Louisville Gets Back To Being Murdery

Louisville Metro Police are investigating two separate homicides. [WDRB]

All hell broke loose in Louisville last week. Track excavators were rolled into General Electric’s Appliance Park Saturday to clear a path for firefighters to reach two stubborn pockets of flames that continued burning inside the wreckage of Building 6. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police’s Traffic Unit is investigating a fatal accident that left an 8-year-old girl dead Saturday evening. [WHAS11]

Health officials in Indiana on Saturday began a needle-exchange program Saturday in a county where an HIV outbreak among intravenous drug users has grown to nearly 90 cases. [H-L]

It’s been one year since a Louisville man was found murdered on the doorstep of his Rubel Avenue home. Friday night, his family pleaded for anyone with information to step forward. [WLKY]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz are among 57 Republicans in Congress who are calling on the Supreme Court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage. [HuffPo]

With flash floods causing havoc across the metro and canceling classes for Jefferson County students, graduation dates have shifted along with the last day of school. [WAVE3]

PEE ALERT! PEE ALERT! Social conservatives are doubling down on their push for state-based religious freedom laws, lashing out at businesses that have vigorously opposed the measures and accusing Democrats of trampling Christians’ civil rights. [Politico]

Shantasia Durr was first institutionalization at age 5. She spent much of her youth in social services, living in more than a dozen places until she graduated high school last year. [WFPL]

At the Tin Roof, a live music joint near Lucas Oil Stadium, where the NCAA’s Final Four basketball tournament concludes Monday, bar manager Brittany Strohmeyer eyed a group of out-of-town fans. Do they view Indiana as she sees it, warm and hospitable? Or do they think her state is run by bigots? [WaPo]

The Starks Building has been sold, according to a source close to the deal. [Business First]

The handling of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act by the Statehouse and Gov. Mike Pence gave Indiana a “black eye,” and it’s important for people who oppose the law to speak up, New Albany City Councilman John Gonder said of his resolution calling for the legislation to be repealed. [News & Tribune]

We Were First! Kentucky Hated The Gays Before Indiana

Just in case you needed another instance of Greg Fischer having no idea what he’s talking about. He’s to be applauded on the needle exchange front but we all know he didn’t “misspeak” — he just had no idea what was going on. [WDRB]

Oh, now David Jones wants a closer look at the JCPS budget? How convenient. He thinks he can sit on his hands for ages and only wake up after tension boils over the top. [C-J/AKN]

A man found dead after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood in West Louisville has now been identified. [WHAS11]

For the first time in the history of this tobacco state, the House voted on — and passed — a bill to ban indoor smoking statewide in workplaces and other public spaces, such as bars and restaurants. And then the Senate assigned House Bill 145 to its Committee on Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection, where it saw no further action. [H-L]

Way to go, Louisville, now your old people are shooting each other. [WLKY]

The National Collegiate Athletic Association expressed concern Thursday with a new “religious freedom” law in Indiana that could open the door to legalized discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. [HuffPo]

Watching this AirBnB slap fight between Greg Fischer and the Metro Council is tons of fun. [WAVE3]

There is significant evidence that cop cams cut down on most civilian complaints. But a close examination of violent encounters with the police caught on tape suggests that even with seemingly incontrovertible video evidence, questions will often linger. The kind of sea change that police reform activists desire will still likely escape them. [HuffPo]

African American leaders in Louisville are speaking out against Kentucky’s U.S. senators and their efforts to block the confirmation of Loretta Lynch as U.S. attorney general. [WFPL]

Remember when Kentucky enacted this legislation in 2013 and no one batted an eyelash? Thousands of people marched in Indiana’s largest city on Saturday to protest a state law that supporters contend promotes religious freedom but detractors see as a covert move to support discrimination against gay people. [Reuters]

If you can’t find the right people for these jobs you aren’t even trying to look for them. Period. [Business First]

Jeffersonville’s embarrassingly bad mayor has shown himself once more? [News & Tribune]

Gen Con Should Just Move To Louisville

It’s just another day for UPS driver Mark Casey. He has 60 miles to drive, and 125 deliveries to make. [WDRB]

One deal to restore Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home appears dead, but a Philadelphia attorney says he wants to buy the site and convert it to a museum honoring the three-time Louisville heavyweight boxing champion and humanitarian. [C-J/AKN]

Way to go, JCPS, you’ve done it again. There is new information about the 5-year-old girl left alone on a JCPS school bus for hours on March 11. [WHAS11]

Told ya Jamie Comer is in one of the biggest CYA moves in the history of gubernatorial primary politics in Kentucky. HUGE MEGA PEE ALERT! Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer’s claim that Kentucky had lost 50,000 jobs had disappeared from his campaign website. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Three weeks after he was shot in a West Louisville neighborhood, 13-year-old Tay Reed returned to school. [WLKY]

The number of uninsured U.S. residents fell by more than 11 million since President Barack Obama signed the health care overhaul five years ago, according to a pair of reports Tuesday from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

A(sic) inmate who had been placed into the Home Incarceration Program is charged with escape after he walked out of the Hall of Justice and tried to leave. [WAVE3]

Thirty-one stats(sic) have water supplies dipping below normal. Droughts have formally been declared in 22 of them. How we use water has never been more important, especially in the American Southwest, where drought conditions are the most severe in a generation — and could last another 1,000 years. [ProPublica]

Louisville’s shrinking tree canopy has finally been quantified. Jefferson County is losing trees at a rate of about 54,000 a year, according to a comprehensive assessment of the county’s trees scheduled to be released later this morning. [WFPL]

A major gaming convention, Gen Con, threatened on Tuesday to move its annual event out of Indiana if Gov. Mike Pence signs into law a controversial bill that would allow private businesses to deny service to homosexuals on religious grounds. [Reuters]

The First Link Supermarket at 431 E. Liberty St. in downtown Louisville has been for sale for awhile now, but the agent representing the store’s owner said he would prefer to lease the space after the death of his father and business partner last month. [Business First]

Another step in approving the new radio and television stations at Greater Clark County Schools’ high schools was approved at this week’s board meeting. [News & Tribune]

Everyone Has A Sports Thing Hangover

Big blue nation has undoubtedly descended on downtown Louisville. While some may call them crazy, the rest of the sports world isn’t — and that world is taking notice of the city. [WDRB]

The Economy Inn, 3304 Bardstown Road near Goldsmith Lane, has long harbored a reputation as a haven for drug addicts and prostitutes. Would this be on anyone’s radar if wealthy Highlands residents didn’t have to drive by on their way to Target? [C-J/AKN]

After the games, droves of fans have to go somewhere and many choose to stay in town and keep on celebrating. [WHAS11]

Earlier this winter, the folks at Bernheim Arboretum noticed a majestic golden eagle spending time in the forested hills of Bernheim Forest in Bullitt County. [H-L]

Three of the so-called misidentified four are facing a lawsuit. Less than two weeks ago the four men held a news conference to talk about their $1.5 million settlement with metro Louisville. [WLKY]

Indiana is expected to pass a religious freedom bill that could legalize discrimination against LGBT citizens. The legislation has language that is similar to a bill that was vetoed by Arizona’s former Republican governor last year after a national outcry. [HuffPo]

Investigators say a fire at a vacant building that displaced 13 people from a neighboring home on Saturday is “suspicious.” [WAVE3]

The Prince of Wales has described how the world faces the challenges of an economic system with enormous shortcomings, and an environmental crisis that threatens us all. His words of warning came yesterday at the end of his four-day tour of America when he gave a speech on health and the environment following a symposium in Louisville, Kentucky. [Daily Mail]

For Louisville’s homeless residents, case managers are counselors, teachers and movers. They can help people who have lived on the streets—sometimes for decades—adjust to life in a home. [WFPL]

Brooke Barzun explains how she is trying to re-invent the rules of diplomacy by asking the great and the good to relax. [Belfast Telegraph]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will be ceasing its scares in Southern Indiana. Todd Moore, who owns the roughly 50,000-square-foot property, plans to relocate the haunted house south into Louisville and sell the Jeffersonville location to New Hope Services Inc. for redevelopment into an income-based housing community for people ages 55 and older. [Business First]

Officials remain tight-lipped on the reasons for Jeffersonville Police Department Lt. Chris Grimm’s removal as chief, beyond Mayor Mike Moore’s explanation that it’s “time for a new direction” in the force. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Streets Have Always Been Pothole City

After an abrupt change in leadership for Jeffersonville Police, the new chief appointed is making history and says he is ready to take charge. [WDRB]

Jeffersonville Police Chief Chris Grimm was ousted from the position Monday by Mayor Mike Moore, who attributed the demotion only to a “new direction in the police department,” according to a news release. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky State Auditor Adam Edelen has described the financial practices of the city of West Buechel as “astounding and highly irregular. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has ruled in favor of a newspaper seeking police records. [H-L]

A JCPS teacher accused of sex crimes with a child wants his trial delayed. [WLKY]

The tide has turned for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender couples seeking to be married in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A). [HuffPo]

Metro government has gotten more than 1,000 reports of potholes in the past three days as winter quickly gave way to warmer weather. [WAVE3]

But none of the top candidates in this field gets within 10 points of Hillary Clinton in a series of hypothetical general election matchups. Rand Paul comes closest, with 43% saying they’d be more likely to back him while 54% choose Clinton. [CNN]

A week after announcing the receipt of $6.3 million from the foundations of businessmen “Papa” John Schnatter and Charles Koch, the University of Louisville has released the underlying seven-year agreements. Rebecca Peek, a U of L senior and member of the Student Labor Action Project, said she was ashamed of the school’s agreement. [WFPL]

The U.S. government is preparing to roll back a widely criticized approach to public health, in which the “lost pleasure” people might suffer if they quit smoking or chose to eat healthier foods was used to reduce the projected benefits of new regulations, government officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

This time next year, the new Speed Art Museum will be open for business. [Business First]

Former Jeffersonville City Councilman John Perkins’ name is back on the ballot for the May primary election, following a circuit court’s decision. [News & Tribune]

What A Death-Filled Week It’s Been!

Raven Taylor’s high school education suddenly came to a halt when, at the age of 15, she got pregnant. [WDRB]

The eight-state commission that sets water quality standards for the Ohio River has recommended relaxing its rules for mercury and certain other toxic pollutants that concentrate as they move through the food web. [C-J/AKN]

The Ohio River once again leads the nation for industrial pollution. That’s even as the eight-state commission that sets the river’s water quality standards recommends relaxing rules on mercury and certain other toxic chemicals. [More C-J/AKN]

In light of recent tragedies involving multiple JCPS school communities, district officials held a news conference to tell the public how the district is supporting its students and staff at an emotional time. [WHAS11]

The partisan divide over same-sex marriage among top elected officials remains stark, with Democrats overwhelmingly on record in favor and Republicans mostly silent so far. [H-L]

A group of people gathered at 26th and Chestnut streets Monday morning to protest an officer-involved shooting Saturday afternoon. [WLKY]

The gender pay gap is alive and well everywhere in America, but it’s more alive in some states than in others. [HuffPo]

Police said a 4-year-old girl died Saturday of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound suffered on Friday. [WAVE3]

In 1986, I was as ready to leave the closet as I would ever be—but how would I do so? Though I was a third term Democratic congressman from Massachusetts, I had lived too long with the burden of “the gay thing” to treat coming out as a political matter alone. [Politico]

Louisville Gas and Electric is still on track to open the company’s natural gas-fired power plant in Louisville in May, as it retires the current Cane Run coal power plant. The new power plant won’t produce coal ash, but 60 years worth of old ash will remain on site. [WFPL]

Late last week Governor Beshear’s office pushed out a release about kyhealthnow (can we quit it with the no caps and such?) so go look at the stuff. [Click the Clicky]

Louisville is now the United States headquarters for the Leadership Pipeline Institute, a Denmark-based international leadership organization. [Business First]

February’s winter storms proved costly for Clark County. The commissioners declared an emergency Thursday to use cumulative capital fund dollars pay for more than $85,000 in expenses for snow-related road maintenance during a two-week period in February. [News & Tribune]

Holding Our Breath For An End To The Death

Louisville police say the city’s latest murder victim was robbed and kidnapped before he was murdered. [WDRB]

Maybe we can try arresting our way out of yet another nightmare. After a deadly start to 2015, leaders of the Metro Council’s Public Safety Committee asked top city officials, including Police Chief Steve Conrad, to speak during a specially called Monday meeting to talk about recent violence and increase in homicides. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating a fatal hit and run involving a pedestrian. [WHAS11]

Lexington is pushing forward with its efforts to increase Internet speeds. [H-L]

Before the latest bout of snow, crews were working on repairing the roads, but the weather brought those plans to a halt. Now officials estimate there are nearly 10,000 potholes across Louisville. [WLKY]

A New York judge ordered a Papa John’s pizza restaurant franchise and its owner to fork over more than $2 million after short-changing hundreds of delivery workers and shaving hours from their paychecks, prosecutors said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Everybody is losing their mind over an upcoming Prince concert. [WAVE3]

On Monday, the city council of Indianapolis passed a “Homeless Bill of Rights” to protect its population without housing, one of the first cities to do so. [ThinkProgress]

Braving temperatures in the 30s on a recent Wednesday morning, the 25 or so people bunched in the Kroger parking lot in west Louisville had plenty of grounds for complaint. [WFPL]

The United States government on Friday urged the Supreme Court to strike down bans on same-sex couples’ marriages across the country, concluding, “There is no adequate justification for such a discriminatory and injurious exercise of state power.” [BuzzFeed]

It might come as little surprise that Kentucky, home to Papa John’s International Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc., has the highest number of fast-food restaurants per capita. [Business First]

A request to seek bids on a partial repaving of the district’s service center was contested at Greater Clark County Schools board of trustees meeting and passed by a thin margin. [News & Tribune]