They Poured Out Perfectly Fine Bourbon!

Thought everything was puppies and rainbows with the new person running Metro Animal Services? So much for hiring an underwear model to run an agency mired in scandal. Now Possibility City sees what happens when Greg Fischer puts these folks in charge. [C-J/AKN]

What, you thought Matt Bevin wasn’t a backward-ass bigot? [WDRB]

If there’s a bike lane, bicyclists better use it, or they may find themselves in jail. That’s the message a Louisville Metro Police officer gave to bicycling advocate and former mayoral candidate Jackie Green on Friday in the form of a double citation for blocking traffic and running a red light. [More C-J/AKN]

The Dare to Care Kids Café has expanded to include a new location. Children 18 and younger can now go to the Shawnee Community Center on South 37th Street for a hot, healthy meal between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The cost is free. [WHAS11]

Louisville Gas and Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. are asking regulators to allow them to own and operate charging stations for electric vehicles. [H-L]

WARNING! AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As authorities continue to investigate a shooting and carjacking in Old Louisville, many who live and work there say their community is no more dangerous than any other part of the metro. [WLKY]

Apparently, if you are a Democratic presidential candidate, there is no longer such a thing as being too strict about gun safety. All three candidates were locked in a fierce battle to prove their gun control bona fides at the Democratic debate at Drake University in Iowa on Saturday night. [HuffPo]

If you wanna pour out Elijah Craig, just send it here instead. It’s a big stink in the California neighborhood, even after some community leaders struck a deal with Heaven Hill Distillery for a proposed biodigester. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an anti-abortion group’s bid to force the federal government to reveal more information about a $1 million grant it made in 2011 to women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in New Hampshire. [Reuters]

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce President Dave Adkisson says he’s at odds with Governor-elect Matt Bevin over dismantling Kentucky’s health care exchange. [WFPL]

Carter Caves may be the “best kept secret of the park system,” according to its park manager, but it may also be Carter County’s best-kept secret for how to truly open up recreational tourism in the northeast region of Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s pledge to scale back the Medicaid expansion and dismantle Kynect, Kentucky’s award-winning health insurance exchange, has caused concern among health clinics. [Business First]

An advertising campaign to drive students to Clarksville Community Schools cost more than $163,000, but the 83 students it’s credited with bringing in gave the district an extra $548,000 in tuition support from the state for the district. [News & Tribune]

UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

Another Reason To Think Swift Is Gross

If Greg Fischer’s involved in discussing the future of the South End, you know it’s doomed. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority ended its total ban on firearms and agreed Monday to give promoters and booking agents of events at the KFC Yum! Center the right to decide whether ticketed visitors can carry firearms into the downtown arena. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you need another reason to distrust Greg Fischer and his people to protect anything. Quite a fascinating trip down memory lane. [WHAS11]

Veterans and active duty military personnel are invited to visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs free of charge on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day. [H-L]

A case of tuberculosis at the JBS Swift processing plant is being investigated by the health department. [WLKY]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

The UAW says Ford’s investment in U.S. plants of $9 billion will create or keep about 8,500 jobs over the next four years. [WAVE3]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Yum Brands Inc. again is getting negative press for its food-supplier practices. This Washington Post story from today identifies Yum — which owns the KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut brands — as the last major fast food company not to embrace higher-quality food sourcing that takes animal welfare into account. [Business First]

An ordinance to give $75,000 to a local organization aimed at eliminated homelessness advanced at Thursday night’s New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Hype Isn’t Gonna Help JCPS Improve

We love to hate on Donna Hargens and Jefferson County Public Schools but come on. This is the dumbest thing yet from WDRB about JCPS and it’s being used by the racist anti-busing crowd. The insinuation (watch them try to claim otherwise in 3, 2…) that all teachers who resign do so because they feel unsafe is dangerous and based in teabagger delusion land. Remember that there are something like 6,000 teachers when they try to claim that a dozen resignations = harbinger of doom. [WDRB]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer refused to sign an ordinance Thursday shielding area community centers for needy residents from his administrative changes after an overwhelming margin of Metro Council members passed the measure. Instead of vetoing the legislation, which was approved by a 20-3 vote last month, Fischer has asked the state attorney general to weigh in, launching the city’s two branches of government into a legal joust over who has final say about a potential overhaul at Neighborhood Place sites. [C-J/AKN]

Three people have been arrested and a man continues to recover in the hospital after a shooting in the Chickasaw neighborhood Friday night. [WHAS11]

Kip Cornett said he and his wife were at an airport in June when he read on his cellphone a column by Barry Weisbord, president and co-publisher of Thoroughbred Daily News. [H-L]

A 27-year-old Louisville man became the city’s latest homicide victim on Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

The medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders released its internal report on Thursday about the October attack on its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The report also revealed that pilots shot at staff members fleeing the hospital. [HuffPo]

The Americana Community Center, Inc. held its annual fundraiser Saturday night. The center strives to provide a spectrum of services to the diverse individuals and families of the Louisville Metro area, including refugees, immigrants and those born in the United States. [WAVE]

By most accounts, Kentucky’s implementation of President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare reform was a success. Tuesday’s elections in the state could mean big changes are coming, however – with ominous portents for the future of the president’s signature legislative achievement. [BBC]

The fallout continues from Halloween, when University of Louisville President James Ramsey and his staff posed for a photograph at a U of L party wearing stereotypical “Mexican” costumes. The photo went viral, and a few written apologies were issued, but they’ve been lacking. [WFPL]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Wait, people are surprised this is happening? Its been quite a ride, but the Velocity Indiana entrepreneurial accelerator and co-working space is effectively closing shop. [Business First]

In another plea for the state’s help on Clark County’s diminishing revenue stream, County Attorney Lisa Glickfield is drafting a letter of support from board members to legislators to raise the tax levy. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Bad Moment For JCPS

SurveyUSA has finally been kicked to the curb! [H-L & C-J/AKN]

Police say they arrested two men Tuesday night after an investigation into credit card skimming. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens named Tom Hudson, president and CEO of Louisville manufacturing company Nth/works, as the school district’s new chief business officer. [C-J/AKN]

Police in La Grange are asking for the public’s help in locating a woman missing for a month. [WHAS11]

Republican state Rep. Mike Harmon defeated state Auditor Adam Edelen, denying a second term to a politician many have seen as a rising star among Kentucky Democrats. [H-L]

Of COURSE Jefferson County Public Schools had another bad news day! [WLKY]

If France can do it, the United States can do it. France will end its ban on blood donations by gay men, its health minister said Wednesday, calling the move the end “of a taboo and discrimination.” [HuffPo]

Is Portland on the edge of changing or are things getting worse? Maybe all these incidents seem to be increasing because there’s increased media attention? [WAVE3]

It is rare to hear a candidate for the United States Senate so earnestly quote rock lyrics. Rarer still, lyrics from a Canadian progressive-rock band. But Rand Paul quoted “The Spirit of Radio” by Rush — a group whose members were similarly influenced by the writings of Ayn Rand — everywhere he went during the Republican primary in Kentucky in 2010. [NY Times]

Opinions issued by a federal appeals court Monday will allow two major air pollution-related lawsuits in Louisville to move forward. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s newest lieutenant governor-elect is unique in many ways. She and her running mate, Gov.-elect Matt Bevin, are some of this election cycle’s first victorious political outsiders. (Bevin had been likened to Donald Trump). Jenean Hampton is also the first African American to be elected to statewide office in Kentucky. And she’s just one of a handful of black women on the national level to identify with the tea party movement. [WaPo]

If you’ve been paying attention to the Louisville-area industrial real estate market during the last 12 to 18 months, you know the market is punching along at a rate rarely, if ever, seen for Louisville. [Business First]

Solutions for cars speeding through a neighborhood and taxis operating illegally in the city were both on the discussion list for the Board of Public Works and Safety in New Albany on Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Jim Ramsey Did A Stupid Thing

It has made headlines for crime and health violations, but Saturday brought a different view of a controversial Louisville hotel. The Economy Inn held a Halloween party. [WDRB]

The former principal of Buechel Metro High School says Jefferson County Public Schools leaders have created a false perception of his tenure as a way to demonstrate a need to merge two alternative schools and create the new Minor Daniels Academy. [C-J/AKN]

Metro Police are investigating a shooting that happened just south of downtown. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton Jr. has stepped in, after months of back-and-forth between Jefferson District and Family courts over which would take on the additional workload of new Emergency Protective Orders meant to protect dating couples from an abusive partner. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police are conducting a death investigation after a was body found Saturday morning near Frost Middle School. [WLKY]

Triple Crown champion American Pharoah took charge out of the gate, winning the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic by 6 1/2 lengths Saturday in his final race before retirement. [HuffPo]

On Tuesday New Albany voters will decide who should lead the city. There will be three names to chose from – the incumbent, a real estate developer or a businessman. [WAVE3]

I applaud the Democrats and Republicans who came together [Friday] morning to pass a responsible, long-term budget agreement that reflects our values, grows our economy and creates jobs. This agreement will strengthen the middle class by investing in education, job training, and basic research. It will keep us safe by investing in our national security. It protects our seniors by avoiding harmful cuts to Medicare and Social Security. It is paid for in a responsible, balanced way – in part with a measure to ensure that partnerships like hedge funds pay what they owe in taxes just like everybody else. It locks in two years of funding and should help break the cycle of shutdowns and manufactured crises that have harmed our economy. This agreement is a reminder that Washington can still choose to help, rather than hinder, America’s progress, and I look forward to signing it into law as soon as it reaches my desk. After that, Congress should build on this by getting to work on spending bills that invest in America’s priorities without getting sidetracked by ideological provisions that have no place in America’s budget process. If we can do that, we’ll help our workers and businesses keep growing the economy and building an America full of opportunity for all. [President Barack Obama]

Everyone keeps begging us to write about Jim Ramsey’s latest racist stunt. If this is what sets everyone on fire over Jimbo and his mess, something’s gone terribly wrong. The man has been in a literal pile of corrupt shit since 2008. Felner and the rest of the folks have thieved, done prison time, gotten away with everything while Ramsey turned a blind eye. Shirley Dubya? She’s currently being paid more than $300,000 to do nothing for a year. The myriad Rick Pitino sex scandals? Just blips on the radar. But the man shows his true colors by dressing in a demeaning and racist way? That’s what sets fire to him and causes rage to bubble to the surface? We’re tired. [WFPL]

Amid the recent pressure on police to wear body cameras, one thing is often overlooked: Not all cameras are created equal. In fact, cameras vary a lot — and the variations — some contentious — can have a profound effect on how the cameras are used and who benefits from them. [NPR]

The U.S. Justice Department has rejected a settlement offer from AB Electrolux that would have allowed the company to move ahead with its acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. [Business First]

While candidates for Charlestown’s city council come from different parts of the area and different political parties, they all envision a growing Charlestown. That’s because with the River Ridge Commerce Center and the east-end bridge, the city can’t escape changes. But how the city can take advantage of those changes is where the candidates from the city’s four districts differ. The most talked about issues include the future of the Pleasant Ridge Subdivision and they city’s battle with brown water. [News & Tribune]

UofL Loves Flushing Cash Down The Drain

Here’s a lesson in stupid lawsuits that draw even more attention to a scandal you wish would go away. [WDRB]

With Halloween approaching, the mansion for the University of Louisville president in the Cherokee Triangle is once again decorated for the holiday, and President James Ramsey and his wife, Jane, may hand out treats to trick-or-treaters on Halloween night Saturday as they have in the past. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 and the Center for Women and Families are teaming up for a new challenge. [WHAS11]

Lexington could be poised to become the second city in Kentucky to increase the minimum wage. [H-L]

The attorney for the woman at the center of Louisville basketball’s recruitment sex scandal answered questions on local radio. [WLKY]

Tuberculosis has joined HIV/AIDS as the top infectious disease killer on the planet, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The downtown bridge project is one step closer to being completed. The bridge is officially connected from river bank to river bank across the Ohio. [WAVE3]

A group of nearly 40 representatives, from the Congressional Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses, wrote to Attorney General Loretta Lynch Wednesday morning, requesting that the Department of Justice do more to address gun violence in minority communities across the country. [Mother Jones]

The Louisville Water Company has finished the phase-out of two hazardous chemicals that were stored at both of the company’s water treatment plants. [WFPL]

A panel of medical experts said on Friday the prices of prescription medicines in the United States need to be brought in line with the value they bring to patients instead of continuing to let drugmakers set any price they choose. [Reuters]

The U.S. Department of Justice says AB Electrolux is stonewalling it in its fight over the GE Appliances merger, according to a report by legal site Law360. [Business First]

Construction on the renovated Jeffersonville marina — now called Fisherman’s Wharf — is complete, according to an announcement. [News & Tribune]