Surprise! Everything Is Still Terrible

Police cruisers and crime scene tape blocked off an apartment on Appleton Lane near Dixie Highway, early Sunday morning. [WDRB]

GLI is part of what’s wrong with Louisville and it’s beyond time for everyone to recognize it. An organization like that is not necessary in the modern era. Louisville’s first heat-management plan is flawed and should not be used as the basis for any new regulatory programs aimed at reducing temperatures, the city’s chamber of commerce said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Still not a mention by Louisville media that the Trump “headquarters” is a potential campaign finance nightmare. [WHAS11]

The Madison County school district has decided to take a drug company up on its offer of two free doses of Narcan, a life-saving drug in instances of heroin overdose — even though the district hasn’t seen an overdose problem. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a homicide after a man was found shot to death inside a Shively apartment. [WLKY]

After the chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign resigned on Friday, former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski tried to insist Trump’s bid for the White House was going just fine. Lewandowski, who was fired by Trump in June, drew a puzzling parallel to make his point, arguing that in 2004, John Kerry was also making staff changes as the election approached. [HuffPo]

A missing Russellville teenager is believed to be in the Louisville area. [WAVE3]

Middle- and lower-income children don’t visit eye doctors as often as wealthier kids, and as a result, thousands of them may have undiagnosed sight-threatening conditions, U.S. researchers say. [Reuters]

More than a year after introducing a multimillion-dollar body camera system, the Louisville Metro Police Department isn’t keeping track of how the cameras are being used. [WFPL]

ProPublica’s reporting on the water crisis in the American West has highlighted any number of confounding contradictions worsening the problem: Farmers are encouraged to waste water so as to protect their legal rights to its dwindling supply in the years ahead; Las Vegas sought to impose restrictions on water use while placing no checks on its explosive population growth; the federal government has encouraged farmers to improve efficiency in watering crops, but continues to subsidize the growing of thirsty crops such as cotton in desert states like Arizona. [ProPublica]

A West Louisville supermarket that opened as a citywide collaboration in 2012 has new leadership at the helm and will be given a new name. [Business First]

Though unanimously passed on second reading, an updated noise ordinance for New Albany drew a lot of debate at Thursday’s city council meeting. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Is Now Back To Its Old Tricks

LG&E is closing its coal ash ponds at its power plants in Louisville and Trimble County. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has moved a Layne Elementary teacher to another school in the district after it said it found a “pattern of poor professional judgment and unsafe behavior,” particularly in relation to how the teacher used restraint on students. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS and JCTA are still unable to come to an agreement on salaries and contracts. [WHAS11]

The number of homeless students in Lexington schools has nearly doubled in the past three years, according to a new report that recommends more money and attention to schools with the highest percentage of homeless students. [H-L]

The Kentucky Arts Council says it has awarded a Teaching Art Together grant that will fund an artist residency in eight schools in the eastern part of the state. [WLKY]

A vastly underappreciated legacy of Barack Obama’s presidency is one that neither his conservative opponents nor his liberal allies like to mention: He’s presided over a historically unprecedented reduction in government employees. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jefferson County Public Schools employees are taught to restrain students who might be a danger to themselves or others. In the last two school years at JCPS, restraints were used 8,537 times. [WAVE3]

Ignore all the hype! If you’re wondering why Kentucky Democrats avoided Fancy Farm this year, look no further than the event’s emcee, who cracked racist jokes right off the bat. Republicans didn’t need the help of Democrats to burn their racist Trump barn down this year. [Page One]

Louisville’s Planning Commission has approved rules governing the siting of anerobic biodigesters in the city. The regulations approved Thursday were stricter than what planners had originally proposed, but won’t be finalized until they’re approved by Metro Council. [WFPL]

How dare anyone want safe drinking water or the preservation of lands. That makes native Appalachians environmental extremists, according to Rand Paul. He goes from literally telling black people they shouldn’t be allowed to sit at the lunch counter to making shit up about coal. [The Gleaner]

Churchill Downs Inc. CEO Bill Carstanjen said Thursday that the company’s Twinspires.com subsidiary will move from Mountain View, Calif., to Louisville before the end of the year and gave more details on its planned joint-venture acquisition of a Berlin, Md., casino and racetrack that was announced Tuesday. [Business First]

Pamela Fisher said she’s never shot a gun in her life. A gun range is planned for Clarksville. [News & Tribune]

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Three Horrible Superintendents In A Row

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens must “step up to the challenge” of leading Kentucky’s largest school district and regain the trust that has eroded in the past year, according to an annual evaluation unanimously approved by the school board Tuesday. [WDRB]

Thanks, religious extremists, for ruining hospitals everywhere when you buy them up! The state is investigating whether patient care is unsafe at University of Louisville Hospital because of staff cuts made by KentuckyOne Health. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s a battle over trees but for Cynthia Huber the fight has a deeper meaning. “This is not only did they lose their loved ones that they have memorialized but they’re also losing the tree in memory of that person,” she said. [WHAS11]

Welp, readers of the Herald-Leader can now look forward to a much poorer experience. The Lexington Herald-Leader announced on Monday that it will transfer its printing and packaging operations to Louisville starting in August, and that the company will put its downtown Lexington building on the market. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Jefferson County Public School board voted unanimously to approve Superintendent Donna Hargens’ 2015-2016 summative evaluation. [WLKY]

“You might think, ‘Well that is not going to happen to us in America. We’re not going to listen to some ridiculously haired buffoon, peddling lies and nativism in the hopes of riding a protest vote into power.’” Oliver said. “Well let Britain tell you, it can happen, and when it does, there are no fucking do-overs.” [HuffPo]

Photographs went viral on social media; thoroughbreds with sores on their backs, ribs showing. Hooves in need of trimming. The outcry began drawing attention from equine industry standards such as the Daily Racing Form and Blood Horse. [WAVE3]

In his final State of the Union address in January, President Obama made an ambitious pledge to overhaul the management of fossil fuels on America’s public lands in his final year, focusing, in particular, on the antiquated and little-known federal coal program. [ThinkProgress]

A new Google project to estimate solar potential has come to Louisville. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell tried to blame Democrats for refusing to fund Zika-related activities. Reality? McConnell and his friends pushed all kinds of nastiness into the legislation that they knew would keep Democrats from supporting it. Like trying to harm women and undoing confederate flag bans in federal cemeteries. [TPM]

Aetna Inc. isn’t happy with Missouri’s decision earlier this year to oppose its pending purchase of Humana Inc. [Business First]

The South Central Regional Airport Authority has received assurance of the $750,000 local match needed for the runway extension project at the Clark Regional Airport. [News & Tribune]

MSD & Health? In The Same Sentence?

Assistant Superintendent Amy Dennes has announced that she will retire from Jefferson County Public Schools effective Aug. 1. [WDRB]

Under proposed changes announced Wednesday by Gov. Matt Bevin, many Kentuckians covered by Medicaid would… Here’s your chance to watch poor Kentuckians suffer. As well as your chance to watch the Republican Party of Kentucky’s drunken, delusional leadership foam at the mouth about how wonderful this is. Such a shame the KDP has no guts. [C-J/AKN]

Water Step and MSD continue to spread their knowledge of healthy drinking water and education as a professor from Nairobi, Kenya is in town hoping to better his community. [WHAS11]

Two members of the former Kentucky Retirement Systems Board of Trustees are suing Gov. Matt Bevin, claiming Bevin did not have the authority to remove board chairman Thomas Elliott of Jefferson County from the panel. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Four people were shot in a Louisville apartment Tuesday night. Two died and two others are recovering. [WLKY]

Democrats literally sat down on the floor of the House chamber on Wednesday — and forced the House into a temporary recess — as part of an effort to compel Republican leadership to vote on gun control legislation. [HuffPo]

WAVE’s teabagger web guy is taking time out of his busy day of posting mugshots of brown people to bring you the important story about mulch fires. [WAVE3]

This should be filled with schadenfreude. Long-time Republican activist and public relations executive Scott Jennings will emcee this year’s Fancy Farm Picnic political speaking on Aug. 6. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Gas and Electric has chosen a solar energy company as a partner in a new effort to offer solar energy to business and industrial customers. [WFPL]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! What is white privilege – and do white Americans believe they benefit from it? [BBC]

America’s economy has been on the rebound since the Great Recession, but Uric Dufrene still spies some downward trends. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

Deadly Weekend In Compassionate City

One person is dead following a shooting at a park in southwest Jefferson county. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer unveiled his budget plan Thursday, devoting $2.5 million toward the Affordable Housing Trust Fund, which has been woefully underfunded since its inception eight years ago. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! With shootings continuing to rise in the area, Kentucky’s lieutenant governor is reaching out in efforts to help tackle the problem. [WHAS11]

Kentucky officials say unemployment rates fell in 83 of the state’s counties between April 2015 and April 2016. Jobless rates rose in 33 counties and stayed the same in four. [H-L & Press Release]

Maybe E-town is the worst. Police have arrested an Elizabethtown man on a felony charge that he struck his adult son in the head with a claw hammer. [WLKY]

The presidential campaign of Donald Trump has largely been a policy-free, fact-free, detail-free event, based on emotion (especially fear), pandering to shallow slogans (“Make America Great”), and the aggressive personal and ad hominem abuse of his Republican and Democratic opponents. [HuffPo]

Two people, a male and a female, were shot early Sunday morning near the University of Louisville campus. [WAVE3]

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says Edward Snowden performed a “public service” by triggering a debate over surveillance techniques, but still must pay a penalty for illegally leaking a trove of classified intelligence documents. [CNN]

Louisville is now officially in ozone season, the several months every year when pollution and meteorological factors contribute to unhealthy ozone levels in the area. [WFPL]

The Federal Reserve should raise interest rates “in the coming months” if the economy picks up as expected and jobs continue to be generated, U.S. central bank chief Janet Yellen said on Friday, bolstering the case for a rate increase in June or July. [Reuters]

Kentucky State Fair Board chairman Mark Lynn has appointed a search committee to find a replacement for Clifford “Rip” Rippetoe, the former fair board president and CEO, who recently departed to take a job in San Diego. [Business First]

For kids in Floyd County this summer, there will be such a thing as free lunch. Starting June 6, children under the age of 18 and adults enrolled in a state-approved education program for the mentally or physically disabled can get lunch and a snack at no charge. [News & Tribune]

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Racist Republicans Are Really Butthurt

University of Louisville President James Ramsey received total compensation of $2.8 million from the school’s nonprofit foundation in 2014, while the university’s former provost Shirley Willihnganz received $1.1 million and Ramsey’s chief of staff, Kathleen Smith, received $859,181. [WDRB]

The second-graders in Sarah Bowling’s class at Dunn Elementary were on a mathematical scavenger hunt. Students cradling clipboards moved around the room matching groupings of things and learning the concept that three groups of five things total the same as five groups of three things. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! There is no fallout, just a bunch of racists calling for the death of Ricky Jones. [WHAS11]

As more coal companies file for bankruptcy, it’s increasingly likely that taxpayers will be stuck with the very high costs of preventing abandoned mines from becoming environmental disasters. [H-L]

Norfolk Southern is pursuing criminal charges against an Ohio man for disrupting rail service. [WLKY]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) went all in on Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.), the head of the Democratic National Committee, on Saturday, saying he supports a primary challenger in her re-election bid for her House seat and would remove her from the DNC if elected president. [HuffPo]

The decision came after a Brown School Student Based Decision Making (SBDM) Council meeting on Tuesday night. [WAVE3]

Most shootings with four deaths or injuries are invisible outside their communities. And most of the lives they scar are black. [NY Times]

On a rainy Friday afternoon, about a half-dozen people stay dry inside the storied Phoenix Hill Tavern on Baxter Avenue. [WFPL]

Uhhh… [ThinkProgress]

Three descendants of Brown-Forman Corp. founder George Garvin Brown have been elected the company’s board of directors, and three other descendants will leave the board. [Business First]

By upgrading its lights in city hall, Jeffersonville expects to save $12,000 this year. The energy and cost savings are part of Duke Energy’s Smart Saver Incentive Program, which rewards businesses that replace equipment with higher-efficiency products by lowering the costs of purchasing new equipment. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City With A Bullet

The mother of two sons killed Sunday in the Shawnee neighborhood told WDRB the man who killed them preyed on them and was hoping to recruit them in his gang. [WDRB]

A lack of front door intercoms, a door propped open, overgrown shrubbery – these are some of the most common security vulnerabilities in schools, according to a Saturday panel about school safety during the National Rifle Association’s annual meeting in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

A judge has ended a restraining order that barred the city of Louisville from removing a 120-year-old monument to Confederate soldiers that sits near the University of Louisville. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s state universities are grappling with nearly a decade of budget cuts, about $170 million in all. Over the next two years, they’ll have to cut another 4.5 percent. As the schools prepare their biennial budgets, which have to be ready in June, they are announcing exactly how they will address deficits caused by decreased state support and increased costs for pensions and health care. Nationally, Kentucky is losing ground against other states, which are starting to reinvest in higher education. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Are we still pretending that other law enforcement officers there don’t know what happened? Okay. [WLKY]

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) and officials in 10 additional states have filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration after it told schools and colleges to allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity to comply with existing civil rights laws. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Urban League, located at 1535 West Broadway, hosted a community conversation Tuesday night [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering about what’s going on in Frankfort? Let’s just say it’s a hot mess of a sex scandal involving legislators and law enforcement officers. [Page One]

A Louisville Catholic school will be the site of a new air pollution experiment, as researchers at the University of Louisville study whether trees and greenery can reduce pollution from a nearby roadway. [WFPL]

Most shootings with four deaths or injuries are invisible outside their communities. And most of the lives they scar are black. [NY Times]

Louisville Central Community Centers Inc. has named Kevin Fields Sr. president and chief operating officer. [Business First]

After reviewing some of the issues at each of the three campuses, some of the details of the demographic study and a survey to rank school needs, Doug Reiter chimed in with what he and others think it’ll take for West Clark Community Schools to get residents to vote in favor of the referendum. [News & Tribune]