Compassionate City Returned To Murder

It was a long, tumultuous school year for hundreds of JCPS bus drivers as they dealt with disruptive and abusive student behavior, often while trying to monitor traffic signals and navigate around pedestrians and other vehicles. [WDRB]

When it comes to hospital safety, Kentucky ranks worse than most other states, and no hospital in the Louisville area earned an “A” from a nonprofit group that recently evaluated scores of health-care institutions nationwide. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The woman killed in an early morning shooting has been identified. [WHAS11]

Celebrity chef and renowned restaurateur Bobby Flay has finalized a deal with WinStar Farm to acquire a minority interest in Grade I winner and Belmont Stakes entrant Creator. [H-L]

Two people were taken to University Hospital after a shooting at a White Castle. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali is remembered for his influence inside and outside of the boxing ring and for standing up for his principles in the face of fierce backlash. [HuffPo]

A cop got shot and suddenly the community cared about gun violence. Never mind the hundreds of other shootings. [WAVE3]

It is impossible to realize fully the significance of a time or events as one lives them. It’s only in looking back from a distance of time and perspective that you might be able to understand. [Ronnie Ellis]

Thousands of people crowded the streets of Louisville on Friday to pay their final respects to boxing legend Muhammad Ali. He died last week at age 74. [WFPL]

In the 1830s, the civilized world began to close debtors’ prisons, recognizing them as barbaric and also silly: The one way to ensure that citizens cannot repay debts is to lock them up. In the 21st century, the United States has reinstated a broad system of debtors’ prisons, in effect making it a crime to be poor. [NY Times]

Louisville has made another step toward bringing Google Fiber here. The Louisville Metro Council unanimously passed an ordinance Thursday that grants Google Fiber’s Kentucky affiliate a franchise for public right-of-way access to install communications infrastructure. [Business First]

For the first time since the 1970s, Clarksville selected a town manager to lead the town during a time of growth and redevelopment. Kevin Baity is expected to start work by the end of the month. [News & Tribune]

Puke Alert: Ali Funeral Ticket Scalpers

The Jefferson County Coroner’s office could soon be without a morgue in a battle between county and state. [WDRB]

When young Cassius Clay returned to his hometown in 1960 after winning an Olympic gold medal as a light heavyweight, he was greeted by hundreds of fans at the airport, and a 30-car motorcade followed him to Central High School, his alma mater. [C-J/AKN]

People are so disgusting that they scalped tickets FOR A FUNERAL! It’s so gross we’re still thinking about it more than 24 hours later. [WHAS11]

Have you seen what’s going on in Lexington? Houses and other buildings on 10-acre lots must be excluded from the total acreage before an agricultural exemption on property taxes can be given to a homeowner, according to an official legal opinion from the Kentucky Department of Revenue to Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator David O’Neill. [H-L]

Compassionate City has reached peak pedestrian accident. Getting hit by an LMPD cruiser takes the cake. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama mourned the death of boxing legend Muhammad Ali in a Saturday statement, remembering “The Greatest” for his talent and his spirit. [HuffPo]

Why we love Louisville: someone gets shot every day. [WAVE3]

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats. [The Intercept]

Demand for bourbon is putting pressure on the population of Kentucky’s white oak trees, which are used to make staves for whiskey barrels. [WFPL]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Forty-five years after founding his fire-protection company, Richard Barber was considering an expansion plan. Meanwhile, an Indiana company was looking for growth opportunities. [Business First]

Getting some answers on the process and what’s coming forward for the Summit Springs development off State Street is the aim of a city council work session Monday night. [News & Tribune]

Shootings, Shootings & More Shootings!

Greater Louisville Inc. is calling on employees of Louisville businesses to line the procession route for boxing legend Muhammad Ali on Friday. [WDRB]

Gov. Matt Bevin on Friday appointed three new members to the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD is investigating a shooting that may have injured a child. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey and three-time Kentucky Derby winner Kent Desormeaux issued a brief statement Saturday through his agent, J.R. Pegram, stating that Desormeaux will return to riding in New York on June 9 following a brief stay in an alcohol rehabilitation program at Cirque Lodge in Sundance, Utah. [H-L]

There are several events going on around Louisville this week to honor Muhammad Ali. [WLKY]

Throughout U.S. history, white Americans have toned down the life stories of radical people of color so that they can celebrate them as they want them to be, not as they were. [HuffPo]

Another day, another bunch of shootings in Compassionate City. It’s really compassionate. [WAVE3]

On the morning of May 29, 2014, an overcast Thursday in Washington, DC, the general counsel of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Robert Litt, wrote an email to high-level officials at the National Security Agency and the White House. [VICE]

Regulations governing Louisville’s short-term rental industry won’t take effect until later this summer. [WFPL]

Arising from the shadows of the American repressed, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump have been sending chills through the corridors of establishment power. Who would have thunk it? [Bill Moyers]

No more Red7e? The Kentucky Science Center has named PriceWeber Marketing Communications Inc. as its agency of record. [Business First]

The heart of Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana work is in Dawn Klemm’s sunny living room, decorated with the coastal blues inspired by Charleston, South Carolina and aided by the company of her pug. [News & Tribune]

Just Bulldoze The Damn Racist Statue

The city’s parks department has pledged to change how it collects money at Iroquois Amphitheater after an audit found cash management practices there were “inadequate.” [WDRB]

Richard Braudus stood outside Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home in the Parkland neighborhood holding a portrait of the boxing legend and talking about their friendship as dozens gathered to take photographs and mourn the former heavyweight champion’s death. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It was another successful year for the WHAS Crusade for Children. The annual campaign raised more than $5.4 million this year. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky has spent more than $5 million in the last year to fix federal billing issues involving a Hazard cardiology practice it acquired three years ago, but UK officials have declined to provide documents detailing problems that led to the payments. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro police are investigating after shots were fired near Algonquin Park, sending people running in fear. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali was a man made of love, kindness and faith. In a 1974 interview with journalist David Frost, Ali said these were three of several qualities that he hoped people would always remember about him, long after the day he died. [HuffPo]

PEE ALERT! Thomas McAdam, notorious for saying some of the most heinous, racist shit you can imagine, is dropping a racist as a client? Please. [WAVE3]

This should make the Beshear Family happy. New payday loan sharking rules won’t stop predatory lenders. [The Intercept]

Maybe it was the way his life transected areas that define America – race and religion; war and sports – or perhaps it was his own love for words. Whatever the reason, Muhammad Ali’s life and career inspired writing that was nearly as captivating as the man himself. [WFPL]

Muhammad Ali crafted the plan for his final tribute years ago, long before he died. On Friday, his family will honor him just like he planned, with a global celebration in his hometown. [Richmond Register]

Louisville vegans, rejoice: The partners behind NOLAfare are opening their first restaurant. [Business First]

Individual health insurance costs are expected to climb across Indiana in 2017 as insurers continue to grapple with rising health care expenses and a market that was only recently overhauled by the federal Affordable Care Act. [News & Tribune]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Louisville Loves A Good Pedestrian Accident

A young child is in critical condition after being hit by a vehicle in west Louisville. [WDRB]

The Memorial Day weekend wasn’t the deadliest on record by any stretch, but three deaths in unrelated incidents and a shooting near University of Louisville that left a college student seriously injured still made for a tragic holiday. The slayings increased Louisville’s 2016 homicides total to 47. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a story about a pedestrian accident in J-town. [WHAS11]

The U.S Department of Labor has funded a grant worth $3.4 million to help retrain out-of-work coal miners in Kentucky. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting at Lincoln and Colorado avenues. [WLKY]

As the nation once again honors American war dead on Memorial Day, instead of spouting the usual nationalistic platitudes that that U.S. soldiers fought to keep the country “safe and free,” perhaps we should analyze whether that is really true. [HuffPo]

If you’re going to run hyped up stories about suicide attempts, the least you could do is include resources for those in need. [WAVE]

The Federal Reserve should raise interest rates “in the coming months” if the economy picks up as expected and jobs continue to be generated, U.S. central bank chief Janet Yellen said on Friday, bolstering the case for a rate increase in June or July. [Reuters]

Is the Portland renaissance real? An assessment of progress. [WFPL]

Courtrooms across the nation are using computer programs to predict who will be a future criminal. The programs help inform decisions on everything from bail to sentencing. They are meant to make the criminal justice system fairer — and to weed out human biases. [ProPublica]

Wait, this came as a surprise to people? Some folks must live in an alternate universe. [Business First]

Shelters across the state are losing government money due to a massive policy shift that emphasizes permanent housing for the homeless. [News & Tribune]

Deadly Weekend In Compassionate City

One person is dead following a shooting at a park in southwest Jefferson county. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer unveiled his budget plan Thursday, devoting $2.5 million toward the Affordable Housing Trust Fund, which has been woefully underfunded since its inception eight years ago. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! With shootings continuing to rise in the area, Kentucky’s lieutenant governor is reaching out in efforts to help tackle the problem. [WHAS11]

Kentucky officials say unemployment rates fell in 83 of the state’s counties between April 2015 and April 2016. Jobless rates rose in 33 counties and stayed the same in four. [H-L & Press Release]

Maybe E-town is the worst. Police have arrested an Elizabethtown man on a felony charge that he struck his adult son in the head with a claw hammer. [WLKY]

The presidential campaign of Donald Trump has largely been a policy-free, fact-free, detail-free event, based on emotion (especially fear), pandering to shallow slogans (“Make America Great”), and the aggressive personal and ad hominem abuse of his Republican and Democratic opponents. [HuffPo]

Two people, a male and a female, were shot early Sunday morning near the University of Louisville campus. [WAVE3]

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says Edward Snowden performed a “public service” by triggering a debate over surveillance techniques, but still must pay a penalty for illegally leaking a trove of classified intelligence documents. [CNN]

Louisville is now officially in ozone season, the several months every year when pollution and meteorological factors contribute to unhealthy ozone levels in the area. [WFPL]

The Federal Reserve should raise interest rates “in the coming months” if the economy picks up as expected and jobs continue to be generated, U.S. central bank chief Janet Yellen said on Friday, bolstering the case for a rate increase in June or July. [Reuters]

Kentucky State Fair Board chairman Mark Lynn has appointed a search committee to find a replacement for Clifford “Rip” Rippetoe, the former fair board president and CEO, who recently departed to take a job in San Diego. [Business First]

For kids in Floyd County this summer, there will be such a thing as free lunch. Starting June 6, children under the age of 18 and adults enrolled in a state-approved education program for the mentally or physically disabled can get lunch and a snack at no charge. [News & Tribune]

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Fun Weekend Of Compassionate Shootings

Police are investigating a shooting that happened overnight near U of L’s campus. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has agreed to pay $1.75 million to the family of a 16-year-old disabled boy who suffered two fractured legs —a life-threatening injury — after he was physically restrained by a teaching assistant. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The public is beginning tours of Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home. [WHAS11]

Hotel and motel stays in Fayette County will cost more this fall. On Thursday, the Urban County Council voted unanimously to increase the Fayette County hotel and motel tax by 2.5 percentage points to pay for a nearly $250 million overhaul and expansion of the Lexington Convention Center. That means hotel taxes will rise to 9.5 percent. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating the death of a woman in south Louisville. [WLKY]

The United States has killed the leader of the Afghan Taliban in an air strike in a remote border area just inside Pakistan, Afghanistan said on Sunday, in an attack likely to dash any immediate prospect for peace talks. [HuffPo]

Two people were shot early Sunday morning near the University of Louisville campus. [WAVE3]

Your risk of getting killed by a car goes up with every mile per hour. [ProPublica]

The Portland Investment Initiative, an organization founded by developer Gill Holland with the goal of purchasing and renovating real estate in the West Louisville neighborhood, has closed on two new properties. [WFPL]

Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, promised on Thursday to roll back some of America’s most ambitious environmental policies, actions that he said would revive the ailing U.S. oil and coal industries and bolster national security. [Reuters]

Two Louisville small businesses will receive more than $100,000 in loans that will aid in the advancement of two aging buildings. [Business First]

When Betty Watkins envisions what Charlestown might look like in five or 10 years, what she hopes for seems simple enough. [News & Tribune]