Fischer Backtracked On Something Else

Louisville-area buyers have the fewest choices of homes for sale in at least a decade, according to figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors, which covers mainly Jefferson, Oldham and Bullitt counties. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer’s chief of community services is backpedaling on a controversial proposal to scale back the number of city employees who oversee Louisville’s Neighborhood Place locations. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A transgender woman files suit against a Louisville nursing college. The lawsuit, filed Friday in Jefferson Circuit Court, alleges the Galen College of Nursing discriminated against Vanessa Gilliam for being transgender. The complaint also accuses the college of excluding Gilliam from using the women’s restroom even though she identifies as a female. [WHAS11]

The mantras uttered by participants in the Thoroughbred sales arena have taken on a broken-record tone: Good horses will bring the good money. Selectively still reigns. To get the very best of the best, one’s wallet is going to have to stretch. [H-L]

A clerk who police say shot and killed a man during an alleged attempted robbery returned to work Saturday. [WLKY]

At CVS pharmacies in 12 states, friends and family members of people suffering from opiate addiction will now be able to get the overdose reversal drug naloxone without a prescription. Just not in Kentucky. [HuffPo]

Jessie Boleware didn’t see her next door neighbor’s house aflame until she heard the sirens racing toward 4922 Garden Green Way on Friday night. [WAVE3]

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo renewed his call for national gun control legislation on Saturday as he delivered a eulogy for the top state attorney who was fatally wounded by a stray bullet in Brooklyn earlier this month. [Reuters]

A barge that teaches students about river ecosystems is beginning its fall tour in Louisville this week. [WFPL]

Renewable energy has for the first time surpassed coal in supplying the UK’s electricity for a whole quarter, according to government statistics released on Thursday. [The Guardian]

A 32.5-acre site off Jefferson Boulevard near Fern Valley Road has been targeted for a new industrial business park that could attract logistics companies or a Ford Motor Co. supplier. [Business First]

Three men accused of stealing political signs from yards in the Clarksville Parkwood subdivision were arrested Thursday. [News & Tribune]

Russell’s A Start And A Big Step Forward

The number of people being shot in Louisville is on the rise, according to Louisville Metro Police. [WDRB]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out about what James Procell, of UofL’s music lie-berry, discovered. [WHAS11]

Sometimes the best ideas really do come while enjoying a glass of bourbon. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands of zombies took over the Highlands on Saturday night, but it’s what some of the undead left behind that has neighbors upset. [WLKY]

Louisville is the 4th-most segregated city in America (or the metro area is), apparently, and no one wants to talk about it. When are we going to talk about it? Or are we always just going to hold feel-good events and talk about puppies and rainbows on the teevee instead of trying to improve life for people living in the West End? [HuffPo]

We often hear the stories of homicide victims, but the stories of people who actually survive violent attacks often are left untold. [WAVE3]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

In about a month, Metropolitan Sewer District officials will wrap up a short-term program aimed at buying out homeowners whose houses flood frequently. [WFPL]

The national campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs through Labor Day weekend and is aimed at reducing deaths and injuries caused by motorists driving drunk or impaired by drugs. During the 2014 Labor Day holiday, there were six alcohol-related highway deaths on Kentucky roadways. Statewide, law enforcement officers arrested 55 people for DUI during that same time period. The 2015 Labor Day enforcement period begins at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept.4 and extends through Monday, Sept. 7 at 11:59 p.m. [Press Release]

Revitalizing Russell — once a bustling economic center in West Louisville — has been a hot topic for some community leaders for years. But the buzz seems to be increasing lately as several projects have committed substantial investment to the neighborhood. [Business First]

Jeffersonville Parks Authority President Ed Zastawny says he wants the public to know the city only had an issue maintaining the 10th Street medians once the Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission stopped taking care of them early last year. [News & Tribune]

Sadly, There Won’t Be 40 Days Of Peace

The 2015 Dirt Bowl Championship was held Sunday at Shawnee Park, but basketball wasn’t the only reason for the event. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other community leaders helped announce a 40 Days of Peace Campaign, which will start Thursday. [WDRB]

When Jefferson County Public Schools launched a contest in 2013 for its “Schools of Innovation,” the plan was to find ideas for helping students so out-of-the-box that they could “make bureacrats gasp.” [C-J/AKN]

School starts on Wednesday for students in Jefferson County and officials are continuing the annual tradition of helping parents with making the bus commute smoother. [WHAS11]

More than 93 percent of teachers and 89 percent of education leaders who were evaluated have been rated “exemplary” or “accomplished” in the first year of statewide implementation of Kentucky’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness System. [H-L]

An area festival showcased the wide variety of hemp – a crop many are hoping to bring back to the Bluegrass. [WLKY]

Asked if his flat tax plan would further separate the haves from the have-nots, GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-WTF) said Sunday that income inequality is the result of some Americans working harder than others, rather than economic policies. [HuffPo]

A Kentucky non-profit organization is pushing for the legalization of medical marijuana. [WAVE3]

Robert Freeman has been helping people extract public information from New York state agencies for four decades. He is the executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government, a division of the New York Department of State that advises the public on the Freedom of Information Law — the state statute authorizing access to public records. [ProPublica]

Louisville home buyers and sellers interested in environmentally friendly elements and technology have a new way to identify those features on their homes. [WFPL]

Rand Paul in an interview Sunday called Donald Trump, who refused to rule out a third-party run during the first GOP debate, a “fake conservative.” [The Hill]

Nashville, Tenn., gets called a boomtown so frequently these days that it borders on cliche. Yet it’s clear that the city just three hours away down Interestate 65 has seen significant growth in the past several years. [Business First]

Options available for the city to address blighted commercial buildings, some of which have been shuttered for years, will be a topic during the next New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]

FOP Leadership Needs To Change Now

While dozens of protestors called for his resignation Monday afternoon, Fraternal Order of Police President Dave Mutchler denied that his open letter last week was “dividing the community” and claimed he has heard nothing but support from the officers he represents. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer has appointed a businessman and a Fairdale High School teacher to the board of the Louisville Metropolitan Sewer District. [C-J/AKN]

Shortly after the news spread that 21-year-old Dylann Storm Roof had shot and killed nine men and women during a prayer meeting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, the River City Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) Lodge 614 President Dave Mutchler released a controversial letter to local activists and community members. [WHAS11]

Two sustainability projects in Louisville have won awards from the U.S. Conference of Mayors. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Protesters gathered outside the Louisville Metro Police Department Monday as a response to what they called an attack. [WLKY]

Russell Moore still thinks the religious right will win the battle against same-sex marriage. Oh, not at the Supreme Court later this month — like nearly everyone else, Moore is almost positive the right will lose there. But the long game… that, he says, could be a different story. [HuffPo]

A local church is honoring and praying for lives lost in Charleston. Bates Memorial Baptist Church says although they’re miles away, they feel pain their brothers and sisters are suffering. [WAVE3]

“The Confederate Battle Flag means different things to different people, but the fact that it continues to be a painful reminder of racial oppression to many suggests to me at least that it’s time to move beyond it, and that the time for a state to fly it has long since passed. There should be no confusion in anyone’s mind that as a people we’re united in our determination to put that part of our history behind us.” [Mitch McConnell]

Kentucky gubernatorial candidates Matt Bevin and Jack Conway lobbed barbs in their first joint public appearance on Friday. [WFPL]

Many of the quotes attributed to the Founding Fathers in two of Rand Paul’s books are either fake, misquoted, or taken entirely out of context. [BuzzFeed]

Michigan-based Village Green announced this week that it has closed on the purchase of the 800 Apartments buildings, a 29-story apartment tower at 800 S. Fourth St. it bought from Chicago-based owner Leon Petcov. Why aren’t more people excited about this? [Business First]

From emergency contacts to pants size, Paul Stensrud knows the men and women he helps through Jesus Cares at Exit 0, a homeless outreach organization that operates throughout Clark and Floyd counties. [News & Tribune]

Making Big Moves Against Mountaintop Removal

Woah, PNC bank is tanking Mountaintop Removal seriously.

Beginning on page two of the bank’s 2015 Corporate Responsibility Report (Warning: External PDF Link — or if it’s inaccessible, we’ve archived a copy), MTR gets a mention:






Driven by environmental and health concerns, as well as our risk appetite, we introduced a mountaintop removal (MTR) financing policy in late 2010 and subsequently enhanced that policy in 2014. As a result, our MTR financing exposure has declined significantly and will continue to do so moving forward. Overall, PNC’s exposure to firms participating in MTR represents less than one-quarter of 1 percent of PNC’s total financing commitments. Under the policy, PNC will not extend credit to individual MTR mining projects or to coal producers with 25 percent or more of their production coming from MTR mining.

This is kind of a big deal. Especially in Kentucky. A state where legislative leaders still lie about the benefits of destroying mountains while personally profiting from their destruction.

Wondering how to help Kentucky’s environment? Follow PNC’s lead if you’re a big bank or business trying to be less awful. Read their report. Have some guts and stand up.

UPDATE: Seems like PNC is likely to get some 2015 Earth Day Awards nominations.

Frankfort Democrats May Just Be The Worst

By a unanimous vote, Councilman David Tandy (D-4) was elected President of the Louisville Metro Council for the remainder of 2015 during the Council’s regular meeting on Thursday night. Maybe he’ll visit Cordish again and sign a non-disclosure agreement, refusing to reveal what he discovers to the public. Or maybe he’ll use his council staff as a babysitter again. So many opportunities. [Press Release]

Students, staff and alumni at Fern Creek Traditional High School are seeking to rename the school Fern Creek High School. [WDRB]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday delivered a blow to Metropolitan Sewer District management, providing an opinion that there’s no legal reason why the agency’s board could not agree to a contract provision requested by one of its unions. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has joined in the criminal investigation into the troubled Southeast Bullitt Fire Department. [WHAS11]

Food prices across Kentucky continue to rise, increasing 1. 7 percent in the last quarter of 2014. According the Kentucky Farm Bureau Marketbasket Survey, the cost of 40 basic grocery items averaged $129.14 in the last quarter. It’s the seventh consecutive quarter of rising prices and represents an all-time high. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A doctor who practiced in Louisville and southern Indiana was charged Wednesday by a federal grand jury with prescribing pain medications that resulted in the deaths of five patients, health care fraud and unlawful distribution or dispensing of controlled substances. [WLKY]

A bill that would redefine a full-time work week under the Affordable Care Act as 40 hours instead of 30 actually amounts to a break for corporations, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) argued in a hearing Thursday. [HuffPo]

The era of prohibiting alcohol sales on Sundays in Indiana might be over soon. [WAVE3]

Johnny Bell, D-Glasgow, the new state House majority whip, informed his predecessor’s staff Wednesday that they would be replaced – including Yolanda Costner, one of the women suing the legislature over allegations of sexual harassment by former Rep. John Arnold. [Ronnie Ellis]

A majority of Kentuckians think that the state’s domestic violence laws should include unmarried couples who haven’t live together and those who don’t share a child, according to a poll released Thursday. [WFPL]

Prompted by an investigation by ProPublica and NPR, Sen. Charles Grassley asks a Missouri nonprofit hospital to explain why it seizes the wages of thousands of its patients. [ProPublica]

Mayor Greg Fischer announced Tuesday that Louisville’s Office of Sustainability has launched a “green” infrastructure incentive program for businesses. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan has requested Time Warner Cable pursue strategies for Gigabit connections on a trial basis for some areas of New Albany. The city has been exploring a permanent Gigabit connection to provide high-speed Internet options for customers in New Albany. In a press release issued Friday, the city announced the trial areas will include downtown, the Purdue Research Park and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]