Is There A Murder Every Other Day?

City leaders in Jeffersonville have released an ambitious new plan to help fight homelessness in the city. [WDRB]

The makeup of the membership of the metro panel that decides some key zoning-related cases is facing a legal challenge. State law requires the membership of the seven-member Metro Board of Zoning Adjustment to be diverse and reflect the demographics of Metro Louisville. But the newly filed lawsuit notes that the board has only one African-American and two women among its membership. [C-J/AKN]

The ongoing discussions about the relationship between the police and the community continue with a ‘monthly race summit’ that is set to start Thursday evening. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul of Kentucky, running for president on a platform of keeping the government out of people’s business, took a deep breath when asked at a recent stop in Philadelphia whether he’d make addressing abortion a part of his campaign. Pander to bigots = you’re a bigot. [H-L]

The coroner has identified the man shot and killed at a downtown restaurant. Compassionate City. It’s Possible here. [WLKY]

American gun owners are far more likely to injure themselves or someone else with their firearm than to stop a criminal, according to a new study from a group calling for tighter gun control. [HuffPo]

There’s a lot that we can learn from our past so we can move forward in the future. In light of what we’re going through in our country with outrage in cities like Ferguson, Baltimore, even here in Louisville, there is a demand for change when it comes to encounters between police, city leaders and minorities. [WAVE3]

This is not a time for peace and quiet. Only scared white people want peace and quiet. [NY Times]

Independent candidate for governor Drew Curtis needs to get 5,000 signatures by Aug. 11 in order to appear on the ballot in November’s general election. [WFPL]

When Audrey Haynes sat down before the legislature’s Medicaid Oversight and Advisory Committee Wednesday, she expected the data she brought would persuade lawmakers that Kentucky’s expansion of Medicaid has been good for the state. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville Foundation is moving ahead on the second phase of building out the ShelbyHurst Office and Research Park, which would include a conference hotel and numerous commercial developments on the University of Louisville’s Shelby Campus. [Business First]

The police presence was strong at Clarksville’s most recent town council meeting. Not only were four reserve officers stationed at the door, manning the new metal detectors, but they appeared on the council’s agenda as well. [News & Tribune]

Fischer: Your White Privilege Is Showing

Officials have released the names of two people who were recently killed in separate incidents. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell and District Court Judge Stephanie Pearce Burke are again butting heads, this time over Burke’s handling of a case originally set for trial this week. If you haven’t kept up with this, it’s crazy. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer says that if you aren’t doing anything illegal, you’ve got nothing to worry about. Which should ring hollow for just about anybody with the ability to think on their own. Those 150+ shootings are super-compassionate. Nothing to see here, puppies and rainbows. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray applauded the work of the Urban County Council in its deliberation of his proposed $323 million budget on Tuesday but declined to say if he would veto any changes council made to the budget. [H-L]

State officials plan to keep an outreach center open for one more year in a southern Indiana county that’s facing the largest HIV outbreak in state history. [WLKY]

Don’t call Chris Christie rich. The Clintons say they still have bills to pay. And Mike Huckabee? Despite his wealth, he was born “blue collar, not blue blood.” [HuffPo]

This white lady assaulted a police officer by allegedly grabbing her throat. She wasn’t arrested or shot. [WAVE3]

Roughly half of deaths from 12 smoking-related cancers may be linked directly to cigarette use, a U.S. study estimates. [Reuters]

Some would-be homebuyers in Louisville are facing tough conditions. New figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors show that the number of homes available for sale is down 17 percent from last year. [WFPL]

Two years ago in the Netherlands, artist Paul de Kort designed an 81-acre park near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. His assignment? To use nothing but landscaping to dampen the noise of airplanes. Such a project had never been attempted—and the science behind his design was discovered almost by accident. [Gizmodo]

Commercial real estate developer William P. Butler intends to purchase Lexington, Ky.-based American Founders Bank and move its headquarters to Louisville, according to a news release from the bank. [Business First]

Contractual issues between the city and the New Albany police union could be ruled upon soon. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Loves Killing People

Two weeks after he took a personal leave of absence, principal at the Academy @ Shawnee Houston Barber has resigned from Jefferson County Public Schools. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Council members want to reallocate up to $5 million from Mayor Greg Fischer’s budget to supplement the city’s “embarrassing” road maintenance. [C-J/AKN]

Really? Killing the guy because he was swinging a flag pole? Way to go, Louisville, you love killing people. How compassionate. [WHAS11]

Bill Mott has conditioned some of the all-time greats in the sport of Thoroughbred racing. Yet last Sunday, he was just another fan on the Belmont Park backstretch, grinning ear to ear while asking fellow trainer Bob Baffert if he could get close to the gleaming bay colt, American Pharoah. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The loved ones of a man found dead in a west Louisville alley made an emotional plea Friday that someone come forward with information that might lead police to his killer. [WLKY]

The Iowa Supreme Court has affirmed the right to be drunk on your front porch. [HuffPo]

A local company hired to do cleanup related to the massive fire at GE Appliance Park is suing the conglomerate, claiming GE is refusing to pay its bill. [WAVE3]

When it comes to the National Security Agency’s recently disclosed use of automated speech recognition technology to search, index and transcribe voice communications, people in the United States may well be asking: But are they transcribing my phone calls? The answer is maybe. [The Intercept]

This seems like it’s worth paying attention to again. Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad on Wednesday asked the Metro Council to approve a near $170-million budget that includes funding for body cameras and more officers. [WFPL]

The state veterinarian has banned the sale of birds at flea markets and swap meets to protect Kentucky’s poultry industry amid an avian flu outbreak. [Glasgow Daily Times]

No. There is no such thing as too much bourbon fun. [Business First]

Though the New Albany Police Merit Commission has twice voted to fire former officer Laura Schook, the city administration and police department again declined Friday to release disciplinary-related documents in her personnel file. [News & Tribune]

Murder Murder Murder Murder Murder

Police are looking for answers after a body was found in west Louisville early Thursday. [WDRB]

This has got to be the dumbest cat fight ever. We love art probably more than the next person. But come on. Your eyes will roll back in your head over this nonsense. [C-J/AKN]

The first needle exchange program in Kentucky is now underway in Louisville. The goal is to stop the spread of HIV and hepatitis C and ultimately curb drug use around the area. [WHAS11]

Health officials say more than 50 southern Indiana people exposed to a student with a confirmed case of tuberculosis have tested positive for the disease in preliminary tests. [H-L]

The University of Louisville continues to explore a possible $55 million expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [WLKY]

A recent draft of the health care transparency section of TPP released by Wikileaks on Wednesday reveals the deal would make Medicare vulnerable to legal challenges from pharmaceutical companies and jeopardize future attempts by the insurer to negotiate lower drug prices. [HuffPo & WikiLeaks]

The University of Louisville School of Medicine will be one of the first to pilot a program to train physicians in standard protocol for treating LGBT patients. [WAVE3]

Congressional Republicans are one step closer to blocking the Obama administration’s attempt to clarify the EPA’s regulatory powers under the Clean Water Act. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad on Wednesday asked the Metro Council to approve a near $170-million budget that includes funding for body cameras and more officers. [WFPL]

The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday voted to repeal meat labeling laws, which were widely backed by U.S. consumer groups, after Canada and Mexico threatened $3 billion in trade sanctions. [Reuters]

American Pharoah is gracing the cover of Sports Illustrated’s June 15 issue, but some people aren’t happy with the photo used for the front of the magazine. [Business First]

Civic organizations have already begun taking sides in regards to Greater Clark County Schools’ referendum plan — and the district won’t find friends amongst at least three of them. [News & Tribune]

River Gunshot City Morning Update

What, no mention of transfers and how those are handled? Nothing but TARC puppies & rainbows? Surely not. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is planning to boost participation in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program by assigning two health employees to reach new participants in the wake of eliminating half of their clinics. Probably too little, too late. [C-J/AKN]

One of two Louisville rappers shot early Monday morning after leaving a concert has died. [WHAS11]

Next week, the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees is expected to approve UK’s largest budget ever, a $3.4 billion document that reflects a burgeoning health care enterprise paired with continued reliance on tuition paid by out-of-state students. [H-L]

A 9-year-old boy who was shot in the leg Monday night continues to recover at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced Tuesday that the Pentagon has added “sexual orientation” as a protected class under its Military Equal Opportunity Policy. [HuffPo]

A community is left shaken more than 24 hours after a triple shooting alerted the Russell neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Coal companies and 14 states sued to stop a draft regulation to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, a priority for the Obama administration. [NY Times]

Preservationists are having difficulty finding a suitable site for the Old Louisville Water Co. building. [WFPL]

Officially, the U.S. has a high school graduation rate of 81 percent — a historic high. But our months-long investigation, in partnership with reporters at 14 member stations, reveals that this number should be taken with a big grain of salt. [NPR]

A section of vacant properties on West Main Street near the Louisville Slugger Museum and Frazier History Museum are the target of a major redevelopment that could top $20 million. [Business First]

A former bookkeeper at a Jeffersonville business is facing federal charges on allegations she used company credit cards to make personal purchases, including firearms, funeral services and Halloween costumes. [News & Tribune]

Give Thanks For The Needle Exchange

Metro Louisville’s needle exchange program designed to combat the heroin crisis kicks off today. [WDRB]

What’s that? One of Greg Fischer’s “innovation” team members was tazed and arrested after allegedly leaving a child in a hot car? And he works for former Metro Animal Services shyster Donald Robinson? Surely not. [C-J/AKN]

What the hell is wrong with people these days?! [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday told lawmakers Monday that state officials would work with Fayette County staff to develop a plan aimed at closing the achievement gap. [H-L]

Really, what the hell is wrong with people!? Louisville Metro Police investigators were at Ballard Park again Tuesday morning, collecting evidence after a 9-year-old boy was shot Monday night. [WLKY]

Next season’s flu shot will contain two new flu strains that weren’t present in last season’s shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

These data only include base pay and don’t include monstrous payouts from, say, the UofL Foundation. [WAVE3]

The rate of abortions falls across almost all of the US since 2010, a new survey from the Associated Press suggests. [BBC]

Bluegrass musicians played a Kentucky-flavored tune at the graduation ceremony last week for nine graduates, who received their bachelor of fine arts degree. [WFPL]

After watching the biggest donors increasingly shun the major political parties and send their six-figure checks to super-PACs and other outside spending groups, Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress made a sly bid last December to bring billionaires and millionaires back into the party fold. [Mother Jones]

American Pharoah wasn’t a shoo-in to win the Triple Crown. But his prospects for victory appeared more likely than other Thoroughbreds that won both the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes in recent years. [Business First]

A tiny park in the middle of downtown Jeffersonville is now easier to enjoy. [News & Tribune]

Let’s See How Many Compassionate Possibility City Shootings Greg Fischer Can Try To Ignore This Year

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. A shooting in the Parkland neighborhood sent two people to the hospital. [WDRB]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [C-J/AKN]

On any given baseball diamond, you’re likely to find a young boy shine. The pride of a parent means alot, especially if you’re Scott Patrick and you’re parents outnumber your entire team. [WHAS11]

Want a look at what’s going on with Lexington’s school district? A Bryan Station High School teacher has told the Fayette County school board that the district’s failure to provide enough resources for a behavior management plan meant that “disruptions, disengagement and acts of violence and aggression are far too common at our school.” [H-L]

Locust Grove, the 18th century home of the sister and brother-in-law of George Rogers Clark and William Clark, is growing industrial hemp. [WLKY]

At a time of historic economic inequality, it should be a no-brainer to raise a tax on inherited wealth for the very rich. Yet there’s a move among some members of Congress to abolish it altogether. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there were two separate shootings Sunday evening. Police are investigating two separate shootings that happened about an hour apart overnight in Louisville. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is using an online questionnaire to gather additional public input about the future of quail restoration efforts in the state. [Richmond Register]

America’s top sire commands some $300,000 for each of his offspring. That adds up to about $35 million a year — and potentially hundreds of millions over his lifetime. [WFPL]

Science issues aren’t usually hot topics for presidential candidates, whose rhetoric tends to revolve more around jobs and the economy than space exploration and funding for energy research. But one organization wants to change that, and is pushing for 2016 presidential candidates to agree to a full debate on science issues, including climate change. [ThinkProgress]

People pulled out their wallets in a big way for this year’s WHAS Crusade for Children. The 62nd annual event raised nearly $5.7 million for children who have special need. [Business First]

Positive skin tests came back for 48 people tested for tuberculosis at Rock Creek Community Academy on Thursday, Clark County Health Department officials said, but that doesn’t mean 48 people have the disease. [News & Tribune]