Give Thanks For The Needle Exchange

Metro Louisville’s needle exchange program designed to combat the heroin crisis kicks off today. [WDRB]

What’s that? One of Greg Fischer’s “innovation” team members was tazed and arrested after allegedly leaving a child in a hot car? And he works for former Metro Animal Services shyster Donald Robinson? Surely not. [C-J/AKN]

What the hell is wrong with people these days?! [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday told lawmakers Monday that state officials would work with Fayette County staff to develop a plan aimed at closing the achievement gap. [H-L]

Really, what the hell is wrong with people!? Louisville Metro Police investigators were at Ballard Park again Tuesday morning, collecting evidence after a 9-year-old boy was shot Monday night. [WLKY]

Next season’s flu shot will contain two new flu strains that weren’t present in last season’s shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

These data only include base pay and don’t include monstrous payouts from, say, the UofL Foundation. [WAVE3]

The rate of abortions falls across almost all of the US since 2010, a new survey from the Associated Press suggests. [BBC]

Bluegrass musicians played a Kentucky-flavored tune at the graduation ceremony last week for nine graduates, who received their bachelor of fine arts degree. [WFPL]

After watching the biggest donors increasingly shun the major political parties and send their six-figure checks to super-PACs and other outside spending groups, Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress made a sly bid last December to bring billionaires and millionaires back into the party fold. [Mother Jones]

American Pharoah wasn’t a shoo-in to win the Triple Crown. But his prospects for victory appeared more likely than other Thoroughbreds that won both the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes in recent years. [Business First]

A tiny park in the middle of downtown Jeffersonville is now easier to enjoy. [News & Tribune]

Let’s See How Many Compassionate Possibility City Shootings Greg Fischer Can Try To Ignore This Year

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. A shooting in the Parkland neighborhood sent two people to the hospital. [WDRB]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [C-J/AKN]

On any given baseball diamond, you’re likely to find a young boy shine. The pride of a parent means alot, especially if you’re Scott Patrick and you’re parents outnumber your entire team. [WHAS11]

Want a look at what’s going on with Lexington’s school district? A Bryan Station High School teacher has told the Fayette County school board that the district’s failure to provide enough resources for a behavior management plan meant that “disruptions, disengagement and acts of violence and aggression are far too common at our school.” [H-L]

Locust Grove, the 18th century home of the sister and brother-in-law of George Rogers Clark and William Clark, is growing industrial hemp. [WLKY]

At a time of historic economic inequality, it should be a no-brainer to raise a tax on inherited wealth for the very rich. Yet there’s a move among some members of Congress to abolish it altogether. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there were two separate shootings Sunday evening. Police are investigating two separate shootings that happened about an hour apart overnight in Louisville. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is using an online questionnaire to gather additional public input about the future of quail restoration efforts in the state. [Richmond Register]

America’s top sire commands some $300,000 for each of his offspring. That adds up to about $35 million a year — and potentially hundreds of millions over his lifetime. [WFPL]

Science issues aren’t usually hot topics for presidential candidates, whose rhetoric tends to revolve more around jobs and the economy than space exploration and funding for energy research. But one organization wants to change that, and is pushing for 2016 presidential candidates to agree to a full debate on science issues, including climate change. [ThinkProgress]

People pulled out their wallets in a big way for this year’s WHAS Crusade for Children. The 62nd annual event raised nearly $5.7 million for children who have special need. [Business First]

Positive skin tests came back for 48 people tested for tuberculosis at Rock Creek Community Academy on Thursday, Clark County Health Department officials said, but that doesn’t mean 48 people have the disease. [News & Tribune]

Happy Greg Fischer Rainbow Funtimes

Bank Street in Portland could become the new E. Market Street in Nulu. A new soccer stadium for the Louisville City Football Club could be built in West Louisville. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have opened an in-custody death review after a man who police handcuffed late Saturday became unresponsive and died soon after. [C-J/AKN]

A salary review is underway for six top UofL officials, including president James Ramsey. [WHAS11]

Health insurance costs will probably jump by 10 percent or more next year for many Kentuckians buying coverage through Kynect, the state-run insurance exchange created under the federal Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

An activist and a University of Louisville doctor are shining light on gun violence in the city. [WLKY]

A majority of Democratic members in the House and Senate have now signed on to letters rebuking the Obama administration for expanding the practice of detaining immigrant women and children. [HuffPo]

Oh, look, people are finally realizing that Greg Fischer is an entitled d-bag. Kind of like the Brown Family found out after it was too late. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah drew the favorable post number five for the 147th running of the Belmont Stakes on Saturday when the colt looks to become the first Triple Crown winner in nearly four decades. [Reuters]

Is this the “essence and spirit” of Louisville or of every other modern building in every other generic city on earth? It’s not ugly but it’s certainly not got anything Louisville about it. [WFPL]

College admissions take a crucial factor into account that could be creating enormous racial bias, but it’s not grades or extracurricular activities or even SAT scores. It’s a student’s disciplinary record. [ThinkProgress]

The LG&E Center, the downtown office tower at 220 W. Main St., has a new owner. [Business First]

Citing more time for review, the Jeffersonville Board of Public Works has twice tabled city paving bids wherein the lowest bidder sued the city last year. [News & Tribune]

County Attorney’s Office Sounds Fun

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has reprimanded a prosecutor and ordered him to go to sensitivity training for making “insensitive and derogatory” comments about the family that owns Hwang’s Martial Arts Academy. [WDRB]

Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer will be called to testify before a Kentucky legislative committee this month over allegations that his office is not physically examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

You might have to dig a little deeper to pay for your college degree as the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is set to vote on a tuition hike Thursday. [WHAS11]

Ahmed Zayat spends big money buying and betting on horses, and brags about how successful he’s been at everything he’s set out to accomplish. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just days into a pilot program for police body cameras, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has gone on the record to address concerns from the public. [WLKY]

The leaders of six of Europe’s largest oil producers are calling for a plan to price planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, citing climate change as “a critical challenge for our world.” [HuffPo]

For the third consecutive year Ford Motor Company says it will shorten the annual summer shutdown at some of its plants in order to meet the demand by consumers for vehicles. [WAVE3]

New York City, Baltimore and other major cities have seen a recent rise in gun violence. The uptick has raised the alarm for many police departments that worry the summer months may make the problem worse. [NPR]

Louisville transportation officials are offering bus passes to young people this summer at a discounted rate. [WFPL]

More than 150 people in southeast Indiana have been diagnosed with HIV, the largest outbreak in state history. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. has completed the sale of its Concentra Inc. subsidiary for $1.06 billion in cash. [Business First]

Section 8 housing voucher system, social security income, food stamps — Kelli Orman wishes she didn’t have to rely on any of these low-income assistance services. [News & Tribune]

Council Holding Fischer Accountable

A bipartisan group of Louisville Metro Council members wants more information about how Mayor Greg Fischer nominates people to scores of city boards and commissions. But not David Yates — he cowardly removed his name as a sponsor. [WDRB]

How do people even have kids knowing this crap can happen? Too terrifying to think about. [C-J/AKN]

For the first time the public is seeing a second incident where a school resource officer appears to punch a middle school student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is calling for a 140-mile extension of the Mountain Parkway from Prestonsburg to Beckley, W.Va., at a cost of $8 billion to $10 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood that left one man hospitalized. [WLKY]

College graduates, brace yourselves for some disappointing news. Wages for university grads are 2.5 percent lower than what they were 15 years ago, according to the latest edition of the Economic Policy Institute’s annual report on the labor market prospects of new workers. [HuffPo]

A New Albany councilman referred to a colleague as a “lying piece of (expletive)” during a debate over public prayer on Monday. Councilman Dan Coffey made the comment into an open microphone, yet denied using the curse word during a brief, tense interview after the meeting. [WAVE3]

On Wednesday, when President Barack Obama spoke at the US Coast Guard Academy’s commencement ceremony, he called climate change “an immediate risk to our national security.” In recent months, the Obama administration has repeatedly highlighted the international threats posed by global warming and has emphasized the need for the country’s national security agencies to study and confront the issue. [Mother Jones]

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced more than $54 million in grant funds to clean up contaminated brownfields sites around the country, and one of the projects getting funding is in Louisville. [WFPL]

The lawyer for the man who alleges that Ahmed Zayat has not paid a $2 million gambling debt filed a $10 million libel suit on Monday against Zayat, the owner of American Pharoah. [NY Times]

Cecilia Henderson, the 71-year-old widow of Angel’s Envy bourbon creator Lincoln Henderson, is suing her son, saying that Wesley Henderson has “effectively stolen” her share of proceeds from a recent sale to Bacardi Ltd. [Business First]

A community that successfully addresses homelessness is a united one, according to Michael Stoops, the director of community organizing at the National Coalition for the Homeless. [News & Tribune]

Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City: Come For The Bourbon & Secrecy, Stay For The Shootings

Louisville loves a good shooting — especially if it involves a police officer. [WDRB]

Oh, look, Martha read something on The ‘Ville Voice and wrote about it again. [C-J/AKN]

If they have to ruin perfectly good bourbon with mint and sugar, at least it’s for charity. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s mayor is spending money to save buildings from the 1960s and Louisville has Greg Fischer. [H-L]

See? Another fun shooting in Possibility City! Police are investigating a shooting that sent two people to the hospital on Monday evening. [WLKY]

U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Katie Higgins’ dream as a little girl was to follow in her family’s footsteps and become a pilot. Her dream came true in 2011, when she received her wings. But last weekend, she flew even higher when she became the first female pilot with the prestigious Blue Angels. [HuffPo]

They said “Hooker Hotel” in the headline, so that’s pretty much all you need to know. Though, if they can bulldoze historic downtown properties, the least the city could do is bulldoze this joint. [WAVE3]

What, you thought merely the handful of wingnut extremists in the presidential race was enough? [The Hill]

A bad break-up about a year ago put Jewel Owens in a situation she’d never been before. [WFPL]

A mega company’s bid to change the product and flow direction of an existing natural gas pipeline is drawing the attention and concern of citizens and environmental groups across Kentucky. [The Morehead News]

Investigators say that the cost of replacing GE Appliances’ building that was destroyed by fire could reach $400 million, and they say that the fire destroyed $60 million worth of parts. [Business First]

Mayor Bob Hall says concerns about the scope of a steering committee aimed at improving the Pleasant Ridge neighborhood have given him pause in accepting an invitation to the board. [News & Tribune]