Best Everything Puppies Rainbows Fun

Greg Fischer says everything is rosy in Louisville.

Right?

From the Washington Post:

A new study has identified 10 large cities where the most substantial shares of the population live in economically distressed communities. It also shines a spotlight on the major and midsize cities where the gaps between those struggling and those doing well have grown largest.

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And here’s a map of the big and midsize cities in which the people who are struggling the most also happen to live in close proximity — in the same city — with those who are doing well. Call them the most unequal cities.

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The group’s researchers created an index of economic distress and inequality based on seven metrics. That list includes: the share of people age 25 or older who have a college degree, the portion of the city’s livable housing stock that’s vacant, the unemployment rate and changes in the labor-force participation rate, the percentage of the population that lives on incomes below the federal poverty line, how a Zip code’s median income compares to that same figure statewide and what share of the area’s businesses have closed. In each of those categories, the index relies on Zip-code level, five-year averages of census data to account for one-time big events and economic flukes.

The map referenced?

Here:


FROM THE WASHINGTON POST

Yep.

Everything is rosy. Magical. Compassionate. Possible. EVERYTHING IS PERFECT AND TRANSPARENT AND AWESOME!

Really, we all love Louisville. But we definitely need a reality check when it comes to the fluff Greg Fischer is throwing out. Even the Brown Family has woken up to that reality.

Major Reality Check For Greg Fischer

You thought everything was going swell for Greg Fischer?

His lack of transparency has gotten so bad that Gill Holland is speaking up:

As much as our city government and the Omni developers most likely want the critical letters to the editor to stop, the reality is that the groundswell of citizen dismay is growing. An increasing number of Louisvillians are realizing there are several significant issues with the Omni situation.

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There are two main problems with this deal. One is financial. The clause of the contract where the city contractually promises NOT to incentivize any other significant (more than 400 rooms) hotel group within a mile of downtown for almost 10 years is of utmost concern. In my mind, the city will grow significantly in the next decade, and we will need another major hotel. But nope, that can’t happen, not if it is within a mile. What if a developer wants to build a 400-room hotel overlooking the upcoming Waterfront Park West? Nope. This clause is a competition killer, and government should encourage competition, not stifle it.

The second problem is a general lack of transparency and community involvement in this deal.

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As concerned citizens and various constituencies write their letters to the editor and do their design charrettes, it doesn’t seem like the city has any true interest in hearing what citizens are saying, because the “deal is done.”

Instead of bucking up and saying things could have been done better, city government seems to be entrenching.

Click here to read the entire letter.

There’s a lot more where that came from.

Fischer’s New Letter Re: FOP Mess

Here’s Greg Fischer’s letter:

Monday, June 22, 2015

Dear colleagues,

A recent letter by FOP President Dave Mutchler highlighted some of the very real challenges you face as law enforcement officers. When we sign up for public service, we are held to a high standard and at times face criticism — some of it constructive and reasonable, some of it dishonest or unfair, all of it allowed under the First Amendment.

Sergeant Mutchler also has a First Amendment right to speak his mind. However, responsible dialogue must be made with sensitivity to community relations, historical challenges, the raw and emotional time our city and nation find themselves in, and the recognition that words can have real consequences.

For many, it was hard not to interpret Mr. Mutchler’s letter as threatening. While he said that was not his intention, he used language that made many people fearful and defensive. Furthermore, some of his statements have the potential to undue (sic) years of the Louisville Metro Police Department’s work to develop thoughtful and constructive relationships with community members. That is why I rebuked his letter last week.

While I disagree with some of Mr. Mutchler’s words, I want to be absolutely clear in my support for LMPD, and my understanding of the even more difficult task of policing in the post-Ferguson world, as well as the importance of LMPD protecting every one of our citizens’ constitutional rights.

Through my regular interaction with LMPD and the community, I know we can be a model city for balancing the difficult work of policing and community activism. In order to advance that critical work, and protect not only our community members but also protect you, I will continue to speak strongly against any words or acts that potentially lead toward unrest.

I remain inspired and proud of our force, and will continue to do all I can to lift up, advance and promote your good work.

Sincerely,

Greg Fischer

Strong words from the mayor to the LMPD.

Meanwhile, Mutchler still hasn’t responded to the Human Relations Commission’s Advocacy Board.

Fischer Finally Kicks Ass, Takes Names

Read part of the statement from the mayor & police chief:

Mr. Mutchler, in separate phone calls with both of us prior to his news conference, said he was seeking to clarify his position, strike a constructive tone, and emphasize that no person of good will should feel threatened in our city. After listening to his press conference remarks, we remain concerned that Mr. Mutchler, with the leadership position he holds, does not understand the impact of the tone of his remarks and original letter.

The threatening tone is not representative of the vast majority of our officers or our citizens — and many have told us that they have a significantly differently (sic) view than Mr. Mutchler. His words do absolutely nothing to help build community-police relations and undermine the noble and difficult work our police do every day, from keeping us safe and secure in our homes to protecting our First Amendment right to speak our minds.

Almost unprecedented for Fischer to take such a strong position.

Good on him.

Fischer: Your White Privilege Is Showing

Officials have released the names of two people who were recently killed in separate incidents. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell and District Court Judge Stephanie Pearce Burke are again butting heads, this time over Burke’s handling of a case originally set for trial this week. If you haven’t kept up with this, it’s crazy. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer says that if you aren’t doing anything illegal, you’ve got nothing to worry about. Which should ring hollow for just about anybody with the ability to think on their own. Those 150+ shootings are super-compassionate. Nothing to see here, puppies and rainbows. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray applauded the work of the Urban County Council in its deliberation of his proposed $323 million budget on Tuesday but declined to say if he would veto any changes council made to the budget. [H-L]

State officials plan to keep an outreach center open for one more year in a southern Indiana county that’s facing the largest HIV outbreak in state history. [WLKY]

Don’t call Chris Christie rich. The Clintons say they still have bills to pay. And Mike Huckabee? Despite his wealth, he was born “blue collar, not blue blood.” [HuffPo]

This white lady assaulted a police officer by allegedly grabbing her throat. She wasn’t arrested or shot. [WAVE3]

Roughly half of deaths from 12 smoking-related cancers may be linked directly to cigarette use, a U.S. study estimates. [Reuters]

Some would-be homebuyers in Louisville are facing tough conditions. New figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors show that the number of homes available for sale is down 17 percent from last year. [WFPL]

Two years ago in the Netherlands, artist Paul de Kort designed an 81-acre park near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. His assignment? To use nothing but landscaping to dampen the noise of airplanes. Such a project had never been attempted—and the science behind his design was discovered almost by accident. [Gizmodo]

Commercial real estate developer William P. Butler intends to purchase Lexington, Ky.-based American Founders Bank and move its headquarters to Louisville, according to a news release from the bank. [Business First]

Contractual issues between the city and the New Albany police union could be ruled upon soon. [News & Tribune]

It’s Positive UofL Spin Time Again

Another day, another horrific death in Possibility City. Don’t worry, everything is fine, we have bike lanes in white neighborhoods. (What? We’re still not supposed to talk about the racial divide in this city?) [WDRB]

American Pharoah blew into racing immortality Saturday, his 51/2-length victory over Frosted in the Belmont Stakes making him racing’s first Triple Crown winner since 1978 and only the 12th ever to sweep the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer can give away tens of millions of dollars to Cordish for literally doing nothing. He can cut WIC programs in half, which are pocket change by comparison. But he can still afford to sink $7.4 million into non-essentials — including a $300,000 swimming pool filter. [WHAS11]

Dr. David Jones is still impressed by the sight of it: A smiling fast-food worker taking the time to feed a disabled woman her favorite meal, a steak burrito. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! We sadly hear this isn’t the only Trinity teacher up to no good. The school has allegedly shipped teachers off to other parts of the state when catching them up to no good in the past, as well. [WLKY]

American Pharoah has cemented his misspelled name among horse racing royalty, claiming the Triple Crown with his win at the Belmont Stakes on Saturday, a feat not done since 1978. [HuffPo]

A southern Indiana county is facing a sharp increase in hepatitis C cases, but officials say it’s too soon to seek state permission for a needle-exchange program. [WAVE3]

According to data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the leading causes of cancer death are generally the same across the country. [Click the Clicky]

Researchers at Louisville’s James Graham Brown Cancer Center have found a new way to treat advanced melanoma using the herpes simplex 1 virus. [WFPL]

Thousands gathered in St. Paul, Minnesota Saturday afternoon to march in protest of the growing network of tar sands pipelines in America, singling out one pipeline — the Alberta Clipper — in particular. [ThinkProgress]

UofL is mired in controversy so it’s time for some PR spin. The University of Louisville has found its leader for the recently announced UL Additive Manufacturing Competency Center, a partnership with UL LLC, a global safety science company. [Business First]

Health officials are still searching for “patient zero” seven months after detecting HIV among drug users in the small, rural town of Austin. [News & Tribune]

Happy Greg Fischer Rainbow Funtimes

Bank Street in Portland could become the new E. Market Street in Nulu. A new soccer stadium for the Louisville City Football Club could be built in West Louisville. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have opened an in-custody death review after a man who police handcuffed late Saturday became unresponsive and died soon after. [C-J/AKN]

A salary review is underway for six top UofL officials, including president James Ramsey. [WHAS11]

Health insurance costs will probably jump by 10 percent or more next year for many Kentuckians buying coverage through Kynect, the state-run insurance exchange created under the federal Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

An activist and a University of Louisville doctor are shining light on gun violence in the city. [WLKY]

A majority of Democratic members in the House and Senate have now signed on to letters rebuking the Obama administration for expanding the practice of detaining immigrant women and children. [HuffPo]

Oh, look, people are finally realizing that Greg Fischer is an entitled d-bag. Kind of like the Brown Family found out after it was too late. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah drew the favorable post number five for the 147th running of the Belmont Stakes on Saturday when the colt looks to become the first Triple Crown winner in nearly four decades. [Reuters]

Is this the “essence and spirit” of Louisville or of every other modern building in every other generic city on earth? It’s not ugly but it’s certainly not got anything Louisville about it. [WFPL]

College admissions take a crucial factor into account that could be creating enormous racial bias, but it’s not grades or extracurricular activities or even SAT scores. It’s a student’s disciplinary record. [ThinkProgress]

The LG&E Center, the downtown office tower at 220 W. Main St., has a new owner. [Business First]

Citing more time for review, the Jeffersonville Board of Public Works has twice tabled city paving bids wherein the lowest bidder sued the city last year. [News & Tribune]