Where’s All That Compassion, Louisville?

More than a decade ago, lawmakers in Frankfort passed the same sex marriage ban that was overturned Friday by the Supreme Court. Reaction at the Capitol to the ruling was muted and mixed. [WDRB]

If Louisville health-care giant Humana sells, as expected, analysts and consultants who track the health care industry predict that a takeover would drastically shrink the local workforce. [C-J/AKN]

By a vote of 25 to 1, the Louisville Metro Council on Thursday approved the FY 2016 Capital and Operating Budgets for Metro Louisville. [WHAS11]

Luke Barlow and Jim Meade of Bardstown met 48 years ago and married in 2009 in Iowa. But, as Barlow said 90 minutes after the Supreme Court declared their marriage legal in Kentucky, the two men had never held hands in public here. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A large LGBT crowd gathered downtown at Jefferson Square to kick-off the celebrations. [WLKY]

Justice Antonin Scalia may have penned the most colorful dissent to Friday’s landmark Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality, but his colleague Clarence Thomas wrote the weirdest. [HuffPo]

Seems like maybe the issue here isn’t panhandling? And maybe the city should do a better job of, you know, being compassionate? [WAVE3]

Despite challenging lower court rulings throwing out Kentucky’s ban on same sex marriage, Gov. Steve Beshear moved quickly to comply with Friday’s historic U.S. Supreme Court ruling invalidating such bans in all 50 states. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Louisville Metro Council on Thursday approved a $873 million budget for the upcoming 2016 fiscal year, with a caveat that the total could increase by roughly $5 million for road paving if surplus funds are not available at the end of this fiscal year. [WFPL]

The authors of the 1968 Fair Housing Act wanted to reverse decades of government-fostered segregation. But presidents from both parties declined to enforce a law that stirred vehement opposition. [ProPublica]

You probably know that Louisville-based Humana Inc. is an acquisition target. Late last week, it was reported that Aetna Inc. has made an offer on the company. [Business First]

A Supreme Court decision handed down Friday that allows same-sex couples to legally marry in all 50 states wasn’t the only thing Melissa and Erin Love had to celebrate. The two Jeffersonville women, who share 2 and 6-year-old sons, tied the knot in Clark County exactly one year ago yesterday, making the historic day even more notable. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Clowns Panic Over Needles

Why not work to educate the man? Maybe try to get him and people tossing about veiled threats and racist dog whistles to realize that crap isn’t okay? [WDRB]

One week into the opening of Louisville’s syringe exchange, health officials doled out 1,352 clean syringes to drug users and collected just 189. So get with the program, small town Kentucky! [C-J/AKN]

There is new information on a deadly night of crime sprees leading up to a Canadian tourist’s murder on Derby day. [WHAS11]

For Rand Paul, the rubber is meeting the road. In the wake of last week’s racist shootings in Charleston, S.C., the Republican Party has been torn on the issue of whether the Confederate flag should continue to fly on the grounds of the state Capitol in Columbia. [H-L]

Don’t worry, everything is puppies and rainbows with JCPS’ Donna Hargens! [WLKY]

After getting the cold shoulder, U.S. health insurer Anthem Inc. said it’s raising its offer to buy smaller rival Cigna Corp. for about $47 billion, including cash and stock. [HuffPo]

LMPD Chief Conrad promises real changes. We’ll believe it when we see it. [WAVE3]

Leave it to backwater Republicans to complain about Louisville’s needle exchange. [WKYT]

On any given night, as many as 300 people in Southern Indiana are sleeping in shelters, cars or on the street, according to a street count earlier this year. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a Los Angeles ordinance that lets police view hotel guest registries without a warrant violates the privacy rights of business owners, taking away what the city called a vital tool to fight prostitution and other crimes. [Reuters]

Greater Louisville Inc. said the 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly produced some definitive wins, but it also said that the state legislature missed key opportunities to move the state forward and help it become more business-friendly. [Business First]

After about two months on the job, new Jeffersonville Police Department Chief Kenny Kavanaugh says additional officers are needed to meet the demand of law enforcement within the city. [News & Tribune]

Is There A Murder Every Other Day?

City leaders in Jeffersonville have released an ambitious new plan to help fight homelessness in the city. [WDRB]

The makeup of the membership of the metro panel that decides some key zoning-related cases is facing a legal challenge. State law requires the membership of the seven-member Metro Board of Zoning Adjustment to be diverse and reflect the demographics of Metro Louisville. But the newly filed lawsuit notes that the board has only one African-American and two women among its membership. [C-J/AKN]

The ongoing discussions about the relationship between the police and the community continue with a ‘monthly race summit’ that is set to start Thursday evening. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul of Kentucky, running for president on a platform of keeping the government out of people’s business, took a deep breath when asked at a recent stop in Philadelphia whether he’d make addressing abortion a part of his campaign. Pander to bigots = you’re a bigot. [H-L]

The coroner has identified the man shot and killed at a downtown restaurant. Compassionate City. It’s Possible here. [WLKY]

American gun owners are far more likely to injure themselves or someone else with their firearm than to stop a criminal, according to a new study from a group calling for tighter gun control. [HuffPo]

There’s a lot that we can learn from our past so we can move forward in the future. In light of what we’re going through in our country with outrage in cities like Ferguson, Baltimore, even here in Louisville, there is a demand for change when it comes to encounters between police, city leaders and minorities. [WAVE3]

This is not a time for peace and quiet. Only scared white people want peace and quiet. [NY Times]

Independent candidate for governor Drew Curtis needs to get 5,000 signatures by Aug. 11 in order to appear on the ballot in November’s general election. [WFPL]

When Audrey Haynes sat down before the legislature’s Medicaid Oversight and Advisory Committee Wednesday, she expected the data she brought would persuade lawmakers that Kentucky’s expansion of Medicaid has been good for the state. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville Foundation is moving ahead on the second phase of building out the ShelbyHurst Office and Research Park, which would include a conference hotel and numerous commercial developments on the University of Louisville’s Shelby Campus. [Business First]

The police presence was strong at Clarksville’s most recent town council meeting. Not only were four reserve officers stationed at the door, manning the new metal detectors, but they appeared on the council’s agenda as well. [News & Tribune]

Fischer: Your White Privilege Is Showing

Officials have released the names of two people who were recently killed in separate incidents. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell and District Court Judge Stephanie Pearce Burke are again butting heads, this time over Burke’s handling of a case originally set for trial this week. If you haven’t kept up with this, it’s crazy. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer says that if you aren’t doing anything illegal, you’ve got nothing to worry about. Which should ring hollow for just about anybody with the ability to think on their own. Those 150+ shootings are super-compassionate. Nothing to see here, puppies and rainbows. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray applauded the work of the Urban County Council in its deliberation of his proposed $323 million budget on Tuesday but declined to say if he would veto any changes council made to the budget. [H-L]

State officials plan to keep an outreach center open for one more year in a southern Indiana county that’s facing the largest HIV outbreak in state history. [WLKY]

Don’t call Chris Christie rich. The Clintons say they still have bills to pay. And Mike Huckabee? Despite his wealth, he was born “blue collar, not blue blood.” [HuffPo]

This white lady assaulted a police officer by allegedly grabbing her throat. She wasn’t arrested or shot. [WAVE3]

Roughly half of deaths from 12 smoking-related cancers may be linked directly to cigarette use, a U.S. study estimates. [Reuters]

Some would-be homebuyers in Louisville are facing tough conditions. New figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors show that the number of homes available for sale is down 17 percent from last year. [WFPL]

Two years ago in the Netherlands, artist Paul de Kort designed an 81-acre park near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. His assignment? To use nothing but landscaping to dampen the noise of airplanes. Such a project had never been attempted—and the science behind his design was discovered almost by accident. [Gizmodo]

Commercial real estate developer William P. Butler intends to purchase Lexington, Ky.-based American Founders Bank and move its headquarters to Louisville, according to a news release from the bank. [Business First]

Contractual issues between the city and the New Albany police union could be ruled upon soon. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Loves Killing People

Two weeks after he took a personal leave of absence, principal at the Academy @ Shawnee Houston Barber has resigned from Jefferson County Public Schools. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Council members want to reallocate up to $5 million from Mayor Greg Fischer’s budget to supplement the city’s “embarrassing” road maintenance. [C-J/AKN]

Really? Killing the guy because he was swinging a flag pole? Way to go, Louisville, you love killing people. How compassionate. [WHAS11]

Bill Mott has conditioned some of the all-time greats in the sport of Thoroughbred racing. Yet last Sunday, he was just another fan on the Belmont Park backstretch, grinning ear to ear while asking fellow trainer Bob Baffert if he could get close to the gleaming bay colt, American Pharoah. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The loved ones of a man found dead in a west Louisville alley made an emotional plea Friday that someone come forward with information that might lead police to his killer. [WLKY]

The Iowa Supreme Court has affirmed the right to be drunk on your front porch. [HuffPo]

A local company hired to do cleanup related to the massive fire at GE Appliance Park is suing the conglomerate, claiming GE is refusing to pay its bill. [WAVE3]

When it comes to the National Security Agency’s recently disclosed use of automated speech recognition technology to search, index and transcribe voice communications, people in the United States may well be asking: But are they transcribing my phone calls? The answer is maybe. [The Intercept]

This seems like it’s worth paying attention to again. Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad on Wednesday asked the Metro Council to approve a near $170-million budget that includes funding for body cameras and more officers. [WFPL]

The state veterinarian has banned the sale of birds at flea markets and swap meets to protect Kentucky’s poultry industry amid an avian flu outbreak. [Glasgow Daily Times]

No. There is no such thing as too much bourbon fun. [Business First]

Though the New Albany Police Merit Commission has twice voted to fire former officer Laura Schook, the city administration and police department again declined Friday to release disciplinary-related documents in her personnel file. [News & Tribune]