The UofL Scandals Just Won’t Quit

A third recent appointee to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees has a business connection to the university’s nonprofit foundation. [WDRB]

As Southern Indiana schools’ student population becomes increasingly diverse, its pool of teachers remains overwhelmingly white. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! In a room full of people–Denita Wright made her opinion very clear. From the moment she stepped through the door at the California Neighborhood Community Center, she passed out signs that read, “We don’t want it.” [WHAS11]

The best part of this – or maybe the most terrifying – is that Republicans in Frankfort have worked hard to fight needle exchanges that prevent this sort of thing. Kentucky saw a dramatic increase in the rate of hepatitis C infections among women ages 15-44 in recent years, according to a new federal report that offers further evidence of growing problems in the state from intravenous drug use. [H-L]

University of Louisville trustees have postponed a meeting to decide the status of school President James Ramsey. [WLKY]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

Now that a Court has determined Metro government has the right to remove the monument, the Commission on Public Art must recommend where and why. [WAVE3]

Kevin Green’s lawyers were pleading with the governor for mercy. It was spring 2008, and Mr. Green, a 31-year-old who had shot and killed a grocery owner, was on Virginia’s death row. His woes, his lawyers said, dated to childhood; he was born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, repeated three years of elementary school and never learned to tie his shoes. [NY Times]

A new board to develop strategies for agricultural water use in Kentucky is closer to its first meeting. [WFPL]

After a lengthy debate and a deal between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Democratic Party’s rules committee voted to created a “unity commission” that would dramatically limit the role of convention “superdelegates,” binding roughly two-thirds of them to the results of state primaries and caucuses. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Republic Bancorp Inc. announced second-quarter net income of $8.3 million and a diluted earnings per common share of $0.40, which was a 2 percent increase compared to the company’s second quarter in 2015. [Business First]

Clark County voters may be using new machines for the November election, but clerk Susan Popp said this won’t change the way voting happens on their end. [News & Tribune]

Be Sure To Handle Sick Bats, Folks

Of course the Health Department has to warn people. Doctors say several Louisville children were potentially exposed to a deadly disease this month after touching an animal known to carry the disease. [WDRB]

During a briefing about the Health Science Center at Thursday’s University of Louisville Board of Trustees meeting, J. David Grissom, a trustee and former banker who is chairman of an investment firm, asked what the university is doing in response to reports that KentuckyOne Health, which manages U of L Hospital, has been cited for a nursing shortage there and received “D” mark on cleanliness and other issues. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Many of us probably don’t think twice about getting a regular haircut, but for the homeless and less fortunate, it can be an unaffordable luxury. [WHAS11]

A former central Kentucky sheriff’s deputy has been convicted on charges that he arrested a man for crimes he didn’t commit. [H-L]

Just in case you were beginning to feel a bit safe out there in the suburbs… [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton made her first appearance with vice presidential pick, Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), hailing him for being extremely qualified for the job and offering a stark contrast to Donald Trump and his VP choice. [HuffPo]

Young adults from West Louisville put on a “Celebration of Life” block party Sunday. The event was put on by Do Ya Part, a group of youths from the West End who want to help those in need while also shedding hope, love and family values on the community, and was held at Cole’s Place on W. Kentucky Street. [WAVE3]

President Obama said in an interview broadcast Sunday that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s comments about NATO show he is unprepared to address issues of foreign policy. [The Hill]

While questions loom about the University of Louisville’s future, its new Board of Trustees met Thursday and took no significant action. [WFPL]

A federal agency sends thousands of letters a year to health providers closing out complaints about HIPAA violations. Though the government could make those letters public, it doesn’t. ProPublica has started to do so. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. just doubled its number of military members. Guess they needed a bit of positive press spin. [Business First]

Divided on a provision that would keep the board from hearing expulsion appeals, New Albany-Floyd County Schools’ board of trustees passed a new policy on suspension and expulsion with a 4-3 vote. [News & Tribune]

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Everybody Has Humana Panic…

The U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit Thursday to block the $37 billion takeover of Louisville-based Humana by Aetna. [WDRB]

On the third floor of the Copper & Kings brandy distillery near the edge of Butchertown, a spacious tasting room that’s accented by a view of the Louisville skyline is expected to soon be renovated into the neighborhood’s latest cocktail spot. [C-J/AKN]

Charges have been filed months after the nation watched one woman harassed at a Donald Trump rally on Super Tuesday in Louisville. [WHAS11]

Programs allowing intravenous drug users to exchange dirty syringes for clean ones are spreading in Kentucky as communities confront growing heroin abuse and concerns over the potential for disease outbreaks caused by addicts sharing needles. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Boosting trust between Louisville police and the community is a goal of Mayor Greg Fischer and Police Chief Steve Conrad. [WLKY]

Just in case you need a reminder of what the current Republican Party stands for? Remember this video of Steve King spewing out some serious loads of white supremacy. [HuffPo]

A Charlestown animal refuge faces more than $1 million in fines and possible closure after a 24-page complaint filed by the US Department of Agriculture. [WAVE3]

President Obama on Wednesday vented his frustration over persistent tensions between law enforcement and minority communities following a nearly four-hour meeting with representatives from both groups. [The Hill]

Officials in Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration did not directly answer whether they plan to notify users of a problem-plagued state benefits system that they should reapply for services such as Medicaid and food assistance. [WFPL]

Back in January, as the Supreme Court was preparing for its most important abortion case in a generation, some four dozen social scientists submitted a brief explaining why they believed key portions of Texas law HB2 should be struck down. [ProPublica]

Dearborn-based Ford Motor Co. is partnering with tequila brand Jose Cuervo by testing a bioplastic made from byproducts of the agave plants it uses in production. [Business First]

Days after learning that a private firm plans to buy and redevelop Charlestown’s Pleasant Ridge neighborhood, opponents pleaded with city officials Thursday to consider a different plan. [News & Tribune]

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Don’t Go To The Hospital Or Else

Police in Floyd County, Indiana are investigating a home invasion that took place on Wednesday morning. [WDRB]

What’s your risk of avoidable hospital death? Thousands of lives could be saved if more hospitals were as safe as those that received an A grade in a recent round of grading by a watchdog group that found no top scorers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Cole’s Place in the Parkland neighborhood is no stranger to crime, finding itself as the site of shooting scenes in the late night hours. [WHAS11]

Curiosity finally got the best of me. I had to drive up I-75 and see Noah’s Ark. I found the ark to be an impressive piece of woodcraft, which made me feel better about paying $40 to see it. (It cost an additional $10 to park in the 4,000-space parking lot, which was only a fraction full.) [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews were called to the scene of a house fire Wednesday near Taylor Boulevard, in the Iroquois neighborhood. [WLKY]

The last year has shined a harsh light on two distressing realities of American life. Mass shootings are becoming more common. And more Americans are killing themselves. These disturbing trends share something in common, obvious in the first case and less so in the second: guns. [WaPo]

LMPD reviewed its use of force policies this past April and said the department is not only meeting national standards, but is exceeding them. [WAVE3]

Last week, two lawmakers introduced a bill to put new limits on what debt collectors can take from debtors’ paychecks and bank accounts. It is the first legislation to address the issue in decades and follows a series of ProPublica stories about the widespread practice of garnishment. [ProPublica]

When the bullets hit Shenitrea Vaughn’s stomach, they burned like hot rocks. The shooter, she suspects, had come to her home for a robbery. [WFPL]

Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy (D) and Ohio Congresswoman Marcia Fudge (D) introduced a bill this week that aims to help public schools become more racially diverse by providing grants for school districts to create voluntary school desegregation plans. [ThinkProgress]

After decades as a television mainstay in Louisville, journalist Jean West is taking a new government job. [Business First]

Jeffersonville High School Principal Julie Straight said training educators for an active shooter situation wasn’t even on the table before 1999. [News & Tribune]

Latest LMAS Mess Already Forgotten

Putting a stop to violence. That was the goal of rally held Saturday afternoon at Chickasaw Park. [WDRB]

When will media stop giving the Fischer crew a free pass to put their spin on something without ever questioning that spin? This dog euthanasia matter was resolved months and months ago when they figured out what happened. Jessica Jo Montgomery was “resigned” because of her most recent incident – sort of a straw that broke the camel’s back situation. It wasn’t just the euthanasia issue. It was driving drunk in her city car and having that taken away. It was putting down animals without authority to do so. It was stealing a dog house meant for charity. It was treating staff members badly. It was everything that every other shitty LMAS director has done. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! You may not know their hands but you sure know the work they have completed. [WHAS11]

“Defies reason” is how a circuit judge described the Bevin administration’s claim that Planned Parenthood was illegally providing abortions in Louisville. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! If you tell someone from out of state that you’re from Kentucky, one of the first things they’ll likely bring up is bourbon. [WLKY]

Donald Trump introduced Mike Pence as his running mate at a rambling press conference on Saturday that seemed to focus more on Trump himself than his vice-presidential nominee. [HuffPo]

The teachers union, representing about 5,700 certified Jefferson County Public Schools employees, has filed a lawsuit against the district for breach of contract. [WAVE3]

The House Intelligence Committee on Friday released 28 previously classified pages from a 2002 congressional investigation into the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. [The Hill]

Kentuckians with certain Class D felony convictions are now eligible to apply to clear their criminal records as long as they have stayed out of trouble for five years. [WFPL]

Donald Trump says he could have made a deal to stop the Civil War. This is guy is an Amway salesman in the worst way. [Time]

When Kentucky’s tourism industry is held alongside the state’s largest industries, it’s rarely considered a heavyweight, Hank Phillips , president and CEO of the Kentucky Travel Industry Association, said Thursday evening. [Business First]

After several changes and delays, the Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana will receive payment from the city of New Albany. [News & Tribune]

Murder City On Track For Record Year

On Wednesday afternoon, the public learned the identity of Louisville’s latest murder victim, 26-year-old Ashley Spriggs. Her death underscores Louisville’s two-year spike in violent crime. [WDRB]

Matt Bevin said Wednesday that Donald Trump is “absolutely” qualified to serve as president of the United States. [C-J/AKN]

New members of UofL’s Board of Trustees met for the first time Wednesday. Governor Bevin, who hand selected those members, was in attendance and the meeting was also interrupted by a protester. [WHAS11]

If you worry the Creation Museum and its new Noah’s Ark theme park will cause outsiders to think Kentuckians are a bunch of anti-science rubes, at least take comfort in this: Lexington was home to perhaps America’s greatest evolutionary biologist. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city’s latest homicide victim is a young mother, and her killer remains on the loose. [WLKY]

The GOP on Tuesday successfully drafted a platform ― a statement of its core values and principles ― but not before some last-minute drama played out behind the scenes over its refusal to moderate its tone toward lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. [HuffPo]

A 13-year-old boy was shot in the leg Wednesday afternoon by another teenager, according to a Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman. [WAVE3]

A January study published in the journal Health Affairs showed that one year after Medicaid expansion, the number of Kentuckians who reported trouble paying medical bills declined by nearly 13 percentage points. Those skipping prescribed medications because it cost too much decreased by almost 11 points. And people receiving ongoing care for a chronic illness rose by more than 10 points. [Politico]

Dr. Susan Harkema became the face of one of the University of Louisville’s splashiest research successes the moment one of her paralyzed patients wiggled his toe. Her name was in Time Magazine. She was interviewed on “Good Morning America” and CNN. The notoriety brought more funding and patients to U of L with hopes that revolutionary studies would help the paralyzed walk again. But in March, a federal agency took the unusual and drastic move of withdrawing its funding from one of her studies, citing concerns about the validity of the data and unresolved problems with oversight. Meanwhile, the federal Office for Human Research Protections is also conducting its own review, a spokeswoman confirmed. [WFPL]

The violence in Dallas last week is intensifying worries in Cleveland about visitors and protesters taking firearms downtown during the Republican National Convention, where thousands of people plan to demonstrate. [NY Times]

It looks like Kentucky’s health insurance exchange is sticking around — at least for now. [Business First]

Jeffersonville’s ordinance violations bureau is now established by law, following a city council vote Tuesday. Several wheels must be put into motion, however, before code violations can be enforced again. [News & Tribune]

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UofL Seems To Always Disappoint

Some surgeons at University Hospital say a staff shortage is “putting patients in danger.” [WDRB]

A renowned Louisville surgeon has been named commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Public Health. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are looking for answers after a young woman was shot in the Russell neighborhood Tuesday evening.[WHAS11]

Doug Cobb, the Louisville businessman who drew recent attention for sharing political opinions on Twitter that are far outside the mainstream, has declined an appointment to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, according to Gov. Matt Bevin’s office. By “outside the mainstream”? They mean jacked up, homophobic and backwater. [WFPL]

More than 100 members of the Jefferson County Teachers Association lined the streets outside school district headquarters Tuesday asking for fair pay. [WLKY]

Two separate attempts to recognize lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in the Republican Party platform ― a statement of its core ideas and principles ― were voted down by GOP delegates on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Venture capitalist Douglas Cobb, whose appointment to the newly reorganized University of Louisville Board of Trustees was met with criticism because of Cobb’s views on climate change, homosexuality and head basketball coach Rick Pitino, has declined the appointment, Gov. Matt Bevin’s office announced on Tuesday. [WAVE3]

How American politics went insane. It happened gradually – and until the U.S. figures out how to treat the problem, it will only get worse. [The Atlantic]

Food and home are inextricably linked. The flavors we grow up with are the flavors that signify familiarity, safety and even love. Those flavors are very specific to a time and place, and anyone who moves far away from where they grew up will tell you: the cravings can be powerful. [More WFPL]

When Louisville restaurateur Ivor Chodkowski began looking for cheeses to be used in his Harvest Restaurant he looked to his friend Kenny Mattingly, owner of Kenny’s Farmhouse Cheese in Austin. [BGDN]

A national retailer that specializes in pet supplies and food and specialty pet services is bringing a new store to Louisville’s East End. We can love the locals all we want but this is good for those of you in Louisville who are tired of just ordering from Petco or driving to Frankfort. [Business First]

As the nation reels from the recent loss of lives of both civilians and police officers, law enforcement officials consider how the acts affect Indiana communities. [News & Tribune]

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