Fighting Over Grass As Folks Go Hungry

Some say growing grass on abandoned properties in Louisville is a growing problem. [WDRB]

Jack Conway went to western Louisville on Saturday and promised that he would appoint African Americans to the University of Louisville’s board of trustees if he were elected governor. [C-J/AKN]

The oil bust has been largely a supply-driven phenomenon. Unlike the last time that oil prices were this low — during the 2008-2009 financial crisis — this past year’s price collapse has not been because of destruction in demand, but due to too much supply. [WHAS11]

While standardbreds took to the track outside during Red Mile’s regular meet Saturday night, fans of casino gaming took their seats inside for the historic track’s first night of slots-style wagering. [H-L]

Who knew this was a thing? A crowd favorite returned to the Ohio River along Waterfront Park Saturday. A team from Waggener High School was one of 30 teams competing in the Annual Dragon Boat Festival. [WLKY]

Kamilah Brock says the New York City police sent her to a mental hospital for a hellish eight days, where she was forcefully injected with powerful drugs, essentially because they couldn’t believe a black woman owned a BMW. [HuffPo]

With the stroke of a paintbrush, a west Louisville man is transforming shoes. Dinero Andretti creates custom artwork for any shoe and any customer. Some customers have requested specific designs for causes. [WAVE3]

Hidden in the haze of the petrochemical plants and beyond the seemingly endless traffic jams, a Texas city has grown so large that it is poised to pass Chicago as the third biggest in the United States in the next decade. [Reuters]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is looking into concerns that deliberate and systemic bias pollute the process of allocating funds associated with the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, as more than $300,000 allocated for the program this year went unused. [WFPL]

Governor Steve Beshear announced today that U.S. Deputy Secretary of Transportation Victor Mendez, a champion for the nation’s vital transportation infrastructure, will visit Louisville next week to speak to an automotive conference and to view progress on the downtown Ohio River bridge project. [Press Release]

Louisvillians are practically salivating for a major-league sports team to support. [Business First]

Most employee positions or big purchases, with an exception for public safety, will not yet be approved for next year’s budget, but the Jeffersonville City Council is still discussing what’s to come during its annual budget workshops. [News & Tribune]

Yes, Tolls Are Still The Local Devil

And you thought people in Indiana wouldn’t get screwed. About three times as many residents of Clark County, Ind., travel to Louisville to work than do people commuting in the opposite direction, new data shows. [WDRB]

If you missed it last week, another Fischer official jumped ship. [C-J/AKN]

People are still the absolute worst. Metro Parks is dealing with a second case of vandalism at Algonquin Park in a little over a month. [WHAS11]

A Louisville woman who authorities say admitted to setting a series of fires throughout the city has been sentenced to 20 years in prison. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A JCPS student is home safe after being left at the wrong bus stop Thursday, and not being located until nearly 2 a.m. Friday. [WLKY]

Your tax dollars at work — all so Jack can score a few extra political points. Fifteen state attorneys general petitioned a federal court in Washington on Thursday to block new U.S. rules to curb carbon emissions from power plants, in the first of several expected legal challenges to the Obama administration measure. [HuffPo]

Gas prices at dozens of Louisville gas stations plummeted 50 cents overnight, less than two days after they spiked by the same amount amid speculation that problems at a Chicago-area refinery would cause shortages. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Department of Justice says that banning people from sleeping in public could be a violation of their constitutional rights. [Time]

For the first time, Kentucky State Fair-goers who take a TARC bus will pay half-price adult admission and, of course, not pay the $8 parking fee. [WFPL]

It should be easy to come up with a weekly column during a governor’s race, but the 2015 election between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway is unlike any I’ve ever seen. [Ronnie Ellis]

An Ohio development company plans to buy the former Mercy Academy property and build a four-story apartment complex on the East Broadway site. [Business First]

With just over two weeks until applications for the $84 million, statewide Regional Cities Initiative must be submitted, the board that’s required to submit the application locally has yet to be formed. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Southern Indiana & Sewer In The Same Sentence

Seventy-eight years ago this month, Louisville suffered from what’s considered to be the largest natural disaster in the city’s history. The flood of 1937 devastated the city. [WDRB]

Emissions of the cancer-causing chemical 1,3-butadiene doubled in Louisville in 2013 over the year before, but they still were substantially less than before the city enacted a new pollution control plan a decade ago. [C-J/AKN]

There was not an empty seat at the Capitol, Senator Wendell Ford is the 21st person to lie in state. [WHAS11]

Interest groups spent a record-breaking $18.4 million to lobby the Kentucky General Assembly in 2014, the state’s Legislative Ethics Commission said Friday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police are investigating after a man was murdered in the Portland neighborhood. [WLKY]

The average price of a gallon of gasoline in the United States fell 13.3 cents in the past two weeks, falling to its lowest level since late April 2009, but the end of a months-long slide may be near, according to the Lundberg survey released Sunday. [HuffPo]

University of Louisville students completed a project on Sunday that will last a life time, spending the morning putting up birdhouses. [WAVE3]

U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has directed agency staff to create and deliver an updated Animal Welfare Strategy plan within 60 days, according to an internal email reviewed by Reuters. [Reuters]

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana officials say a new mentoring program launched this school year has been a success and will be expanded next year. [WFPL]

Greg Stumbo keeps pushing for the release of that LRC report. So what’s not in the report that he’s so excited about? Remember, the LRC released a report about the Kent Downey Sexytime Condom Tree Scandal that helped House leadership escape the mess. You can probably expect the same sort of whitewash here. [WKYT]

A Ford Motor Co. executive said Friday that a “critical” goal for the company in this year’s contract negotiations with the United Auto Workers union is to “maintain a competitive environment.” [Business First]

The town of Clarksville stands to save about $500,000 by refunding sewer bonds it issued in 2005. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Just Can’t Catch A Break In The News

A JCPS teacher sues the principal of Moore Traditional High School, alleging years of discrimination based on sexual orientation. [WDRB]

It’s the fall of 1985 and the 17-year-old version of me steps on to the campus of Morehead State University. I really have no clue how I made it this far and, even scarier, I have no clue where I am going. College was just the predetermined next step, and like Steve Martin’s character in The Jerk, I wasn’t sure of my special purpose. [Scott Utterback]

It’s because Cordish got all the money. An area tagged for revitalization has some locals still scratching their heads. [WHAS11]

A University of Kentucky professor’s 40-second demonstration during the World Cup could have a lasting impact. On June 12, a paralyzed spinal cord injury patient will kick the first ball of the World Cup in Sao Paulo using an exoskeleton and brain-computer technology. [H-L]

People in Clifton Heights are freaking out because they’re seeing coyotes. Have they forgotten they live right by the dang river and tons upon tons of wooded areas? [WLKY]

Nicholasville, the county seat of Jessamine, sits just a half hour away from the heart of Lexington. The quaint Central Kentucky town is one many move to in hopes of escaping the hustle of the city. It’s a town you’d think upon first glance to be the perfect bedroom community of a small American city. Just remember that appearances can be deceiving. [Page One]

A judge struck down tenure and other job protections for California’s public school teachers as unconstitutional Tuesday, saying such laws harm students — especially poor and minority ones — by saddling them with bad teachers who are almost impossible to fire. [HuffPo]

With gas prices hovering around $4 a gallon many residents have been wondering why prices are as high as they are in our area. University of Louisville Associate professor of Economics Jose Fernandez said we are experiencing an increase over last year at the pump. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

An ordinance raising the minimum wage for city employees sailed through the Louisville Metro Council last week without much fanfare or opposition. Though the ordinance affects only five city workers, some see it as significant in a larger citywide minimum-wage push. [WFPL]

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell became nearly $3 million richer in 2013, according to new financial disclosure records. [The Hill]

The Courier-Journal has eliminated seven editor positions in a realignment of newsroom resources. No one is surprised. [Business First]

Although raises are scarce in the Clark County government, nine Clark County employees are getting a raise at one time — and the increases will benefit both the county and the employees. [News & Tribune]

Indiana Wins All Terrible Awards For The Week

We’re closer and closer to hitting our goal and launching our new project. Consider helping make that happen. [Support Our New Project!]

Quick, everybody freak out over rising gas prices! The world is gonna end! OH NOES!!1! [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad announced Wednesday that his department was revising its pursuit policy to reduce the risk from collisions in car chases that have killed eight people and injured at least 77 since 2007. [C-J/AKN]

Clarksville Police now have the Ford Mustang they believe a killer drove away from a murder scene Tuesday. [WHAS11]

New U.S. single-family home sales fell slightly in October and the prior month’s pace of sales was revised sharply lower, casting a faint shadow over one of the brighter spots in the U.S. economy. [Reuters]

There were tense moments in the courtroom Tuesday, as the second day of testimony wrapped up in the trial of a murder suspect. Marcus Crook is accused of firing several shots at Joseph McNealy three years ago. [WLKY]

A Finnish author and education reformer has won the University of Louisville’s 2013 Grawmeyer Award for education. [WFPL]

Life doesn’t appear to be all puppies and rainbows at the University of Kentucky in Lexington these days. [Page One]

Officials with LG&E and KU Energy LLC and Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government will announce details Thursday of a $940 million construction project at the utility’s Mill Creek Generating Station. [Business First]

The Clark County Board of Aviation Commissioners voted to authorize the county attorney to pursue a legal malpractice suit against the now-former air board attorney at a special meeting at the Clark County Government Building on Wednesday. [News & Tribune]

Former McMahan Fire Chief Paul Barth, convicted of stealing nearly $200,000 from the WHAS Crusade for Children, will have a telephone hearing before a federal judge at 1 p.m. Tuesday to discuss the condition of his bond. [C-J/AKN]

Lengthy criminal past maybe not the full story of that Clarksville shooting victim? The man shot and killed in his own home Tuesday had a lengthy criminal history, connections with the Louisville Outlaws motorcycle club and served time in federal prison. [WAVE3]

Maybe Possibility City Could Become Museum City

We’re closer and closer to hitting our goal and launching our new project. Consider helping make that happen. [Support Our New Project!]

You read about it here first. Two more women filed suit against Ted Pullen for sexytime harassment. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Center for African American Heritage continues to face financial struggles despite $15 million in investments since a renovation in the late 1990s. [H-L]

The Jefferson County Constable charged with shooting a woman in a Walmart parking lot is expected to take a plea deal tomorrow. [WDRB]

Jerry Abramson says it’s necessary to balance energy production with environmental stewardship. Abramson delivered the keynote address today during the Governor’s Conference on Energy and the Environment. [WFPL]

Can’t this city go a week without a shooting death or a stabbing? An argument ended with a stabbing in the Cane Run area. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission appears to be poised to drastically reshape the state’s Thoroughbred racing calendar by taking a month of races from Turfway Park in Florence and giving it to Churchill Downs in Louisville. [H-L]

You can’t even live in New Albany these days without your home burning down. But you can’t live in Louisville without getting shot. [WHAS11]

Edwin Chandler said he appreciates Louisville metro government “stepping up” and paying $8.5 million to settle a wrongful-conviction lawsuit, but he can’t bring himself to forgive the retired Louisville police detective he blames for his years in prison. [C-J/AKN]

Gasoline prices have jumped 20 cents in Louisville and that means it’s time for everybody to freak completely out. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home in western Louisville might become a museum with a restoration of how it once looked in the 1950s. [Business First]

Nobody In Jefferson County Has Health Insurance

More than 100,000 Jefferson County residents don’t have health insurance, but nearly half of them would qualify for Medicaid if the state expands the government program under the federal health reform law. [C-J/AKN]

Some Louisville families say a local recycling company is making it difficult for them to “love thy neighbor.” That’s because a nearby recycling company is also grinding wood. [WDRB]

People in Lexington are absolutely freaking out over rising gas prices. They must have been living in a bubble for quite a while. [H-L]

A constable charged with shooting a suspected shoplifter rejected a plea deal. On Thursday Constable David Whitlock turned down a plea deal offered to him by prosecutors. [WAVE3]

Could this eventually lead to changes in Louisville? A New York City zoning law designed to keep adult entertainment businesses away from schools, churches and residential neighborhoods was deemed unconstitutional by a New York state judge on Thursday. [Reuters]

Two Louisville-based members of the Montford Point Marines have been awarded the highest civilian honor in the United States. [WHAS11]

Joe Gerth was so mad about this he tweeted non-stop. The University of Louisville board of trustees met behind closed doors for more than 2½ hours Thursday to discuss a new operating agreement for University Hospital but took no action. [C-J/AKN]

What will Louisville look like in 25 years? That’s the question Mayor Greg Fischer posed to the community as he unveiled his newest vision and plan Thursday at a luncheon for Leadership Louisville. [WLKY]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer entered the education debate and publicly endorsed former Humana Inc. Chairman David Jones Jr. for Jefferson County school board on Thursday. [WFPL]

Ellis Park enters a new era today as the Henderson, Ky., track begins offering casino-style instant racing games. [Business First]