What’s With All The Misbehaving Judges?

A pilot program that will place volunteer monitors on some of Jefferson County Public Schools’ most challenging bus routes is expected to begin later this month. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A Jefferson District Court judge who jailed a witness without a hearing in a move another judge called “outrageous and disgusting” has been formally charged with violating the Code of Judicial Conduct. [C-J/AKN]

Here’s what your new governor had to say about Planned Parenthood. [WHAS11]

Jordan Smith will serve as grand marshal for the Kentucky Derby Festival’s Pegasus Parade. The 61st annual parade is scheduled to be held on May 5 in Louisville. [H-L]

Maybe some day Louisville will get its act together. Two Louisville teens were arrested, accused of robbing a pizza delivery driver. [WLKY]

A Saudi prince may have just beaten Donald Trump at a game of Twitter trolling. Prince Alwaleed bin Talal said on Twitter that he’s bailed the billionaire out twice — and suggested the GOP presidential frontrunner might need his help a third time. [HuffPo]

Elizabethtown community members gathered at the Lincoln Village Juvenile Detention Center to honor the life of 16-year-old Gynnya McMillen and ask for answers about her unresolved cause of death. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Division of Motor Vehicle Licensing has introduced a new feature on their website that makes it easier for motorists to access their 2015 vehicle property taxes for the upcoming tax season. Now, individuals who normally would contact their county clerks for this information can access it directly online. [Click the Clicky]

In his sixth State of the City address since taking office, Mayor Greg Fischer says he is optimistic about the city’s direction. [WFPL]

Passport Health Plan, Kentucky’s leading provider-sponsored, community-based Medicaid provider, will host a press conference [this] morning at the Muhammad Ali Center to make an important announcement regarding the company’s future and the delivery of Medicaid managed care services. [Press Release]

Lots of states have loosened up their marijuana laws. We can at least talk about it here now, right? [Business First]

Clerk-Treasurer Michelle Miller is suing the Sellersburg Town Council for eliminating a position from her office, claiming the decision was made in political retaliation. [News & Tribune]

Council’s Following Frankfort Off A Cliff

The principal at a top performing JCPS school is concerned about losing teachers. [WDRB]

In a stunning move, Democrat David Tandy said Tuesday he will not seek a fourth term and will forgo a bid to serve a second consecutive term as Metro Council president. Most political observers were the opposite of stunned. Tandy’s been attacked the past year by the Stumbo Democrats – the anti-progressives who learned how to play dirty at the hands of David Yates, Stumbo’s former deputy. On top of that, Tandy has a history of running from fights. Reference: Cordish, everything Abramson ever tried, nearly everything the corrupt Jim King pushed. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. Nothing’s new in 2016. [WHAS11]

Mitch McConnell says a Republican takeover of the statehouse is inevitable. He’s right. But it’ll only last a few years. [H-L]

Making an already difficult system worse. TARC will be adjusting service on seven bus routes beginning Jan. 31. Most of the service changes involve minor adjustments to pick-up times in response to traffic conditions and delays. [WLKY]

Of course Indiana bigots want to fine transgendered individuals for using the “wrong” restroom. [HuffPo]

There’s a new rally cry to help prevent juveniles from getting into trouble late at night. Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad has been asking for a curfew law that is easier for officers to enforce for nearly two years. Now, Louisville Metro Council Members are asking questions. [WAVE3]

A foreclosure case involving Land of Tomorrow Productions LLC, the company that owns the Funtown Mountain property in Cave City, is moving forward, according to action taken during Barren Circuit Court on Monday morning. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Just what Louisville needs, another Greg Fischer protege! [WFPL]

An emotional US President Barack Obama has unveiled new restrictions on gun purchases, saying the “constant excuses for inaction” have to stop. [BBC]

Just a few days before Christmas, the Oldham Chamber and Economic Development named a new leader it believes can march the county toward new heights. [Business First]

Clark County is soon to undergo an inventory and assessment of signs in the county, to comply with federal regulations. [News & Tribune]

Everything Is Awful. Go Back To Bed.

WTF is going on with WDRB? Has literally everyone there turned into some magnet for racist panic? They’re really running stories about Marc Murphy’s cartoon? Jesus H, Louisville, get it together. The entire city is not some awful trailer park filled with Klansmen. This shit has to end at some point. [WDRB]

Fans entering the KFC Yum! Center will experience additional security measures at events beginning January 14. And people are freaking out. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer’s right – the local media hyped the Mall St. Matthews crap up. [WHAS11]

The electric bill at Lacey Griffey’s neat Harlan County home, with its yellow siding and silk-flower arrangements decorating the living room, was $582.07 in January 2013. [H-L]

More people are using their furnace as temperatures drop, leaving room for more cases of carbon monoxide poisoning. [WLKY]

If you missed it this week, there was a whole lot of Jim Gooch hilarity. [Page One]

A skyrocketing homicide rate, a budget surplus of more than $18 million, and the prospect of growing business: those are some of Louisville’s highlights in 2015. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

Registration is now open for Louisville’s Kilowatt Crackdown, a contest to reward for energy efficiency improvements in the city’s buildings. [WFPL]

And if you missed it in Louisville? Everybody is losing their damn mind over some misbehaving kids at a shopping mall. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Hepatitis C, which can damage the liver and cause cancer, affects more than 3 million people in the U.S., and new medications that have come on the market in the past few years will cure the virus in most patients. But a study has found that Medicaid in Kentucky, Indiana and more than 30 other states restrict who receive the pricey drugs. [Business First]

Some Indiana police agencies say their fight against methamphetamine production would be helped by a proposed state law change to require a doctor’s prescription for a common cold medicine that is used to make the illegal drug. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Surprise! More Bad UofL & JCPS News

A lawsuit against “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell may never see the light of day. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer made two key additions to his administration Wednesday in areas dealing with Louisville’s public safety and public assistance. The mayor announced Rashaad Abdur-Rahman will be the new director of the Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods office and Eric Friedlander will serve as acting director of the Community Services department. [C-J/AKN]

Data from Jefferson County Public Schools shows that a new grading scale appears to have increased the number of students getting A grades in classes. [WHAS11]

Glad to see there’s nothing important left to worry about. The University of Kentucky has sometimes been criticized for being a campus of independent units, with academic, athletics and health care divisions operating more separately than together. On a symbolic level, UK officials have decided that will no longer be the case. [H-L]

What the hell is this story about the guy killed in the Highlands? What? No, really, what the hell is that story? [WLKY]

The “Seinfeld” writer who coined “Festivus” wants Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) to stop tweeting about his beloved secular holiday. [HuffPo]

A JCPS bus driver was assaulted and robbed by students. The incident, according to the bus union president, happened on Friday at the Detrick Nichols compound off Taylor Blvd. [WAVE3]

While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky business groups are backing legislation that would expand expungements of some felony convictions. [WFPL]

The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino have put pressure on local authorities to show they’re ready for that kind of violence. Some jurisdictions, such as Los Angeles, are stepping up exercises and terrorism simulations. [NPR]

With truckers in high demand, the online marketplace seeks to connect drivers with carriers that need something hauled. [Business First]

Some of Indiana’s grocery stores and liquor stores say a change in state law that allows alcohol sales on Christmas Day for the first time in decades won’t affect them because their stores are closed on that holiday. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Another Compassionate Holiday Murder (Maybe)

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found dead in the 2100 block of Dahlia Avenue, near the intersection of Bardstown Road and Lancashire Avenue, early Monday. [WDRB]

In a unanimous vote, the Louisville Metro Council moved to hold a significant chunk of Louisville’s $18.9 million surplus on Thursday in order to consider other uses for the funds. The decision came after members from both parties complained Mayor Greg Fischer’s office was not forthcoming with the full surplus amount and didn’t give council members much say over how the money should be allocated. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) is on Winter Break until classes resume on January 4. For many in our community who are busy during this time, school is not something at the forefront of their planning calendar. [WHAS11]

Some in Lexington may have Internet access about 22 times faster than their neighbors. Cable and Internet provider Windstream announced a 1-gigabit-per-second Internet service trial in Lexington on Friday, with the potential for a full launch during the first half of 2016, according to a company press release. [H-L]

Guess Cordish was desperate for some positive press? No, really, this is a good thing. Donated food and supplies were handed out to military and families in need Monday morning as part of the 11th annual Christmas Angel Program at Fourth Street Live. [WLKY]

The latest report on the Arctic by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration finds dwindling sea ice and temperatures as much as 3 Celsius (5.4 Fahrenheit) above average are disrupting walrus and fish populations and having major impacts on the ecosystem. [HuffPo]

Less than two weeks before the end of one of the deadliest years in Louisville’s history, roughly 100 people marched to remember the city’s murder victims Sunday afternoon. The Louisville Urban League hosted the walk. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama urged Americans to remain vigilant against the potential threat of homegrown Islamic State militants on Friday, acknowledging the difficulty of tracking “lone wolf” attackers like those who went on a shooting spree in California. [Reuters]

A Louisville state representative wants to tax electronic cigarette equipment and the liquid nicotine that the devices turn into smokeable vapor. [WFPL]

The Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the first time in nine years Wednesday. NPR’s Audie Cornish talks to Megan Greene, chief economist at John Hancock, about what this means for consumers. [NPR]

A Utah company has expanded in the Louisville market with the purchase of two senior-care facilities, effective Dec. 2. [Business First]

A meeting designed to answer questions about the 2015 Floyd County budget shortfall only created more Tuesday afternoon at the Pine View Government Center. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

This Jackie Green Bike Thing Is Great And Isn’t Getting Enough Press

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Obscure alcohol rules are so dumb. Cold beer won’t be for sale in Indiana’s grocery or convenience stores any time soon. [WDRB]

A longtime advocate for cyclist- and pedestrian-friendly transportation policies rejected a plea agreement Monday in Jefferson District Court on charges of blocking traffic and running a red light while on a bike. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet is moving forward with a $40 million project to widen Preston Highway from two to four lanes in Bullitt County. [WHAS11]

State Sen. Mike Wilson on Monday said he would file legislation in the 2016 General Assembly to allow public charter schools as part of a pilot in Fayette and Jefferson counties. [H-L]

At least Henry County seems to get it. Voters in Henry County have approved the full sale of alcohol across the county. [WLKY]

In a rare senatorial act, full-time Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio joined with a handful of fellow legislators on Friday in an attempt to block local municipalities from undercutting big telecom companies by providing cheap, fast internet service. This is the kind of thing Jamie Comer’s people — like Riggs Lewis — make happen. They work to kill municipal broadband, get rich off TWC, ATT and other providers. You can thank that set of Republican special interests for stifling competition and innovation. [The Intercept]

Metro Gubmint has a nearly $19 million surplus but don’t forget what’s suffered as a result. Metro Animal Services is always — ALWAYS — woefully underfunded. WIC clinics were slashed in a manner that made even Greg Fischer’s allies hate him. Streets are a disaster. Kids are hungry. People are homeless. [WAVE3]

Of course your new governor appointed a birther to his cabinet. Because of course he did. [Page One]

Matt Bevin’s newly appointed commissioner of revenue left his last job, at Lexmark International, after the Lexington-based technology company found a host of accounting errors and declared its internal financial controls to be deficient and in need of remediation. [WFPL]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced today that the sixth annual ‘Cram the Cruiser’ food drive netted 123 tons (246,705 lbs) of food for Kentucky families. [Press Release]

An FBI investigation of three University of Louisville officials involves the for-profit company that they operated out of the university. [Business First]

Leave it to mouth-breathers to freak out about the gays in Indiana. Sen. Travis Holdman hoped debate over his LGBT rights bill would weigh questions of religious liberty with the expansion of civil protections. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Revisiting Ramsey’s Big Reality Disconnect

You may have to watch your step more closely when crossing at least one downtown street. A pedway allowing easy access to the convention center will be going away. [WDRB]

How many scandalous hires does this make for Greg Fischer? The man has no concept of vetting new hires. Where are the liberal hand-wringers now? Every time a shitty hire is revealed, they freak out and attack. Every. Time. But suddenly they’re quiet. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! School time horror stories. “I had a chair thrown across the room and the kid looked at me–this is second grade–and said “what the f*** did I do b****,” Lucretia Gue, a former first grade teacher at Frayser Elementary School said. [WHAS11]

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

Local teevee folks are still freaking out about a white lady married to a preacher. When was the last time they freaked out like this over a person of color? Or over someone not tied to some random church? [WLKY]

Here’s one more indication that American teachers work really, really hard — and don’t make nearly enough. An analysis released Tuesday by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development looks at the state of education around the world, examining everything from intergenerational mobility in education to graduation rates to teacher pay. [HuffPo]

The YMCA of Louisville and the YMCA of Southern Indiana are merging, organization leaders announced during the 25th annual YMCA Mayor’s Thanksgiving Breakfast. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, R-Cookie Tree, said after a town hall at the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center he is in conversations with the CEO of AK Steel about how to keep hundreds of jobs at Ashland Works afloat. [Ashland Independent]

James Ramsey has been thinking a lot lately about stepping down from his role as president of the University of Louisville. That’s all it took for him to think about resigning? Not the myriad scandals, people going to prison, tens of millions of dollars swindled?! [WFPL]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

Electrolux announced plans to buy General Electric Co.’s Louisville-based appliance division for $3.3 billion last year. But the government sued to block the deal in July, citing concerns that it would suppress competition. [Business First]

A bill to include LGBT people in existing anti-discrimination laws is on the slate for the State Senate’s upcoming legislative session. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]