The Compassionate Murders Continue

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. LMPD homicide detectives are investigating after a man was shot and killed in Louisville’s Shawnee neighborhood early Tuesday. [WDRB]

In about six months Kentucky courts must offer emergency civil legal protections for a member of a dating couple in an abusive or violent relationship, but court officials across the state first must figure out how to make the new law work in their courts. [C-J/AKN]

Oldham County only needs about 1,200 signatures to expand packaged alcohol sales to groceries, convenience stores and liquor stores. [WHAS11]

Just in case you were wondering why nothing ever happens when legislators are unethical mountains of awful? John Schaaf, who has been legal counsel for the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission since 2004, will become its news executive director Aug. 1. [H-L]

Jeffersonville is breaking ground on a new, less expensive way to stop sewage overflow from being released into the Ohio River. [WLKY]

Tens of thousands of people are deported each year for minor drug offenses, even if they served their time long ago, because of draconian U.S. drug laws, according to a report released Tuesday by the international advocacy group Human Rights Watch. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man was taken into custody for allegedly shooting a father and his son. [WAVE3]

Nobody disputes the fact that Deng Manyoun attacked a Louisville police officer with a flag pole on Saturday afternoon. What is up for debate — among police and the public in Kentucky — is whether the officer’s split-second decision to respond by firing two bullets into the 35-year-old was justified. [WaPo]

In the coming weeks Louisville residents and visitors will have a new option to get around the city. [WFPL]

As the iconic American gun maker Colt Defense struggled to stay in business after losing a key contract to supply M4 rifles to the U.S. Army, the company was paying a range of political allies, including the National Rife Association, the consulting firm set up by retired Army General Stanley McChrystal, and other trade groups and lobbying outfits. [The Intercept]

After a successful event in Louisville in April, the VEX Robotics World Championship will return to the city for the next four years. [Business First]

The New Albany Human Rights Commission declined Friday to make a statement opposing comments made earlier this month by City Councilman Dan Coffey that some have labeled as demeaning toward gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]

Departing Eugene School District Superintendent Sheldon Berman has a new job more than 3,100 miles from Eugene. Berman will serve for one year as the Andover Public Schools interim superintendent in Andover, Mass., during the coming school year. Those “negative, untrue reports” he’s talking about? You already know they were backed up by government documents, telephone records and first-hand accounts. These shysters are why kids can’t have nice things. [Register-Guard]

Another Day, Another Compassionate Murder In Fischer’s Transparent City

MetroSafe dispatchers have confirmed that homicide detectives are investigating after a man’s body was found on the ground in the west end. [WDRB]

Activists said Sunday that the police shooting of a black man in Old Louisville a day earlier illustrates their claim that officers too often use excessive force to subdue people of color, and they said they hope it leads to police measures to increase transparency. [C-J/AKN]

Owning a home doesn’t come cheap and costs of maintenance and repairs to both inside as well as outside can add up. For the elderly and disabled, paying for the costs isn’t always easy. [WHAS11]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [H-L]

A Kentucky company that’s a top maker of whiskey and other spirits is buying a southern Indiana lumber mill that will turn out wooden segments for its bourbon barrels. Louisville, Kentucky-based Brown-Forman Corp. will spend $12 million to buy and expand that Owen County mill. [WLKY]

Any city struggling to house its residents should look no further than Houston for a few pointers. [HuffPo]

While facts began to surface about Saturday’s officer-involved shooting, local activists came together Sunday to discuss the fatal event. Their main concern is that they say the officer used unnecessary force. [WAVE3]

A group led by anti-gay pastor Rick Scarborough is vowing to defy any ruling by the Supreme Court that recognizes same-sex marriage. Louisville’s Six Flags Over Jesus is part of the group. [ThinkProgress]

A dramatic decline in Kentuckians earning GED diplomas over the last two years has led some lawmakers to question the current version of the test, which rolled out in January of 2014. [WFPL]

Workers are putting the finishing touches on rows of barracks in a 50-acre camp here, the largest immigration detention center in the country. It houses thousands of women and their children who were caught crossing the border illegally and are seeking asylum in the United States. [NY Times]

Nature’s Methane, an Indiana-based biofuel company, has plans to build not one but two biofuel facilities in west Louisville. [Business First]

The Louisville Metro Corrections officer who was charged with driving drunk along Spring Street and almost striking a patrol car before crashing through the Jeffersonville Overlook last year was sentenced to one year probation with a hefty price tag. [News & Tribune]

The TV Folks Love Scaring Meemaws

Instead of scaring the absolute living shit out of the elderly people watching television, maybe start educating the community about needle exchanges? Maybe do something about educating folks on the proper way to discard used needles? [WDRB]

After working into the early hours of last Wednesday morning, paramedic Jon Tyson wheeled into his garage, plugged a large black power cord into his electric-powered Nissan Leaf and hit the sack. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe if we keep killing people we won’t have to worry about the poor or the sick. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul led a successful effort to block renewal of the Patriot Act early Saturday morning, followed by a deeply divided Senate leaving Washington without taking action on the National Security Agency’s soon-to-expire power to collect Americans’ phone records. [H-L]

The Indiana attorney general’s office says the state had to pay more than $1.4 million in fees to plaintiffs’ attorneys in its unsuccessful attempt to maintain its ban on same-sex marriages. [WLKY]

With more and more U.S. states facing public transit funding cuts despite record-breaking commuter demand, many transit systems are being forced to consider service cuts or fare hikes, both of which disproportionally impact low-income riders and neighborhoods. [HuffPo]

A family who lost their son has spent years turning their personal tragedy into a community event to spread positivity. [WAVE3]

The sleepy United States senators thought they were done voting. But then, around 1 a.m. on the Saturday before Memorial Day, Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky and presidential candidate, marched spryly to the Senate floor to let it be known that, no, he would not agree to extend the federal government’s bulk collection of phone records program. Not even for one day. [NY Times]

Louisville residents use public transportation at one of the lowest rates among the nation’s largest cities, according to new research from the University of Michigan. [WFPL]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

It’s time for a reminder about Adam Edelen and educational audits. An audit is NOT a forensic accounting investigation. It’s typically a random sampling that gets reviewed unless specific concerns are brought to light. Or, in the case of Montgomery County, not. Because specific concerns were deliberately ignored by Edelen’s team. When he says there was no fraud discovered? Remember: not a forensic accounting, not an in-depth investigation of every nook and cranny. [Business First]

Michael Crone asked who in the room knew a bully or a victim or a witness to bullying. Only a few hands raised. Crone knew better. [News & Tribune]

Tolling Secrecy Is SOP In Possibility City

If you missed it last night, Jamie Comer’s career officially ended. [Page One from C-J/AKN]

A Louisville lawmaker has asked Attorney General Jack Conway to decide if the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet followed public records law when it refused to release a study on easing bridge tolls on low-income drivers. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro police are investigating separate fatal shootings from Saturday, both involving men in their 20s. [C-J/AKN]

The HIV public awareness campaign, You Are Not Alone, is now being expanded to include messages aimed at reaching travelers and truck drivers along Interstate-65 between Louisville and Indianapolis. The messages encourage drivers to know their HIV status and to protect themselves by avoiding risky sexual behavior. [WHAS11]

Blake Johnson, 16, who identifies as gay, said when he attended last year’s Pride Prom, an annual event for high school students, “I was surrounded by people like me.” [H-L]

Three people have been arrested and charged in connection with a homicide on Derby night. [WLKY]

Famously animal-loving Jon Stewart is said to have bought a farm in New Jersey, for purposes of giving home to rescued farm animals. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? [WAVE3]

“It’s a lot of fun,” House Speaker Greg Stumbo said of the four-way GOP primary. Gov. Steve Beshear added: “They’re having a good time it looks like among the four of them going back and forth.” [CN|Toot]

Here’s your political duh moment. Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul’s efforts to appeal to minority voters hit a rough patch over the past week. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left intact New Jersey’s ban on counseling intended to change the sexual orientation of gay children. [Reuters]

Fresh off a record attendance at the Kentucky Derby on Saturday, a new report has found that the state’s tourism industry continues to grow. [Business First]

Questions surrounding the legality of a signage campaign against the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s referendum may end with a complaint filed with the state Election Division. [News & Tribune]

Fischer? Playing Favorites? Surely Not!

Should the East End bridge be a hazmat route? In Indianapolis, trucks carrying hazardous materials are banned from passing through downtown. A similar prohibition quietly took effect last year for the main northern Kentucky interstate into Cincinnati. [WDRB]

A lawsuit contends Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s office gave preferential treatment to prominent developer Bill Weyland, awarding his company a multi-million dollar contract for office space when it could have rented more space for less under an alternate deal. The lawsuit against the city, filed in Jefferson Circuit Court late Monday by real estate investors Mac Sawyers and Bill Lerner, contends the deal with Weyland was rigged and cost taxpayers more. [C-J/AKN]

Three people are recovering at the hospital after two shootings in Louisville Monday night. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Derby contenders Bolo, International Star, American Pharoah, Dortmund are featured in Tuesday’s report of activity and horses on the backside of Churchill as race preparations kick up a notch. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after human remains were found in a burned car in the 5000 block of KY 393, near US 42, outside Buckner. [WLKY]

In a new survey, more than half of self-identified Republicans said they didn’t think the Affordable Care Act is increasing the number of people with health insurance, with a fifth of respondents saying it has actually reduced the number of people with coverage. For the record, the evidence suggests these people are flat-out wrong. [HuffPo]

Several homeowners on East Riverside Drive plan to file a lawsuit against the Metropolitan Sewer District because they said they were unaware of a Metro Louisville flood ordinance that will force them to move from their home. [WAVE3]

If you were wondering about Greg Fischer being the most milquetoast and ineffective mayor in the country? You’d be mistaken. She’s actually in Baltimore, home of Cordish. [The Hill]

A Kentucky proposal to study the background levels of certain chemicals in urban soil has gotten funding from the federal government. [WFPL]

Want to hear audio of yesterday’s Supreme Court hearing on gay marriage? Transcript will be there, as well. [Part One & Part Two]

Here’s a non-shocker for ya: Greg Heitzman, executive director of the Louisville-Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District, announced during an MSD board meeting that he will retire later this year. [Business First]

Victoria Bennett had a plan. In 2010, realizing that she needed to follow her dream of graduating with an Indiana University degree, Bennett — then a political science student at Kennesaw State University near Atlanta — sold her house, gathered up her savings and prepared to move. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Something Big Is Happening Today

Gotta get personal for a moment on a day like this.

A number of people I know and respect with all of my being (folks like Dan Canon, Joe Dunman, their clients) are before the Supreme Court of the United States arguing in support of gay marriage. It’s overwhelming to think that this is occurring in my lifetime. Overwhelming to realize that future generations will be able to live more equal, happy and less fearful lives because of their work.

Life may suck a lot of the time but this is exciting on a level I never could have imagined as a kid.

If you’re someone who has taken a stand in support of equality at any point in your life, thank you.



At Least It Moved To Cordish Central

Remember the Louisville “purge” nonsense? Now it’s a thing in Baltimore — where Cordish is headquartered. [Baltimore Sun]

They are family homes, but they’re being used like extended stay hotels in neighborhoods where that was never the plan. Now, new rules regulating boarding houses in Louisville are aiming to put a stop to it. [WDRB]

Meanwhile, we give away MILLIONS to Cordish for doing nothing. The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is eliminating half of its clinics serving residents in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program because of a projected $800,000 budget shortfall this year. [C-J/AKN]

When Tess Graham, 64, looks in the mirror these days she sees the female she’s also felt she was inside. “I waited 55 years to see me. That is a long time,” Graham said. [WHAS11]

Trying to pry information out of professional chauffeur T.J. Doyle is harder than wrestling a winning trifecta ticket out of a poor man’s hand. [H-L]

A Louisville elementary school got some big-name recognition when Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear visited to celebrate the school reaching an environmental milestone. [WLKY]

This highly entertaining pothole move is hilarious. It’s a shame it hasn’t happened in Louisville. [HuffPo]

All the pageantry and tradition of Derby week really boils down to one thing: the incredible athletic talent of 20 horses that reach the starting gate on the first Saturday in May. Kentucky loves its horses, and the Derby horses are some of the best treated around. But the Bluegrass is also home to many people who are working to better the lives of other horses that don’t have it anywhere near as good. [WAVE3]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission was scheduled to hold a hearing on Tuesday on Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities’ proposed rate increase. [WFPL]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

Louisville-based Baptist Healthcare System Inc., operator of Baptist Health Louisville and several other hospitals across the state, plans to expand its corporate headquarters on Eastpoint Parkway in Louisville in the coming years. [Business First]

The space the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center’s museum exhibits once occupied now is a labyrinth of metal frames and stacks of drywall. A cacophony of clanging metal on metal and shrieking power tools overwhelms the senses there now, but it won’t be too long before a different sound fills the air. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]