Some Fun(?) Educational Roundup Things

Eastern High School staff physically and verbally harassed a football player over accusations of smoking marijuana, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. [WDRB]

Amid growing protests claiming the building of a methane plant in western Louisville continues a legacy of environmental racism, Mayor Greg Fischer says the Fort Wayne, Ind.-based company behind the project will spend the next two months listening to community concerns before seeking construction approval. [C-J/AKN]

The Highlands Neighborhood Association is encouraging Councilmen David Tandy and Tom Owen to permanently revoke the license of Cahoots which is located on Bardstown Road. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to move five candidates forward in the search for the next state education commissioner. The candidates, who have not been named, are in-state and out-of-state educators. However, the board did not preclude adding finalists when it meets Friday in Lexington, before the start of second-round interviews. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews are quickly restoring Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home, with big plans for it to attract visitors from around the world. [WLKY]

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. [HuffPo]

With its largest-ever incoming class starting school Monday, Spalding University celebrated the growth by rebranding and renaming its new Kentucky College of Art and Design. [WAVE3]

Applications for U.S. home mortgages edged up last week as interest rates declined, an industry group said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

A neighborhood group is hoping concerns about public health and the environment will factor into a city board’s decision to grant a conditional use permit to pork producer JBS Swift. [WFPL]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

Students at Mount Tabor Elementary in New Albany can now use a finger scanning system from Horizon Software to pay for school meals, but some parents are worried about the new technology. [Business First]

Community Montessori High School senior Nick Vaughn narrowly lost in the May New Albany City Council District 6 Republican Party primary. He had a plan to start a work program to benefit disadvantaged residents, and though it won’t be implemented yet in a governmental platform, Vaughn has launched a nonprofit aimed at ushering low-income families out of poverty. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Just Flipping Give Cahoots The Boot

Wednesday is the first day of school for approximately 4,000 early childhood education students in JCPS — but 1,100 have not turned in the required immunization forms and will not be allowed to attend class. [WDRB]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

The Civilian New Albany Traffic Supervisor has resigned amid an investigation into the supervisor’s implementation and execution of duties, according to New Albany Police Chief Todd Bailey. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

An effort to revitalize west Louisville is gearing up. Many people consider Broadway and Ninth Street the dividing line between downtown and west Louisville. [WLKY]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

We brought you the video after a large fight broke out recently in the busy bar area of Bardstown Road. Business owners said after the closings of Jim Porters, Phoenix Hill and several bars downtown, much more traffic headed to the Highlands. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Foiled in state court, a Jefferson County Public Schools teacher filed a federal court suit Monday claiming the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System illegally raised teachers’ share of pension contributions to shore up a retirement plan that is only half-funded. They sure have shopped this story around an awful lot. [WFPL]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

Two hour-long dramas about the world of Kentucky bourbon may be coming to TV soon. [Business First]

Twelve added employee positions — mostly in the public safety sector — are major components of Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore’s proposed 2016 budget. [News & Tribune]

More Fun Stuff At Cahoots Last Night

Gobs of police showed up at Cahoots (1000 block of Bardstown Road) around 4:00 A.M., shutting down traffic, causing all kinds of fun:

LMPD and LMEMS eventually pulled someone out on a stretcher:

That sounds fun. Cahoots sure sounds like a fun family place. Somewhere you definitely won’t get shot and definitely won’t see all kinds of horse deals going down.

But don’t worry! It’s the Highlands. There’s no need for there to be full-court press when something goes down because it’s not the West End. Right? (Kinda like when LMPD tells you the gunshots you not only heard but witnessed, three people called 911 about, were just fireworks, in the daylight…)

Only Thing Worse Than Fischer Transparency Is JCPS Transparency

Despite concerns about increased class sizes and a lack of details on how it would be implemented, the Jefferson County Board of Education approved a plan to merge two of its alternative schools and make structural changes at three other alternative sites on Monday night. [WDRB]

On a train from London to Hull, Matthew Barzun decided to check the web to see what famous people were from the Yorkshire city he was about the visit. The former Louisville Internet entrepreneur knows his way around mathematics and theory, so he was excited to discover that John Venn was from Hull. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS is considering pulling hundreds of thousands of dollars in funding for schools all tied to junk food. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul likes to say that the Republican Party should follow the advice of painter Robert Henri, who said people should “paint like a man coming over a hill singing.” [H-L]

Don’t hold your breath about the level of actual transparency, according to JCPS insiders. Jefferson County Public Schools announced the launch of a “citizen transparency” website Monday night. [WLKY]

The Justice Department urged a federal appeals court Monday to reverse a hold a judge placed on President Barack Obama’s immigration executive action. [HuffPo]

Graduation dates for Jefferson County Public High School students have been released. [WAVE3]

In many municipalities around the country, the days of sorting your recyclables for curbside pickup are long gone, replaced by a system called “single-stream” recycling. But what happens after all those bits of plastic, paper, glass and metal trash get put in the bin? [NPR]

The number of jobs within Louisville area residents’ typical commute distances decreased 11 percent from 2000 to 2012, according to a report released this month by the Brookings Institution. [WFPL]

Hundreds of middle and high school students from across the state traveled to Eastern Kentucky University on Saturday to exhibit their science experiments at the Kentucky Science and Engineering Fair. [Richmond Register]

Kyle and Dustin Staggers already own two restaurants on Bardstown Road — Rumplings and Roux — and they’re working on a third Highlands restaurant called “America. The Diner” at 814 Cherokee Road. [[Business First]]

Mike Pence set aside his longtime opposition to programs that give needles to drug users amid pleas from health officials and conservative legislators to respond to the spreading HIV outbreak in Scott County. [News & Tribune]

Reducing Violence In Possibility City Is Great

Reducing violent deaths in Louisville is the goal of a new campaign, which is focusing on what everyone can do to support the effort. [WDRB]

New Louisville hotels are among the short-term threats to growing Southern Indiana tourism, according to a new marketing report that also lists strengths, weaknesses and possible opportunities in Clark and Floyd Counties. [C-J/AKN]

A Metro Council employee, charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct will have to wait a few weeks before getting her day in court. [WHAS11]

One of the state’s biggest bigots opposes medical marijuana. Because, like all other things he’s afraid of, he doesn’t understand it. The leader of the state’s largest religious organization voiced opposition Tuesday to a proposal in the state legislature that would make it legal for people to use marijuana in Kentucky for medical purposes. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The board overseeing Kentucky’s role in the Ohio River Bridges Project met Tuesday. [WLKY]

Whaaaat??? Thought Greg Fischer said Louisville was the best beer city in the world? [HuffPo]

Mayor Greg Fischer said he was evaluating the “steps forward” after his chief financial officer was accused of drunk and intimate behavior with a subordinate’s wife. [WAVE3]

The US solar boom is taking off at breathtaking speed—even though solar is still a tiny slice of the American energy pie, it has by far the fastest growth of any energy source, and it’s adding jobs apace. [Mother Jones]

In the wake of a massive tire fire in November that burned for a day and left residents in southwestern Louisville under a shelter-in-place, the company responsible is beginning a series of steps to assess the environmental damage. [WFPL]

Plenty of cities tear them down, but Seattle Mayor Ed Murray (D) wants his city to build three new tent encampments for the homeless. [Think Progress]

Mid City Mall will be receiving an updated exterior with new metal awnings, a metal roof and a brick facade. [Business First]

A familiar disagreement between some members of the New Albany City Council and the Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has a new twist. [News & Tribune]

Yet Another Stinky Mess For MSD This Week

Another day, another senseless murder in Possibility City. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has boosted salaries of several top executives by up to 11.6 percent and paid out annual performance payments, including a $32,760 bonus to Executive Director Greg Heitzman. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville International Airport putting a stop to ride-sharing companies from picking up passengers. [WHAS11]

Poor Andy Beshear. More than a year away from being sworn in to an office he hasn’t even won, and already his integrity in that office is open to question because of his unprecedented fund-raising. Not to mention the shadow cast on the administration of his father, Gov. Steve Beshear, as state contractors, lobbyists and appointees have lined up at 87 fund-raising events to give almost $1.5 million to the son’s campaign for attorney general. [H-L]

New court records show how investigators may have gotten a break in an unsolved murder. [WLKY]

The white police officer who killed Michael Brown has resigned from the Ferguson Police Department, his attorney said Saturday, nearly four months after the fatal confrontation with the black 18-year-old that fueled protests in the St. Louis suburb and across the nation. [HuffPo]

An estimated 3,000 to 4,000 coats were handed out during a different kind of Black Friday transaction in Kentuckiana: the Free Coat Exchange. [WAVE3]

The U.N. Committee against Torture urged the United States on Friday to fully investigate and prosecute police brutality and shootings of unarmed black youth and ensure that taser weapons are used sparingly. [Reuters]

The number of Kentuckians who are “underbanked”—that is, people who don’t participate in the banking system—has increased. Nearly a third of Kentuckians (33.2 percent) are considered “underbanked,” according to a recently released report from Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. [WFPL]

Urban agriculture is playing an increasingly important role in global food security, a study has suggested. [BBC]

Bardstown Road Aglow has grown tremendously since its first year. When founder Rosemary Bailey started it 29 years ago, only six businesses participated, recalled Kelli Milligan, owner Renaissance by Design. The antique store was one of the six. [Business First]

Area parents looking to have a night out on the town will want to circle Monday on their calendars, because that’s the deadline to register children for Clarksville Parks & Recreation’s inaugural Parents’ Night Out. [News & Tribune]

Is Everything In Clark County, Ind. Crazy Corrupt?

Does this stink of unnecessary fearmongering? On Wednesday morning, police say a student at Hite Elementary was approached by a stranger in the neighborhood behind her school. [WDRB]

It’s fine and dandy to profess your extreme level of transparency. That is — if you’re actually transparent and not cherry picking what gets released. Like with Metro Animal Services. Greg Fischer, like Jerry Abramson, is all talk and the entire community has finally realized it. [C-J/AKN]

One of the worst work place shootings ever took place in Louisville 25 years ago. On the morning of September 14, 1989, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker walked in to the Standard Gravure Plant on 6th and Broadway Streets. [WHAS11]

Leave it to some shyster judge in Jessamine County to fine a cyclist for riding responsibly and within the law. And you wonder why outsiders think Kentucky is still in the dark ages. [H-L]

It was perfect weather Saturday for one of the larger fall festivals in the Louisville area. [WLKY]

While the Islamic State group is getting the most attention now, another band of extremists in Syria — a mix of hardened jihadis from Afghanistan, Yemen, Syria and Europe — poses a more direct and imminent threat to the United States, working with Yemeni bomb-makers to target U.S. aviation, American officials say. [HuffPo]

Supporters of Alison Lundergan Grimes gathered in the west end of Louisville as the Democratic candidate for Senate opened a new campaign office with less than two months to go before the election. [WAVE3]

Why do Democrats keep trying to ban guns that look scary, not the guns that kill the most people? On the twentieth anniversary of the assault weapons ban, a look at why politicians and the public support a policy that showed no evidence of saving lives. [ProPublica]

The process of selecting a contractor to install the tolling system for the Ohio River Bridges Project takes another step Monday. The joint board for the bridges project will identify a potential toll systems provider, said Chuck Wolfe, a spokesman for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. [WFPL]

How superbugs hitch a ride from hog farms into your community. [Mother Jones]

University of Louisville President James Ramsey called the strategic goals he outlined Thursday to the board of trustees could be viewed as “crazy.” [Business First]

An inmate of the Clark County jail was removed from the facility last week to move furniture from a rental property that belongs to Clark County Circuit Court No. 2 Judge Jerry Jacobi. [News & Tribune]