UofL Loves Flushing Cash Down The Drain

Here’s a lesson in stupid lawsuits that draw even more attention to a scandal you wish would go away. [WDRB]

With Halloween approaching, the mansion for the University of Louisville president in the Cherokee Triangle is once again decorated for the holiday, and President James Ramsey and his wife, Jane, may hand out treats to trick-or-treaters on Halloween night Saturday as they have in the past. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 and the Center for Women and Families are teaming up for a new challenge. [WHAS11]

Lexington could be poised to become the second city in Kentucky to increase the minimum wage. [H-L]

The attorney for the woman at the center of Louisville basketball’s recruitment sex scandal answered questions on local radio. [WLKY]

Tuberculosis has joined HIV/AIDS as the top infectious disease killer on the planet, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The downtown bridge project is one step closer to being completed. The bridge is officially connected from river bank to river bank across the Ohio. [WAVE3]

A group of nearly 40 representatives, from the Congressional Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses, wrote to Attorney General Loretta Lynch Wednesday morning, requesting that the Department of Justice do more to address gun violence in minority communities across the country. [Mother Jones]

The Louisville Water Company has finished the phase-out of two hazardous chemicals that were stored at both of the company’s water treatment plants. [WFPL]

A panel of medical experts said on Friday the prices of prescription medicines in the United States need to be brought in line with the value they bring to patients instead of continuing to let drugmakers set any price they choose. [Reuters]

The U.S. Department of Justice says AB Electrolux is stonewalling it in its fight over the GE Appliances merger, according to a report by legal site Law360. [Business First]

Construction on the renovated Jeffersonville marina — now called Fisherman’s Wharf — is complete, according to an announcement. [News & Tribune]

Who’ll Get Rich Off The Dixie Highway $?

A Bullitt County District Court Judge has dismissed all charges against a man who shot down a drone he said was flying over his property. [WDRB]

She’s great but Donna Hargens probably won’t listen to her at all. Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens has taken her first step to refill her decimated cabinet, naming Dena Dossett as the district’s new chief of data management. [C-J/AKN]

A safer, better Dixie Highway is in the works thanks to a nearly $17 million grant awarded to the city. It will be used for the Transforming Dixie Highway project which will ease congestion and make the area safer for both drivers and pedestrians from Broadway to the Gene Snyder Freeway. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky is going to break with tradition when the General Assembly convenes in January — instead of asking for money for new buildings, UK is going to ask for funding to fix up older ones in the campus core. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro police are investigating two weekend shootings that left three men dead. [WLKY]

This is worth remembering as Amazon does all of its temporary hiring here in the metro area. [HuffPo]

Why do we, as a city, keep acting as if these neighborhood meetings over murders are going to solve everything? It’s admirable and all but… seriously. Nothing’s gonna change until our elected leadership changes. The Oakdale Neighborhood Association announced an emergency meeting in response to early Saturday morning’s double homicide. [WAVE3]

The US Ambassador to the UK has told Sky News that his country’s gun violence problem is the number one issue for the British people he has met in his two years in the London embassy. [Sky]

Housing, legal and data experts will be on hand for two events next week aimed at examining the impact a Supreme Court ruling earlier this year will have on fair housing in Louisville. [WFPL]

University students have less privacy for their campus health records than they would have if they sought care off campus. Schools say they are trying to seek the right balance between privacy and safety. [ProPublica]

Sweden-based AB Electrolux says it will likely spend about $64.6 million in integration costs related to the purchase of Louisville-based GE Appliances. [Business First]

Clark County has started steps to secure a grant to assess potential redevelopment spots for environmental contamination issues. [News & Tribune]

Another Deadly Weekend As Greg Fischer Pushes His Compassionate City Fallacy

If you missed it late Friday, a human trafficking task force has offered to train the University of Louisville in the wake of its latest scandal. [Page One]

Three people are dead after two separate shootings in Louisville took place Saturday morning. [WDRB]

A Jefferson district court judge on Friday ruled that the traffic school program that has generated more than $1.2 million in revenue for County Attorney Mike O’Connell’s office is unconstitutional. [C-J/AKN]

One man is dead after a shooting in the Lake Dreamland neighborhood Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

The city of Lexington might be paying the new 21c Museum Hotel more than $200,000 to replace sidewalks and put in other improvements on North Upper Street. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Family and friends surrounded police tape in the 800 block of West Evelyn Avenue on Saturday morning, while they waited to learn if their loved one was killed in a shooting on Saturday around 12:30 a.m. Two men died as a result of the shooting. [WLKY]

Targeting one of education’s most divisive issues, President Barack Obama on Saturday called for capping standardized testing at 2 percent of classroom time and said the government shares responsibility for turning tests into the be-all and end-all of American schools. [HuffPo]

Two Louisville families lost brothers and sons to gunfire near Churchill Downs early Saturday morning. [WAVE3]

The mayor of Lousville crossed the Atlantic to pay a a visit to Rotherham’s Advanced Manufacturing Park. Mayor Greg Fischer — the Kentucky city’s 50th mayor — paid a visit to the state-of-the-art research facility last Wednesday (21). [Click the Clicky]

An assistant University of Missouri-Kansas City basketball coach has resigned, saying he can’t do his job while battling what he called “false allegations” that he hired dancers to strip and have sex with recruits while he was a coach at Louisville. [WFPL]

Rufus Scales, 26 and black, was driving his younger brother Devin to his hair-cutting class in this genteel, leafy city when they heard the siren’s whoop and saw the blue light in the rearview mirror of their black pickup. Two police officers pulled them over for minor infractions that included expired plates and failing to hang a flag from a load of scrap metal in the pickup’s bed. But what happened next was nothing like a routine traffic stop. [NY Times]

Members of the Louisville-based Independent Pilots Association, a union that represents pilots for United Parcel Service Inc., has voted to authorize a strike against the Atlanta-based shipping giant. [Business First]

Two police agencies in Clark County have been awarded more than $50,000 for crime prevention and policing initiatives. [News & Tribune]

All Kinds Of Compassionate Things Happening

It was almost a year ago when Jefferson County Public Schools officials presented an annual report to the school board about the district’s effort to recruit and hire more minority teachers. [WDRB]

Charter, with the assistance of people like Riggs Lewis, are *this close* to fleecing taxpayers by manipulating your legislative representation. [C-J/AKN]

Family members remember DeShawndre Davis as a charming man who loved to make people laugh. His father said he was at the wrong place at the wrong time when he was shot and killed on Dixie Highway last Sunday. [WHAS11]

Andy Beshear emphasizes that he is his own man, but family ties have been an enormous boon to the Democratic nominee for attorney general. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA! While surrounded by gunshot-wound survivors, community members and relatives, Andrea Davis expressed anger over a shooting during the funeral visitation for his son Deshawndre Davis. [WLKY]

Amid the heroin epidemic, there is little disagreement over the effectiveness of naloxone, the medication that can revive opioid addicts from an overdose. It has come to be seen as an essential tool to combat the skyrocketing number of overdoses. [HuffPo]

Wasn’t that fun, Compassionate City? A vehicle struck several juveniles, sending at least nine to the hospital, early Sunday morning in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Remember the firefighter mess here in Possumbilly City? New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said on Friday the city had agreed to pay $75 million to settle a longstanding dispute with its firefighters over back wages, ending a quarrel in which he was threatened with house arrest. [Reuters]

Louisville Metro Department of Public Health is expanding the city’s syringe exchange program to a second location. [WFPL]

Kentucky, once a near Democratic monopoly, is seeing more voters register Republican and now has a Republican-majority congressional district for the first time since 1999. [Richmond Register]

These have been heady times for those in the domestic whiskey business. Especially for Louisville’s Brown-Forman, the home of Jack Daniel’s, Woodford Reserve, Old Forrester, and so many other notable brown water brands. [Business First]

The residents of Sellersburg chose the same person to be their clerk-treasurer for five straight elections. On Nov. 3, they won’t have that chance. Sellersburg residents will have to choose who will replace the late Dave Kinder. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun Humana Things Happening…

Wait, 448 square feet is tiny? In May, WDRB took you to Louisville’s very first permanent tiny house, which had just broken ground. Five months later, we take you inside now that the house is finished. [WDRB]

In her first comments to a reporter since the publication of her book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” Katina Powell said in a brief interview Friday that her daughters support the book in which she claims she provided them as escorts for University of Louisville players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

After months of community meetings discussing the site for the proposed West Louisville FoodPort, organizers held an event to celebrate the season as well share more information about the project Saturday. [WHAS11]

Democrat Andy Beshear and Republican Whitney Westerfield are the men publicly running to be Kentucky’s next attorney general. But behind the scenes, scores of corporations, wealthy businessmen, lawyers, lobbyists and labor unions have given several million dollars to two independent groups loosely affiliated with the Democratic and Republican parties, which are spending that money on a barrage of attack ads meant to influence voters. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A triple shooting in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood leaves two dead and one injured. [WLKY]

Migrants streaming across the Balkans reached Slovenia on Saturday, diverted overnight by the closure of Hungary’s border with Croatia in the latest demonstration of Europe’s disjointed response to the flow of people reaching its borders. [HuffPo]

Of all the things that are hard to understand, shots fired at a visitation are near the top of the list. Especially, when it was gun fire that claimed the life of the 22-year-old in the casket. [WAVE3]

Maybe we’ll take homelessness this seriously in Louisville some day. Hawaii’s governor has signed an emergency proclamation to deal with the problem of homelessness, saying the state faces the country’s highest per capita rate of homelessness and more needs to be done to house the indigent. [Reuters]

West Louisville residents are organizing against a proposed biodigester plant, where organic waste would be converted into methane gas. The efforts come as Louisville Metro officials — including Mayor Greg Fischer — and the energy company behind the proposal work to educate the community about the technology. [WFPL]

It used to be a given: When your kids reached school age, they’d strap on their backpacks and head for the neighborhood elementary school. Or, you’d pay a hefty tuition to send them to private school. In the last two decades, a third option has emerged. Today, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the country. And lately, they’ve been the subject of passionate and often acrimonious debate about the right way to fix public education in America. [NPR]

The guests have arrived, the band is playing and bride and groom are meeting at the altar. Then the chaplain asks, “does anyone object?” That’s the question Monday for insurers Humana Inc. and Aetna Inc., as shareholders of both companies vote on whether to approve a merger that would combine Humana’s growing Medicare business with Aetna’s portfolio to create the second-largest managed-care company in the United States. [Business First]

Legislation, its effects on funding public schools and the advent of major changes in public education are the discussion table for a meeting of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education on Wednesday, Oct. 21. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Kill Like This

200 trees? Try 200,000. Then we can start talking about the tree canopy here in Possibility City. [WDRB]

A bipartisan pair of Louisville council members want to restrict Mayor Greg Fischer’s office from making any changes to the city’s portion of the Neighborhood Place partnership without Metro Council approval. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating the murder of a man found at the intersection of 20th and Chestnut streets. [WHAS11]

More than 100 former Jefferson County Public Schools students who dropped out are now re-enrolled in classes. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway after two people were found dead Monday afternoon inside a home in southeastern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Will body cameras be a tool for police reform? Only if bad policy doesn’t get in the way. [HuffPo]

Eight people have been wounded by gunfire in the Greater Louisville area since Friday afternoon. Four of them died. It is in this background that Louisville Councilwoman Mary C. Woolridge will introduce the new Commander of the Louisville Metro Police Department Second Division to the community.

The Shell Farms & Greenhouses is an expansive 1,000-acre property in Garrard County, 37 miles south of Lexington, Kentucky. The five-generation family farm is operated by 31-year-old Giles Shell and his 60-year-old father, Gary. The two are whizzes at making ornamental flowers flourish, and like most farmers in the area, the family has grown tobacco for years. [Newsweek]

The author of the bestselling book on people’s relationship with water will be among the speakers Monday during the IdeaFestival Water event. [WFPL]

On the evening of April 29th last year, in the southern Minnesota town of Waseca, a woman was doing the dishes when she looked out her kitchen window and saw a young man walking through her back yard. [New Yorker]

Sarah Davasher-Wisdom has been promoted to senior vice president of public affairs and strategy at Greater Louisville Inc. [Business First]

Throughout all three debates this election season, Jeffersonville mayoral candidates Mike Moore and Dennis Julius challenged the accuracy of some of each others’ statements, asking audience members to look it up for themselves. [News & Tribune]

Bad News For UofL Continues To Flow

When Kentucky and Indiana start charging drivers to cross the Ohio River next year, a cadre of behind-the-scenes workers will oversee toll transactions on three bridges. It’s estimated that more than 110,000 vehicles will use those spans each day. [WDRB]

A “major progress announcement” in regard to the Downtown Crossing portion of the Ohio River Bridges Project is scheduled to be made by Gov. Steve Beshear and other top officials Monday morning. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Plans are proceeding to build in Mercer County the largest solar-powered generating facility in Kentucky. Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities announced Friday that they have secured a contract for engineering, procurement and construction of the facility, and that construction is expected to begin in November. [H-L]

Oh, wait! Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Black men from around the nation are gathering on the National Mall to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March and call for policing reforms and changes in black communities. [HuffPo]

It’s the latest unfavorable national headline for the University of Louisville. This one reads, “Louisville created and continues to nurture dangerous culture for women,” and it tops a story that was posted on Sports Illustrated’s website SI.com Friday. [WAVE3]

Back in 1990, as the debate over climate change was heating up, a dissident shareholder petitioned the board of Exxon, one of the world’s largest oil companies, imploring it to develop a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from its production plants and facilities. The board’s response: Exxon had studied the science of global warming and concluded it was too murky to warrant action. The company’s “examination of the issue supports the conclusions that the facts today and the projection of future effects are very unclear.” [LA Times]

In what alternate universe does Louisville have a transportation plan that doesn’t suck? [WFPL]

The color of debt: how collection suits squeeze black neighborhoods. [ProPublica]

Louisville, meet your new integration overlord. His name is Rick Jelinek, and he’s been selected by Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. to help it integrate Louisville-based health insurer Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

Clarksville is moving forward with the next phase of its comprehensive plan, with the Planning Commission now working toward writing up the formal plan based on input gathered at five recent public meetings. [News & Tribune]