Can We Just All Focus On The West End? Just For Once? Please?

Oldham County voters may soon decide whether to expand alcohol sales. The Oldham County Chamber of Commerce says it now has enough signatures to ask for a special election. [WDRB]

Members of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, have scheduled a series of meetings with Jefferson County legislators in early September to discuss business-related issues as well as legislation expected to come up during the 2016 General Assembly convening in January. [C-J/AKN]

On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded Thursday morning, Aug. 27, with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham. [WHAS11]

Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Arrests were made Thursday morning at the annual ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair. [WLKY]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

The goal to bring 43 new homes to the Russell neighborhood started a decade ago, and Thursday, Mayor Greg Fischer announced a plan to make good on that promise. [WAVE3]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

Jim Wathen has been selling military merchandise at the Kentucky State Fair for nearly a decade. By noon on a recent weekday, he had already restocked a rack of Confederate flags. He said the 3-by-3-inch Confederate flag, his top seller, is a piece of military history. [WFPL]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

A study released Wednesday shows that congested roads are costing the typical Louisville metro area driver more than 40 hours in delays annually and almost $1,050 in lost time and burned fuel. [Business First]

Former New Albany Police Department Officer Laura Schook is proceeding with a federal case against the city as well as an appeal of the decision to fire her in May, and she’s doing so without an attorney. [News & Tribune]

Short-Term Rental Cat Fight Takes Shape

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Leaders with Louisville Metro Council are asking for additional input while they work out details of an ordinance aimed at creating more regulatory oversight in the short term housing market. You should at least have to live in the homes you’re renting out like a hotel. [WDRB]

Another guy without a gun was shot and killed by police officers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Stop signs will soon be placed at a railroad crossing where two people were seriously injured this week in Buechel on Crawford Ave. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Department of Education is seeking public feedback on dozens of proposed social studies standards. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two years after Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis was killed in the line of duty, police continue to investigate. [WLKY]

Bloomberg Philanthropies on Wednesday announced the first eight cities it has selected to participate in a new pilot program to improve life in America’s cities. Chattanooga, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; Kansas City, Missouri; Mesa, Arizona; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jackson, Mississippi; Seattle and New Orleans will be the first to benefit from the What Works Cities Initiative. The project intends to spend $42 million over three years to help U.S. cities address issues like economic development, public health, crime and transportation. [HuffPo]

The developers tasked with rehabbing the iconic 800 Building in downtown Louisville want the taxpayers to help foot the bill. Now, that is a step closer to happening. [WAVE3]

In the early morning hours of June 30, 1995, a fire sparked to life in Kristine Bunch’s mobile home. It fanned out across the floor and climbed up the walls, then formed an impassable barrier across the middle of the trailer. Bunch, 21, snapped awake in the living room. Her three-year-old son, Tony, shrieked for her on the other side of the flames. [Mother Jones]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Later this month, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will escape for a family retreat to mourn his late son, Beau, but also to mull, as his dying son urged him to do, a campaign for president. Some of Mr. Biden’s friends and allies worry that he will decide it is a good idea. [NY Times]

Greater Louisville Inc. has named Deana Epperly Karem vice president of economic development. Karem is the current executive director of the Oldham County Chamber and Economic Development. She’ll start work at GLI on Sept. 1. [Business First]

When Floyd County Solid Waste Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley receives a complaint about the two mobile recycling sites that were closed recently due to budget cuts, she refers them to the people who ordered the reductions. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Bunch Of Death

A homicide investigation is being conducted by LMPD’s Homicide Unit and the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office in the 4400 block of Blevins Gap Road, near Saw Mill Road. [WDRB]

Maybe it can be hidden away in the Louisville Underground? The long-beleaguered Louisville Clock will be moved Friday from its home on Fourth Street at Theater Square to a warehouse in the Portland neighborhood, where it will rest until a suitable permanent location can be found. [C-J/AKN]

The Courier Journal reported JCPS was following up anonymous complaints and found chips, waters, and other vending machine items came into Waggener, but the amount of money being deposited from vending machine sales was short of what it should have been to the total of $3,900. [WHAS11]

The number of heroin overdoses at five northern Kentucky hospitals has continued to climb, but officials aren’t sure if that’s because more people are calling 911 for help, or more people are using heroin. [H-L]

The reward in the case of a missing Nelson County woman has again increased. [WLKY]

Coming back from its Independence Day vacation, Congress appeared no closer Tuesday to finding a way to avoid yet another government shutdown showdown in the fall. [HuffPo]

They are split-second decisions made by police — choices that can mean the difference between life and death for a suspect. Should officers use force? And how much? Community activists like Chad Golden believe sometimes police go farther than they should. [WAVE3]

Questions have been raised about some statues in downtown Lexington. Now, Mayor Jim Gray wants a city board to take a closer look at the statues. [WKYT]

A case over water pollution from Louisville Gas & Electric’s Cane Run Power Plant is scheduled for a hearing in federal court in Louisville tomorrow. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Harry Reid passed the blame on Wednesday over the Senate’s inability to overhaul the Bush-era No Child Left Behind bill. [The Hill]

Some business organizations have decried President Obama’s proposed changes to overtime pay for salaried employees, but most restaurant and retail companies are still working through how, and whether, the regulations would affect them. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair said he was “surprised” that a $450,000 appropriation for police cars was included on Monday’s agenda. [News & Tribune]

It’s Oaks Day So You’re Already Tanked

Here’s your weekly oh snap moment… WAVE 3 anchor Dawne Gee has filed a lawsuit against Baptist Health Louisville over alleged “negligent” treatment she received last May. [WDRB]

If GLI supports the JCPS shakeup, you can bet it’s an absolute disaster. [C-J/AKN]

The post-position draw happened at Churchill Downs on April 29. The Kentucky Derby will happen on May 2. [WHAS11]

Get a glimpse backside as Kentucky Derby contenders work out and clean up. [H-L]

The body of a man missing since February has been found in a truck along Southern Parkway. [WLKY]

Feds pay for drug fraud: 92 percent of foster care, poor kids prescribed antipsychotics get them for unaccepted uses. [HuffPo]

During any other week twenty flights would make a busy day for Atlantic Aviation. However, the Thursday through Saturday of Derby week redefines wingtip-to wingtip. [WAVE3]

For a moment last year, it looked as if the Obama administration was moving toward a history-making end to the federal death penalty. [NY Times]

The Louisville Metro Council, Mayor Greg Fischer and MSD officials announced a plan this week for possibly creating a home buyout program for houses in the area that have been consistently flooded-out during the past several years. Right now, there are a slew of homeowners in flood-prone areas with flood damage they can’t repair even though they have flood insurance. [WFPL]

Looks like Jerry Abramson’s been meddling in Vermont and it didn’t go so swell. [Rutland Herald & VPR]

The University of Louisville’s entrepreneurial ecosystem just got a boost in funding and status. U of L has received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to commercialize research. [Business First]

As Scott County enters its second month of emergency health provisions, its HIV outbreak is sounding alarms across the country for areas at risk of a similar epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Wealthy Local Folks Should Help Hungry Kids

Wealth and perceived power got Greg Fischer’s son out of a serious drug charge. But you expected nothing less. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District will go ahead with an investigation against one of its board members and its former chairman, even though the ethics complaint filed against them was withdrawn by the board member who filed it. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s gasoline tax, which fell by 4.3 cents a gallon Jan. 1, is now expected to drop by another 5.1 cents on April 1 unless legislators change state law. [WHAS11]

Lexington and other cities will not have to enact their own ordinances for ride-sharing companies such as Lyft and Uber now that the state has enacted its own regulations, city attorneys told the Urban County Council on Tuesday. [H-L]

A program that provides snacks and nutritious meals to children during months schools aren’t in session is looking for sponsors. [WLKY]

The American health care system may finally be catching up to the rest of the 21st-century economy, in which convenience is not only expected, but demanded — and massive retailers are driving the change. [HuffPo]

Police surround another Louisville school. Tuesday they came with armored trucks and weapons to a locked down Stuart Middle School, after someone called in a report of a shooting at the school. After sweeping the school twice, police determined it was a hoax. [WAVE3]

A bid to reduce racial and economic segregation in Portland public schools was postponed on Tuesday when a group of protesters stormed a school board meeting and demanded more time to learn about the planned policy changes. The proposed change would limit transfers between schools, which white and affluent families have disproportionately used to remove their children from low-performing schools. [Reuters]

This year’s tax season will be full of questions for people who signed up for Kynect, Kentucky’s health insurance exchange, and those who are uninsured. For the first time, people will have to indicate on their tax form if they had health insurance on their tax return. [WFPL]

Mickie “Red” Roquemore was a charming, “great guy” who was well liked and didn’t cause problems at a homeless shelter where he often stayed in the past. Last year, he even secured housing with the help of an agency. But the Pontiac, Detroit resident was found dead on New Year’s Day on a porch where he had recently been sleeping apparently due to temperatures dipping down to 15 degrees overnight. [Think Progress]

In November, Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, released its legislative wish list for the 2015 short session of the Kentucky General Assembly. [Business First]

Traffic, noise and safety concerns raised by Johnson County communities and other cities along a 106-mile rail line were dismissed in a federal review, but those local leaders are making a second attempt to be heard. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Probably Literally Flushing $ Down The Drain

JCPS has paid out nearly $10 million in legal claims since 2009 that were not covered by its insurance company because the individual claims didn’t meet the district’s $500,000 per claim deductible, according to records obtained by WDRB News under the state’s open records law. The district’s annual liability insurance premium has also increased nearly 50 percent over the last five years – from $526,502 to $777,752. Note: $215,250 (amount of the increase) isn’t nearly 50% of $526,502, it’s just over 40%.

Jim Host and some of the most wealthy folks in the state (like Greg Fischer) want to raise your taxes. Why? Because it doesn’t impact them – it only impacts the poorest people — those who are forced to make decisions based upon sales tax. When you’re wealthy, it almost doesn’t matter. If this were a tax that would impact wealthy business? These folks would be running in the opposite directly. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The community just off Bardstown Road near the old Bashford Manor Mall is now at the center of concerns. The new mayor of West Buechel had police guarding the doors to a city building on January 2, and now he is asking for a state audit amid questions about missing items and city grants. [WHAS11]

A mother needs to get her son out the door. Thick white socks cover his contorted feet, a coat drapes his twisted shoulders, a water bottle with a straw nestles in the concave of his chest, and black straps on his wheelchair secure his wrists. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Chris Fisher, 55, was shot and killed on New Year’s Day inside her home, in east Louisville. [WLKY]

As Republicans assume control of the entire U.S. Congress in the new year, they are expected to push a controversial change to use more macroeconomic projections in determining the impact of tax and budget legislation on the federal deficit. [HuffPo]

The New Albany officer accused of making false allegations about misconduct at the New Albany Police Department will appeal the Merit Commission’s decision to fire her. [WAVE3]

Did you miss all of the shenanigans over the weekend involving Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s top dogs? Drunk, lewd behavior, wiener visible from outside a probably city-owned vehicle, all kinds of craziness. [The ‘Ville Voice]

The number of Jefferson County Public Schools parents and guardians joining Parent Teacher Associations is at its lowest in more than a decade, according to JCPS data. [WFPL]

As Republicans prepare to take full control of Congress on Tuesday, the party’s leaders are counting on judges, not their newly elected majority on Capitol Hill, to roll back President Obama’s aggressive second-term agenda and block his executive actions on health care, climate change and immigration. [NY Times]

Terry Gill said he was at a crossroads in his career. For most of 2014, Gill was a managing director and entrepreneur-in-residence at Access Ventures, a philanthropic venture-capital organization where he began its private-equity group. [Business First]

Officers with the Clarksville Police Department will receive a bump in their base salaries over the next two years. [News & Tribune]

GLI: Working Hard To Keep Everybody Down

Jefferson County Public Schools has hired a new team to help its most vulnerable students. [WDRB]

Of course GLI opposes a living wage for workers in Louisville. Remember, these are people put in charge by Greg Fischer. Arguing that increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 locally would hurt local businesses and possibly result in job loss, Louisville’s chamber of commerce announced its opposition to a proposed increase on Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian gets hit in Possibility City. MetroSafe tells us that a pedestrian has been hit by a vehicle near the intersection of S. Hancock Street and E. Kentucky Street in Louisville. [WHAS11]

The American Heart Association has awarded $1.26 million in grants to the University of Kentucky for cardiovascular research. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Time is running out for crews to finish construction on the Big Four Station in Jeffersonville(sic). [WLKY]

Large churches in the South tend to pay their senior pastors the highest salaries, a new survey finds. That’s right, poorer states have the highest-paid megachurch pastors. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville is spending $300,000 on new police officers and patrols after a series of crimes left students and parents on edge. [WAVE3]

Whenever someone mentions a General Electrics appliance the first thing that comes to mind is 30 Rock‘s Jack Donaghy and the pocket microwave, “The Funcooker.” Of course neither of those things really have anything to do with Electrolux’s deal to buy the GE appliance business, but it’s never the wrong time to reminisce about Liz Lemon and the gang. [Consumerist]

Two Jefferson County Public Schools are getting some help in the fight against childhood obesity. [WFPL]

More carbon dioxide was emitted into our atmosphere between 2012 and 2013 than in any other year since 1984, putting humans on the fast track toward irreversible global warming. [Think Progress]

Jim Mims was one of the people who has allegedly gone after women working in Metro Government, giving them hard times, silencing and discriminating against them. The most recent is a woman who had an injury and, with physician requests, asked Mims to allow her to work from home until recovered – something Metro does not infrequently. Her labor rep even recommended it. Mims wouldn’t have it, started pushing her out, claiming her work needed to be done in-house. When she was gone, he outsourced her (union) job to a grunt who is not in-house. What’s he get as a reward? A sweet promotion. Just like Margaret Brosko of LMAS. [Business First]

Jeffersonville asks for plaintiff to put up $24 million bond in suit over ‘gateway’ property. Jeffersonville’s city attorney submitted two pleadings in response to a resident filing suit against the city Monday. [News & Tribune]