Seeing “Cordish” Is Like Seeing A Big Car Crash On The Side Of The Road

Because the company doesn’t investigate, it just covers things up and pays people off. However, Smith refused to explain how the company investigated the allegations on their own. “I will not go into that,” Smith said when he was asked how the company does it’s own investigations. [WDRB]

Dismayed by allegations of racial discrimination at 4th Street Live, activists denounced the entertainment district and its developer on Wednesday, suggesting that the developer has some civil rights groups in its pocket. [C-J/AKN]

The person police said is behind a threatening note left at the Louisville Jewish Community Center is now behind bars. [WHAS11]

Brown-Forman CEO Paul Varga said Wednesday that the company aspires to grow Woodford Reserve, Old Forester, the Herradura tequila family and other major labels into billion-dollar brands. [H-L]

Property owners near GE Appliance Park have until Saturday, Aug. 1 to submit claims for cleanup costs related to April’s six-alarm fire. [WLKY]

It’s a whole new day for Republican presidential contenders making their second bid for the White House. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is making serious efforts to woo black voters, and is becoming one of the fiercest critics of real estate mogul Donald Trump. Meanwhile former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, known for his stringent opposition to same-sex marriage, is softening his rhetoric about gay people. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? A dog left inside a car in the hot sun died from heat exhaustion, leading to the arrest of an Oldham County woman. [WAVE3]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

Barry Barker would rather not talk about some buses in TARC’s fleet. They’re buses like the one Metro Councilman Tom Owen rode into downtown early Tuesday morning. That bus stalled and had to be banged, slammed and shoved by the driver to get running again, Owen said. [WFPL]

Even as immigration remains a hot topic in the U.S. presidential campaign, the number of people emigrating from Mexico to the United States, legally and illegally, has dropped sharply in recent years, research published Wednesday shows. [Reuters]

U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best Hospitals List Tuesday, which ranks hospitals on medical specialties such as cancer, cardiology, orthopedics and so on. [Business First]

The state will pay $124,500 to end a lawsuit brought by a man who wasn’t provided with a sign language interpreter during his mother’s criminal hearings in 2010 and 2011. In March, the U.S. District Court Southern District of Indiana in New Albany found in favor of Steven Prakel after he claimed courts and judges in Dearborn County failed to hire an interpreter during his mother’s hearings related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated and driving on a suspended license charges. [News & Tribune]

PEE ALERT: Fischer Hired Private A P.I.

The Cordish Companies, the company that manages 4th Street Live!, is under fire after the release of a new report that outlines widespread allegations of discrimination. [WDRB]

Now Greg Fischer has hired a private investigator? HAHAHA. His scandals just won’t go away. The man can’t hire anyone who isn’t dirtier than Jerry Abramson’s housing director. [C-J/AKN]

Citing his innovative approach, vision and leadership in managing and maintaining park facilities and programming, Mayor Greg Fischer today named Seve Ghose as the new director of Metro Parks and Recreation. Prediction on how long it takes for this guy’s scandal to surface? [WHAS11]

The only reason not allow the demonstration is because they know it harms their case when people see it’s just slot machines by a different name. Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate denied a motion by The Family Foundation to require racetracks to provide an in-court demonstration of historical wagering, or instant racing. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The number of heroin cases flooding Louisville’s courts has surged from 190 in 2011 to more than 1,500 in 2014. [WLKY]

One of the nation’s most recognizable names in climate science, Dr. James Hansen, released a new paper this week warning that even 2 degrees Celsius of global warming may be “highly dangerous” for humanity. [HuffPo]

A university board with no black members is unacceptable, say two African American leaders. They are asking Kentucky’s Attorney General to get involved on the makeup of University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [WAVE3]

President Obama is enjoying a winning streak lately, with the Supreme Court reaffirming his signature health care law and Iran agreeing to curbs on its nuclear program. But one longstanding goal continues to bedevil him: closing the wartime prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. [NY Times]

Members of the Justice Resource Center and the West Louisville Minister’s Coalition want Attorney General Jack Conway to weigh in on whether Gov. Steve Beshear broke state law when he did not appoint a single African-American to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees. The groups sent a letter to Conway Tuesday. [WFPL]

Hillary Clinton trails three top Republican presidential candidates in matchups in three key swing states — Iowa, Colorado and Virginia — a new Quinnipiac poll finds. [The Hill]

In February, Louisville-based Almost Family Inc. announced plans to purchase Buffalo, N.Y.-based WillCare HealthCare. It looks like that transaction will be closing soon. [Business First]

After a failed referendum in May, a consultant may give the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp. the advantage next time around. [News & Tribune]

Cordish Fun Just Keeps Getting Better

JCPS students head back to class in less than a month, and the city of Louisville wants to make sure they’re prepared. [WDRB]

You can thank Jerry Abramson and Jim King (along with a little bit of David Tandy) for allowing Cordish to become a thing in Louisville. Fourth Street Live developer Cordish Co. is accused in a scathing consultants’ report of targeting African Americans to keep them out of the popular downtown entertainment district and another venue it runs in Missouri. [C-J/AKN]

Friday, a settlement from Metro Louisville, a man who was a Lt. Col. in the National Guard, with a traumatic brain injury, says he was treated like a pan-handler by Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees scaled back a merit raise for school President James Ramsey, whose million-dollar-plus compensation has drawn criticism from some trustees and faculty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA CAP! Arson investigators say they have a list of potential suspects in a deadly Old Louisville fire. [WLKY]

Last year was likely the warmest year since 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed on Thursday in a report written by hundreds of scientists from 58 countries. [HuffPo]

Louisville loves killing people and this weekend was no exception. Seven people suffered what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries in a shooting inside a Louisville nightclub early Sunday morning, Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman Dwight Mitchell said. [WAVE3]

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination — a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers. [BuzzFeed]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees is giving President James Ramsey a hefty 25 percent bonus and 3 percent raise. [WFPL]

Charter Communications is ramping up its Washington lobbying operations as the telecommunications firm makes its case to regulators reviewing its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. [The Hill]

Greg Fischer made another appeal Friday for citizens or businesses to submit proposals for the potential reuse and relocation of the former Louisville Water Co. building on South Third Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners scheduled a public hearing on whether to adopt an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration made by the Clark County health officer. [News & Tribune]

Is Fischer’s Omni Train Off The Rails?

If you’re wealthy and aren’t supporting this place, something is wrong with you. It is expected to be a much safer environment for women and children in danger. The Center for Women and Families is in the process of getting an extra layer of protection. [WDRB]

The Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau has set up an advisory council of representatives of some high-profile, out-of-town organizations to suggest what Louisville might do to improve its status as a meeting destination in hope of drawing more lucrative tourism business. [C-J/AKN]

If it’s not a gunshot death or a pedestrian death, it’s possibly a train death. [WHAS11]

The Council on Postsecondary Education is holding a series of public meetings around the state to get input on a new five-year plan to guide Kentucky’s higher education and adult education systems. Don’t worry, this won’t matter. Don’t get too excited about it. [H-L]

A new report shows the number of people who died from drug overdoses in Kentucky jumped 7 percent last year while the number of deaths attributed to heroin stayed about the same. [WLKY]

More states are considering restoring the right to vote to felons, with supporters saying that once their debt to society is paid they should be allowed to exercise a fundamental right. [HuffPo]

The design for the 30 story Omni building planned for downtown Louisville is suddenly uncertain after a regulatory panel delayed its approval for at least two weeks. [WAVE3]

Wondering why poor kids are unhealthy? The Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday adopted a GOP amendment that would provide schools flexibility in meeting Department of Agriculture (USDA) rules for serving whole-grain products and reducing sodium levels. [The Hill]

Since 2010, vandals have caused more than $400,000 in damages at Louisville parks and community centers, according to data provided by Metro Parks. [WFPL]

The top electricity providers in the country are going renewable much more slowly than smaller companies, according to data reported Tuesday by sustainability group Ceres. [ThinkProgress]

A few weeks ago, we reported that the U.S. Department of Justice had filed a lawsuit that aims to block AB Electrolux’s acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. The government contends that the deal would lead to less competition, higher prices and fewer options for American buyers. Electrolux, for its part, has a plan to convince regulators otherwise. [Business First]

Another candidate has entered the New Albany race for mayor, but this one wants to break through the limitations of the current political system. [News & Tribune]

What? Money Scandals At UofL? Woah

It’s a fight over one letter on a driver’s license: ‘M’ for male, ‘F’ for female — but it’s not a simple switch for people in the transgender community. [WDRB]

After six weeks of testing in the city’s fifth police division, body cameras are due to hit many western Louisville neighborhoods next week. [C-J/AKN]

Body cameras are becoming more visible now that they’re in the hands of Louisville Metro Police officers. [WHAS11]

Federal officials have announced plans to cut off funding for a Louisville nursing home. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s more than symbolic — it’s what people have used for years to justify segregation and racism amongst the business class. [WLKY]

The New Horizons mission to Pluto has been a dream come true for scientists, who’ve waited years to get their first close-up glimpse of the distant dwarf planet. But some of the informal names they’re giving its distinctive features are straight out of nightmares. [HuffPo]

You know the drill. Another day, another murder. The Louisville Metro Police Department Homicide Unit is investigating after a man was shot in the Russell neighborhood. [WAVE3]

President Obama challenged Republicans to back the nuclear agreement with Iran, arguing it would allow a future GOP president to keep a stronger check on Tehran’s nuclear ambitions. Obama conceded few, if any, GOP elected officials will back the deal. But he called out Sen. Rand Paul by name, asking whether the 2016 presidential hopeful would support the agreement. [The Hill]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustee’s compensation committee recommended President James Ramsey receive a 6 percent merit raise on his base compensation next year, even as some board members have raised concerns over Ramsey’s high salary. [WFPL]

A regional cap-and-trade program has added $1.3 billion in economic activity to nine New England and Mid-Atlantic states since 2011, while decreasing their carbon emissions by 15 percent, according to independent analysis released Tuesday. [ThinkProgress]

Jefferson Community and Technical College has reopened its search to find a replacement for recently retired president Tony Newberry and aims to have someone in place by January 2016. [Business First]

Southern Indiana Equality President Brad Bell vowed the new organization will be “everybody driven” in attempting to protect and lobby for the rights of minorities and the disenfranchised. [News & Tribune]

Yeah, That Was Totally Just A Glitch

The Louisville Water Company failed to read one of the meters at the KFC Yum! Center for four years, letting about $100,000 in water and sewer charges go uncollected, arena officials said. [WDRB]

An event is planned at the University of Louisville on July 20 to mark the 1969 lunar moon landing by the Apollo 11 astronauts. [C-J/AKN]

Executives at Floyd Memorial Hospital say they plan to hire a consultant to consider options for securing the survival of the 236-bed facility in New Albany. [WHAS11]

Considering Republicans’ condemnation of Beshear for implementing the Affordable Care Act by executive order, the suggestion that he wield his pen again on this issue was more laughably hypocritical than the Rowan County clerk’s explanation of her intolerant beliefs. [H-L]

It floods enough that people should know better to drive into water, right? Rescue crews were called to Louisville’s Lake Forest community twice Tuesday morning to help two drivers whose cars were submerged in floodwaters. [WLKY]

It was September of their sophomore year at Tufts University in 2012 when John Kelly went to a party and saw someone who had sexually assaulted them only two weeks earlier. [HuffPo]

If you’ve headed into downtown Louisville lately, you have probably noticed a big difference on the Ohio River Bridges Project as some major progress is being made. [WAVE3]

Two Richmond residents had their bags packed and were ready to get married June 26 regardless of Kentucky law. However, the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision meant they could celebrate at home with their family instead of traveling to Chicago that night, they said. [Richmond Register]

When Roger Collins first started coming around the Baxter Community Center, the kids really didn’t talk to him. [WFPL]

U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning heard testimony today in the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky’s lawsuit against Rowan County and Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to issue marriage licenses to any eligible couple, in an attempt to keep same-gender couples from obtaining them. [ACLU-KY]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees’ compensation committee voted unanimously Monday to give university president James Ramsey a pay raise of 6 percent and a 25 percent annual bonus — though a consultant’s study found that Ramsey is already paid much more than his peers. [Business First]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services interim CEO Dr. Dan Eichenberger said he is seeking out the help of a consultant to map out the future of the hospital. [News & Tribune]