Wait. Nope. Another Bad Week For JCPS

JCPS has received 115 calls through its bullying tipline. Fifty-two calls have come from middle schools, 31 from elementary schools, and 25 from high schools, while seven calls have come from other areas. [WDRB]

Jessica Green needs to hold Greg Fischer’s feet to the fire. She’s one of the few people who could do it and get away with it. Metro Council members blasted Mayor Greg Fischer’s administration Thursday for failing to alert them about a key vacancy on the planning commission last summer that resulted in an appointment being made without the mayor’s or council’s approval. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An 18-year-old Jeffersontown High School student appeared in front of a judge Friday morning, charged with a felony after police say he and two other students beat another student, leaving him for dead. [WHAS11]

Just what Kentucky needs! Another tax increase. The very thing the working poor cannot afford is sales tax. [H-L]

The new and improved Speed Museum has reopened its doors. The museum had been closed for 3 1/2 years for renovations and construction of a new wing. [WLKY]

In NPI’s telling, white Americans are increasingly under siege in their own country, doomed to be a hated minority as people of color grow ever more numerous and politically powerful. And Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy has given the group’s members more hope than ever that help is on the way. [HuffPo]

There are new developments for a firefighter’s widow fighting with state government over whether her husband died in the line of duty. [WAVE3]

Kashiya Nwanguma, a student at the University of Louisville who is black, attended a Trump rally in Louisville this month, she says, to better understand the Trump phenomenon. She said in an interview this week that she suddenly felt the crowd’s attention turn to her after Trump saw the anti-Trump sign she was holding and asked that she be removed. Someone promptly snatched it out of her hand. Next, she was being roughly shoved by several white men. “I think a lot of it has to do with ignorance that’s rooted in fear of the other,” said Nwanguma, 21, when asked about the incident Thursday. “None of the people who were attacking me even knew what was on my sign. I obviously stood out in the crowd based on my appearance.” [WaPo]

Louisville has officially kicked off an education and advocacy campaign to promote the use of solar energy. [WFPL]

More than 30 states have enacted some version of voter ID law in recent years. How much do these laws change voting rules and what impact could they have on the general election? [ProPublica]

“‘Population health” has become something of a trend in the health care industry. [Business First]

The Clark County Council will vote Monday, March 14, on a budget revision to account for cuts dictated in the state certified budget order, for the sixth year in a row. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Continues To Muck Things Up

In November, the University of Louisville Board of Trustees filed a motion in Franklin Circuit Court to dismiss a lawsuit by the Kentucky Justice Resource Center contending the board has too few minority members in violation of state law. [WDRB]

The city must pay former Jefferson County Constable David Whitlock about $33,000 in wages for more than five years of unpaid work, a Jefferson Circuit Court judge has ruled, and may owe other peace officers similar back salaries. [C-J/AKN]

A man whose drone was shot down over a Bullitt County home is now suing that shooter in federal court. [WHAS11]

Really, there aren’t more pressing educational issues to tackle instead of pandering in an election year? A Kentucky Republican state senator from London has introduced a bill that he said could have prevented biblical references from being cut from a presentation of A Charlie Brown Christmas at a Johnson County elementary school. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some southern Indiana families face an uncertain future after city officials in Charlestown revived controversial plans that could lead to tearing down a neighborhood. [WLKY]

The nation’s largest LGBT civil rights organization, Human Rights Campaign, endorsed Hillary Clinton for president on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

A routine appointment vote this month for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board was anything but routine after a Louisville Metro councilman asked to table or postpone a vote to reappoint two people to that board. [WAVE3]

A federal judge on Tuesday ruled President Obama cannot use executive privilege to keep records on the “fast and furious” gun-tracking program from Congress. [The Hill]

Superintendent Donna Hargens says Jefferson County Public Schools is working to ensure that Louisville families are aware of its offerings in anticipation of a new push for state charter school legislation. [WFPL]

One European country can’t seem to stop breaking records when it comes to wind power. [ThinkProgress]

Is your favorite Louisville restaurant making the grade? [Business First]

The Clark County Clerk’s office was granted an $10,800 additional appropriation this week in part to help with transferring the influx of Jeffersonville city court cases that are coming in. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]

Who Is Worse? Tom Wine Or Jim Ramsey? Possibility City!

Their homes were bombed, lives threatened, and they nearly starved to death. Now the newest Syrian refugee families have found a safe-haven right here in Louisville. [WDRB]

Tom Wine. MLK parade. Shenanigans. Read all about it. [C-J/AKN]

This is what local media has become. An “exclusive” interview in the “crime” section with the kid who crashed a drone in Lexington. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Housing Corp. is looking for volunteers to help count Kentucky’s homeless population. The count will begin at sunrise on Jan. 27 and continue for 24 hours. The point-in-time count is known as the K-Count. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Members of The Stand Up Louisville Coalition began planning a protest in recent days, after learning that Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine would be a grand marshal in the 44th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Motorcade. Now Wine has withdrawn his name from the list of grand marshals. [WLKY]

General Electric Co agreed to sell its appliances business to China’s Qingdao Haier Co Ltd for $5.4 billion in cash, the companies said on Friday. The move comes weeks after GE abandoned a $3.3 billion deal with Sweden’s Electrolux following months of opposition from U.S. antitrust regulators. [HuffPo]

Didn’t this happen just a couple years ago? Late November 2013, maybe? [WAVE3]

The nation’s cities are at the frontlines of a food system that sickens and impoverishes millions of Americans every year. Local communities where people live, shop, work, and receive healthcare bear the brunt of this system’s unhealthy, unjust outcomes, which disproportionately affect communities of color and low-income Americans. The five cities chosen—Oakland, Memphis, Louisville, Baltimore, and Minneapolis—all have populations between 400,000 and 700,000, and in all of them, the percentage of residents living below the federal poverty line is higher than the national average. [Click the Clicky]

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is launching a new program to provide a long-acting, reversible contraceptive arm implant to women in Louisville. [WFPL]

The Obama administration on Friday said it would announce the next steps in its planned overhaul of how the United States manages coal development on federal land, which sources have said includes freezing new leases. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Senate passed a measure Thursday that’s aimed at allowing the state’s bourbon tourism industry to reach its full potential. [Business First]

Even though he won a recount, Jeffersonville City Councilman Steve Webb is challenging the lawfulness of November’s general election, requesting a trial that could result in a special election. [News & Tribune]

Been To The Falls? No? JUST GO!

It was not icy roads but a strong odor that people in Southern Indiana were complaining about on Monday morning. Most people say it smelled like propane or natural gas but emergency officials don’t think it’s anything that hazardous. [WDRB]

Standing in front of dozens of Jefferson County Public Schools principals, the district’s chief business officer acknowledged that JCPS has done a “horrible job of communicating” its proposed budget changes that could cut hundreds of thousands of dollars from some schools’ budgets. [C-J/AKN]

An exhibit featuring family photographs of Anne Frank has opened at Louisville Free Public Library and continues through Feb. 27. [WHAS11]

Virginia Kraft Payson’s conviction has won more battles than any list of her achievements can do justice to, whether it documenting outdoor exploits as a journalist for Sports Illustrated or crafting bloodlines as one of Thoroughbred racing’s most noted owner/breeders. [H-L]

Two years ago, WLKY did a story on T.J. Floyd — a young boy who suffers with what’s called an invisible injury. [WLKY]

Solar is the energy employer of the future — or at least that’s how the numbers look today. A new report on the state of the solar industry out Tuesday from the nonprofit Solar Foundation shows that the number of jobs in the United States in the solar industry outpaced those in the oil and gas industries for the first time ever. [HuffPo]

Parents and principals showed up at Monday’s board meeting to express concern for budget allocations that aim to make Jefferson County Public Schools a more equitable school system by shifting funding between schools. [WAVE3]

The EPA’s own advisory board says the agency needs to clarify its findings on fracking. [ThinkProgress]

Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee joined the field for the Kentucky Republican presidential caucus before the Thursday deadline, bringing the total of candidates to 11. [WFPL]

Of course Matt Bevin is the butt of national jokes. Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has notified U.S. authorities that he plans to dismantle the state’s health insurance exchange created under the Obama Administration’s Affordable Care Act. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Crossdock Development is at it again in Jeffersonvile’s River Ridge Commerce Center. [Business First]

Holly Kelley and her family were among the first to experience the new interactive exhibits in the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at its reopening Friday. [News & Tribune]

Everything Is Awful. Go Back To Bed.

WTF is going on with WDRB? Has literally everyone there turned into some magnet for racist panic? They’re really running stories about Marc Murphy’s cartoon? Jesus H, Louisville, get it together. The entire city is not some awful trailer park filled with Klansmen. This shit has to end at some point. [WDRB]

Fans entering the KFC Yum! Center will experience additional security measures at events beginning January 14. And people are freaking out. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer’s right – the local media hyped the Mall St. Matthews crap up. [WHAS11]

The electric bill at Lacey Griffey’s neat Harlan County home, with its yellow siding and silk-flower arrangements decorating the living room, was $582.07 in January 2013. [H-L]

More people are using their furnace as temperatures drop, leaving room for more cases of carbon monoxide poisoning. [WLKY]

If you missed it this week, there was a whole lot of Jim Gooch hilarity. [Page One]

A skyrocketing homicide rate, a budget surplus of more than $18 million, and the prospect of growing business: those are some of Louisville’s highlights in 2015. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

Registration is now open for Louisville’s Kilowatt Crackdown, a contest to reward for energy efficiency improvements in the city’s buildings. [WFPL]

And if you missed it in Louisville? Everybody is losing their damn mind over some misbehaving kids at a shopping mall. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Hepatitis C, which can damage the liver and cause cancer, affects more than 3 million people in the U.S., and new medications that have come on the market in the past few years will cure the virus in most patients. But a study has found that Medicaid in Kentucky, Indiana and more than 30 other states restrict who receive the pricey drugs. [Business First]

Some Indiana police agencies say their fight against methamphetamine production would be helped by a proposed state law change to require a doctor’s prescription for a common cold medicine that is used to make the illegal drug. [News & Tribune]

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