Possibility City’s Back To Shooting Everyone

The future of a Louisville YMCA branch is in jeopardy as traffic at the Berrytown location continues to be low despite numerous efforts to boost attendance. [WDRB]

The more attention news directors give this troubled kid, the worse he gets. It’s almost worse than the way Louisville media folks try to eat each other alive out in fits of jealousy and bitterness. [C-J/AKN]

Two men accused in a Louisville bar attack say they were offered money to carry out the crime. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to appear in his courtroom Thursday and explain why she should not be held in contempt of court, according to Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins. All of her deputy clerks are supposed to join her, Watkins said. [H-L]

Police are investigating two shootings and are not yet saying if the two incidents are related. [WLKY]

All across the country, Americans are finding that the prices of the prescription drugs they need are soaring. Tragically, doctors tell us that many of their patients can no longer afford their medicine. As a result, some get sicker. Others die. [HuffPo]

A new festival is set to highlight a multitude of talented artists from Louisville and across Kentucky. The Golden Culture Art and Music Festival is making history as it brings attention to an often over-looked local music subculture: hip-hop. [WAVE3]

Homeschooling has been legal throughout the United States for about 25 years, but regulations vary dramatically by state. Only two states require background checks for parents who choose to homeschool, and just ten require parents to have a high school degree. [ProPublica]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

As many as 6.9 million Americans haven’t made payments on their student loans in nearly a year, which is up 6 percent from last year, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Education. A 2013 Federal Reserve Bank of New York report shows that the delinquency rate may actually be higher than people think because half of student loans are in forbearance, deferment or grace periods. [Think Progress]

By the time Tom Jurich, vice president and director of athletics for the University of Louisville, addressed the media at a news conference this morning, word had spread that U of L planned a $55 million expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [Business First]

In the small Parke County town of Rockville, population 2,591, police officers are donning new body cameras before they head out on patrol. [News & Tribune]

People Dying & You’re Mad Over A Lion

Told ya Jack’s probably gonna win. Conway, the Democratic nominee, leads Bevin 45 percent to 42 percent, with 13 percent of voters undecided. Curtis polled at 8 percent, leaving Conway with 43 percent and Bevin with 38 percent. [H-L]

An investigation by the Louisville Fire Department found GE could have done more to prevent a fire that destroyed a building at Appliance Park, but company officials say investigators are wrong and they have the video to prove it. [WDRB]

Fire investigators have blamed the total loss of a General Electric warehouse on outdated Appliance Park equipment that failed when fire crews rushed to the scene April 3. [C-J/AKN]

A shooting just before midnight has sent a victim to the hospital, only hours after fatal shooting in the same area. [WHAS11]

A lawsuit filed in federal court in California against Maker’s Mark Distillery was dismissed on Monday. The plaintiffs had alleged that they were mislead by the premium bourbon’s claims on the label to be “handmade” but U.S. District Judge John A. Houston found that the claim “cannot reasonably be interpreted as meaning literally by hand nor that a reasonable consumer would understand the term to mean no equipment or automated process was used to manufacture the whisky.” [H-L]

Metro police are investigating a stabbing at a south Louisville bar. But everything is puppies and rainbows in Possibility City. [WLKY]

There’s a simple, popular solution that Republican leaders in Congress could grab hold of to get themselves out of their embarrassing public fight over the highway bill, and President Barack Obama could help force them to do it. [HuffPo]

Louisville officials spent at least $2.5 million on additional security measures after a night of mob violence rocked the city in 2014, according to records obtained by WAVE 3 News. [WHAS11]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Rowan County has thrown bigoted hypocrite Kim Davis to the wolves. [WFPL]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

United Parcel Service Inc. says it’s already working closely with retail customers on planning for this year’s peak season — even though there are indications of a softer shipping season this year. [Business First]

As statewide numbers showed a climbing trend, school districts in Clark and Floyd counties also realized an increase of children living in poverty. [News & Tribune]

Support That JCPS Clothing Program

Just more of that well-known Greg Fischer transparency! Greg Fischer’s office called a meeting but banned cameras as it planned to update local media on the Omni Hotel project. [WAVE3]

Officials with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office arrested a man who authorities say passed contraband to a Metro Corrections inmate. [WDRB]

One by one, women board a breast-cancer screening van in southwestern Jefferson County to receive mammograms. [C-J/AKN]

We’d share more information with you but the new comms person at JCPS is apparently a disaster who refuses to communicate with anyone who doesn’t drink the Kool-aid. The JCPS annual Clothing Assistance Program Blitz kicked off Monday morning. [WHAS11]

Even after years of talk about a “war on coal,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell startled some of his constituents in March when he urged open rebellion against a White House proposal for cutting pollution from coal-fired power plants. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just a reminder that, sure, there’s fun crap happening but your leadership is effectively ignoring the shooting problem in this city. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama fired back at former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R) on Monday after the 2016 Republican presidential candidate invoked the specter of the Holocaust in comments regarding the Iran nuclear deal. [HuffPo]

History was made Sunday when the the city’s first statue honoring a woman was unveiled at Cathedral of the Assumption. [WAVE3]

In L.A. and cities across the United States, it is effectively illegal to be dirt poor in a country where more than 45 million people live in poverty. [The Intercept]

Harrison County, Indiana, officials are being sued in federal court by a former employee of the county clerk’s office who claims she was fired after refusing to process a same-sex marriage license. [WFPL]

New York state recently announced an increase in the minimum wage for fast food workers, to $15 an hour. It’s the fruit of a three-year labor campaign. But there’s another group of workers out there that hasn’t had a real wage increase in decades. [NPR]

The advertising and marketing agency Power Creative has developed a new executive leadership team. CEO David Power said he’s promoted three employees to serve as chief operating, innovation and marketing officers. He created the three positions to better define roles. [Business First]

This time last year, onlookers from the Big Four Bridge were met with the sight of dilapidated docks and an eroding, uneven shoreline at Jeffersonville’s Ohio River bank. [News & Tribune]

The Weekend: Just A Shooting Spree

Louisville Metro Police spokesperson Carey Klain says a total of four people were shot during two separate weekend incidents. Nothing to see here, move along. [WDRB]

Here are some changes in Jefferson County schools that students and parents should know before classes start up again. [C-J/AKN]

Three lucky Louisville birds saw a new beginning Friday, July 24. The Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky Inc., or RROKI, released three Peregrine Falcons at Hayes Kennedy Park after months of rehabilitation. [WHAS11]

A bunch of fat, racist, white guys played dress-up on Friday and showed their true colors. Kentucky’s state government should not turn its back on Confederate symbols, including the “stars and bars” battle flag and Jefferson Davis, speakers told more than a hundred people at a “Southern pride” rally outside the Capitol Friday. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! If you love stories about shootings that your elected leadership is desperate to ignore, here’s another. [WLKY]

Americans’ views of Sen. Bernie Sanders have grown more favorable as they continue to learn more about him, according to a new Gallup poll. [HuffPo]

Where is Blue? Can’t he buy this, tear it down and pave things over for a parking lot? Could operate a shuttle service to the new Costco. [WAVE3]

Despite widespread belief to the contrary, no federal law explicitly protects LGBT people from discrimination. Thursday marks the introduction of The Equality Act, a comprehensive bill that would, if passed, add “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the protections that already exist based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. But it also would do more than that. [ThinkProgress]

The idea of converting downtown Louisville’s one-way streets to two-ways has support from business proponents, but motor vehicles aren’t the only way to get around the city. [WFPL]

The H-2 visa program invites foreign workers to do some of the most menial labor in America. Then it leaves them at the mercy of their employers. Thousands of these workers have been abused — deprived of their fair pay, imprisoned, starved, beaten, raped, and threatened with deportation if they dare complain. And the government says it can do little to help. [BuzzFeed]

Louisville-based Almost Family Inc. (NYSE: AFAM) announced plans to purchase Jacksonville, Fla.-based Ingenios Health Co. Ingenios provides in-home clinical assessments for Medicare Advantage, Medicaid and others in seven states and in Washington D.C. [Business First]

One candidate has been tabbed and another will soon be selected to fill vacated positions in upcoming New Albany City Council races. [News & Tribune]

The Weekend: Killing Time In Louisville

Just a reminder that these things continue to happen in Possibility City. [WDRB]

For so long, he searched for the word. To describe what he felt but dare not say aloud. To rationalize the thoughts that consumed his days. To understand why being Jennifer, despite his most fervent attempts, just didn’t feel right. [C-J/AKN]

And then this. A woman was rushed to the hospital after a shooting in the Parkland neighborhood on July 20. [WHAS11]

The power washer was spraying away another year’s worth of grime this week as residents of Fancy Farm prepared for the annual picnic at St. Jerome’s Parish, where Kentucky’s politicos flock on the first Saturday of August each year. [H-L]

But don’t worry! A theme park is adding a new roller coaster. Everything is fine. [WLKY]

The transition to a renewable economy may be a painful one, particularly in this era of aversion to active government. [HuffPo]

The start of a two day celebration for the 25th anniversary of the Signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act kicked off on Sunday in Shawnee Park. [WAVE3]

Just like in Kentucky, where it’s good for the Beshear Family’s wealthy donors and not so great for everyone else. The global economy is improving. Just don’t tell many of the people who live and work in it. [CBS News]

Following last month’s landmark Supreme Court ruling allowing gay marriage in Kentucky, Louisville’s tourism agency has ramped-up its outreach to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. [WFPL]

Japan’s Mitsubishi corporation is making a big apology. It’s not for any recall or defect in its products, which include automobiles, but for its use of American prisoners of war as forced labor during World War II. [NPR]

Dallas-based Omni Hotels & Resorts likely has a few interesting weeks ahead. [Business First]

A community literacy project using retired newspaper racks will kick-off Saturday in New Albany at the annual Monarch Celebration. [News & Tribune]

Cordish Fun Just Keeps Getting Better

JCPS students head back to class in less than a month, and the city of Louisville wants to make sure they’re prepared. [WDRB]

You can thank Jerry Abramson and Jim King (along with a little bit of David Tandy) for allowing Cordish to become a thing in Louisville. Fourth Street Live developer Cordish Co. is accused in a scathing consultants’ report of targeting African Americans to keep them out of the popular downtown entertainment district and another venue it runs in Missouri. [C-J/AKN]

Friday, a settlement from Metro Louisville, a man who was a Lt. Col. in the National Guard, with a traumatic brain injury, says he was treated like a pan-handler by Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees scaled back a merit raise for school President James Ramsey, whose million-dollar-plus compensation has drawn criticism from some trustees and faculty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA CAP! Arson investigators say they have a list of potential suspects in a deadly Old Louisville fire. [WLKY]

Last year was likely the warmest year since 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed on Thursday in a report written by hundreds of scientists from 58 countries. [HuffPo]

Louisville loves killing people and this weekend was no exception. Seven people suffered what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries in a shooting inside a Louisville nightclub early Sunday morning, Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman Dwight Mitchell said. [WAVE3]

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination — a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers. [BuzzFeed]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees is giving President James Ramsey a hefty 25 percent bonus and 3 percent raise. [WFPL]

Charter Communications is ramping up its Washington lobbying operations as the telecommunications firm makes its case to regulators reviewing its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. [The Hill]

Greg Fischer made another appeal Friday for citizens or businesses to submit proposals for the potential reuse and relocation of the former Louisville Water Co. building on South Third Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners scheduled a public hearing on whether to adopt an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration made by the Clark County health officer. [News & Tribune]

No Compassion, No Transparency

Three Louisville lawmakers wrote a letter to Jefferson County Public Schools superintendent Donna Hargens on Monday raising “grave concerns” over the hiring of the district’s former lawyer as a teacher at Central High School. [WDRB]

First, Scott County became the epicenter of Indiana’s largest-ever HIV outbreak. Now, the health officer in the next county south — Clark — says he is leaning toward declaring a public health emergency given high rates of HIV and hepatitis C there. [C-J/AKN]

This is why we can’t have nice things, Louisville. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader just highlighted why it may not be a bad thing to let Republicans to take control of the statehouse. A couple years out of power would result in a number of Democratic resignations in leadership, a bunch of corrupt actors could be weeded out, giving the younger generations time to get their act together to once again lead. [H-L]

Murders happen on a seemingly daily basis but Greg Fischer’s still going on about compassionate this, compassionate that. [WLKY]

At no point in recent memory have consumers been as excited about bourbon as they are today. [HuffPo]

Eight shootings in a single weekend. Jones was shot and killed Saturday evening outside his home, one of eight weekend shootings that Louisville Metro Police are investigating. Jones and two other people, including a Louisville musician and a 60-year-old woman, died of their injuries. [WAVE3]

More than 150,000 U.S. families are homeless each year. The number has been going down, in part because of a program known as rapid rehousing, which quickly moves families out of shelters and into homes. [NPR]

Louisville firefighters will monitor through the night three historic Whiskey Row buildings that were extensively damaged by fire Monday afternoon. [WFPL]

Universal child care is becoming a central pillar of the liberal agenda — one that, if it is ever realized, could take its place alongside some of the great progressive reforms of the 20th Century, and possibly the Affordable Care Act, as a defining achievement of the Democratic Party. [WaPo]

The Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission voted 3-2 to negotiate with OTH Development LLC to develop a former American Legion property in the city. [Business First]

Utility companies that will be relocating infrastructure for the 10th Street widening project at their own cost want further assurance from the city that the project’s actually happening. [News & Tribune]