Attacks On Ricky Jones Are Just Dumb

Sitting near the corner of Bardstown Road and Grinstead Drive, a new business is getting ready to open in the Highlands. But the new development is also sparking concern among some neighbors. [WDRB]

Watching people pile on to attack Ricky Jones is bizarre. All he did was speak up with a bit of common sense and people lost their minds. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A member of an advisory committee that is reviewing the allegations of strippers and escorts for the University of Louisville men’s basketball program says he is surprised by the school’s decision to self-impose a ban on postseason play. [WHAS11]

If you missed it, this is one of the most important stories in the history of ever. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The man charged with killing three people on Wheeler Avenue over the weekend knew at least one of his victims. [WLKY]

As president, both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders would expand the federal government’s role in reforming criminal justice across the country, they told The Huffington Post in answer to a 20-question survey last month. What would the Republican candidates do? They didn’t say. [HuffPo]

From behind the shadow of the Economy Inn, another hotel is coming into the limelight for all the wrong reasons. [WAVE3]

Marco Rubiobot on Monday insisted the immigration reform bill he helped spearhead through the Senate was never intended to become law and that the authors of the bill expected conservatives in the House to make it “even better.” [NBC News]

A renovated warehouse in the Portland neighborhood will be the new home for the University of Louisville’s art studios. [WFPL]

A vote to block the Obama administration’s ambitious climate regulation was one of Antonin Scalia’s last acts as a Supreme Court justice. His sudden death may have opened a new path to the rule’s survival. [Reuters]

Jennifer Lawrence and her foundation have given Kosair Children’s Hospital an early Valentine’s Day gift. But at $2 million, the award-winning actress and native Louisvillian’s gift is a tad more generous than the traditional roses or chocolate. [Business First]

Southern Indiana residents are being asked to give their input into a region-wide arts project as part of a 14-month process that will result in a masterplan to better connect and strengthen the area’s arts and cultural assets over the next decade. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! More Bad UofL & JCPS News

A lawsuit against “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell may never see the light of day. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer made two key additions to his administration Wednesday in areas dealing with Louisville’s public safety and public assistance. The mayor announced Rashaad Abdur-Rahman will be the new director of the Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods office and Eric Friedlander will serve as acting director of the Community Services department. [C-J/AKN]

Data from Jefferson County Public Schools shows that a new grading scale appears to have increased the number of students getting A grades in classes. [WHAS11]

Glad to see there’s nothing important left to worry about. The University of Kentucky has sometimes been criticized for being a campus of independent units, with academic, athletics and health care divisions operating more separately than together. On a symbolic level, UK officials have decided that will no longer be the case. [H-L]

What the hell is this story about the guy killed in the Highlands? What? No, really, what the hell is that story? [WLKY]

The “Seinfeld” writer who coined “Festivus” wants Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) to stop tweeting about his beloved secular holiday. [HuffPo]

A JCPS bus driver was assaulted and robbed by students. The incident, according to the bus union president, happened on Friday at the Detrick Nichols compound off Taylor Blvd. [WAVE3]

While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky business groups are backing legislation that would expand expungements of some felony convictions. [WFPL]

The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino have put pressure on local authorities to show they’re ready for that kind of violence. Some jurisdictions, such as Los Angeles, are stepping up exercises and terrorism simulations. [NPR]

With truckers in high demand, the online marketplace seeks to connect drivers with carriers that need something hauled. [Business First]

Some of Indiana’s grocery stores and liquor stores say a change in state law that allows alcohol sales on Christmas Day for the first time in decades won’t affect them because their stores are closed on that holiday. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Death Isn’t Compassionate, Greg Fischer

Another day, another death in Possibility Compassionate City! Officials have released the name of a man who was murdered in the Algonquin neighborhood. [WDRB]

Tens of thousands braved cold temperatures and fog as thick as burgoo on Saturday for a once-in-a lifetime chance to walk across the new Abraham Lincoln Bridge joining Louisville and Jeffersonville. [C-J/AKN]

A St. Matthews family is hoping a cash reward will motivate someone to come forward and offer information in the death of their loved one. [WHAS11]

Officials say thousands of people walked along the new Abraham Lincoln Bridge on Saturday, two days before the bridge connecting Louisville and Jeffersonville, Indiana, opens for vehicle traffic. [H-L]

Christmas was in full swing Sunday at the Kosair Charities annual holiday party. [WLKY]

The biggest winner from a bipartisan highway funding deal hammered out by congressional negotiators on Tuesday isn’t a Republican, a Democrat, or even the nation’s roadways. It’s Emigrant Savings Bank. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian death! How compassionate! A man was arrested and charged with murder after a deadly hit-and-run accident Sunday morning in the Portland neighborhood. [WAVE3]

U.S. Senate Democrats plan to unveil a package of proposals this week to tighten domestic security in the wake of the mass shooting in California that killed 14 people and injured 21, according to a Senate Democratic source on Sunday. [Reuters]

Child care centers taking part in Kentucky’s subsidy program for low-income families will soon get a higher reimbursement rate, but advocates say more needs to be done to improve the quality of centers. [WFPL]

On a rainy October Saturday, about half a dozen people trudged up a rocky path to witness what coal companies had done to Kayford Mountain, West Virginia. For generations, locals had gathered to pray on this high ground, and three towering white crosses marked the site. The surrounding woods showed off their early fall color, but not far beyond them was a vast, gray bulldozed moonscape left by mountaintop-removal coal mining. [Politico]

A developer has applied to revise and expand a historic property in Louisville’s Highlands neighborhood. [Business First]

A presentation of facilities needs for Greater Clark County Schools brought up three subjects: a five-year plan of projects that could tally $68 million, future referendum thoughts and the problems with keeping Maple and Spring Hill Elementary schools open. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun(?) Educational Roundup Things

Eastern High School staff physically and verbally harassed a football player over accusations of smoking marijuana, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. [WDRB]

Amid growing protests claiming the building of a methane plant in western Louisville continues a legacy of environmental racism, Mayor Greg Fischer says the Fort Wayne, Ind.-based company behind the project will spend the next two months listening to community concerns before seeking construction approval. [C-J/AKN]

The Highlands Neighborhood Association is encouraging Councilmen David Tandy and Tom Owen to permanently revoke the license of Cahoots which is located on Bardstown Road. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to move five candidates forward in the search for the next state education commissioner. The candidates, who have not been named, are in-state and out-of-state educators. However, the board did not preclude adding finalists when it meets Friday in Lexington, before the start of second-round interviews. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews are quickly restoring Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home, with big plans for it to attract visitors from around the world. [WLKY]

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. [HuffPo]

With its largest-ever incoming class starting school Monday, Spalding University celebrated the growth by rebranding and renaming its new Kentucky College of Art and Design. [WAVE3]

Applications for U.S. home mortgages edged up last week as interest rates declined, an industry group said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

A neighborhood group is hoping concerns about public health and the environment will factor into a city board’s decision to grant a conditional use permit to pork producer JBS Swift. [WFPL]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

Students at Mount Tabor Elementary in New Albany can now use a finger scanning system from Horizon Software to pay for school meals, but some parents are worried about the new technology. [Business First]

Community Montessori High School senior Nick Vaughn narrowly lost in the May New Albany City Council District 6 Republican Party primary. He had a plan to start a work program to benefit disadvantaged residents, and though it won’t be implemented yet in a governmental platform, Vaughn has launched a nonprofit aimed at ushering low-income families out of poverty. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Just Flipping Give Cahoots The Boot

Wednesday is the first day of school for approximately 4,000 early childhood education students in JCPS — but 1,100 have not turned in the required immunization forms and will not be allowed to attend class. [WDRB]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

The Civilian New Albany Traffic Supervisor has resigned amid an investigation into the supervisor’s implementation and execution of duties, according to New Albany Police Chief Todd Bailey. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

An effort to revitalize west Louisville is gearing up. Many people consider Broadway and Ninth Street the dividing line between downtown and west Louisville. [WLKY]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

We brought you the video after a large fight broke out recently in the busy bar area of Bardstown Road. Business owners said after the closings of Jim Porters, Phoenix Hill and several bars downtown, much more traffic headed to the Highlands. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Foiled in state court, a Jefferson County Public Schools teacher filed a federal court suit Monday claiming the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System illegally raised teachers’ share of pension contributions to shore up a retirement plan that is only half-funded. They sure have shopped this story around an awful lot. [WFPL]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

Two hour-long dramas about the world of Kentucky bourbon may be coming to TV soon. [Business First]

Twelve added employee positions — mostly in the public safety sector — are major components of Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore’s proposed 2016 budget. [News & Tribune]

More Fun Stuff At Cahoots Last Night

Gobs of police showed up at Cahoots (1000 block of Bardstown Road) around 4:00 A.M., shutting down traffic, causing all kinds of fun:

LMPD and LMEMS eventually pulled someone out on a stretcher:

That sounds fun. Cahoots sure sounds like a fun family place. Somewhere you definitely won’t get shot and definitely won’t see all kinds of horse deals going down.

But don’t worry! It’s the Highlands. There’s no need for there to be full-court press when something goes down because it’s not the West End. Right? (Kinda like when LMPD tells you the gunshots you not only heard but witnessed, three people called 911 about, were just fireworks, in the daylight…)

Only Thing Worse Than Fischer Transparency Is JCPS Transparency

Despite concerns about increased class sizes and a lack of details on how it would be implemented, the Jefferson County Board of Education approved a plan to merge two of its alternative schools and make structural changes at three other alternative sites on Monday night. [WDRB]

On a train from London to Hull, Matthew Barzun decided to check the web to see what famous people were from the Yorkshire city he was about the visit. The former Louisville Internet entrepreneur knows his way around mathematics and theory, so he was excited to discover that John Venn was from Hull. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS is considering pulling hundreds of thousands of dollars in funding for schools all tied to junk food. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul likes to say that the Republican Party should follow the advice of painter Robert Henri, who said people should “paint like a man coming over a hill singing.” [H-L]

Don’t hold your breath about the level of actual transparency, according to JCPS insiders. Jefferson County Public Schools announced the launch of a “citizen transparency” website Monday night. [WLKY]

The Justice Department urged a federal appeals court Monday to reverse a hold a judge placed on President Barack Obama’s immigration executive action. [HuffPo]

Graduation dates for Jefferson County Public High School students have been released. [WAVE3]

In many municipalities around the country, the days of sorting your recyclables for curbside pickup are long gone, replaced by a system called “single-stream” recycling. But what happens after all those bits of plastic, paper, glass and metal trash get put in the bin? [NPR]

The number of jobs within Louisville area residents’ typical commute distances decreased 11 percent from 2000 to 2012, according to a report released this month by the Brookings Institution. [WFPL]

Hundreds of middle and high school students from across the state traveled to Eastern Kentucky University on Saturday to exhibit their science experiments at the Kentucky Science and Engineering Fair. [Richmond Register]

Kyle and Dustin Staggers already own two restaurants on Bardstown Road — Rumplings and Roux — and they’re working on a third Highlands restaurant called “America. The Diner” at 814 Cherokee Road. [[Business First]]

Mike Pence set aside his longtime opposition to programs that give needles to drug users amid pleas from health officials and conservative legislators to respond to the spreading HIV outbreak in Scott County. [News & Tribune]