk. [WAVE3]

Heads-up, Louisville Metro Government. When homeless people cluster and set up stable tent camps, most American cities eventually send garbage men, cops, and social workers to tear the camps down, kick out the occupants, and even destroy their belongings. But in Indianapolis, such encampments are now protected from the sudden, destructive approach that so many other cities use to break up unsightly homeless communities. [ThinkProgress]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is shuttling a proposed surplus spending plan on to the full council for final approval. [WFPL]

A Louisville House Democrat filed two bills Monday in an attempt to block Gov. Matt Bevin’s plan to dismantle the state health exchange, kynect, and revamp how Kentucky delivers Medicaid. [The Morehead News]

A new rail yard on in Jeffersonville will serve as a transfer and loading terminal for Louisville & Indiana Railroad Co. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council will introduce two ordinances and one resolution at Monday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Outrage Reaching Fever Pitch

Some Jefferson County Public Schools board members are raising questions about the district potentially misusing Every 1 Reads funds. Surprise! David Jones doesn’t think it’s a big deal because $420,000 to him is like $420 to you. And Allison Martin blaming someone else? No surprise there. [WDRB]

No amount of positive spin stories like these getting shopped around by people like Mark Hebert will improve UofL’s scandal-ridden mess of a leadership debacle. The University of Louisville produced 10 Fulbright scholars this school year — the same number as Stanford — and ranking it among the 42 highest universities in the United States. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Flashing red and blue lights and police choppers were all creating quite a scene at the Big Four Bridge on Saturday. [WHAS11]

An affidavit filed in federal court says the shooting of a U.S. postal worker in Louisville was the result of a drug deal. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents on both sides of the gun debate showed up at a committee meeting Tuesday to voice their opinion on whether guns should be allowed inside Town Hall. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell draws a fine line between their nefarious calls for delay and his wise calls for delay. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian struck on the streets of Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s troubled public pension funds are fighting a bill requiring them to disclose performance fees paid to outside asset managers and use more transparent methods when selecting those managers. [Reuters]

The attorney hired to represent Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky in a lawsuit over abortion services says he’ll ask a judge to dismiss the case. [WFPL]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

We at Louisville Business First often report about programs to encourage entrepreneurs in the area, and now those efforts are gaining broader attention. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman gave a shout-out to Louisville’s startup community in his Feb. 17 column. [Business First]

There was only one winner Thursday night at the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s Teacher of the Year recognition dinner. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Admin An Extension Of Frankfort

Gossip started more than a week ago that Allison Martin was bringing Daniel Kemp with her to JCPS. Because that’s apparently how things work these days – government jobs are handed out to friends, not the person who is best for the job. Screw what’s best for the school district. Konz, along with other local reporters, were under an embargo not to mention it until Monday. [WDRB]

A federal judge last month denied a request by Karen Cunagin Sypher to be placed in a halfway house for the final 12 months of her sentence for attempting to extort University of Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino. [C-J/AKN]

It’s the most important time of year! Girl Scout cookie season! [WHAS11]

A 22-year-old man had been living on the streets less than a month when he was found unresponsive outside a Lexington Taco Bell and later died, his wife said Friday. [H-L]

Greater Clark County Schools students enjoyed another day off Monday, but many are talking about the humorous way the message was delivered. [WLKY]

The Affordable Care Act is nearly six years old, and over that time it’s made real headway accomplishing some of its key goals. [HuffPo]

Always exciting when there’s a story that doesn’t involve pedestrian deaths, shootings, Donna Hargens or Jim Ramsey. Louisville’s Joe Autry got first place in the professional division of the 16th International Snow Sculpting Competition Japan Cup, which took place Feb. 9-13, in Nayoro, Japan. [WAVE3]

Most students in the U.S. are learning about climate change in schools, according to a new survey. But the quality of that climate science education is, for many students, questionable. [ThinkProgress]

A panel to review deaths and near-deaths in Kentucky’s correctional facilities would be created by legislation introduced Thursday in the state House of Representatives. [WFPL]

Landowners who had opposed efforts to put a natural gas pipeline across 13 counties have been victorious in the Kentucky Supreme Court. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

A Bardstown business found its Facebook page shut down Thursday over what the social networking site first said were “policy violations.” [Business First]

After one member questioned some of the processes for budget changes and how grants are distributed, the Clark County Special Education Cooperative may review some of their practices at a meeting in March. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]