Revisiting Ramsey’s Big Reality Disconnect

You may have to watch your step more closely when crossing at least one downtown street. A pedway allowing easy access to the convention center will be going away. [WDRB]

How many scandalous hires does this make for Greg Fischer? The man has no concept of vetting new hires. Where are the liberal hand-wringers now? Every time a shitty hire is revealed, they freak out and attack. Every. Time. But suddenly they’re quiet. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! School time horror stories. “I had a chair thrown across the room and the kid looked at me–this is second grade–and said “what the f*** did I do b****,” Lucretia Gue, a former first grade teacher at Frayser Elementary School said. [WHAS11]

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

Local teevee folks are still freaking out about a white lady married to a preacher. When was the last time they freaked out like this over a person of color? Or over someone not tied to some random church? [WLKY]

Here’s one more indication that American teachers work really, really hard — and don’t make nearly enough. An analysis released Tuesday by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development looks at the state of education around the world, examining everything from intergenerational mobility in education to graduation rates to teacher pay. [HuffPo]

The YMCA of Louisville and the YMCA of Southern Indiana are merging, organization leaders announced during the 25th annual YMCA Mayor’s Thanksgiving Breakfast. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, R-Cookie Tree, said after a town hall at the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center he is in conversations with the CEO of AK Steel about how to keep hundreds of jobs at Ashland Works afloat. [Ashland Independent]

James Ramsey has been thinking a lot lately about stepping down from his role as president of the University of Louisville. That’s all it took for him to think about resigning? Not the myriad scandals, people going to prison, tens of millions of dollars swindled?! [WFPL]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

Electrolux announced plans to buy General Electric Co.’s Louisville-based appliance division for $3.3 billion last year. But the government sued to block the deal in July, citing concerns that it would suppress competition. [Business First]

A bill to include LGBT people in existing anti-discrimination laws is on the slate for the State Senate’s upcoming legislative session. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

At Least Fischer Isn’t A Xenophobe/Bigot

Good grief, you can’t even hide in the ceiling these days without getting arrested. [WDRB]

This story originally ran in late January. Twenty-one Syrian refugees will arrive in Louisville over the next two weeks, a figure expected to increase in Kentucky and beyond as the U.S. begins to take in an expanded number of refugees fleeing Syria’s bloody civil war. [C-J/AKN]

A week after the deadly terrorist attacks that rocked Paris, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is urging the community to stand in solidarity with refugees and those affected by the horrific acts. [WHAS11]

The American Civil Liberties Union says a Kentucky county clerk’s office should reissue altered marriage licenses even though the governor has promised to recognize them as valid. [H-L]

Your tax dollars are paying for Jerry Abramson’s pals to conduct media boat tours. [WLKY]

The nation’s capital is receiving a wonderful gift this holiday season. Atlanta’s Homeward Choir, a group of men from the city’s Central Night Shelter, have been invited to perform at the White House Open House Holiday Celebration on Dec. 21. [HuffPo]

As temperatures drop back into the 20s, homeless shelters across Louisville are starting Operation White Flag. [WAVE3]

First-hand accounts like this won’t deter pandering bigots like Rand Paul and Matt Bevin. Until last year, I was one of 4.3 million people at the mercy of the legal immigration system, waiting for the chance to stay in the U.S. for good. [BuzzFeed]

A group of about 80 people gathered on Friday afternoon to call on the Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney to cease his efforts to have Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens removed from all criminal cases pending before him. [WFPL]

NPR’s Rachel Martin speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, about the screening process refugees go through before entering the United States. [NPR]

The Louisville Arena Authority has a new member and a new chairman after the resignation earlier this month of chairman Larry Hayes. [Business First]

Sheriff Frank Loop said he had no idea the Floyd County Animal Control Board voted Thursday to suspend services to residents living outside the city limits for the rest of 2015. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Fun Fischer Tax Hikes & Horrible Bigots

There’s a new statue on Louisville’s Museum Row. [WDRB]

Just what Louisville’s working poor need! Once they lose access to health care, they can pay more taxes for the crap that Greg Fischer and his rich daddy want to build and/or destroy. [C-J/AKN]

Bourbon has become such a big tourism draw that the Louisville Filson Historical Society celebrates the day prohibition was repealed more than 80 years ago. [WHAS11]

The water tower in Lebanon is about to get a new mural that should make it very popular on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. The tower will be graced by a bottle of bourbon, making it look like the world’s largest Maker’s Mark pour. The city’s 135-foot water tower will be getting a mural by internationally recognized muralist Eric Henn, who will paint it to look like the neck of a gigantic bottle, complete with signature red wax, is pouring bourbon straight down. [H-L]

The Muhammad Ali Center marked a milestone this week — 10 years in Louisville. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama is accusing Republicans who oppose allowing Syrian refugees into the U.S. of being scared of widows and orphans. He says the political posturing “needs to stop.” [HuffPo]

This story will cause area bigots to lose their minds. [WAVE3]

U.S. consumer prices increased in October after two straight months of declines as the cost of healthcare and other services rose, evidence of firming inflation that further supports views that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month. [Reuters]

Amid city efforts to develop a system for reusing elements of historical buildings, stakeholders and city officials met Monday to discuss potential uses for preserved parts of the old Board of Trade building. [WFPL]

Poverty does not treat men and women equally, especially in old age. Women 65 years old and older who are living in poverty outnumber men in those circumstances by more than 2 to 1. And these women are likely to face the greatest deprivation as they become older and more frail. [NPR]

Ford Motor Co.’s 9,000 UAW members have voted to reject a new contract that would have set working conditions and raises through the next four years. [Business First]

Indiana bigots are apparently just like Kentucky bigots. Two Syrian refugee families who had been approved to be moved to the United States and were scheduled to arrive in Indianapolis on Thursday have been officially told they are not welcome. [News & Tribune]

UofL Continues Series Of Hot Garbage Fires

In the span of less than two hours Wednesday afternoon, the University of Louisville announced that its Board of Trustees executive committee would have a closed-door meeting Thursday morning — then said the committee would not meet after all. [WDRB]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering why your neighbor is snowed into hype about compassion? It’s because media outlets run crap like this, unchecked, as if it’s gospel. Mayor Greg Fischer is celebrating Louisville’s status as a compassionate city. [WHAS11]

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Maybe Louisville should try the same thing? The Lexington Parking Authority is giving people the opportunity to pay off parking tickets with food. [WLKY]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

The name of a man who was shot and killed Tuesday night in a Dixie Highway Taco Bell parking lot during dinner time has been released. [WAVE3]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Matthew Barzun, the American ambassador to the Court of St. James’s, stood before a buzzing, boisterous audience of several hundred teenagers in a poor borough on the southern edge of greater London and asked them what frustrated or concerned them the most about the United States. [NY Times]

Just wait til we start talking about affairs and sex scandals at LWC… Louisville Water Co. president and CEO Jim Brammell announced Wednesday that he will retire from the position, effective Jan. 1. [Business First]

While tentative tolling rates for the Ohio River Bridges Project have been set for almost two years, some details have yet to be finalized. For some, those details could make all the difference. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

Hype Isn’t Gonna Help JCPS Improve

We love to hate on Donna Hargens and Jefferson County Public Schools but come on. This is the dumbest thing yet from WDRB about JCPS and it’s being used by the racist anti-busing crowd. The insinuation (watch them try to claim otherwise in 3, 2…) that all teachers who resign do so because they feel unsafe is dangerous and based in teabagger delusion land. Remember that there are something like 6,000 teachers when they try to claim that a dozen resignations = harbinger of doom. [WDRB]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer refused to sign an ordinance Thursday shielding area community centers for needy residents from his administrative changes after an overwhelming margin of Metro Council members passed the measure. Instead of vetoing the legislation, which was approved by a 20-3 vote last month, Fischer has asked the state attorney general to weigh in, launching the city’s two branches of government into a legal joust over who has final say about a potential overhaul at Neighborhood Place sites. [C-J/AKN]

Three people have been arrested and a man continues to recover in the hospital after a shooting in the Chickasaw neighborhood Friday night. [WHAS11]

Kip Cornett said he and his wife were at an airport in June when he read on his cellphone a column by Barry Weisbord, president and co-publisher of Thoroughbred Daily News. [H-L]

A 27-year-old Louisville man became the city’s latest homicide victim on Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

The medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders released its internal report on Thursday about the October attack on its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The report also revealed that pilots shot at staff members fleeing the hospital. [HuffPo]

The Americana Community Center, Inc. held its annual fundraiser Saturday night. The center strives to provide a spectrum of services to the diverse individuals and families of the Louisville Metro area, including refugees, immigrants and those born in the United States. [WAVE]

By most accounts, Kentucky’s implementation of President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare reform was a success. Tuesday’s elections in the state could mean big changes are coming, however – with ominous portents for the future of the president’s signature legislative achievement. [BBC]

The fallout continues from Halloween, when University of Louisville President James Ramsey and his staff posed for a photograph at a U of L party wearing stereotypical “Mexican” costumes. The photo went viral, and a few written apologies were issued, but they’ve been lacking. [WFPL]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Wait, people are surprised this is happening? Its been quite a ride, but the Velocity Indiana entrepreneurial accelerator and co-working space is effectively closing shop. [Business First]

In another plea for the state’s help on Clark County’s diminishing revenue stream, County Attorney Lisa Glickfield is drafting a letter of support from board members to legislators to raise the tax levy. [News & Tribune]

Another Deadly Weekend As Greg Fischer Pushes His Compassionate City Fallacy

If you missed it late Friday, a human trafficking task force has offered to train the University of Louisville in the wake of its latest scandal. [Page One]

Three people are dead after two separate shootings in Louisville took place Saturday morning. [WDRB]

A Jefferson district court judge on Friday ruled that the traffic school program that has generated more than $1.2 million in revenue for County Attorney Mike O’Connell’s office is unconstitutional. [C-J/AKN]

One man is dead after a shooting in the Lake Dreamland neighborhood Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

The city of Lexington might be paying the new 21c Museum Hotel more than $200,000 to replace sidewalks and put in other improvements on North Upper Street. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Family and friends surrounded police tape in the 800 block of West Evelyn Avenue on Saturday morning, while they waited to learn if their loved one was killed in a shooting on Saturday around 12:30 a.m. Two men died as a result of the shooting. [WLKY]

Targeting one of education’s most divisive issues, President Barack Obama on Saturday called for capping standardized testing at 2 percent of classroom time and said the government shares responsibility for turning tests into the be-all and end-all of American schools. [HuffPo]

Two Louisville families lost brothers and sons to gunfire near Churchill Downs early Saturday morning. [WAVE3]

The mayor of Lousville crossed the Atlantic to pay a a visit to Rotherham’s Advanced Manufacturing Park. Mayor Greg Fischer — the Kentucky city’s 50th mayor — paid a visit to the state-of-the-art research facility last Wednesday (21). [Click the Clicky]

An assistant University of Missouri-Kansas City basketball coach has resigned, saying he can’t do his job while battling what he called “false allegations” that he hired dancers to strip and have sex with recruits while he was a coach at Louisville. [WFPL]

Rufus Scales, 26 and black, was driving his younger brother Devin to his hair-cutting class in this genteel, leafy city when they heard the siren’s whoop and saw the blue light in the rearview mirror of their black pickup. Two police officers pulled them over for minor infractions that included expired plates and failing to hang a flag from a load of scrap metal in the pickup’s bed. But what happened next was nothing like a routine traffic stop. [NY Times]

Members of the Louisville-based Independent Pilots Association, a union that represents pilots for United Parcel Service Inc., has voted to authorize a strike against the Atlanta-based shipping giant. [Business First]

Two police agencies in Clark County have been awarded more than $50,000 for crime prevention and policing initiatives. [News & Tribune]

Come On, Just Ask Some Questions, Maybe?


The mainstream media just blindly regurgitates this “compassion” nonsense without so much as asking a single question?


LOUISVILLE (WDRB) – For the fourth year in a row, the Charter for Compassion International has named Louisville as its Model Compassionate City.

The Charter for Compassion is a cooperative effort to restore compassionate living to the center of community life. It is based in Seattle, Washington.

Rev. Dr. Joan Brown Campbell, chair of the Board of Trustees and the Global Compassion Council, presented the award to Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday, Oct. 16, during a reception at the 2015 Parliament of the World’s Religions in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Mayor Fischer attended the Parliament as a speaker and panelist, along with Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad. Tom Williams, of Stoll Keenon Ogden PLLC is co-host of Compassionate Louisville and was a panel moderator at the Parliament.

“It is an honor to be recognized for a trait that comes so naturally to the citizens of Louisville,” Mayor Fischer said of the Model City designation. “Our citizens have a deep and profound instinct to help one another and to give.”

When the Mayor took office in 2011, he set three goals for Louisville – pillars of community life. He said we must be a city of lifelong learning, of health, and of even greater compassion. Louisville was the seventh city to sign on to the Compassion Charter, and Mayor Fischer created Compassionate Louisville to help develop and implement a city-wide campaign to nurture and champion the growth of compassion.

One of its signature events is the annual Mayor’s Give a Day Week, in which the entire city makes time for volunteering, service and compassion. This year, the city broke its own world record, with more than 166,000 volunteers and acts of compassion.

Copyright 2015 WDRB Media. All rights reserved.


LOUISVILLE, Ky. —Louisville has been named a model city for compassion for the fourth year in a row.

The Charter for Compassion International handed out the award at a ceremony in Salt Lake City.

One of the signature, compassionate Louisville events is the mayor’s Give a Day week.

This year, Louisville broke its own record with more than 166,000 volunteers and acts of compassion.

Surely not.

Surely that wouldn’t happen here in Possibility City.