If GLI Backs It, It’s Bad News Bears

More than 600 well-paying jobs could be coming to Louisville as an out-of-state company partners with a local non-profit to form a Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WDRB]

David Keith thought the fight to save his neighborhood was over. [C-J/AKN]

If GLI backs something, you know it’s the worst thing on earth. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt says that if Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget is approved by the General Assembly, the Department of Education will face $72 million in reductions over the next two years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville-based Passport Health Plan is partnering with Virginia-based Evolent Health to create the Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WLKY]

The FBI is joining a U.S. investigation into Flint, Michigan’s water contamination crisis, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

The Falls of the Ohio, a state park covered in fossils, is a perfect place to take pictures – expect for one thing. [WAVE3]

Legislation that would prohibit the General Assembly from diverting state lottery funds away from Kentucky’s need- and merit-based scholarship programs has cleared a House committee. [Press Release]

Jerome Perry doesn’t have many white neighbors. There are so few, in fact, that Perry can list the houses around him where white families live. Even the homes that are blocks away from his tidy yellow brick home on 45th Street in Louisville’s Westover neighborhood. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

Get ready to roll your eyes really hard at all the hype over this Omni hotel mess… [Business First]

After a little more than an hour of discussion Wednesday, the committee tasked with finding a possible compromise to the current weapons ban at the town’s municipal building came to some amicable starting points. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Breathe. The Air Might Not Kill You.

Former Jefferson County Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Matt Conway was charged with felony assault Wednesday night after allegedly attacking his wife, according to a police report. Remember when his brother was covering up his police investigation(s)? [WDRB]

Everything is so corrupt in West Buechel that they’ve started some kind of watchdog organization. [C-J/AKN]

Just what Louisville needs – another stadium/arena. [WHAS11]

The red steel shipping container was once used to transport toothbrushes and bras. By May, it and another container will be transformed into a one bedroom, one-bathroom, 640-square-foot home that will be part of a new live-work community on York Street spearheaded by the North Limestone Community Development Corp. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A team of physicians, surgeons and nurses are creating an advanced heart failure program at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

When Donald Trump first watched his new TV ad that began airing this week, he said, “Play it again. I love the feel of it.” I, too, had to play it again, not because I too loved the feel, but out of amazement that this is what the front runner for the Republican nomination had chosen to put in his first TV ad of the campaign. [HuffPo]

A man is charged with wanton endangerment after setting himself on fire in the parking lot of a busy downtown convenience store. Maybe instead of jailing this man, Possumbilly City could get him some help? [WAVE3]

The FBI now tracks animal abuse like it tracks homicides. It was more than 10 years ago that Mary Lou Randour realized she couldn’t answer what should have been a simple question: Was cruelty against animals on the rise or in decline? [WaPo]

About a dozen people filed into a Jeffersontown gun shop shortly after noon on Tuesday, just after President Barack Obama wrapped up a live address outlining details of his executive actions designed to bolster gun control and curb gun violence. [WFPL]

Time Warner Cable said late Wednesday that hackers may have stolen up to 320,000 customers’ email passwords. [The Hill]

Craig Richard, the former CEO of Greater Louisville Inc. who left the chamber of commerce in 2014 to become CEO of Invest Atlanta, will resign from his position Jan. 18, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed announced Wednesday. Part of a pattern. These folks leave after screwing up in Louisville and eventually get figured out, forced resignations occur, blah blah blah. [Business First]

Nonprofits looking to do some good for youth in Clark and Floyd counties have a chance to bolster their budgets with grants from the Community Foundation of Southern Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Kill Like This

200 trees? Try 200,000. Then we can start talking about the tree canopy here in Possibility City. [WDRB]

A bipartisan pair of Louisville council members want to restrict Mayor Greg Fischer’s office from making any changes to the city’s portion of the Neighborhood Place partnership without Metro Council approval. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating the murder of a man found at the intersection of 20th and Chestnut streets. [WHAS11]

More than 100 former Jefferson County Public Schools students who dropped out are now re-enrolled in classes. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway after two people were found dead Monday afternoon inside a home in southeastern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Will body cameras be a tool for police reform? Only if bad policy doesn’t get in the way. [HuffPo]

Eight people have been wounded by gunfire in the Greater Louisville area since Friday afternoon. Four of them died. It is in this background that Louisville Councilwoman Mary C. Woolridge will introduce the new Commander of the Louisville Metro Police Department Second Division to the community.

The Shell Farms & Greenhouses is an expansive 1,000-acre property in Garrard County, 37 miles south of Lexington, Kentucky. The five-generation family farm is operated by 31-year-old Giles Shell and his 60-year-old father, Gary. The two are whizzes at making ornamental flowers flourish, and like most farmers in the area, the family has grown tobacco for years. [Newsweek]

The author of the bestselling book on people’s relationship with water will be among the speakers Monday during the IdeaFestival Water event. [WFPL]

On the evening of April 29th last year, in the southern Minnesota town of Waseca, a woman was doing the dishes when she looked out her kitchen window and saw a young man walking through her back yard. [New Yorker]

Sarah Davasher-Wisdom has been promoted to senior vice president of public affairs and strategy at Greater Louisville Inc. [Business First]

Throughout all three debates this election season, Jeffersonville mayoral candidates Mike Moore and Dennis Julius challenged the accuracy of some of each others’ statements, asking audience members to look it up for themselves. [News & Tribune]

Can We Just All Focus On The West End? Just For Once? Please?

Oldham County voters may soon decide whether to expand alcohol sales. The Oldham County Chamber of Commerce says it now has enough signatures to ask for a special election. [WDRB]

Members of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, have scheduled a series of meetings with Jefferson County legislators in early September to discuss business-related issues as well as legislation expected to come up during the 2016 General Assembly convening in January. [C-J/AKN]

On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded Thursday morning, Aug. 27, with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham. [WHAS11]

Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Arrests were made Thursday morning at the annual ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair. [WLKY]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

The goal to bring 43 new homes to the Russell neighborhood started a decade ago, and Thursday, Mayor Greg Fischer announced a plan to make good on that promise. [WAVE3]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

Jim Wathen has been selling military merchandise at the Kentucky State Fair for nearly a decade. By noon on a recent weekday, he had already restocked a rack of Confederate flags. He said the 3-by-3-inch Confederate flag, his top seller, is a piece of military history. [WFPL]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

A study released Wednesday shows that congested roads are costing the typical Louisville metro area driver more than 40 hours in delays annually and almost $1,050 in lost time and burned fuel. [Business First]

Former New Albany Police Department Officer Laura Schook is proceeding with a federal case against the city as well as an appeal of the decision to fire her in May, and she’s doing so without an attorney. [News & Tribune]

Short-Term Rental Cat Fight Takes Shape

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Leaders with Louisville Metro Council are asking for additional input while they work out details of an ordinance aimed at creating more regulatory oversight in the short term housing market. You should at least have to live in the homes you’re renting out like a hotel. [WDRB]

Another guy without a gun was shot and killed by police officers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Stop signs will soon be placed at a railroad crossing where two people were seriously injured this week in Buechel on Crawford Ave. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Department of Education is seeking public feedback on dozens of proposed social studies standards. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two years after Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis was killed in the line of duty, police continue to investigate. [WLKY]

Bloomberg Philanthropies on Wednesday announced the first eight cities it has selected to participate in a new pilot program to improve life in America’s cities. Chattanooga, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; Kansas City, Missouri; Mesa, Arizona; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jackson, Mississippi; Seattle and New Orleans will be the first to benefit from the What Works Cities Initiative. The project intends to spend $42 million over three years to help U.S. cities address issues like economic development, public health, crime and transportation. [HuffPo]

The developers tasked with rehabbing the iconic 800 Building in downtown Louisville want the taxpayers to help foot the bill. Now, that is a step closer to happening. [WAVE3]

In the early morning hours of June 30, 1995, a fire sparked to life in Kristine Bunch’s mobile home. It fanned out across the floor and climbed up the walls, then formed an impassable barrier across the middle of the trailer. Bunch, 21, snapped awake in the living room. Her three-year-old son, Tony, shrieked for her on the other side of the flames. [Mother Jones]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Later this month, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will escape for a family retreat to mourn his late son, Beau, but also to mull, as his dying son urged him to do, a campaign for president. Some of Mr. Biden’s friends and allies worry that he will decide it is a good idea. [NY Times]

Greater Louisville Inc. has named Deana Epperly Karem vice president of economic development. Karem is the current executive director of the Oldham County Chamber and Economic Development. She’ll start work at GLI on Sept. 1. [Business First]

When Floyd County Solid Waste Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley receives a complaint about the two mobile recycling sites that were closed recently due to budget cuts, she refers them to the people who ordered the reductions. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Bunch Of Death

A homicide investigation is being conducted by LMPD’s Homicide Unit and the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office in the 4400 block of Blevins Gap Road, near Saw Mill Road. [WDRB]

Maybe it can be hidden away in the Louisville Underground? The long-beleaguered Louisville Clock will be moved Friday from its home on Fourth Street at Theater Square to a warehouse in the Portland neighborhood, where it will rest until a suitable permanent location can be found. [C-J/AKN]

The Courier Journal reported JCPS was following up anonymous complaints and found chips, waters, and other vending machine items came into Waggener, but the amount of money being deposited from vending machine sales was short of what it should have been to the total of $3,900. [WHAS11]

The number of heroin overdoses at five northern Kentucky hospitals has continued to climb, but officials aren’t sure if that’s because more people are calling 911 for help, or more people are using heroin. [H-L]

The reward in the case of a missing Nelson County woman has again increased. [WLKY]

Coming back from its Independence Day vacation, Congress appeared no closer Tuesday to finding a way to avoid yet another government shutdown showdown in the fall. [HuffPo]

They are split-second decisions made by police — choices that can mean the difference between life and death for a suspect. Should officers use force? And how much? Community activists like Chad Golden believe sometimes police go farther than they should. [WAVE3]

Questions have been raised about some statues in downtown Lexington. Now, Mayor Jim Gray wants a city board to take a closer look at the statues. [WKYT]

A case over water pollution from Louisville Gas & Electric’s Cane Run Power Plant is scheduled for a hearing in federal court in Louisville tomorrow. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Harry Reid passed the blame on Wednesday over the Senate’s inability to overhaul the Bush-era No Child Left Behind bill. [The Hill]

Some business organizations have decried President Obama’s proposed changes to overtime pay for salaried employees, but most restaurant and retail companies are still working through how, and whether, the regulations would affect them. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair said he was “surprised” that a $450,000 appropriation for police cars was included on Monday’s agenda. [News & Tribune]

It’s Oaks Day So You’re Already Tanked

Here’s your weekly oh snap moment… WAVE 3 anchor Dawne Gee has filed a lawsuit against Baptist Health Louisville over alleged “negligent” treatment she received last May. [WDRB]

If GLI supports the JCPS shakeup, you can bet it’s an absolute disaster. [C-J/AKN]

The post-position draw happened at Churchill Downs on April 29. The Kentucky Derby will happen on May 2. [WHAS11]

Get a glimpse backside as Kentucky Derby contenders work out and clean up. [H-L]

The body of a man missing since February has been found in a truck along Southern Parkway. [WLKY]

Feds pay for drug fraud: 92 percent of foster care, poor kids prescribed antipsychotics get them for unaccepted uses. [HuffPo]

During any other week twenty flights would make a busy day for Atlantic Aviation. However, the Thursday through Saturday of Derby week redefines wingtip-to wingtip. [WAVE3]

For a moment last year, it looked as if the Obama administration was moving toward a history-making end to the federal death penalty. [NY Times]

The Louisville Metro Council, Mayor Greg Fischer and MSD officials announced a plan this week for possibly creating a home buyout program for houses in the area that have been consistently flooded-out during the past several years. Right now, there are a slew of homeowners in flood-prone areas with flood damage they can’t repair even though they have flood insurance. [WFPL]

Looks like Jerry Abramson’s been meddling in Vermont and it didn’t go so swell. [Rutland Herald & VPR]

The University of Louisville’s entrepreneurial ecosystem just got a boost in funding and status. U of L has received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to commercialize research. [Business First]

As Scott County enters its second month of emergency health provisions, its HIV outbreak is sounding alarms across the country for areas at risk of a similar epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]