The City’s Losing Yet Another Convention

Louisville sure is Compassionate City. According to LMPD spokesperson Dwight Mitchell, three people were found dead in a home on the 1600 block of Louis Coleman Jr. Drive after police responded to a report of shots fired in the neighborhood Saturday afternoon. [WDRB]

Thanks, religious extremists, for ruining hospitals everywhere when you buy them up! The state is investigating whether patient care is unsafe at University of Louisville Hospital because of staff cuts made by KentuckyOne Health. [C-J/AKN]

WARING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As violence continues to spike around the city, one neighborhood is continuing to combat crime by promoting a festival of non-violence. [WHAS11]

Meanwhile, the people who do all the actual work at UK are paid dirt in comparison. University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto received a 48 percent increase in his base pay and a three-year contract extension Friday. [H-L]

If it’s not a gun death, it’s a stabbing, so that’s fun. Police are investigating a stabbing in southern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell (R-Cowardly Grandmother) is supporting Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump for president — but he isn’t saying, at least for now, whether he thinks the business mogul is actually up to the job. [HuffPo]

A big convention in Louisville will finish out its contract, and then it will be off to another city. SkillsUSA Executive Director Timothy Lawrence said hotels and transportation are the two biggest factors why the organization will be switching locations in 2021. [WAVE3]

A tax break that benefits only about 2,000 people adds up to billions in savings for them — and billions lost for the US economy. Leo Hindery Jr. remembers the call he got the night before he was to testify before Congress, in September of 2007, to close a tax loophole enjoyed by private-equity investors. It was from Stephen Schwarzman, co-founder of the Blackstone Group, the largest private-equity management firm in the US. [Bill Moyers]

Residents wishing to rent their homes through online portals like Airbnb must soon adhere to a set of local regulations. [WFPL]

Republicans STILL DON’T have an actual health care alternative and they never will. The House GOP’s health-care proposal would expand savings accounts, provide tax credits for buying insurance, and allow people to purchase coverage across state lines. Just don’t ask how much it costs. [The Atlantic]

Aetna Inc. and Humana Inc. are giving themselves a little more time to shore everything up before merging. [Business First]

The last vote is just three days away, but some the details regarding Floyd Memorial Hospital’s sale to Baptist Health have raised concerns among local officials. [News & Tribune]

MSD & Health? In The Same Sentence?

Assistant Superintendent Amy Dennes has announced that she will retire from Jefferson County Public Schools effective Aug. 1. [WDRB]

Under proposed changes announced Wednesday by Gov. Matt Bevin, many Kentuckians covered by Medicaid would… Here’s your chance to watch poor Kentuckians suffer. As well as your chance to watch the Republican Party of Kentucky’s drunken, delusional leadership foam at the mouth about how wonderful this is. Such a shame the KDP has no guts. [C-J/AKN]

Water Step and MSD continue to spread their knowledge of healthy drinking water and education as a professor from Nairobi, Kenya is in town hoping to better his community. [WHAS11]

Two members of the former Kentucky Retirement Systems Board of Trustees are suing Gov. Matt Bevin, claiming Bevin did not have the authority to remove board chairman Thomas Elliott of Jefferson County from the panel. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Four people were shot in a Louisville apartment Tuesday night. Two died and two others are recovering. [WLKY]

Democrats literally sat down on the floor of the House chamber on Wednesday — and forced the House into a temporary recess — as part of an effort to compel Republican leadership to vote on gun control legislation. [HuffPo]

WAVE’s teabagger web guy is taking time out of his busy day of posting mugshots of brown people to bring you the important story about mulch fires. [WAVE3]

This should be filled with schadenfreude. Long-time Republican activist and public relations executive Scott Jennings will emcee this year’s Fancy Farm Picnic political speaking on Aug. 6. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Gas and Electric has chosen a solar energy company as a partner in a new effort to offer solar energy to business and industrial customers. [WFPL]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! What is white privilege – and do white Americans believe they benefit from it? [BBC]

America’s economy has been on the rebound since the Great Recession, but Uric Dufrene still spies some downward trends. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

Finally, An End To A Terrible Week

A spokeswoman for insurance giant Humana says the company is increasing security after receiving a report of graffiti found inside a restroom. [WDRB]

This is what lobbyists can get you. Norton Healthcare has secured city agreement to issue up to $725 million in tax-exempt bonds, with much of the proceeds targeted for helping to pay for a long list of capital projects. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell, author of Breaking Cardinal Rules, has now added her name to a lawsuit against some UofL students who claimed their degrees were diminished by her claims. [WHAS11]

Growing abuse of the powerful painkiller fentanyl drove the number of overdose deaths in Kentucky to a new record high in 2015, according to a report released Tuesday. [H-L]

Officials with MSD, LG&E and the Louisville Water Company announced the date for the 27th annual Ohio River sweep — June 18. [WLKY]

John McCain is responsible for the Orlando massacre because he has long pushed homophobic policies. [HuffPo]

Indiana State Police are asking for the public’s help in solving two homicide cases. On May 11, the bodies of Sarah Ipock, 30, and an unidentified male were pulled from the Ohio River by separate barge crews. [WAVE3]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

It seems unlikely that Louisville Metro Council members will approve a large sewer rate increase after a contentious budget hearing Wednesday. [WFPL]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. plans to build a four-story nursing home in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS: Still The Most-Hated Local Devil

The Jefferson County Board of Education met for more than three hours in executive session following its regular meeting Tuesday night to discuss the performance and evaluation of Superintendent Donna Hargens. [WDRB]

Tucked against an Ohio River levee in Rubbertown sits a plain brick building that on many rainy days is all that stands between nature’s fury and deadly flooding that could impact tens of thousands of residents. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Support from Mayor Mike Moore to ease traffic congestion on a busy road means hundreds of thousands of dollars getting pulled from an airport expansion agreement. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin spoke this past weekend at a Utah retreat organized by Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee who has been one of the most outspoken critics of Donald Trump. [H-L]

The Jefferson County Public Schools Board of Education met Tuesday night. Board members voted to approve a $165,603 contract with Bellarmine University and Dr. Theresa Magpuri-Lavell, an employee of Bellarmine University, for the third year of the JCPS-Bellarmine Literacy Project. [WLKY]

What we do know — what I’ve known my entire life — is that the sight of two men kissing is a stunning, terrifying thing. A dangerous thing. A thing that inspires fury and fear and violence and, yes, murder. [HuffPo]

Another tree fell in a storm, so Louisville media lost its mind for an entire day. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali grew up in a poor neighbourhood in segregated Louisville, Kentucky, in the 1950s. Sixty years later, segregation has yet to lose its grip on the city. [BBC]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking to ban nearly all apartments and condominiums from use as short-term rental units. [WFPL]

Last weekend, US TV show host John Oliver bought and forgave $15m (£10.3m) worth of medical debt, delighting hundreds of people who had defaulted on the sky-high expenses from life-threatening illnesses. It only cost him $60,000 plus a $50 set-up fee. So is it that simple? [BBC]

PNC Bank has agreed to pay millions of dollars to the University of Kentucky’s marketing partner to be the school’s “official” bank, with the school getting 70 percent of the proceeds. [Business First]

The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA) announced last week that New Hope Services has been approved for funding an expansion and rehabilitation of its Highland Glen housing community in Scottsburg. [News & Tribune]

UofL Hospital Sounds Like Tons Of Fun

A southern Indiana man was arrested in California yesterday armed with explosive chemicals and guns. Police say he told them he was headed to a gay pride event in Los Angeles. We spoke with some of Jim Howell’s neighbors who told us they had no idea how dangerous he was. [WDRB]

A leading University of Louisville surgeon says that staffing cuts by KentuckyOne Health at U of L Hospital have rendered it “unsafe” for the care of seriously ill and injured patients. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands marched from Indiana and Kentucky to show their support for the people of Orlando. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Community and Technical College System Board of Regents approved its budget for next year, which includes a 6.1 percent tuition increase for students and no raises for faculty or staff to help deal with continued budget cuts. [H-L]

Two people were taken to University Hospital after a shooting at a White Castle. [WLKY]

Rabbi Michael Lerner, a political activist and the editor of Tikkun Magazine, didn’t hesitate to get political while speaking at the funeral of sports legend Muhammad Ali, who died at age 74 on June 3. [HuffPo]

Twenty-year-old James Howell, who attended Ballard High School, has been arrested multiple times in Southern Indiana. [WAVE3]

A gunman wielding an assault-type rifle and a handgun took hostages and opened fire inside a crowded Florida nightclub, killing approximately 20 people and wounding 42 others before dying in a gunfight with SWAT officers, police said Sunday. [Politico]

The Kentucky Supreme Court will decide the fate of local minimum wage laws. On Friday, the court heard arguments over whether Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance violates state law by going beyond the scope of Kentucky’s minimum wage, which is tied to the federal rate of $7.25 per hour. [WFPL]

If you support this monster, you’re enabling, supporting, okaying, begging for more hatred. Donald J. Trump on Sunday sought to capitalize on the mass shooting at a gay club in Orlando, reiterating his controversial call for a temporary ban on Muslim migration to the United States and criticizing Hillary Clinton for what he claimed was her desire to “dramatically increase admissions from the Middle East.” [NY Times]

It’s so far, so good as Aetna Inc. works to fold Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

A new leader has been named to guide the News and Tribune’s editorial vision. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City Returned To Murder

It was a long, tumultuous school year for hundreds of JCPS bus drivers as they dealt with disruptive and abusive student behavior, often while trying to monitor traffic signals and navigate around pedestrians and other vehicles. [WDRB]

When it comes to hospital safety, Kentucky ranks worse than most other states, and no hospital in the Louisville area earned an “A” from a nonprofit group that recently evaluated scores of health-care institutions nationwide. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The woman killed in an early morning shooting has been identified. [WHAS11]

Celebrity chef and renowned restaurateur Bobby Flay has finalized a deal with WinStar Farm to acquire a minority interest in Grade I winner and Belmont Stakes entrant Creator. [H-L]

Two people were taken to University Hospital after a shooting at a White Castle. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali is remembered for his influence inside and outside of the boxing ring and for standing up for his principles in the face of fierce backlash. [HuffPo]

A cop got shot and suddenly the community cared about gun violence. Never mind the hundreds of other shootings. [WAVE3]

It is impossible to realize fully the significance of a time or events as one lives them. It’s only in looking back from a distance of time and perspective that you might be able to understand. [Ronnie Ellis]

Thousands of people crowded the streets of Louisville on Friday to pay their final respects to boxing legend Muhammad Ali. He died last week at age 74. [WFPL]

In the 1830s, the civilized world began to close debtors’ prisons, recognizing them as barbaric and also silly: The one way to ensure that citizens cannot repay debts is to lock them up. In the 21st century, the United States has reinstated a broad system of debtors’ prisons, in effect making it a crime to be poor. [NY Times]

Louisville has made another step toward bringing Google Fiber here. The Louisville Metro Council unanimously passed an ordinance Thursday that grants Google Fiber’s Kentucky affiliate a franchise for public right-of-way access to install communications infrastructure. [Business First]

For the first time since the 1970s, Clarksville selected a town manager to lead the town during a time of growth and redevelopment. Kevin Baity is expected to start work by the end of the month. [News & Tribune]

Just Bulldoze The Damn Racist Statue

The city’s parks department has pledged to change how it collects money at Iroquois Amphitheater after an audit found cash management practices there were “inadequate.” [WDRB]

Richard Braudus stood outside Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home in the Parkland neighborhood holding a portrait of the boxing legend and talking about their friendship as dozens gathered to take photographs and mourn the former heavyweight champion’s death. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It was another successful year for the WHAS Crusade for Children. The annual campaign raised more than $5.4 million this year. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky has spent more than $5 million in the last year to fix federal billing issues involving a Hazard cardiology practice it acquired three years ago, but UK officials have declined to provide documents detailing problems that led to the payments. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro police are investigating after shots were fired near Algonquin Park, sending people running in fear. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali was a man made of love, kindness and faith. In a 1974 interview with journalist David Frost, Ali said these were three of several qualities that he hoped people would always remember about him, long after the day he died. [HuffPo]

PEE ALERT! Thomas McAdam, notorious for saying some of the most heinous, racist shit you can imagine, is dropping a racist as a client? Please. [WAVE3]

This should make the Beshear Family happy. New payday loan sharking rules won’t stop predatory lenders. [The Intercept]

Maybe it was the way his life transected areas that define America – race and religion; war and sports – or perhaps it was his own love for words. Whatever the reason, Muhammad Ali’s life and career inspired writing that was nearly as captivating as the man himself. [WFPL]

Muhammad Ali crafted the plan for his final tribute years ago, long before he died. On Friday, his family will honor him just like he planned, with a global celebration in his hometown. [Richmond Register]

Louisville vegans, rejoice: The partners behind NOLAfare are opening their first restaurant. [Business First]

Individual health insurance costs are expected to climb across Indiana in 2017 as insurers continue to grapple with rising health care expenses and a market that was only recently overhauled by the federal Affordable Care Act. [News & Tribune]

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