Things Aren’t So Green In Compassionate City

A town hall meeting in Louisville on Tuesday night discussed how violent crime and citizens’ relationship with police is being felt in the city and around the country. [WDRB]

Under Mayor Greg Fischer’s leadership, Louisville has undertaken several studies aimed at better understanding the city’s environmental challenges. A new national ranking suggests it may be time to move beyond research and into action. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two JCPS elementaries are at the bottom of the scale, when it comes to making the grade on statewide test scores. [WHAS11]

Lexington ranked among the least green cities in a new study that criticized its lack of green space compared to the other 99 largest cities in the country. [H-L]

The Kentucky State Fair Board says it has hired its next president and CEO. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell says the country must not turn its back on the nation’s coal miners — but that’s exactly what those miners say the Republican Senate Majority Leader is doing. [H-L]

A Metro Corrections officer who posted a controversial meme on Facebook will not lose his job as a result of the incident. [WAVE3]

“Do you speak English?” When Hua-Yu Sebastian Cherng walked into his summer school classroom for the first time as a brand-new teacher, a student greeted him with this question. Nothing in his training had prepared him to address race and identity. But he was game, answering the student lightly, “Yes, I do, but this is a math class, so you don’t have to worry about it.” [NPR]

Tim Harrison didn’t expect to be released from prison last week. When he got the news, he argued with the guards. He told them they had the wrong guy. He said his sentence wasn’t yet up. [WFPL]

After Donald Trump reaffirmed his long-held belief this week that the men known as the Central Park Five were guilty in an infamous, decades-old rape case, two members of the since-exonerated group blasted Trump in interviews with Mother Jones, calling him a “stunt artist” and saying “he’s gotten worse” since his involvement in their 1990 conviction. [Mother Jones]

Southern Indiana Plastics Inc., which makes plastic parts for the automotive and lawn and garden industries, has acquired Louisville-based Progress Plastics Inc. [Business First]

Grants, programming for students and other services were approved at Greater Clark County Schools’ board of trustees meeting on Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

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Crime In The Highlands? Surely Not!

Tolls are coming to the Ohio River Bridges and drivers are getting ready. [WDRB]

Talk is cheap for Matt Bevin. During his campaign for governor and since his election, Matt Bevin has said he supports restoring civil rights to nonviolent felons who have completed their sentences. [C-J/AKN]

Crime spike in the Highlands? It’s been going on since at least 2014 but no one wants to talk about it because it might frighten the wealthy white people. [WHAS11]

On Friday, the state Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether panhandlers have a legally protected right to ask motorists and pedestrians for money and if Lexington’s city-wide ban violates panhandlers’ First Amendment right to free speech. [H-L]

JCPS students got an inside look at how vehicles are made at the Louisville Ford Assembly Plant on Wednesday. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s lewd comments about women present him with a tough challenge roughly one month before Election Day, and it’s also landed House Republicans in trouble. [HuffPo]

Louisville-based Yum! Brands is cutting jobs as part of a major corporate overhaul. [WAVE3]

In 1990, a group of four black teens and one Latino teen were convicted of the brutal assault and rape of a jogger. The April 1989 attack came amid rising crime rates in New York City and a wave of violence in Central Park itself. [ThinkProgress]

As the University of Louisville-Clemson football game was played last weekend, dozens of attendees ate, drank and filled the Green Building in NuLu for the culmination of Diversity Pitch Fest. [WFPL]

The number of Americans who support the death penalty has fallen below half for the first time, according to a US study. [BBC]

A new report shows that the number of small businesses in Kentucky that offer employee health insurance dropped sharply from 2012 to 2015. Only 26.6 percent of small businesses in the state offered health insurance last year, down from 36.4 percent in 2012, according to the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission has formally asked the state’s high court to give Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson more than a “mere slap on the wrist” over findings that Henderson acted unethically. [News & Tribune]

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Another Rough Weekend In Louisville

Donald J. Trump declared a $916 million loss on his 1995 income tax returns, a tax deduction so substantial it could have allowed him to legally avoid paying any federal income taxes for up to 18 years, records obtained by The New York Times show. [NY Times]

Sure was a fun and compassionate weekend in Possumbility City. Louisville Metro Police are investigating after a man was shot in the chest. [WDRB]

Kathleen Smith, former University of Louisville President James Ramsey’s chief of staff, is out at the university’s fundraising arm, the U of L Foundation. [C-J/AKN]

Senior citizens and disabled individuals can start applying for heating assistance in Louisville next week. [WHAS11]

Standard good old boy behavior in Kentucky. Former University of Kentucky board chairman Billy Joe Miles of Owensboro pleaded not guilty Monday to rape, sodomy and bribing a witness at a hearing in which the prosecutor said the alleged victim has received death threats and other harassment since the charges were filed. [H-L]

Around 1:30 a.m. Saturday Louisville Metro police responded to a call of a shooting on the 7300 block of Southside Drive. [WLKY]

Donald Trump ramped up his feud with former Miss Universe Alicia Machado on Friday, calling her “disgusting” and accusing her of having a sex tape. [HuffPo]

A Louisville teenager was killed in a shooting early Saturday morning in Lexington. [WAVE3]

Donald J. Trump has a cruel streak. He willfully causes pain and distress to others. And he repeats this public behavior so frequently that it’s fair to call it a character trait. Any single example would be off-putting but forgivable. Being shown many examples across many years should make any decent person recoil in disgust. [The Atlantic]

Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia are among the states challenging the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan, or CPP, in oral arguments Tuesday before the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. [WFPL]

At Monday night’s debate, Donald Trump was called out for stiffing the people who work for him. Trump has been accused of failing to pay hundreds of contractors. And so far, he hasn’t seemed very sorry. When asked about failing to pay someone by Hillary Clinton this week, Trump replied, “Maybe he didn’t do a good job and I was unsatisfied with his work.” [WaPo]

Kathleen Smith, a longtime aide to former University of Louisville president James Ramsey, has been placed on paid administrative leave from her position with the University of Louisville Foundation. [Business First]

As one of the first orders of business, the Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana is working to put in place a network of volunteers and organizations that would work together to offer safe shelter for homeless in extreme weather. [News & Tribune]

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Jim Ramsey-UofL Funtimes Just Won’t Quit, Now Involves Fun Foundation Construction Shenanigans

What this story doesn’t tell you is that one guy is paying for everything out of his own pocket. That means he’s making massive campaign contributions to Trump in violation of FEC limits. [WDRB]

James Ramsey, who was forced to resign last month as president of the University of Louisville, apparently plans to stay awhile at its foundation, where he is still president. The foundation is constructing new offices at its building at 215 Central Ave., for Ramsey and Kathleen Smith, his chief of staff, according to a university official and several tradesmen who were busy working Friday on the space. [C-J/AKN]

Surprise! TARC is making cuts/alterations/changing routes again. Just what Compassionate Possibility City needs – more (bad) transportation changes for the working poor. [WHAS11]

We’ve been yelling about it for years and here you go. Many people in Lexington who see doctors at University of Kentucky HealthCare write checks to the Kentucky Medical Services Foundation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Muhammad Ali tribute hanging at Spalding University has disappeared. [WLKY]

The Justice Department plans to stop using privately run prisons that typically house undocumented federal inmates following a report finding they are less safe than those that are federally run, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates said Thursday. [HuffPo]

A man was arrested after a three-hour standoff with police in the Shawnee neighborhood Saturday afternoon. [WAVE3]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 8 percentage points among likely voters, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Friday. [Reuters]

Over the past decade, the news about Kentucky’s coal industry has been reliably bad. The latest numbers show the state is mining the smallest amount of coal since about 1934, and there are fewer coal miners employed here than anytime in the 20th century. [WFPL]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made a direct appeal to African-American voters, saying “What do you have to lose?” [BBC]

University of Louisville Hospital is back in compliance after concerns were raised about patient safety. [Business First]

The Tri-County Health Coalition, based in New Albany, has opened its doors to homeless community members to come in and cool off in the summer heat. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Is Now Back To Its Old Tricks

LG&E is closing its coal ash ponds at its power plants in Louisville and Trimble County. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has moved a Layne Elementary teacher to another school in the district after it said it found a “pattern of poor professional judgment and unsafe behavior,” particularly in relation to how the teacher used restraint on students. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS and JCTA are still unable to come to an agreement on salaries and contracts. [WHAS11]

The number of homeless students in Lexington schools has nearly doubled in the past three years, according to a new report that recommends more money and attention to schools with the highest percentage of homeless students. [H-L]

The Kentucky Arts Council says it has awarded a Teaching Art Together grant that will fund an artist residency in eight schools in the eastern part of the state. [WLKY]

A vastly underappreciated legacy of Barack Obama’s presidency is one that neither his conservative opponents nor his liberal allies like to mention: He’s presided over a historically unprecedented reduction in government employees. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jefferson County Public Schools employees are taught to restrain students who might be a danger to themselves or others. In the last two school years at JCPS, restraints were used 8,537 times. [WAVE3]

Ignore all the hype! If you’re wondering why Kentucky Democrats avoided Fancy Farm this year, look no further than the event’s emcee, who cracked racist jokes right off the bat. Republicans didn’t need the help of Democrats to burn their racist Trump barn down this year. [Page One]

Louisville’s Planning Commission has approved rules governing the siting of anerobic biodigesters in the city. The regulations approved Thursday were stricter than what planners had originally proposed, but won’t be finalized until they’re approved by Metro Council. [WFPL]

How dare anyone want safe drinking water or the preservation of lands. That makes native Appalachians environmental extremists, according to Rand Paul. He goes from literally telling black people they shouldn’t be allowed to sit at the lunch counter to making shit up about coal. [The Gleaner]

Churchill Downs Inc. CEO Bill Carstanjen said Thursday that the company’s subsidiary will move from Mountain View, Calif., to Louisville before the end of the year and gave more details on its planned joint-venture acquisition of a Berlin, Md., casino and racetrack that was announced Tuesday. [Business First]

Pamela Fisher said she’s never shot a gun in her life. A gun range is planned for Clarksville. [News & Tribune]

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The UofL Scandals Just Won’t Quit

A third recent appointee to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees has a business connection to the university’s nonprofit foundation. [WDRB]

As Southern Indiana schools’ student population becomes increasingly diverse, its pool of teachers remains overwhelmingly white. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In a room full of people–Denita Wright made her opinion very clear. From the moment she stepped through the door at the California Neighborhood Community Center, she passed out signs that read, “We don’t want it.” [WHAS11]

The best part of this – or maybe the most terrifying – is that Republicans in Frankfort have worked hard to fight needle exchanges that prevent this sort of thing. Kentucky saw a dramatic increase in the rate of hepatitis C infections among women ages 15-44 in recent years, according to a new federal report that offers further evidence of growing problems in the state from intravenous drug use. [H-L]

University of Louisville trustees have postponed a meeting to decide the status of school President James Ramsey. [WLKY]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

Now that a Court has determined Metro government has the right to remove the monument, the Commission on Public Art must recommend where and why. [WAVE3]

Kevin Green’s lawyers were pleading with the governor for mercy. It was spring 2008, and Mr. Green, a 31-year-old who had shot and killed a grocery owner, was on Virginia’s death row. His woes, his lawyers said, dated to childhood; he was born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, repeated three years of elementary school and never learned to tie his shoes. [NY Times]

A new board to develop strategies for agricultural water use in Kentucky is closer to its first meeting. [WFPL]

After a lengthy debate and a deal between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Democratic Party’s rules committee voted to created a “unity commission” that would dramatically limit the role of convention “superdelegates,” binding roughly two-thirds of them to the results of state primaries and caucuses. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Republic Bancorp Inc. announced second-quarter net income of $8.3 million and a diluted earnings per common share of $0.40, which was a 2 percent increase compared to the company’s second quarter in 2015. [Business First]

Clark County voters may be using new machines for the November election, but clerk Susan Popp said this won’t change the way voting happens on their end. [News & Tribune]

Be Sure To Handle Sick Bats, Folks

Of course the Health Department has to warn people. Doctors say several Louisville children were potentially exposed to a deadly disease this month after touching an animal known to carry the disease. [WDRB]

During a briefing about the Health Science Center at Thursday’s University of Louisville Board of Trustees meeting, J. David Grissom, a trustee and former banker who is chairman of an investment firm, asked what the university is doing in response to reports that KentuckyOne Health, which manages U of L Hospital, has been cited for a nursing shortage there and received “D” mark on cleanliness and other issues. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Many of us probably don’t think twice about getting a regular haircut, but for the homeless and less fortunate, it can be an unaffordable luxury. [WHAS11]

A former central Kentucky sheriff’s deputy has been convicted on charges that he arrested a man for crimes he didn’t commit. [H-L]

Just in case you were beginning to feel a bit safe out there in the suburbs… [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton made her first appearance with vice presidential pick, Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), hailing him for being extremely qualified for the job and offering a stark contrast to Donald Trump and his VP choice. [HuffPo]

Young adults from West Louisville put on a “Celebration of Life” block party Sunday. The event was put on by Do Ya Part, a group of youths from the West End who want to help those in need while also shedding hope, love and family values on the community, and was held at Cole’s Place on W. Kentucky Street. [WAVE3]

President Obama said in an interview broadcast Sunday that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s comments about NATO show he is unprepared to address issues of foreign policy. [The Hill]

While questions loom about the University of Louisville’s future, its new Board of Trustees met Thursday and took no significant action. [WFPL]

A federal agency sends thousands of letters a year to health providers closing out complaints about HIPAA violations. Though the government could make those letters public, it doesn’t. ProPublica has started to do so. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. just doubled its number of military members. Guess they needed a bit of positive press spin. [Business First]

Divided on a provision that would keep the board from hearing expulsion appeals, New Albany-Floyd County Schools’ board of trustees passed a new policy on suspension and expulsion with a 4-3 vote. [News & Tribune]

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