It’s Frigid. People Are Homeless. Step Up.

Only two years ago, one in every five patients who sought care at University of Louisville Hospital had no health insurance. [WDRB]

Wildlife in Need is again under fire from animal-rights group PETA after a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection revealed abuse of its animals and unsafe conditions for visitors. [C-J/AKN]

There are over $8 million dollars worth of improvement planned scheduled for the Louisville International Airport in 2016. [WHAS11]

Lexington and Louisville are getting out of the taxi cab regulation business. Mostly. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s been more than week since an elderly woman was attacked and carjacked just feet from her front door. [WLKY]

Pushing back against efforts to bar Syrian refugees from resettling in the U.S., President Barack Obama vowed Saturday that his country will be a welcoming place for millions fleeing violence around the world “as long as I’m president.” [HuffPo]

Saturday morning, volunteers took more than 5,000 new, or gently-used, blankets to more than two dozen drop-off points. They’ll hand out equally as many next month. [WAVE3]

We’re looking at you, Rand Paul, and the rest of the bigoted cowards this state sends to Washington. Acutely aware of the consequences to Jews who were unable to flee Nazism, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum looks with concern upon the current refugee crisis. While recognizing that security concerns must be fully addressed, we should not turn our backs on the thousands of legitimate refugees. [United States Holocaust Memorial Museum]

Ford workers across the country have voted in favor of a new four-year contract. The United Auto Workers union said late Friday that the contract passed with a 51.4 percent vote. [WFPL]

It is one of the central political puzzles of our time: Parts of the country that depend on the safety-net programs supported by Democrats are increasingly voting for Republicans who favor shredding that net. [ProPublica]

Two major Louisville developments have received financial backing from state tourism officials. [Business First]

Another Jeffersonville City Council At-large winner’s eligibility to serve has been challenged in a recount petition. [News & Tribune]

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New Albany Schools Have Come A Long Way

The New Albany Floyd County School board has added “sexual orientation” to its non-discrimination policy. [WDRB]

A University of Louisville study of asthma, older adults and indoor air quality is revealing a mix of potentially dangerous chemicals inside participants’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

The footage is hard to watch. “No mother ever wants to see anything like that and my daughter was clearly trying to get away from her and it hurt. It hurt a lot,” parent Valerie Gholston said. [WHAS11]

Top level administrators are being hired at the University of Kentucky at more than twice the rate of full-time faculty, according to UK employee statistics. [H-L]

Just hours after two people are arrested and brought in for questioning about a Tuesday night killing, the victim’s girlfriend hopes justice will be served. [WLKY]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Oh, right, that’s totally going to solve all of their problems. Just a few weeks after hosting a Halloween Party, a troubled motel on Bardstown Road is inviting the neighborhood over for another holiday event. [WAVE3]

Tell us more, Matt Bevin, about how great refugees have it and about how easy it is for them to find safety. LGBT refugees from across the Middle East flock to Turkey, escaping Islamist militias, sexual assault, and death threats. But what they find there leaves many in despair. [BuzzFeed]

With uncertainty about the future of his signature health initiative, Gov. Steve Beshear is touting the outcomes of Kentucky’s efforts to improve the well-being of residents. [WFPL]

More than half a dozen state governors have come out against President Obama’s plans to relocate several thousand Syrian refugees within the United States. Some have pledged to actively resist settlement of these refugees. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R), for example, signed a letter to Obama that begins “as governor of Texas, I write to inform you that the State of Texas will not accept any refugees from Syria in the wake of the deadly terrorist attack in Paris.” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) issued an executive order instructing all “departments, budget units, agencies, offices, entities, and officers of the executive branch of the State of Louisiana” to “utilize all lawful means to prevent the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the State of Louisiana while this Order is in effect.” The problem for Jindal, Abbott and the other governors opposed to admitting refugees, however, is that there is no lawful means that permits a state government to dictate immigration policy to the president in this way. [ThinkProgress]

Surprise! UofL put Deborah Dietzler on leave. [Business First]

Residents within West Clark Community Schools’ boundaries won’t just vote for a president this time next year, but also a referendum project for the district. [News & Tribune]

They Poured Out Perfectly Fine Bourbon!

Thought everything was puppies and rainbows with the new person running Metro Animal Services? So much for hiring an underwear model to run an agency mired in scandal. Now Possibility City sees what happens when Greg Fischer puts these folks in charge. [C-J/AKN]

What, you thought Matt Bevin wasn’t a backward-ass bigot? [WDRB]

If there’s a bike lane, bicyclists better use it, or they may find themselves in jail. That’s the message a Louisville Metro Police officer gave to bicycling advocate and former mayoral candidate Jackie Green on Friday in the form of a double citation for blocking traffic and running a red light. [More C-J/AKN]

The Dare to Care Kids Café has expanded to include a new location. Children 18 and younger can now go to the Shawnee Community Center on South 37th Street for a hot, healthy meal between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The cost is free. [WHAS11]

Louisville Gas and Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. are asking regulators to allow them to own and operate charging stations for electric vehicles. [H-L]

WARNING! AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As authorities continue to investigate a shooting and carjacking in Old Louisville, many who live and work there say their community is no more dangerous than any other part of the metro. [WLKY]

Apparently, if you are a Democratic presidential candidate, there is no longer such a thing as being too strict about gun safety. All three candidates were locked in a fierce battle to prove their gun control bona fides at the Democratic debate at Drake University in Iowa on Saturday night. [HuffPo]

If you wanna pour out Elijah Craig, just send it here instead. It’s a big stink in the California neighborhood, even after some community leaders struck a deal with Heaven Hill Distillery for a proposed biodigester. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an anti-abortion group’s bid to force the federal government to reveal more information about a $1 million grant it made in 2011 to women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in New Hampshire. [Reuters]

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce President Dave Adkisson says he’s at odds with Governor-elect Matt Bevin over dismantling Kentucky’s health care exchange. [WFPL]

Carter Caves may be the “best kept secret of the park system,” according to its park manager, but it may also be Carter County’s best-kept secret for how to truly open up recreational tourism in the northeast region of Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s pledge to scale back the Medicaid expansion and dismantle Kynect, Kentucky’s award-winning health insurance exchange, has caused concern among health clinics. [Business First]

An advertising campaign to drive students to Clarksville Community Schools cost more than $163,000, but the 83 students it’s credited with bringing in gave the district an extra $548,000 in tuition support from the state for the district. [News & Tribune]

Another Weekend Of Death In Compassionate City

Police are on the scene of a fatal shooting in the 1500 block of South 12th Street in the Algonquin neighborhood. [WDRB]

Attorneys and judges can now file their documents electronically in Jefferson County courts, a step officials say will cut costs and increase efficiency. Jefferson County – which handled 200,000 paper-based court cases last year – was the last of Kentucky’s 120 counties to adopt “eFiling,” which allows many in the legal system to file criminal and civil case records from outside the courthouse and its operating hours. [C-J/AKN]

A transgender woman files suit against a Louisville nursing college. The lawsuit, filed Sept. 25 in Jefferson Circuit Court, alleges the Galen College of Nursing discriminated against Vanessa Gilliam for being transgender. The complaint also accuses the college of excluding Gilliam from using the women’s restroom even though she identifies as a female. [WHAS11]

The 66 percent of Owsley County that gets health coverage through Medicaid now must reconcile itself with the 70 percent that voted for Republican Governor-elect Matt Bevin, who pledged to cut the state’s Medicaid program and close the state-run Kynect health insurance exchange. The community’s largest-circulation newspaper, the Three Forks Tradition in Beattyville, did not say much about Kynect ahead of the election. Instead, its editorials roasted Obama and Hillary Clinton, gay marriage, Islam, “liberal race peddlers,” “liberal media,” black criminals and “the radical Black Lives Matter movement.” [John Cheves]

Police in St. Matthews said they received a call about a body in a parking garage in Suburban Hospital. [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) has consistently voiced his disapproval of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy decisions, but on Thursday his criticism went a step further, implying the president is an “idiot” for how he’s handled U.S. involvement in the Syrian conflict during an Iowa campaign stop. [HuffPo]

A racial issue at the University of Louisville has resulted in a lawsuit that claims minorities are still underrepresented on the University’s Board of Trustees. [WAVE3]

Capital punishment in the United States has moved into the slow lane, with the number of executions and new death sentences likely to hit lows not seen for more than 20 years. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee has unanimously approved a measure that will allow people to get more information about how flood prone their property is, among other things. [WFPL]

Technology and social media companies are pushing out an ever-increasing amount of data to tally up which 2016 presidential candidates are winning the race for most mentions online. [The Hill]

A lot of undocumented immigrants got federally subsidized health insurance through Louisville-based Humana Inc. this year, but they didn’t keep it for long. [Business First]

Imagine a Main Street attraction in Clarksville with a mixed-use central district, or a revamped riverfront to take advantage of the town’s perch along the Ohio River. [News & Tribune]

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UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

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Stumbo Lackey Wants To Be Pretzeldent

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The Centers for Disease Control is in Scott County, Indiana, testing hundreds of people for HIV. [WDRB]

This should be an awkward Greg Stumbo-style disaster. David Yates is jumping into the race for Metro Council president next year in an effort to unify Louisville Democrats, suggesting incumbent David Tandy is losing support among the splintered majority caucus. [C-J/AKN]

The search is on for a murder suspect police say shot and killed a man near a Valley Station business Tuesday evening. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s police department hopes to have its officers equipped with body cameras by June. [H-L]

A pedestrian was struck and killed by an LMPD wrecker in the 4900 block of Southside Drive. [WLKY]

As friends and family gathered Tuesday at the funeral of Tyshawn Lee — one of the youngest Chicago residents lost to gun violence this year — to mourn and remember the boy, Father Michael Pfleger delivered a fiery eulogy indicting the city over the execution of a 9-year-old child. [HuffPo]

Here comes the positive media spin from Chad Carlton and crew about tolls. And whattya know, they couldn’t even get the facts straight about when the area last saw tolls. [WAVE3]

The last time Kentucky elected a Republican governor he ran into trouble with the Democratic attorney general. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

In its ongoing Failure Factories series, the Tampa Bay Times is investigating the disastrous effects of the Pinellas County School Board’s 2007 decision to abandon school integration in favor of “neighborhood schools.” Schools in high-poverty black communities were promised additional funding and resources. Then the promises weren’t met, and performance at the schools has plummeted. [ProPublica]

An organization led by Louisville’s high-profile rehabilitation king Gill Holland has recently received $250,000 in private funding. [Business First]

New police body camera video shows a struggle during an arrest in Clarksville for which a local business owner was later found not guilty. [News & Tribune]

Another Reason To Think Swift Is Gross

If Greg Fischer’s involved in discussing the future of the South End, you know it’s doomed. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority ended its total ban on firearms and agreed Monday to give promoters and booking agents of events at the KFC Yum! Center the right to decide whether ticketed visitors can carry firearms into the downtown arena. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you need another reason to distrust Greg Fischer and his people to protect anything. Quite a fascinating trip down memory lane. [WHAS11]

Veterans and active duty military personnel are invited to visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs free of charge on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day. [H-L]

A case of tuberculosis at the JBS Swift processing plant is being investigated by the health department. [WLKY]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

The UAW says Ford’s investment in U.S. plants of $9 billion will create or keep about 8,500 jobs over the next four years. [WAVE3]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Yum Brands Inc. again is getting negative press for its food-supplier practices. This Washington Post story from today identifies Yum — which owns the KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut brands — as the last major fast food company not to embrace higher-quality food sourcing that takes animal welfare into account. [Business First]

An ordinance to give $75,000 to a local organization aimed at eliminated homelessness advanced at Thursday night’s New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]