All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]

Who Is Worse? Tom Wine Or Jim Ramsey? Possibility City!

Their homes were bombed, lives threatened, and they nearly starved to death. Now the newest Syrian refugee families have found a safe-haven right here in Louisville. [WDRB]

Tom Wine. MLK parade. Shenanigans. Read all about it. [C-J/AKN]

This is what local media has become. An “exclusive” interview in the “crime” section with the kid who crashed a drone in Lexington. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Housing Corp. is looking for volunteers to help count Kentucky’s homeless population. The count will begin at sunrise on Jan. 27 and continue for 24 hours. The point-in-time count is known as the K-Count. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Members of The Stand Up Louisville Coalition began planning a protest in recent days, after learning that Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine would be a grand marshal in the 44th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Motorcade. Now Wine has withdrawn his name from the list of grand marshals. [WLKY]

General Electric Co agreed to sell its appliances business to China’s Qingdao Haier Co Ltd for $5.4 billion in cash, the companies said on Friday. The move comes weeks after GE abandoned a $3.3 billion deal with Sweden’s Electrolux following months of opposition from U.S. antitrust regulators. [HuffPo]

Didn’t this happen just a couple years ago? Late November 2013, maybe? [WAVE3]

The nation’s cities are at the frontlines of a food system that sickens and impoverishes millions of Americans every year. Local communities where people live, shop, work, and receive healthcare bear the brunt of this system’s unhealthy, unjust outcomes, which disproportionately affect communities of color and low-income Americans. The five cities chosen—Oakland, Memphis, Louisville, Baltimore, and Minneapolis—all have populations between 400,000 and 700,000, and in all of them, the percentage of residents living below the federal poverty line is higher than the national average. [Click the Clicky]

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is launching a new program to provide a long-acting, reversible contraceptive arm implant to women in Louisville. [WFPL]

The Obama administration on Friday said it would announce the next steps in its planned overhaul of how the United States manages coal development on federal land, which sources have said includes freezing new leases. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Senate passed a measure Thursday that’s aimed at allowing the state’s bourbon tourism industry to reach its full potential. [Business First]

Even though he won a recount, Jeffersonville City Councilman Steve Webb is challenging the lawfulness of November’s general election, requesting a trial that could result in a special election. [News & Tribune]

Sanctuary? More Like Torture Farm

A Jefferson County Board of Education is speaking out against a district proposal that would increase class sizes and potentially eliminate assistant principals from some elementary schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said it will be “looking into” a recent barn fire at a Charlestown, Ind., wildlife refuge that killed 41 animals. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools is trying to distance itself from a fake Twitter account that was getting a lot of attention on Tuesday. [WHAS11]

Prompted by new federal regulations, the state’s two largest utility companies are closing several storage ponds that collect the coal ash burned by power plants. [H-L]

Fire broke out Tuesday at a popular but controversial animal sanctuary that is home to lions and tigers. [WLKY]

“As frustration grows, there will be voices urging us to fall back into tribes, to scapegoat fellow citizens who don’t look like us, or pray like us, or vote like we do, or share the same background.” [HuffPo]

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office is hosting several firearms training session to provide information beneficial to anyone owning and carrying a gun. [WAVE3]

General Electric will announce [today] that it has selected Boston for global headquarters, according to an official familiar with the process. [Boston Globe]

Pork processor JBS Swift now has official permission to use a Butchertown parking lot for staging refrigeration trucks, despite the objections of its neighbors. [WFPL]

As winter sets in around the country, thousands of the nation’s poor are struggling to keep the heat on thanks to intentional underfunding of a key federal progam(sic). [ThinkProgress]

Thorntons Inc., a Louisville-based gas station and food store chain, broke ground on its new $27.8 million headquarters on Friday. [Business First]

Advocates are praising Congress’ recent softening of a longtime ban on federal dollars going to needle exchanges amid growing intravenous drug abuse that’s spreading hepatitis and HIV in many states. [News & Tribune]

Been To The Falls? No? JUST GO!

It was not icy roads but a strong odor that people in Southern Indiana were complaining about on Monday morning. Most people say it smelled like propane or natural gas but emergency officials don’t think it’s anything that hazardous. [WDRB]

Standing in front of dozens of Jefferson County Public Schools principals, the district’s chief business officer acknowledged that JCPS has done a “horrible job of communicating” its proposed budget changes that could cut hundreds of thousands of dollars from some schools’ budgets. [C-J/AKN]

An exhibit featuring family photographs of Anne Frank has opened at Louisville Free Public Library and continues through Feb. 27. [WHAS11]

Virginia Kraft Payson’s conviction has won more battles than any list of her achievements can do justice to, whether it documenting outdoor exploits as a journalist for Sports Illustrated or crafting bloodlines as one of Thoroughbred racing’s most noted owner/breeders. [H-L]

Two years ago, WLKY did a story on T.J. Floyd — a young boy who suffers with what’s called an invisible injury. [WLKY]

Solar is the energy employer of the future — or at least that’s how the numbers look today. A new report on the state of the solar industry out Tuesday from the nonprofit Solar Foundation shows that the number of jobs in the United States in the solar industry outpaced those in the oil and gas industries for the first time ever. [HuffPo]

Parents and principals showed up at Monday’s board meeting to express concern for budget allocations that aim to make Jefferson County Public Schools a more equitable school system by shifting funding between schools. [WAVE3]

The EPA’s own advisory board says the agency needs to clarify its findings on fracking. [ThinkProgress]

Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee joined the field for the Kentucky Republican presidential caucus before the Thursday deadline, bringing the total of candidates to 11. [WFPL]

Of course Matt Bevin is the butt of national jokes. Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has notified U.S. authorities that he plans to dismantle the state’s health insurance exchange created under the Obama Administration’s Affordable Care Act. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Crossdock Development is at it again in Jeffersonvile’s River Ridge Commerce Center. [Business First]

Holly Kelley and her family were among the first to experience the new interactive exhibits in the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at its reopening Friday. [News & Tribune]

Out-Of-Control Local Media Hype

There was a definitely-not-rare shooting in Louisville yesterday and everyone at WDRB lost their damn mind. Education reporter Toni Konz was there with bells on, scaring the shit out of her teenage followers. All because it was a slow news day. [WDRB]

Congress has effectively lifted the nation’s longstanding ban on federal funding for needle exchange programs, which allow intravenous drug addicts to trade dirty syringes for clean ones in the hopes of preventing disease. [C-J/AKN]

The folks at WHAS11 weren’t quite as bad when it came to freaking out over the shooting. That station is no longer run by a delusional teabagger, so it’s the least hype-y station in town. [WHAS11]

A proliferation of threats at schools across the state has officials working with police to determine best responses and prevention techniques. [H-L]

WLKY was also beside itself with the shooting coverage. Just not quite as insane as WDRB. [WLKY]

The economy generated almost 300,000 jobs last year and cut the nominal unemployment rate to five percent. But family incomes for most people are still deeply depressed. [HuffPo]

Don’t worry, WAVE3 also got in on the shooting hype action. The tea people in charge there made sure they hyped it up plenty. [WAVE3]

Swedish home appliance maker Electrolux said on Monday its CEO Keith McLoughlin would retire and be replaced by senior executive Jonas Samuelson, just a month after the biggest deal in the company’s history collapsed. [Reuters]

This is what happens when people like WDRB’s education reporter hype the hell out of something, keeping people scared. Sure, she and her colleagues freak out when their actions are questioned, but they’re still to blame. CALM DOWN BEYONCE! [WFPL]

In 10 months, Americans will go to the polls to pick the next U.S. president. When they cast their ballots, those votes will likely hinge on how they feel about the issues most important to them. But what are those issues? [NPR]

A pair of creditors is looking to force the troubled Bullitt Utilities Inc. into Chapter 7 bankruptcy, claiming it is their best hope of getting paid what they’re owed. [Business First]

Indiana politics are just as dumb as Kentucky politics. The first meeting the New Albany City Council in 2016 had little drama, except for one announcement from the councilman who is beginning his fifth term. [News & Tribune]

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