HOW Is JBS Still In The Damn News?!

Inclusivity is powerful. Much more than being just the opposite of exclusivity, it’s a distinct way of looking at the world. Its power has been revealed to me over and over in the internet business, in political campaigns, and from living in my adopted hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. [Matthew Barzun]

Seniors in Jefferson County Public Schools would graduate over a three-day period at the end of May, according to a proposal that will be up for school board approval on Tuesday, March 22. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric Company warned Mayor Greg Fischer on Monday it will stop collecting a 2 percent fee used to fund public safety and other community initiatives if a new franchise agreement cannot be reached by the end of March. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! JBS Swift plant’s plan to begin killing pigs using CO2, rather than the current method of electrocution, called for a public meeting Wednesday night. [WHAS11]

John Sanders’ room on the second floor of St. James Place is comfortable yet cramped. There is no storage space for his pots and utensils in the small kitchenette on one side of his room. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A woman was rushed to University Hospital after a shooting Wednesday night in southwest Louisville. [WLKY]

In an effort to curb America’s deadly opioid crisis, federal health officials are urging doctors to largely avoid prescribing highly addictive painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin when treating patients for chronic pain. [HuffPo]

Critics say it’s a destruction of civil rights. Supporters say it’s part of Kentucky’s constitution. Tuesday, Kentucky’s Senate has passed a bill allowing businesses to refuse service to people based on their religious beliefs in certain situation. [WAVE3]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A call this week for fiber Internet service providers to begin applying for franchise status marks the next step in Louisville’s quest to become a gigabit city. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell spoke to Donald Trump on Tuesday and recommended that the business mogul condemn violence at his rallies. [Politico]

The state of Florida has already given Humana Inc. the OK to merge with its Connecticut-based competitor, Aetna Inc. But some doctors groups aren’t so sure. [Business First]

The first phase of a project to install security cameras along Riverside Drive in Clarksville is completed and the town is ready for phase two. [News & Tribune]

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This City Is So Super-Compassionate

Compassionate City. Homicide detectives are investigating after a person was fatally shot in the Algonquin neighborhood late Tuesday. [WDRB]

Portland has long fostered its green cred with a light rail, efforts to curb sprawl, bicycle-friendly policies, and in many people’s minds, it has maintained a crunchy granola atmosphere. I have some experience with Portland. I used to live there years ago, and nearly landed a job at The Oregonian before finding my way to Kentucky. But recently, that image has been tarnished a bit with – as weird as it sounds – the discovery by the U.S. Forest Service of tree moss containing toxic chemicals from the air. It even got the full New York Times treatment on March 2: Toxic Moss in Portland, Ore., Shakes Cities Green Ideals. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky businesses could invoke their religious beliefs to refuse service to gay, lesbian or transgender customers under a bill passed by the state Senate. [WHAS11]

We still maintain that this is probably one of Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes’ biggest accomplishments. [H-L]

Complaints about Louisville’s vacant and abandoned properties surged last year compared to 2014. [WLKY]

Donald Trump continued to beat the GOP field on Tuesday night, winning contests in Florida, North Carolina and Illinois, but dropping Ohio to John Kasich and struggling against Ted Cruz in Missouri. [HuffPo]

It may be round two for a public nuisance ordinance designed to deal with problem hotels. “Anytime you have a new ordinance, there’s going to be opportunities to make improvements,” Patrick Carrico, the President of the Bon Air Neighborhood Association, said. [WAVE3]

House Democrats on Tuesday showed their hand on the state budget, sending to the floor a budget that puts more money into pensions than Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposals while restoring cuts to education and creating less debt than which the governor called. [Ronnie Ellis]

The attorneys representing Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky say a lawsuit filed earlier this year by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration lacks the merit. [WFPL]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump predicted on Wednesday that there would be “riots” if he does not secure the GOP nomination, given his lead among delegates. [The Hill]

Can KentuckyOne fix what ails the state? No. But it’s sure gonna spend every last cent it’s got on public relations and getting media coverage. This is just the latest example of the hype. [Business First]

Indiana communities will soon get about $430 million to fix roads under a deal forged on the last day of the Legislature’s session. Getting much more than that means raising taxes — an option that many local leaders will find loathsome. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

JCPS Can’t Catch A Break With Hargens

It’s one thing after another with Donna Hargens. Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens admits the district made a “data entry discrepancy” in reporting to the state the number of times students were either physically held down or confined to a room last school year. [WDRB]

One victim was found in a garbage can. A second was beaten to death and set on fire, his body found burning on a sidewalk. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The story of Katina Powell, the UofL basketball scandal, and possible new details will be getting nationwide attention once again. Powell sat down with ESPN’s Outside the Lines for the second time on March 8 in Louisville for another interview. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky state Senate has approved a bill that would give public school districts an incentive for starting school in late August. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It was bizarre-o watching Greg Fischer speak at a Jefferson County Board of Education meeting. [WLKY]

Can you imagine the Kentucky Democratic Party doing something like this? Of course you can’t. We can’t. The KDP not only fears the gays, it fears women. So something like this isn’t going to happen any time soon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro police are investigating after two people were shot in the Chickasaw neighborhood late Tuesday night. [WAVE3]

House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said Tuesday he expects the House to vote on a two-year state budget plan early next week, one which will restore most of Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed funding cuts to education. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville has won a gold ranking in sustainability from a global group, making it the first university in Kentucky to achieve gold status. [WFPL]

“Religious Liberty” is the new FEAR THE GAY buzzword. Candidates in Kentucky sure are taking advantage of it. [FiveThirtyEight]

Believe it or not, CEOs and investors of these innovative software and technology companies have Congress to thank for an upcoming banner year for startups. [Business First]

Several ongoing projects in downtown Jeffersonville may look stalled, but work inside and behind the scenes is moving forward. [News & Tribune]

Murder City’s Homicide Unit Is Expanding

The small city of Hillview is suing its former attorney for more than $15 million. In a complaint filed in Bullitt Circuit Court Tuesday, the city alleges Mark Edison, who served as Hillview city attorney from Jan. 2003 to March 2015, failed to properly advise city leaders during a land dispute case in the early 2000s. That case led to a judgment against the city of $11.4 million. [WDRB]

At the end of every April, OneWest interim director Jenny Recktenwald says, out-of-town companies hunt for western Louisville’s most vulnerable residents with overdue tax bills. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro Police Department is expanding its Homicide Unit in an effort to lower crime in 2016 and take more violent offenders off the streets. [WHAS11]

With Gov. Matt Bevin’s blessing, a state House panel Thursday approved a bill that would allow Lexington’s Urban County Council to pass an additional 2.5 percent transient room tax to help pay for an expanded Lexington Convention Center. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WLKY]

Remember when this happened in Kentucky and then everyone forgot about it? A Georgia-based telecom startup had a clear, pointed response after the state’s senate approved a measure that will allow business owners to cite their religious beliefs in denying services to same-sex couples. [HuffPo]

Surprise! A new ranking of the happiest and healthiest cities is out and it is not good news for Louisville. [WAVE3]

New orders for long-lasting U.S. manufactured goods in January rose by the most in 10 months as demand picked up across the board, offering a ray of hope for the downtrodden manufacturing sector. [Reuters]

Deborah Collins squinted her eyes, triple-checking the information on the screen in front of her. She traced the blinking cursor with her finger, repeating her ZIP code, address and phone number. [WFPL]

The FBI’s much-discussed request to Apple can seem innocuous: Help us extract six weeks of encrypted data from the locked iPhone of Syed Farook, an employee of San Bernardino’s health department who spearheaded an attack that killed 14 people. Most people believe Apple should comply. But the FBI is demanding a lot more than the data on a single phone. [ProPublica]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. will be selling four transitional care hospitals and acquiring five long-term acute care facilities from Select Medical Holdings Corp. [Business First]

Jeffersonville police and fire chiefs are asking for some of the money the city council didn’t fund for this year when it tried to create a balanced budget. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Pedestrian Deaths, Shootings And JCPS Bus Crashes Are All The Rage In Compassionate City

No one thinks the Omni Hotel will live up to all the Fischer-pushed hype. Not even the people surrounding Fischer. [WDRB]

It’s now painfully clear that A Kentucky Newspaper’s education reporter will regurgitate whatever JCPS tells her without question. We had high hopes for her. Shame on us. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The students over at Bellarmine University are on a rescue mission. [WHAS11]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced Friday afternoon that he is retiring after 34 years with the agency. [H-L]

Another day, another JCPS bus crash. A Jefferson County Public Schools bus driver was injured Tuesday morning in a crash on Bardstown Road at Little Springs Boulevard, just south of the Gene Snyder Freeway. [WLKY]

The same crap is happening in Kentucky but the KDP is sitting on its hands. In South Dakota, Governor Dennis Daugaard is right this moment mulling over a bill sent to his desk by the legislature that would bar transgender students — kids often facing bullying and discrimination — from using bathrooms or locker rooms that correspond with their gender identity. [HuffPo]

Six months ago, Tracy Blue was waxing poetic about “Modern Louisville,” a new magazine geared to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities, the fourth print venture that her husband, University of Louisville trustee Jonathan Blue launched with her listed as publisher. [WAVE3]

Over a lifetime following government and politics as a spectator and for many years as a reporter, I’ve reached some conclusions. Campaigns matter. They tell us things about candidates and usually, though not always, what sort of office-holders they’ll likely be. Visions and philosophies are shared and promises made. Campaigns often reveal how the candidate operates under pressure as well as insights into character. [Ronnie Ellis]

There will be more court-appointed attorneys available to represent poor people in court under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget. [WFPL]

We started getting some clarity in the Republican and Democratic races Saturday night. Hillary Clinton squeaked out a win in Nevada — but did so in a way that suggests she has, despite Bernie Sanders’s strength, maintained her national advantage. Marco Rubio’s strong showing in South Carolina helped push Jeb Bush out of the race, giving Mr. Rubio a chance to unify the mainstream of the Republican Party and bring about a true three-way race. [NY Times]

A more than $6.2 million expansion could be coming to a senior living facility in southeast Louisville. [Business First]

For more than 14 years, foster parents William Yowell and Lizzette Steed-Yowell have opened their New Albany home to children whose lives have been turned upside down by neglect or abuse. The couple stresses the importance of providing a safe home for children in need, but there’s another ingredient they say is even more impactful: Open hearts. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Continues To Muck Things Up

In November, the University of Louisville Board of Trustees filed a motion in Franklin Circuit Court to dismiss a lawsuit by the Kentucky Justice Resource Center contending the board has too few minority members in violation of state law. [WDRB]

The city must pay former Jefferson County Constable David Whitlock about $33,000 in wages for more than five years of unpaid work, a Jefferson Circuit Court judge has ruled, and may owe other peace officers similar back salaries. [C-J/AKN]

A man whose drone was shot down over a Bullitt County home is now suing that shooter in federal court. [WHAS11]

Really, there aren’t more pressing educational issues to tackle instead of pandering in an election year? A Kentucky Republican state senator from London has introduced a bill that he said could have prevented biblical references from being cut from a presentation of A Charlie Brown Christmas at a Johnson County elementary school. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some southern Indiana families face an uncertain future after city officials in Charlestown revived controversial plans that could lead to tearing down a neighborhood. [WLKY]

The nation’s largest LGBT civil rights organization, Human Rights Campaign, endorsed Hillary Clinton for president on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

A routine appointment vote this month for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board was anything but routine after a Louisville Metro councilman asked to table or postpone a vote to reappoint two people to that board. [WAVE3]

A federal judge on Tuesday ruled President Obama cannot use executive privilege to keep records on the “fast and furious” gun-tracking program from Congress. [The Hill]

Superintendent Donna Hargens says Jefferson County Public Schools is working to ensure that Louisville families are aware of its offerings in anticipation of a new push for state charter school legislation. [WFPL]

One European country can’t seem to stop breaking records when it comes to wind power. [ThinkProgress]

Is your favorite Louisville restaurant making the grade? [Business First]

The Clark County Clerk’s office was granted an $10,800 additional appropriation this week in part to help with transferring the influx of Jeffersonville city court cases that are coming in. [News & Tribune]

Local Media Mall Freak Out Continues

UofL can’t go a dang week without SOME sort of scandal. And this guy potentially put peoples’ lives at risk. [WDRB]

Really? The mall needs a parental escort policy? Kids have been going to the mall since it opened but people are only now freaking out about it? Get a damn grip, Louisville. Enough with the panic. [C-J/AKN]

Ready for the Christian Taliban (Hal Heiner and his wife, Frank Simon, Jerry Stephens) to take over education in Kentucky? [WHAS11]

In 1970, a female couple filed a lawsuit in Louisville that may have been a precursor of the 2015 Supreme Court decision to strike down the limitations on gay marriage. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new Fund for the Arts program called Arts for Kosair Kids is giving local children opportunities they wouldn’t normally have. [WLKY]

The National Catholic Reporter has named two of the men at the heart of the Supreme Court’s landmark same-sex marriage case its “persons of the year.” Greg Bourke and Michael DeLeon were two of the several dozen plaintiffs in the case Obergefell v. Hodges. In June, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of these couples and legalized marriage equality nationwide. [HuffPo]

An LMPD officer is recovering from injuries at UofL Hospital following a crash while on duty early Tuesday morning. [WAVE3]

For the poor in the Deep South’s cities, simply applying for a job exposes the barriers of a particularly pervasive and isolating form of poverty. [WaPo]

“We’re afraid that with the implementation of a plan like the Indiana plan, we will see a reduction in the number of those who have Medicaid coverage and an increase in the number of uninsured and an increase in the uncompensated care that we provide,” Wagner said. [WFPL]

The Kentucky attorney general’s office has issued an opinion stating that the state racing commission cannot delegate rule-making authority to private companies like racetracks, putting in jeopardy a plan by Keeneland to write races in which the race-day administration of the regulated medication Lasix would be prohibited. The Kentucky attorney general, Jack Conway, is the son of a racing commissioner, Thomas Conway, who has supported race-day Lasix use. Jack Conway is leaving office in January, to be replaced by Andy Beshear, the son of Steve Beshear, who said in a recent speech that he supports restrictions on medication use. [DRF]

Oh, look, now Business Fart is getting in on the Mall St. Matthews hype! It’s like WDRB’s print counterpart. [Business First]

After months of waiting, Floyd County officials received information they requested regarding finances of the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]