How Much Time Has He Spent Raising Taxes?

Another day, another JCPS bus accident. They’re almost as plentiful as shootings or pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Can you imagine how much better off Louisville would be if Greg Fischer spent the amount of time he’s spent trying to raise your taxes on holding people like Sadiqa Reynolds accountable? With hours left for the local option sales tax to advance in the state Senate, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made a push Tuesday to rally support for the bill. [C-J/AKN]

A single vote upheld the decision to prevent James Helinger from returning to his post as a Buechel Police Lieutenant. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission will discuss the decline of important natural pollinators like bees and butterflies. The meeting Thursday in Frankfort will be open to the public. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City! One person was rushed to the hospital after an early morning shooting in Okolona. Was apparently a teen who was found shot in the groin. [WLKY]

This man helps American cities hide their homeless populations. His tactics are being put to use in Louisville by Greg Fischer. But no one wants to talk about it because how dare anyone question puppies and rainbows. [HuffPo]

Parents within West Clark Community Schools are voicing concerns over school conditions and overcrowding at Silver Creek High School in Clark County. [WAVE3]

Louisville businessman Hal Heiner leads the crowded race for the Republican party’s nominee for Kentucky’s next governor who would then likely take on Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [WKYT]

John Schnatter’s long-running, multi-generational ties to the University of Louisville just grew $4.64 million deeper. [WFPL]

A new study has found that when transgender young people are allowed to fully identify with their gender and take steps toward transition, it significantly improves their depression and anxiety. [Think Progress]

When Lily DeRosia read about the mandatory overtime and long shifts forced on workers at the Louisville company that makes Girl Scout cookies, she was inspired to try to do something about it. [Business First]

Floyd County is in the process of hiring a public works director. [News & Tribune]

Are You Excited For Not Diana To Visit?

Everybody is freaking out about Prince Charles and that lady who is not Diana coming to Louisville. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer on Monday nominated Sujata Barai Chugh, a public policy and nonprofit grant writing consultant, to fill one of two open seats on the Metropolitan Sewer District board. [C-J/AKN]

An underground service explosion caused a disruption to power to some customers in the areas of 4th, Liberty, Fifth and Jefferson streets, according to LG&E spokesperson Natasha Collins. [WHAS11]

Raising the minimum wage is a top issue for Kentucky voters, contrary to the nonsense Greg Fischer has spewed. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville police are investigating human remains found on a construction site in Lake Louisvilla in eastern Jefferson County, on Monday. [WLKY]

When he published Diana: Her True Story in 1992, Andrew Morton faced a “cataclysm” from the British establishment, who wished to “deny the message and denigrate the messenger” behind the explosive biography. [HuffPo]

Now we’re leaving shootings (okay, not really) and are getting back to good old fashioned stabbings. [WAVE3]

Hypocrisy. Disappointment. Frustration. That’s how Democrats described their feelings about Republicans as they listened to President Barack Obama call for a renewal of the Voting Rights Act in front of the Edmund Pettus Bridge on the anniversary of the march that helped get the law passed 50 years ago. [Politico]

Louisville Metro Government will pay $1.5 million to settle a legal suit filed by a group of young men wrongfully arrested in summer 2014. [WFPL]

No new research projects will begin at the U.S. government’s key livestock study center until animal welfare is improved through stronger oversight and better training of standards, U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said on Monday. [Reuters]

Nucleus, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, plans to keep its deadline intact for the construction of a six-story parking garage at 220 S. Preston St. in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

The Indiana Senate’s top budget writer said Thursday he wants to consider ways of possibly easing proposed school funding shifts that could lead to cuts for many urban and rural districts with shrinking enrollments. [News & Tribune]

Watch Greg Pretend He Didn’t Want To Run

Another day, another pedestrian death. Doesn’t matter who is at fault – the victim or the driver – this city is riddled with pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Shots rang out early Tuesday morning in the Beecher Terrace housing project, leaving in their wake the city’s 21st homicide victim of 2015. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer claims he has no intention to try running for U.S. Senate again in 2016. But he absolutely wanted to. He still doesn’t comprehend that he’ll never win statewide office. Ever. And if anyone had enough money, he wouldn’t currently be mayor. [WHAS11]

When I first heard that Alan Stein had agreed to chair the Fayette County Public Schools’ redistricting committee, I thought: Has he lost his mind? [Tom Eblen]

For this year’s 60th Celebration of the Kentucky Derby Festival, KDF has teamed up with the Kentucky Lottery to name someone the 2015 Festival Fanatic. [WLKY]

Darren Wilson, the former police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August, will not face federal civil rights charges in connection with Brown’s death, Justice Department officials said Wednesday. [HuffPo]

A fight among teenagers Monday led to gunfire in the Shawnee neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Here’s Greg Stumbo using Legislative Research Commission staffers to write a column about how he believes he’s a pension genius who saved the pension system. Sadly, everyone old enough to legally think on their own knows all hell is breaking loose on that front. [Floyd County Times]

A voluntary biennial survey for Kentucky teachers that’s meant to measure their opinions of schools, resources, education leadership and community support is now available to take online. [WFPL]

Over the past decade, states have slashed workers’ compensation benefits, denying injured workers help when they need it most and shifting the costs of workplace accidents to taxpayers. [ProPublica]

Is it just us or is this yet another hyped up Fischer stunt that won’t go anywhere? [Business First]

Residents of the 200 and 300 blocks of Pearl Street in downtown Jeffersonville soon will have a designated place to park. [News & Tribune]

Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Have So Many Murders

Internal reviews conducted by the Kentucky Department of Education at three of Jefferson County’s lowest performing schools show progress is being made towards improving achievement, but that some changes must still be made. [Toni Konz]

Does anyone really buy into this Fischer transparency schtick anymore? n the wake of criticisms that public officials were deleting electronic messages, Mayor Greg Fischer Monday said that every person serving on a board or commission will be issued an email address to conduct all official government business. [C-J/AKN]

Two of Louisville’s largest employers are urging Kentucky lawmakers to reject Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s push for the state to allow a local option sales tax. [WHAS11]

A move to raise the minimum wage in Kentucky’s largest city has resulted in a lawsuit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another couple of senseless murders in Possibility City. [WLKY]

To Washington insiders he is Dr Evil: the hidden orchestrator of industry campaigns against the Humane Society, Mothers against Drunk Driving, and other seemingly uncontroversial groups. Now Richard Berman, a one-time lobbyist turned industry strategist, has zeroed in on another target: Barack Obama’s new power plant rules. [HuffPo]

What began as a call for help along Interstate 71 ended with police discovering a car crash with a man shot dead inside Wednesday. The shooting forced southbound I-71 closed near the Gene Snyder Freeway for hours impacting travel for hundreds of people. [WAVE3]

Brown-Forman is among 16 organizations across the United States recognized for climate action. [EPA]

The recent revelation that breathalyzer tests are video recorded at the Louisville jail may lead to an influx of filings to re-opened drunk driving cases in the near future. [WFPL]

Wanna dig through Churchill Downs’ quarterly and full year earnings results? [External PDF Link]

The Kentucky Derby Festival unveiled its 2015 Pegasus Pins at an event at Hard Rock Café and it doesn’t suck. [Business First]

Slick, icy roads didn’t stop New Albany residents from packing the Carnegie Center for Art & History to discuss a hot-button issue Saturday. [News & Tribune]

Fischer’s Right: Clear Your Dang Sidewalks!

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s office hopes the Kentucky House will soon take up a pair of bills giving the city more power to deal with vacant and abandoned properties. [WDRB]

Senate Republican leaders on Friday sent the bill to ban smoking in indoor public places to a committee chaired by an opponent of the bill. [C-J/AKN]

As the days of ice and snow slowly pass us by, Mayor Fischer asks locals to tend to their sidewalks and help out around the neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Democrats have become a confused political party with a muddled message and an inability to turn out enough of its loyal voters, a party task force charged with how to revive the embattled party said Saturday. [H-L]

Almost two years later and there are still no arrests and no suspects in the murder of Bardstown police officer Jason Ellis. [WLKY]

U.S. District Judge James Boasberg issued a preliminary injunction Friday blocking the Obama administration from detaining individuals seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border, saying the policy illegally aims to deter others from immigrating to the U.S. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man was arrested after he fired a gun into a parking lot. [WAVE3]

Congressman Thomas Massie, R-Ky. 4th District, told a small audience at Ashland Community and Technical College’s Summit campus he is personally concerned with entrepreneurship. [Ashland Independent]

It’s the second week of smoking cessation classes at Family Health Centers in the Portland neighborhood. [WFPL]

The Obama administration says the current system promotes conflicts of interest, leads to high fees and erodes returns on investment. [NPR]

Sayreville, N.J.-based Sabert Corp. is doubling the size of its food-packaging manufacturing center in Shepherdsville with a project that got under way a few months ago. [Business First]

The appeals hearing for embattled New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook will be held March 10 and March 11 in executive sessions. [News & Tribune]

The Snow Has Ruined Everything Forever & Ever

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, along with other city leaders, provided residents in Metro Louisville with an update at a Tuesday afternoon press conference, regarding the city’s plans for snow removal — and he also addressed criticisms that some streets had not yet been cleared. [WDRB]

A 19-year-old inmate charged with multiple crimes including kidnapping and robbery committed suicide Monday morning, according to Corrections Major Endora Davis. [C-J/AKN]

What happens when a bunch of whitewater boaters throw a party and a film festival breaks out? [WHAS11]

Steve Beshear issued two executive orders Tuesday: to protect consumers from price gouging and to make sure Kentuckians have access to needed prescription orders during winter’s onslaught. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two people and a dog were pulled from an icy pond in Lyndon on Tuesday afternoon. [WLKY]

Attorney General Eric Holder called Tuesday for a moratorium on the death penalty pending a Supreme Court decision on the use of lethal injection drugs in Oklahoma. [HuffPo]

As road crews continued to clear routes throughout the city Tuesday, many businesses spent the day getting back up and running. [WAVE3]

Many children pretend to be astronauts or dream of exploring space, but eight Rowan County students have dedicated time to learning about space science. [The Morehead News]

Jefferson County Public Schools will stay closed on Wednesday because of the winter weather, school district officials announced Tuesday during a news conference with city officials. [WFPL]

Just in case you missed it, here’s a deeper look at the behind-the-scenes of Greg Fischer’s minimum wage nonsense. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Ford says pricing pressures and excess capacity are among the problems for the U.S. auto industry. [Business First]

Though two members hadn’t cast a vote on the matter as of Friday, the Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County board isn’t expected to seat New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair. [News & Tribune]