Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City: Come For The Bourbon & Secrecy, Stay For The Shootings

Louisville loves a good shooting — especially if it involves a police officer. [WDRB]

Oh, look, Martha read something on The ‘Ville Voice and wrote about it again. [C-J/AKN]

If they have to ruin perfectly good bourbon with mint and sugar, at least it’s for charity. [WHAS11]

Lexington’s mayor is spending money to save buildings from the 1960s and Louisville has Greg Fischer. [H-L]

See? Another fun shooting in Possibility City! Police are investigating a shooting that sent two people to the hospital on Monday evening. [WLKY]

U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Katie Higgins’ dream as a little girl was to follow in her family’s footsteps and become a pilot. Her dream came true in 2011, when she received her wings. But last weekend, she flew even higher when she became the first female pilot with the prestigious Blue Angels. [HuffPo]

They said “Hooker Hotel” in the headline, so that’s pretty much all you need to know. Though, if they can bulldoze historic downtown properties, the least the city could do is bulldoze this joint. [WAVE3]

What, you thought merely the handful of wingnut extremists in the presidential race was enough? [The Hill]

A bad break-up about a year ago put Jewel Owens in a situation she’d never been before. [WFPL]

A mega company’s bid to change the product and flow direction of an existing natural gas pipeline is drawing the attention and concern of citizens and environmental groups across Kentucky. [The Morehead News]

Investigators say that the cost of replacing GE Appliances’ building that was destroyed by fire could reach $400 million, and they say that the fire destroyed $60 million worth of parts. [Business First]

Mayor Bob Hall says concerns about the scope of a steering committee aimed at improving the Pleasant Ridge neighborhood have given him pause in accepting an invitation to the board. [News & Tribune]

City’s Murder Rate Creeps A Bit Higher

The City of Louisville has been dismissed from a lawsuit stemming from the mob violence on March 22, 2014, according to court documents. [WDRB]

An officer-involved shooting near Lassiter Middle School in South Louisville resulted in a fatality Wednesday evening, according to LMPD spokeswoman Carey Klain. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS wants a waiver to keep the test scores of some immigrant students who are not proficient in English from being counted against their schools. [WHAS11]

We still can’t stop laughing at how hard Sannie “Secret Sannie” Overly and the Democrats are fighting to keep their corruption secret. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Greg Fischer’s Compassionate Possibility City! [WLKY]

Global warming isn’t just affecting the weather, it’s harming Americans’ health, President Barack Obama said Tuesday as he announced steps government and businesses will take to better understand and deal with the problem. [HuffPo]

Freshman Monica Sokolik said she never felt uncomfortable with anything her Delta Zeta sisters asked of her when she pledged the sorority fall semester. But she’s grateful University of Louisville administrators are investigating claims of hazing leveled against Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, on principle. [WAVE3]

Neither Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky nor New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was invited to address the NRA’s Leadership Forum. [Politico]

On the first day of its new HIV clinic, the Community Outreach Center in Austin, Ind., is quiet. [WFPL]

Rand Paul has skipped most Homeland Security hearings since 2014, a review of videos and documents related to the hearings show. [BuzzFeed]

Marathon Petroleum Corp. recently told federal regulators that only a small amount of jet fuel has been cleaned up in Shively — nearly two months after 160 barrels of the fuel were leaked into the ground. [Business First]

The Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning Department is proposing changes to its sign ordinance to reduce visual clutter and provide consistency throughout the city. [News & Tribune]

What A Death-Filled Week It’s Been!

Raven Taylor’s high school education suddenly came to a halt when, at the age of 15, she got pregnant. [WDRB]

The eight-state commission that sets water quality standards for the Ohio River has recommended relaxing its rules for mercury and certain other toxic pollutants that concentrate as they move through the food web. [C-J/AKN]

The Ohio River once again leads the nation for industrial pollution. That’s even as the eight-state commission that sets the river’s water quality standards recommends relaxing rules on mercury and certain other toxic chemicals. [More C-J/AKN]

In light of recent tragedies involving multiple JCPS school communities, district officials held a news conference to tell the public how the district is supporting its students and staff at an emotional time. [WHAS11]

The partisan divide over same-sex marriage among top elected officials remains stark, with Democrats overwhelmingly on record in favor and Republicans mostly silent so far. [H-L]

A group of people gathered at 26th and Chestnut streets Monday morning to protest an officer-involved shooting Saturday afternoon. [WLKY]

The gender pay gap is alive and well everywhere in America, but it’s more alive in some states than in others. [HuffPo]

Police said a 4-year-old girl died Saturday of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound suffered on Friday. [WAVE3]

In 1986, I was as ready to leave the closet as I would ever be—but how would I do so? Though I was a third term Democratic congressman from Massachusetts, I had lived too long with the burden of “the gay thing” to treat coming out as a political matter alone. [Politico]

Louisville Gas and Electric is still on track to open the company’s natural gas-fired power plant in Louisville in May, as it retires the current Cane Run coal power plant. The new power plant won’t produce coal ash, but 60 years worth of old ash will remain on site. [WFPL]

Late last week Governor Beshear’s office pushed out a release about kyhealthnow (can we quit it with the no caps and such?) so go look at the stuff. [Click the Clicky]

Louisville is now the United States headquarters for the Leadership Pipeline Institute, a Denmark-based international leadership organization. [Business First]

February’s winter storms proved costly for Clark County. The commissioners declared an emergency Thursday to use cumulative capital fund dollars pay for more than $85,000 in expenses for snow-related road maintenance during a two-week period in February. [News & Tribune]

How Much Time Has He Spent Raising Taxes?

Another day, another JCPS bus accident. They’re almost as plentiful as shootings or pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Can you imagine how much better off Louisville would be if Greg Fischer spent the amount of time he’s spent trying to raise your taxes on holding people like Sadiqa Reynolds accountable? With hours left for the local option sales tax to advance in the state Senate, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made a push Tuesday to rally support for the bill. [C-J/AKN]

A single vote upheld the decision to prevent James Helinger from returning to his post as a Buechel Police Lieutenant. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission will discuss the decline of important natural pollinators like bees and butterflies. The meeting Thursday in Frankfort will be open to the public. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City! One person was rushed to the hospital after an early morning shooting in Okolona. Was apparently a teen who was found shot in the groin. [WLKY]

This man helps American cities hide their homeless populations. His tactics are being put to use in Louisville by Greg Fischer. But no one wants to talk about it because how dare anyone question puppies and rainbows. [HuffPo]

Parents within West Clark Community Schools are voicing concerns over school conditions and overcrowding at Silver Creek High School in Clark County. [WAVE3]

Louisville businessman Hal Heiner leads the crowded race for the Republican party’s nominee for Kentucky’s next governor who would then likely take on Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [WKYT]

John Schnatter’s long-running, multi-generational ties to the University of Louisville just grew $4.64 million deeper. [WFPL]

A new study has found that when transgender young people are allowed to fully identify with their gender and take steps toward transition, it significantly improves their depression and anxiety. [Think Progress]

When Lily DeRosia read about the mandatory overtime and long shifts forced on workers at the Louisville company that makes Girl Scout cookies, she was inspired to try to do something about it. [Business First]

Floyd County is in the process of hiring a public works director. [News & Tribune]

More Possibility In Chattanooga Than Louisville?

The words don’t always come easy. For Perry Clemons, they sometimes vanish. Clemons is 58-years-old and lives in Clarkson, Kentucky. [WDRB]

As Mayor Greg Fischer joins Metro Council member Angela Lee in calling for a fuller environmental study of the Brownsboro Road site purchased for a new Veterans Affairs Medical Center, plans are in the works to turn about half of the second choice site into a subdivision. [C-J/AKN]

What? Another shooting? Surely not. Not in Possibility City where everything is Compassionate and Transparent. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul takes the first step toward running for president when he asks state party leaders to endorse his idea to create a 2016 presidential caucus in Kentucky. [H-L]Singed by their defeat in the battle over Homeland Security funding, Republicans aren’t about to renew their fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration anytime soon. [Politico]

They’ll run stories like this about animal shelters hundreds of miles away. But couldn’t be bothered to dig in at Metro Animal Services at any point over the past decade. [WLKY]

Louisville doesn’t have the guts to do something like this. Fischer and council will always bend over backwards for lobbyists. [HuffPo]

Lexington has started to shoot its kids just like Louisville! Copycat. We were first. Lexington police told media outlets a 9-year-old boy was taken to UK Hospital after being shot while riding in his parents’ car. [WAVE3]

A factory in Louisville, Kentucky, made chewing tobacco for over a century before folding in 2009. Now the abandoned site is a symbol of how the city is changing: The 24-acre brownfield will soon become one of the largest hubs for local food in the U.S. [Fast Company]

Louisville Metro Police is on track to putting body cameras on some officers this summer. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s proposal to consolidate more than a dozen regulatory offices into an agency that would oversee food safety is drawing the intrigue and ire of some food safety advocates, producers, and experts — some of whom question the feasibility of a move that’s decades in the making. [ThinkProgress]

A U.S. Supreme Court decision about whether patients who get insurance through federally administered exchanges should have their costs subsidized is not expected to have an impact on Kynect, Kentucky’s insurance exchange. [Business First]

At first it looks like some kind of marketing ploy. Six picnic tables, surrounded by a garbage can on a concrete slab in the middle of Same Peden Community Park in New Albany. [News & Tribune]

Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]