The Weekend: Just A Shooting Spree

Louisville Metro Police spokesperson Carey Klain says a total of four people were shot during two separate weekend incidents. Nothing to see here, move along. [WDRB]

Here are some changes in Jefferson County schools that students and parents should know before classes start up again. [C-J/AKN]

Three lucky Louisville birds saw a new beginning Friday, July 24. The Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky Inc., or RROKI, released three Peregrine Falcons at Hayes Kennedy Park after months of rehabilitation. [WHAS11]

A bunch of fat, racist, white guys played dress-up on Friday and showed their true colors. Kentucky’s state government should not turn its back on Confederate symbols, including the “stars and bars” battle flag and Jefferson Davis, speakers told more than a hundred people at a “Southern pride” rally outside the Capitol Friday. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! If you love stories about shootings that your elected leadership is desperate to ignore, here’s another. [WLKY]

Americans’ views of Sen. Bernie Sanders have grown more favorable as they continue to learn more about him, according to a new Gallup poll. [HuffPo]

Where is Blue? Can’t he buy this, tear it down and pave things over for a parking lot? Could operate a shuttle service to the new Costco. [WAVE3]

Despite widespread belief to the contrary, no federal law explicitly protects LGBT people from discrimination. Thursday marks the introduction of The Equality Act, a comprehensive bill that would, if passed, add “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the protections that already exist based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. But it also would do more than that. [ThinkProgress]

The idea of converting downtown Louisville’s one-way streets to two-ways has support from business proponents, but motor vehicles aren’t the only way to get around the city. [WFPL]

The H-2 visa program invites foreign workers to do some of the most menial labor in America. Then it leaves them at the mercy of their employers. Thousands of these workers have been abused — deprived of their fair pay, imprisoned, starved, beaten, raped, and threatened with deportation if they dare complain. And the government says it can do little to help. [BuzzFeed]

Louisville-based Almost Family Inc. (NYSE: AFAM) announced plans to purchase Jacksonville, Fla.-based Ingenios Health Co. Ingenios provides in-home clinical assessments for Medicare Advantage, Medicaid and others in seven states and in Washington D.C. [Business First]

One candidate has been tabbed and another will soon be selected to fill vacated positions in upcoming New Albany City Council races. [News & Tribune]

The Weekend: Killing Time In Louisville

Just a reminder that these things continue to happen in Possibility City. [WDRB]

For so long, he searched for the word. To describe what he felt but dare not say aloud. To rationalize the thoughts that consumed his days. To understand why being Jennifer, despite his most fervent attempts, just didn’t feel right. [C-J/AKN]

And then this. A woman was rushed to the hospital after a shooting in the Parkland neighborhood on July 20. [WHAS11]

The power washer was spraying away another year’s worth of grime this week as residents of Fancy Farm prepared for the annual picnic at St. Jerome’s Parish, where Kentucky’s politicos flock on the first Saturday of August each year. [H-L]

But don’t worry! A theme park is adding a new roller coaster. Everything is fine. [WLKY]

The transition to a renewable economy may be a painful one, particularly in this era of aversion to active government. [HuffPo]

The start of a two day celebration for the 25th anniversary of the Signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act kicked off on Sunday in Shawnee Park. [WAVE3]

Just like in Kentucky, where it’s good for the Beshear Family’s wealthy donors and not so great for everyone else. The global economy is improving. Just don’t tell many of the people who live and work in it. [CBS News]

Following last month’s landmark Supreme Court ruling allowing gay marriage in Kentucky, Louisville’s tourism agency has ramped-up its outreach to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. [WFPL]

Japan’s Mitsubishi corporation is making a big apology. It’s not for any recall or defect in its products, which include automobiles, but for its use of American prisoners of war as forced labor during World War II. [NPR]

Dallas-based Omni Hotels & Resorts likely has a few interesting weeks ahead. [Business First]

A community literacy project using retired newspaper racks will kick-off Saturday in New Albany at the annual Monarch Celebration. [News & Tribune]

Cordish Fun Just Keeps Getting Better

JCPS students head back to class in less than a month, and the city of Louisville wants to make sure they’re prepared. [WDRB]

You can thank Jerry Abramson and Jim King (along with a little bit of David Tandy) for allowing Cordish to become a thing in Louisville. Fourth Street Live developer Cordish Co. is accused in a scathing consultants’ report of targeting African Americans to keep them out of the popular downtown entertainment district and another venue it runs in Missouri. [C-J/AKN]

Friday, a settlement from Metro Louisville, a man who was a Lt. Col. in the National Guard, with a traumatic brain injury, says he was treated like a pan-handler by Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees scaled back a merit raise for school President James Ramsey, whose million-dollar-plus compensation has drawn criticism from some trustees and faculty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA CAP! Arson investigators say they have a list of potential suspects in a deadly Old Louisville fire. [WLKY]

Last year was likely the warmest year since 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed on Thursday in a report written by hundreds of scientists from 58 countries. [HuffPo]

Louisville loves killing people and this weekend was no exception. Seven people suffered what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries in a shooting inside a Louisville nightclub early Sunday morning, Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman Dwight Mitchell said. [WAVE3]

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination — a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers. [BuzzFeed]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees is giving President James Ramsey a hefty 25 percent bonus and 3 percent raise. [WFPL]

Charter Communications is ramping up its Washington lobbying operations as the telecommunications firm makes its case to regulators reviewing its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. [The Hill]

Greg Fischer made another appeal Friday for citizens or businesses to submit proposals for the potential reuse and relocation of the former Louisville Water Co. building on South Third Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners scheduled a public hearing on whether to adopt an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration made by the Clark County health officer. [News & Tribune]

No Compassion, No Transparency

Three Louisville lawmakers wrote a letter to Jefferson County Public Schools superintendent Donna Hargens on Monday raising “grave concerns” over the hiring of the district’s former lawyer as a teacher at Central High School. [WDRB]

First, Scott County became the epicenter of Indiana’s largest-ever HIV outbreak. Now, the health officer in the next county south — Clark — says he is leaning toward declaring a public health emergency given high rates of HIV and hepatitis C there. [C-J/AKN]

This is why we can’t have nice things, Louisville. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader just highlighted why it may not be a bad thing to let Republicans to take control of the statehouse. A couple years out of power would result in a number of Democratic resignations in leadership, a bunch of corrupt actors could be weeded out, giving the younger generations time to get their act together to once again lead. [H-L]

Murders happen on a seemingly daily basis but Greg Fischer’s still going on about compassionate this, compassionate that. [WLKY]

At no point in recent memory have consumers been as excited about bourbon as they are today. [HuffPo]

Eight shootings in a single weekend. Jones was shot and killed Saturday evening outside his home, one of eight weekend shootings that Louisville Metro Police are investigating. Jones and two other people, including a Louisville musician and a 60-year-old woman, died of their injuries. [WAVE3]

More than 150,000 U.S. families are homeless each year. The number has been going down, in part because of a program known as rapid rehousing, which quickly moves families out of shelters and into homes. [NPR]

Louisville firefighters will monitor through the night three historic Whiskey Row buildings that were extensively damaged by fire Monday afternoon. [WFPL]

Universal child care is becoming a central pillar of the liberal agenda — one that, if it is ever realized, could take its place alongside some of the great progressive reforms of the 20th Century, and possibly the Affordable Care Act, as a defining achievement of the Democratic Party. [WaPo]

The Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission voted 3-2 to negotiate with OTH Development LLC to develop a former American Legion property in the city. [Business First]

Utility companies that will be relocating infrastructure for the 10th Street widening project at their own cost want further assurance from the city that the project’s actually happening. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Shoots Even More

A MetroSafe dispatcher has confirmed that multiple victims were shot near 25th Street and Broadway in west Louisville. [WDRB]

Aetna’s acquisition of Humana appears to be part of a merger frenzy as the five biggest U.S. health insurers look to get bigger. But any acquisition or merger of this proportion must overcome potential hurdles. [C-J/AKN]

The opportunity of ownership is a wish come true for one of Louisville’s newest small business owners looking to turn his new restaurant into the Russell neighborhood’s latest treasure. [WHAS11]

The Humane Society of the United States is objecting to a proposed expansion of bear hunting in Kentucky. The group says the state’s black bear population is still small and needs time to expand. [H-L]

Louisville Fire and Rescue continued their search for three people missing after a pontoon boat capsized on the Ohio River Saturday night. [WLKY]

So let me be clear about a few things: I do not want to order a wedding cake from a bakery owned by a guy who thinks I’m going to hell. I have no desire to purchase bouquets from a florist who pickets Pride parades. I wouldn’t serve pizza at a wedding if the owner paid me and offered to serenade my guests with an a cappella version of “Born This Way.” And finally, the suggestion that I would be insane enough to want to force a homophobic clergyperson to preside over my most sacred day is beyond insulting. [HuffPo]

Louisville is home to more than 12,000 Humana employees, but the company’s sale could affect thousands more. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s voters have seen this script before: insurgent Kentucky Republican takes down established candidates openly or presumably preferred by U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, Kentucky’s ultimate establishment Republican. [Ronnie Ellis]

If Aetna’s plan to purchase Humana becomes official, what was Louisville’s largest standalone publicly traded company by revenue will cease to exist as the city has known it. [WFPL]

Weight screenings in high school were not enough to get overweight and obese kids on track toward a healthier weight, a recent U.S. study found. [Reuters]

The merger deal between Louisville-based Humana Inc. and Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. finally has been announced. Though we now know details of the agreement, we have to wait to see what the fallout will be for Louisville. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. But about two months into the division’s operations, the Jeffersonville City Council is discussing ways to reorganize it because some members are dissatisfied with the qualifications of its manager. [News & Tribune]

Let The Minimum Wage Freakout Begin

A Louisville Metro Council member is asking the mayor to take action concerning the Economy Inn on Bardstown Road. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw is turning over to Louisville Metro Government more than $2.46 million as surplus from fees she collected during her fourth, four-year term than ran through 2014. [C-J/AKN]

A Jefferson County Circuit judge has upheld an ordinance raising the city’s minimum wage to $9 an hour over the next three years. [WHAS11]

Redefining marriage for the nation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed one another. The 5-4 decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges reverses a Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that upheld state bans of same-sex marriage in Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee. Lower courts in all four states had struck down the bans as unconstitutional. [H-L]

Union workers at Appliance Park are getting ready to vote on a new contract. [WLKY]

Paleontologists in South Africa have announced the name for a new dinosaur species, but they didn’t have to do any digging to find the creature’s bones. [HuffPo]

A young woman was killed after a hit-and-run at 26th Street and Broadway, and the 19-year-old’s family members said they are begging for answers and justice. [WAVE3]

North Carolina and Tennessee are the latest states to side with telecoms, which have long lobbied against allowing cities to become Internet providers. [ProPublica]

Twelve years after first meeting and almost four years after being engaged, Tadd Roberts and Benjamin Moore on Friday became the first same-sex couple to be legally married in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. President Barack Obama said on Friday that for too long Americans have been “blind” to the “unique mayhem” caused by gun violence in this country. [Reuters]

Emptier words have never been spoken. Wiederwohl stresses the importance of transparency in public sector. [Business First]

Fired by the New Albany Merit Commission for conduct unbecoming an officer, Laura Schook is claiming two of the board members who voted to terminate her are serving illegally based on city ordinance. [News & Tribune]