Keith Henderson’s Mess Front & Center

Louisville Metro Police responded to a fatal accident in the area of Eastern Parkway and Baxter Avenue. [WDRB]

One person was killed and another person was injured late Friday night in a shooting that occurred in downtown Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city’s homicide count now up to 65. The latest happened on Friday morning when a man was found dead in a Taylor Berry neighborhood backyard. [WHAS11]

Italian spirits maker Campari, parent of Wild Turkey, on Tuedsay reported that sales for the first six months were down 1.8 percent to $834 million. Excluding the effect of the exchange rate and other factors, the company said organic growth was up 5 percent, boosted in part by gains from Wild Turkey and Aperol. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents of one Louisville community are uneasy after a man was killed and a woman was injured in a shooting. [WLKY]

Limestone and steel for our homes, wheat and vegetables for our dinner, fossil fuels for our industries: we rely heavily on our planet’s natural resources to survive. Yet we’re using up these resources at such an unsustainable pace that we may be “irreversibly” depleting some of them ― and critically damaging our Earth in the process, according to a new United Nations report. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! When students in Kentucky go back to school there will be a change. No longer are public schools in the state allowed to use the physical restraints known as Aikido Control Training, or ACT. [WAVE3]

Louisville police said on Thursday they were reviewing a request to reopen the 51-year-old unsolved murder of the city’s first female prosecutor, a civil rights pioneer who once represented boxer Muhammad Ali. [Reuters]

George Griffiths remembers a different Louisville. Originally from Kingston, Jamaica, Griffiths moved to the city from New York after his job transferred him 28 years ago. He’s lived in the United States since 1970. [WFPL]

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed a pledge last month, along with most of the nation’s governors, to combat the opioid crisis, calling it “one of the deadliest drug epidemics in our nation’s history.” But when confronted with a spiraling HIV outbreak in his home state as a result of opioid addicts sharing contaminated needles, Pence dragged his feet before agreeing to lift a ban on programs that distribute sterile needles. [Politico]

Atlanta-based United Parcel Service Inc. is enhancing its educational assistance programs for employees at its Worldport facility in Louisville. [Business First]

This week’s top story sheds new light on accusations that Floyd County Prosecutor Keith Henderson violated rules of ethics in regards to a David Camm book deal. [News & Tribune]

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LG&E + Solar Just Feels Super-Dirty

If there’s one thing Louisville loves as much as a compassionate shooting, it’s a compassionate pedestrian accident. A child was hit by a car Monday night in a south Louisville neighborhood. [WDRB]

State laws have blocked the expansion of grassroots community-led solar power, and now utilities are putting their own stamp on new ways letting customers get their energy from the sun with requests before Kentucky energy regulators. Customers of Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities may get a chance to participate in what’s called “community solar,” where customers pay into a new solar farm and then receive credit on their bills for electricity generated from those solar panels. [C-J/AKN]

A Louisville Metro Corrections officer finds himself out of a job after a 5-month investigation revealed he used racist, derogatory language towards another employee. [WHAS11]

Italian spirits maker Campari, parent of Wild Turkey, on Tuedsay reported that sales for the first six months were down 1.8 percent to $834 million. Excluding the effect of the exchange rate and other factors, the company said organic growth was up 5 percent, boosted in part by gains from Wild Turkey and Aperol. [H-L]

The Kentucky Alliance hosted a panel discussion Monday about gun violence and race relations. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s former campaign manager reignited the long-debunked “birther” conspiracy theory on Tuesday night. Corey Lewandowski, now a CNN analyst/in-house Trump surrogate, suggested that President Barack Obama hadn’t released his Harvard transcripts because they might show he wasn’t a citizen of the United States. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness wants to help people in WAVE Country stop smoking. [WAVE3]

In Syria’s civil war, it’s dangerous to even treat the wounded. Since the beginning of the civil war, the Syrian government has killed hundreds of medical personnel, and dozens of doctors have been assassinated by ISIS. The few doctors who dare to treat the casualties have been forced to work in secret. [ProPublica]

White supporters of the movement have encountered responses (from welcoming to wariness) from some African-American activists. That hasn’t stopped them from leading pro-BLM protests in Louisville. [WFPL]

If you’ve yet to read this story, put on your crazy glasses. A report of a car full of men in body armor with semi-automatic weapons brought Lexington police to the Walmart on Richmond Road on Saturday night. Officers found two men, one in body armor, a 20-year-old woman and a six-month old baby. [More H-L]

The internet is no stranger to debate — just ask anyone who’s read through the comments on a YouTube video or Facebook post. But there also are debates between internet providers, such as those who have a stake in Louisville as Google Inc. considers rolling out its Fiber gigabit internet service here. Some companies already in the market are voicing their concerns through a pending lawsuit and a letter sent to government officials. [Business First]

He’s served in an interim role since July 1, but by about 4:15 p.m. Thursday, Lindon Dodd officially became the director of Clark County Community Corrections. [News & Tribune]

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UK Beats UofL At Yet Another Thing

Humana and Aetna may be ready to sell assets to ease Justice Department concerns. [WDRB]

The city issued a building permit Monday for Ford Motor Co. to proceed with $14 million of planned improvements at its Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane. [C-J/AKN]

TARC is expanding its fleet of all-electric buses. Officials say 6, all-electric, zero-emission buses will travel along the Fourth Street Corridor between downtown Louisville and Iroquois Park. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital is ranked No. 1 in Kentucky in U.S. News and World Report’s Best Hospitals survey, which was released Tuesday. [H-L]

The University of Louisville School of Dentistry is using $2 million in federal funding to provide dental care for people with HIV or AIDS. [WLKY]

Paul Manafort, Donald Trump’s campaign chairman, has had success dealing with hard-to-manage dictatorial types, from Imelda Marcos of the Philippines, to Jonas Savimbi of Angola, to Victor Yanukovych of Ukraine. [HuffPo]

If you showed up at the Jeffersontown Police Department with heroin, needles, or prescriptions you might think officers would put you behind bars. But as of Monday, the department is opening its doors to addicts as part of its Angel Initiative. [WAVE3]

Members of the Indiana State Teachers Association will rally near the annual convention of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) in Indianapolis Friday afternoon where Republican vice presidential nominee Indiana Gov. Mike Pence is speaking on Friday. ALEC, whose members are a mix of representatives of large corporations and legislators, is a group known for drafting model legislation for conservative lawmakers. [ThinkProgress]

Ever wanted to find the cheapest price for a surgery but had no luck accessing information? [WFPL]

Just when it seems that Donald Trump could not display more ignorance and bad judgment or less of a moral compass, he comes up with another ignominy or two. This weekend he denigrated the parents of a fallen American military hero and suggested that if elected he might recognize Russia’s claims to Ukraine and end sanctions. [NY Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. announced plans to open a 60-bed inpatient rehabilitation hospital. [Business First]

New language added to a Clark County zoning ordinance is intended to give the county more recourse to regulate the use of temporary storage units. [News & Tribune]

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Google Fiber Can’t Happen Quickly Enough In Possibility City

At least four other JCPS schools have similar hair policies in place to the one that was temporarily suspended by Butler High last week — and one school has called a special meeting to address it this week. [WDRB]

Louisville’s largest cable and internet provider says the city is giving Google Fiber an unfair advantage, and it wants Mayor Greg Fischer to step in and ease key regulations in the coming weeks. [C-J/AKN]

He was once Louisville’s most high profile charity leader and a top stockbroker. Presidents, Mayors and A-list celebrities appeared at his events when he asked. But for the past year and a half he’s been in a Federal Prison. [WHAS11]

It didn’t take long for a Kentucky school to suspend a dress code policy after significant outcry, both in person and on social media. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A father-to-be was gunned down inside his Pleasure Ridge Park apartment early Monday morning. [WLKY]

Khizr Khan delivered one of the most moving speeches at the Democratic National Convention, captivating viewers with his story about losing his son, a U.S. service member who died in the Iraq War saving his fellow soldiers. [HuffPo]

He once ran for mayor an now he’s challenging citations in a high-profile case, involving his bicycle. [WAVE3]

Six Michigan state workers have been charged with hiding data that showed that drinking water was unsafe in the city of Flint. [BBC]

Revelations about lucrative perks doled out to former University of Louisville president James Ramsey’s top deputies brought outrage Friday from faculty members and taxpayers, but was of no concern to two top trustees. [WFPL]

He walked onto the convention stage Thursday night with his wife beside him, the Constitution to guide him and the pride of a father who knows he has a story to tell. [Politico]

Former University of Louisville president James Ramsey, who resigned Wednesday evening, released a statement Thursday about his status with the U of L Foundation, the school’s nonprofit organization that oversees the school’s endowment. [Business First]

Figuring out how much to spend out of the first few payments of the Floyd Memorial Hospital sale caused some eventful discussion, but the Floyd County Commissioners and Floyd County Council made an agreement at Thursday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

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City’s In A Jim Ramsey Fog, It Seems

Opponents of a plan to let an aging pipeline carry natural gas liquids through Kentucky continue to call on federal regulators to conduct a more thorough review of the project. [WDRB]

Senate Bill 11 – signed into law earlier this year – took effect July 15 and is now allowing alcohol-related businesses statewide to receive new and increased privileges that are meant to support tourism and advance production. [C-J/AKN]

As students in our area stretch out the final days of summer vacation, many parents are already lining up school shopping trips and physicals. Norton Healthcare wants parents to know that back to school physicals can save lives. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas D. Wingate on Friday denied the Family Foundation’s motion for summary judgment against one type of historical racing game, Encore, in use at Kentucky Downs in Franklin. [H-L]

As the story goes, the legacy of Muhammad Ali began when a young Cassius Clay had his red bike stolen from the Columbia Auditorium on South Fourth Street in downtown Louisville. [WLKY]

The father of a Muslim American war hero addressed the Democratic National Convention on Thursday, delivering a brutal takedown of Donald Trump and his inflammatory anti-Muslim rhetoric. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Neighbors in Shawnee surrounded a vacant home in a crime-stricken neighborhood on Friday demanding for the city to listen. [WAVE3]

A U.S. appeals court on Friday struck down a North Carolina law that required voters to show photo identification when casting ballots, ruling that it intentionally discriminated against African-American residents. [Reuters]

Former University of Louisville President James Ramsey has been fairly quiet since the Board of Trustees accepted his offer to resign Wednesday night. [WFPL]

Many patients sent to rehab facilities to recover from medical crises or procedures sometimes suffer additional harm from the care itself, a government study concludes. [ProPublica]

The old, now present, members of the University of Louisville board of trustees will meet next week to vote on the actions taken in their absence by a separate board. [Business First]

With a budget and bonds set, now West Clark Community Schools just sits back and sees what happens for the next month. [News & Tribune]

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Jim Ramsey Finally Got Kicked Out

Throw back to that time everyone told me it was pointless to cover UofL and Jim Ramsey… James Ramsey’s 14-year tenure as president of the University of Louisville came to an abrupt end after about six hours of closed-door negotiations with the Board of Trustees on Wednesday. [WDRB]

The fire in Old Louisville was the most dangerous fire in the city in seven years. In 2009, a fire at 1249 S. Clay St. claimed the lives of six, including four children and two adults. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Second incident in a week? Jeffersontown police continue to monitor the area around a local gun shop after a pickup truck rammed into the entrance early Thursday morning. The suspect remains at large. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes used her speech Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia to paint Hillary Clinton as caring and inquisitive and “a fighter for every single thing Donald Trump is against.” [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police are in the process of hiring 122 new recruits. [WLKY]

A quarter-century after winning his party’s nomination for the presidency, Bill Clinton took the Democratic National Convention stage to tell a story on the night his wife officially won it herself… [HuffPo]

As Tim Stark of Wildlife in Need faces a litany of accusations recently filed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, an administrative law officer has upheld a ruling that allows the Charlestown animal refuge to keep its license. [WAVE3]

Under the Freedom of Information Act, ProPublica requested letters closing HIPAA complaint investigations. Here’s what we’ve received so far. [ProPublica]

Canceled meetings are the norm for the Louisville Metro Council’s recently established committee on vacant properties. [WFPL]

Work that involves complex thinking and interaction with other people seems to help protect against the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to research presented Sunday at the Alzheimer’s Association’s International Conference in Toronto. [WaPo]

A downtown Louisville hotel that was named the best hotel in Kentucky by Business Insider magazine for 2015 will be sold by its out-of-state owner. Annapolis, Md.-based Thayer Lodging Group — a hotel investment group that owns hotels in several U.S. states and Mexico — told Louisville Business First it plans to sell the Seelbach Hilton Hotel in downtown Louisville at the corner of Muhammad Ali Boulevard and South Fourth Street. [Business First]

A real estate company previously focused in the Louisville and Lexington markets has expanded to Southern Indiana, and in a big way. [News & Tribune]

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The UofL Scandals Just Won’t Quit

A third recent appointee to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees has a business connection to the university’s nonprofit foundation. [WDRB]

As Southern Indiana schools’ student population becomes increasingly diverse, its pool of teachers remains overwhelmingly white. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In a room full of people–Denita Wright made her opinion very clear. From the moment she stepped through the door at the California Neighborhood Community Center, she passed out signs that read, “We don’t want it.” [WHAS11]

The best part of this – or maybe the most terrifying – is that Republicans in Frankfort have worked hard to fight needle exchanges that prevent this sort of thing. Kentucky saw a dramatic increase in the rate of hepatitis C infections among women ages 15-44 in recent years, according to a new federal report that offers further evidence of growing problems in the state from intravenous drug use. [H-L]

University of Louisville trustees have postponed a meeting to decide the status of school President James Ramsey. [WLKY]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

Now that a Court has determined Metro government has the right to remove the monument, the Commission on Public Art must recommend where and why. [WAVE3]

Kevin Green’s lawyers were pleading with the governor for mercy. It was spring 2008, and Mr. Green, a 31-year-old who had shot and killed a grocery owner, was on Virginia’s death row. His woes, his lawyers said, dated to childhood; he was born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, repeated three years of elementary school and never learned to tie his shoes. [NY Times]

A new board to develop strategies for agricultural water use in Kentucky is closer to its first meeting. [WFPL]

After a lengthy debate and a deal between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Democratic Party’s rules committee voted to created a “unity commission” that would dramatically limit the role of convention “superdelegates,” binding roughly two-thirds of them to the results of state primaries and caucuses. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Republic Bancorp Inc. announced second-quarter net income of $8.3 million and a diluted earnings per common share of $0.40, which was a 2 percent increase compared to the company’s second quarter in 2015. [Business First]

Clark County voters may be using new machines for the November election, but clerk Susan Popp said this won’t change the way voting happens on their end. [News & Tribune]