Yeah, That Was Totally Just A Glitch

The Louisville Water Company failed to read one of the meters at the KFC Yum! Center for four years, letting about $100,000 in water and sewer charges go uncollected, arena officials said. [WDRB]

An event is planned at the University of Louisville on July 20 to mark the 1969 lunar moon landing by the Apollo 11 astronauts. [C-J/AKN]

Executives at Floyd Memorial Hospital say they plan to hire a consultant to consider options for securing the survival of the 236-bed facility in New Albany. [WHAS11]

Considering Republicans’ condemnation of Beshear for implementing the Affordable Care Act by executive order, the suggestion that he wield his pen again on this issue was more laughably hypocritical than the Rowan County clerk’s explanation of her intolerant beliefs. [H-L]

It floods enough that people should know better to drive into water, right? Rescue crews were called to Louisville’s Lake Forest community twice Tuesday morning to help two drivers whose cars were submerged in floodwaters. [WLKY]

It was September of their sophomore year at Tufts University in 2012 when John Kelly went to a party and saw someone who had sexually assaulted them only two weeks earlier. [HuffPo]

If you’ve headed into downtown Louisville lately, you have probably noticed a big difference on the Ohio River Bridges Project as some major progress is being made. [WAVE3]

Two Richmond residents had their bags packed and were ready to get married June 26 regardless of Kentucky law. However, the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision meant they could celebrate at home with their family instead of traveling to Chicago that night, they said. [Richmond Register]

When Roger Collins first started coming around the Baxter Community Center, the kids really didn’t talk to him. [WFPL]

U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning heard testimony today in the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky’s lawsuit against Rowan County and Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to issue marriage licenses to any eligible couple, in an attempt to keep same-gender couples from obtaining them. [ACLU-KY]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees’ compensation committee voted unanimously Monday to give university president James Ramsey a pay raise of 6 percent and a 25 percent annual bonus — though a consultant’s study found that Ramsey is already paid much more than his peers. [Business First]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services interim CEO Dr. Dan Eichenberger said he is seeking out the help of a consultant to map out the future of the hospital. [News & Tribune]

All Of The Most Compassionate Deaths

Even before a pontoon boat struck a barge on the Ohio River on July 4, killing five people in Louisville, Kentucky was on pace to have the most boating-related deaths since 2010, federal and state data show. [WDRB]

Lawyers for the Sierra Club and LG&E on Thursday argued for two hours over the meaning the word “occasional” in a federal court hearing stemming from a pollution lawsuit filed last year involving the Mill Creek power plant. [C-J/AKN]

The NAACP is calling out the governor for his decision to not reappoint the only African-American of UofL’s Board of Trustees. Raoul Cunningham said this makes the first time in 45 years that there is not an African-American on the 17-member board. [WHAS11]

If this is the worst thing Kentucky Democrats can come up with, they probably ought to just hand over the governor’s mansion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! One week after flames tore through a building in Old Louisville, more information on the investigation has been released. [WLKY]

Kim Davis is officially a national embarrassment. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School teacher has been fired following an investigation into a inappropriate relationship with a student. [WAVE3]

Heroin use in the US has surged in the past decade as experts say people using opioid painkillers are increasingly turning to heroin as a cheaper high. [BBC]

Health officials, confronted with a shocking increase in heroin abuse, are developing a clearer picture of who is becoming addicted to this drug and why. The results may surprise you. [WFPL]

There’s reason to celebrate declines in deaths from colon cancer in the United States — unless you live in three areas that are still lagging behind, a new report finds. Hint: This is bad news for Kentucky. [CBS News]

Kentucky’s Innovation Center, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, announced that it is in the process of transforming a rundown nightclub spot at 252 E. Market St. into a new home for Code Louisville, a code training program operated by KentuckianaWorks, and a new coding boot camp run by The Learning House Inc., an education technology provider. [Business First]

This is a thing you should do in Indiana. On Saturday, July 11, the Georgetown Twin Drive-In Theater is opening its gates to four-legged family members, allowing dogs on a leash to attend for a $2 admission fee. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Bunch Of Death

A homicide investigation is being conducted by LMPD’s Homicide Unit and the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office in the 4400 block of Blevins Gap Road, near Saw Mill Road. [WDRB]

Maybe it can be hidden away in the Louisville Underground? The long-beleaguered Louisville Clock will be moved Friday from its home on Fourth Street at Theater Square to a warehouse in the Portland neighborhood, where it will rest until a suitable permanent location can be found. [C-J/AKN]

The Courier Journal reported JCPS was following up anonymous complaints and found chips, waters, and other vending machine items came into Waggener, but the amount of money being deposited from vending machine sales was short of what it should have been to the total of $3,900. [WHAS11]

The number of heroin overdoses at five northern Kentucky hospitals has continued to climb, but officials aren’t sure if that’s because more people are calling 911 for help, or more people are using heroin. [H-L]

The reward in the case of a missing Nelson County woman has again increased. [WLKY]

Coming back from its Independence Day vacation, Congress appeared no closer Tuesday to finding a way to avoid yet another government shutdown showdown in the fall. [HuffPo]

They are split-second decisions made by police — choices that can mean the difference between life and death for a suspect. Should officers use force? And how much? Community activists like Chad Golden believe sometimes police go farther than they should. [WAVE3]

Questions have been raised about some statues in downtown Lexington. Now, Mayor Jim Gray wants a city board to take a closer look at the statues. [WKYT]

A case over water pollution from Louisville Gas & Electric’s Cane Run Power Plant is scheduled for a hearing in federal court in Louisville tomorrow. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Harry Reid passed the blame on Wednesday over the Senate’s inability to overhaul the Bush-era No Child Left Behind bill. [The Hill]

Some business organizations have decried President Obama’s proposed changes to overtime pay for salaried employees, but most restaurant and retail companies are still working through how, and whether, the regulations would affect them. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair said he was “surprised” that a $450,000 appropriation for police cars was included on Monday’s agenda. [News & Tribune]

No Compassion, No Transparency

Three Louisville lawmakers wrote a letter to Jefferson County Public Schools superintendent Donna Hargens on Monday raising “grave concerns” over the hiring of the district’s former lawyer as a teacher at Central High School. [WDRB]

First, Scott County became the epicenter of Indiana’s largest-ever HIV outbreak. Now, the health officer in the next county south — Clark — says he is leaning toward declaring a public health emergency given high rates of HIV and hepatitis C there. [C-J/AKN]

This is why we can’t have nice things, Louisville. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader just highlighted why it may not be a bad thing to let Republicans to take control of the statehouse. A couple years out of power would result in a number of Democratic resignations in leadership, a bunch of corrupt actors could be weeded out, giving the younger generations time to get their act together to once again lead. [H-L]

Murders happen on a seemingly daily basis but Greg Fischer’s still going on about compassionate this, compassionate that. [WLKY]

At no point in recent memory have consumers been as excited about bourbon as they are today. [HuffPo]

Eight shootings in a single weekend. Jones was shot and killed Saturday evening outside his home, one of eight weekend shootings that Louisville Metro Police are investigating. Jones and two other people, including a Louisville musician and a 60-year-old woman, died of their injuries. [WAVE3]

More than 150,000 U.S. families are homeless each year. The number has been going down, in part because of a program known as rapid rehousing, which quickly moves families out of shelters and into homes. [NPR]

Louisville firefighters will monitor through the night three historic Whiskey Row buildings that were extensively damaged by fire Monday afternoon. [WFPL]

Universal child care is becoming a central pillar of the liberal agenda — one that, if it is ever realized, could take its place alongside some of the great progressive reforms of the 20th Century, and possibly the Affordable Care Act, as a defining achievement of the Democratic Party. [WaPo]

The Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission voted 3-2 to negotiate with OTH Development LLC to develop a former American Legion property in the city. [Business First]

Utility companies that will be relocating infrastructure for the 10th Street widening project at their own cost want further assurance from the city that the project’s actually happening. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Shoots Even More

A MetroSafe dispatcher has confirmed that multiple victims were shot near 25th Street and Broadway in west Louisville. [WDRB]

Aetna’s acquisition of Humana appears to be part of a merger frenzy as the five biggest U.S. health insurers look to get bigger. But any acquisition or merger of this proportion must overcome potential hurdles. [C-J/AKN]

The opportunity of ownership is a wish come true for one of Louisville’s newest small business owners looking to turn his new restaurant into the Russell neighborhood’s latest treasure. [WHAS11]

The Humane Society of the United States is objecting to a proposed expansion of bear hunting in Kentucky. The group says the state’s black bear population is still small and needs time to expand. [H-L]

Louisville Fire and Rescue continued their search for three people missing after a pontoon boat capsized on the Ohio River Saturday night. [WLKY]

So let me be clear about a few things: I do not want to order a wedding cake from a bakery owned by a guy who thinks I’m going to hell. I have no desire to purchase bouquets from a florist who pickets Pride parades. I wouldn’t serve pizza at a wedding if the owner paid me and offered to serenade my guests with an a cappella version of “Born This Way.” And finally, the suggestion that I would be insane enough to want to force a homophobic clergyperson to preside over my most sacred day is beyond insulting. [HuffPo]

Louisville is home to more than 12,000 Humana employees, but the company’s sale could affect thousands more. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s voters have seen this script before: insurgent Kentucky Republican takes down established candidates openly or presumably preferred by U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, Kentucky’s ultimate establishment Republican. [Ronnie Ellis]

If Aetna’s plan to purchase Humana becomes official, what was Louisville’s largest standalone publicly traded company by revenue will cease to exist as the city has known it. [WFPL]

Weight screenings in high school were not enough to get overweight and obese kids on track toward a healthier weight, a recent U.S. study found. [Reuters]

The merger deal between Louisville-based Humana Inc. and Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. finally has been announced. Though we now know details of the agreement, we have to wait to see what the fallout will be for Louisville. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. But about two months into the division’s operations, the Jeffersonville City Council is discussing ways to reorganize it because some members are dissatisfied with the qualifications of its manager. [News & Tribune]

The Minimum Wage Meltdown Isn’t Over

Community leaders began searching for information Wednesday night regarding who was responsible in the hit and run death of Deniesha Pugh. [WDRB]

Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, potentially tipping the balance of a board divided over the actions of the university’s foundation. [C-J/AKN]

Agencies, hospitals and schools across Kentuckiana that serve children with special needs were notified by the WHAS Crusade for Children this week that their grant requests will be funded from the money collected during the 62nd annual WHAS Crusade for Children. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate heard arguments Wednesday in an instant-racing lawsuit on a motion by the Family Foundation to have an in-court demonstration of the electronic games based on past horse races. [H-L]

Bourbon lovers can get their hands on a rare bottle of Pappy Van Winkle without having to wait for hours as Liquor Barn celebrates the grand opening of two new locations. [WLKY]

U.S. employers added a solid 223,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.3 percent, a seven-year low. The numbers reflect a job market moving close to full health and raise expectations that the Federal Reserve will start raising interest rates as early as September. [HuffPo]

Thousands of workers will receive a 50-cent increase in their hourly pay Wednesday as Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance goes into effect, even as a lawsuit against the city continues. [WAVE3]

Senator Mitch McConnell is standing by his call to remove the statue of Jefferson Davis from the state Capitol Rotunda. [More WDRB]

The first phase of Louisville’s minimum wage increase went into effect Wednesday. [WFPL]

In a victory for opponents of partisan gerrymandering, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld the use of an independent commission to draw Arizona’s congressional districts. Writing for a narrow majority in the 5-4 ruling, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg touted the importance of direct democracy and making sure the power of the people is not hijacked by its elected representatives. [Mother Jones]

Kentucky has signed new contracts with five managed-care organizations to provide health care services to Medicaid eligible Kentuckians. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. [News & Tribune]