How’d The Gays Ruin Your Life???

An attorney whose job in Jefferson County Public Schools’ central office was eliminated has been hired as a teacher at Central High School and will earn $84,000 – double the salary of a starting educator — despite not yet having teaching credentials. [WDRB]

Since becoming Chief of Police in 2012, serving the community where I first began as a young patrol officer in Western Louisville in 1980, I have strived to create a police force that is engaged and involved in the city; one that reflects the very people we serve. [C-J/AKN]

The thing no one wants to talk about: the highly-paid lobbyist behind all of this. [WHAS11]

With his campaign deep in debt, Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin is trying to make new friends among Kentucky’s well-heeled donor class. At a private reception in Lexington Monday night, Bevin joined Republican presidential candidate and Florida U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, the Philadelphia 76ers’ Nerlens Noel and some of the state’s top political donors at an event organized by Lexington power couple Kelly Knight and Joe Craft. [H-L]

The gays totally ruined your life again this week. [WLKY]

If you want to silence a black person’s pain, ask for forgiveness. We’re accustomed to our screams being hushed in the wake of tragedy. We’re accustomed to our grief being shoved aside in the rush to find mercy for those who have trespassed against us. [HuffPo]

About 30 same-sex couples have completed the paperwork for a marriage license through the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office in the three business days since the United States Supreme Court declared same-sex marriage bans a violation of equal protections guaranteed through the Constitution’s 14th Amendment. [WAVE3]

The U.S. sued to block Electrolux AB’s $3.3 billion proposed takeover of General Electric Co.’s appliance business. [Bloomberg]

Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, a high-profile group riddled in the past year by tensions over President James Ramsey’s management style and sharing of information. [WFPL]

Data from Kentucky’s 446 public water systems shows they consistently produce excellent quality water and are nearly always in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water requirements, according to the Kentucky annual Drinking Water Report. The report summarizes the compliance data and status of public water system compliance monitoring results. [Energy & Environment Cabinet]

The parent company of The Courier-Journal and WHAS-TV split on Monday to form two new publicly traded companies: TEGNA Inc. and Gannett Co. Inc. [Business First]

Harrison County Council became the second county to sign a resolution in support of a regional development initiative Monday night, exactly two weeks after Clark County Council denied the same resolution to join formal discussions. [News & Tribune]

Transparency Is Not A Thing In Possibility City

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found with a gunshot wound inside the Hampton Inn on Jefferson Street in downtown Louisville just before 11 o’clock Monday night. [WDRB]

Because there’s no such thing as transparency in Louisville! The question of whether the Metropolitan Sewer District was violating the state’s open records rules from its board members’ use of private email accounts won’t be answered by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway. [C-J/AKN]

People are still freaking out about the murder on Ewing Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Fayette County Public Schools have cancelled classes for the rest of the week, according to the district’s website. [H-L]

There was an open conversation between African-American veterans and Congress Wednesday morning in Louisville. [WLKY]

A federal judge’s ruling halting the president’s executive actions on immigration did little to persuade either party in Congress to publicly back down from a budget standoff. [HuffPo]

Electrolux, the Swedish company buying General Electric’s appliance division, will make Louisville’s Appliance Park a key part of future plans, the company’s leader said Tuesday. [WAVE3]

Louisville is the 11th-poorest city in the United States. But it’s still all puppies and rainbows and whatever else Greg Fischer’s spokesgays can come up with on any given day. [CBS News]

Jefferson County Public Schools is asking parents whether an A letter grade should be based on a 90-100 point scale instead of the 93-100 scale currently used. [WFPL]

Scott Welk, who brought forward the lawsuit on Tuesday in California federal court, accused the Jim Beam Brands of violating California’s False Advertising Law with its handmade claims thus forcing him to pay a premium price for Jim Beam’s white label Bourbon. [The Spirit Business]

The elephant in the room: forcing everyone at the dying newspaper to re-apply for their jobs despite saying that wouldn’t happen. And laying Jim Carroll off because Kentucky doesn’t need to know anything about Washington, D.C., obviously. [Business First]

Two challenges have been filed against Clarksville Town Council candidates — Rick Schafer running for District 2 and Dave Disponett running for District 4. [News & Tribune]

When Will Hargens & JCPS Do What’s Right?

Louisville police are investigating a stabbing. We all can agree that’s better than another shooting. Maybe. [WDRB]

Oh, look, your local newspaper finally realized the Jefferson County Public Schools redactions are kinda corrupt. Despite initially telling those involved at JCPS that there just wasn’t much of a story there, of course. [C-J/AKN]

Rapper and actor Percy “Master P” Miller is offering a reward to help bring a killer to justice. [WHAS11]

A sports thing happened with Lexington and people in Louisville are upset. [H-L]

Need another reason to avoid certain areas of the Metro? One man was injured Saturday afternoon in an accidental shooting outside Bass Pro Shops in Clarksville. [WLKY]

The United States and NATO formally ended their war in Afghanistan on Sunday with a ceremony at their military headquarters in Kabul as the insurgency they fought for 13 years remains as ferocious and deadly as at any time since the 2001 invasion that unseated the Taliban regime following the Sept. 11 attacks. But we all know it’s not really over. [HuffPo]

And just in case you needed yet another reason to avoid malls at all costs. [WAVE3]

The United States Supreme Court decides cases involving the nation’s most pressing legal issues, affecting the daily lives of hundreds of millions of Americans — and yet so much about its functioning is shrouded in mystique and exclusivity. [NY Times]

First-year teachers are employed at high-poverty schools in Jefferson County at double the rate of the rest of Kentucky, according to a new report recently released by the U.S. Department of Education. [WFPL]

Elder care challenges prompt tech executives to create startups and apps. [Reuters]

A pre-filed bill for the upcoming session of the Kentucky General Assembly could give Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government legal cover when it comes to a fight over the city’s recent minimum-wage increase. [Business First]

Woah, what the heck is with 12-year-olds running the courts in Indianner? A new judge will to rule over the Clarksville Town Court. [News & Tribune]

Bridge Tolls? What Tolls? Nothing To See Here

The Southern Indiana chamber of commerce is asking state officials to consider changes to traffic and toll plans in an effort to ease the Ohio River Bridges Project’s financial burden on local businesses. [WDRB]

Who in Possibility City believes the Gannett split doesn’t have a serious impact on the company’s “local commitment”? That’s right — absolutely no one. Not even the people who work at A Kentucky Newspaper. [C-J/AKN]

A man form Colorado is staking his time, money and experience on a farm in Kentucky all to make medicine from hemp. [WHAS11]

Another historic bourbon distillery is coming back to life in Lexington. [H-L]

Metro police arrested a New Albany woman on a cruelty to animals charge. [WLKY]

Less than half of borrowers with the most common type of federal student loan are repaying their debt on time, new data released by the U.S. Department of Education show. [HuffPo]

Lots of land have been sitting vacant in St. Matthews since the 1980s. Many people believed the lots could not be built on, but it turns out that’s not the case. [WAVE3]

Some shysters in Louisville are back at it and making false claims. [The ‘Ville Voice]

ESL students are Jefferson County Public Schools’ fastest growing demographic—and major drivers of that growth are unaccompanied minors crossing the southwestern U.S. border and refugees like Hussein, officials say. [WFPL]

Are you a generous person or someone who loves animals? Help Jackson the Dachshund out ASAP, as he needs surgery! Jessica has been a tireless advocate for years and has definitely given more than she’s received. Let’s all pitch in. [Go Fund Me!]

Rumors about the potential sale of GE Appliances have been circulating all summer. A few weeks ago, Bloomberg had this report about it. [Business First]

In terms of the averages, the only benchmark New Albany-Floyd County Schools didn’t make were their own 2013 ISTEP+ scores. [News & Tribune]

Hot Mess Called Cordish Is Just Making Excuses

Yes, kids, your tax dollars paid someone to say your tax dollars are hurting your tax dollars. KFC! Yum Center has actually “added competition and hurt” another taxpayer-subsidized entertainment venue in downtown Louisville: 4th Street Live. That’s according to a long-time Louisville real estate appraiser hired by the Cordish Co., the Baltimore-based developers that own and operate 4th Street Live. [WDRB]

Four crosswalks along Fourth Street are going to become works of art. The crosswalks at the intersections of Fourth at Broadway, York, Breckinridge and Kentucky streets will be painted as part of the SoBro ArtWalks Contest, which is seeking crosswalk designs. [C-J/AKN]

A plea deal has been reached for the former Louisville Metro Housing director and her mother. [WHAS11]

In 1964, former Gov. John Y. Brown Jr. and a group of investors paid $2 million to Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Col. Harland Sanders for his legendary chicken business and his secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices. [H-L]

The Kentucky Humane Society (KHS) in Louisville announced Tuesday a $1 million gift from Sam Swope, founder of Sam Swope Auto Group. [WLKY]

The Gannett Company said on Tuesday that it planned to spin off its print operations, including USA Today, becoming the latest media company to break itself up. [NY Times]

As heroin deaths continue to rise throughout the Commonwealth, interest in an overdose antidote known as Naloxone or Narcan is being considered among law enforcement officials. [WAVE3]

Economists have long argued that a rising wealth gap has complicated the U.S. rebound from the Great Recession. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Greg Fischer has no idea what Louisvillians want or need. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s statewide rail plan is ready for review at the Transportation Cabinet. [Click the Clicky]

Owners of vacant and blighted properties in Lexington may soon face higher taxes. [Business First]

The Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency wants to hear from you. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Still Playing Games With LMAS Scandal

A Jefferson County jury deliberated for about an hour Thursday before finding in favor of The Courier-Journal and its parent company in an age discrimination lawsuit brought by a newspaper executive who was fired in 2011. [WDRB]

Thought Cordish was gonna do all that? The city is moving to find a new life for the long-dormant, historic Louisville Gardens, a century-old, former armory and event venue where Elvis Presley performed and Martin Luther King Jr. spoke. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD released in a statement Wednesday afternoon 22-year-old Danielle Cogswell may have died from a, “suspected overdose.” [WHAS11]

Churchill Downs bought a stake in Saratoga Harness and the deal could lead to financial interest in several more casinos. [H-L]

Sentencing is set for September for a JCPS resource teacher found guilty of murdering her husband. [WLKY]

The cheerleader death story has apparently gone national. [HuffPo]

Metro Council members said they will pursue new zoning rules that require boarding house operators to get a license as neighbors complain the group homes continue to plague West Louisville. [WAVE3]

Want to read the most scandalous Louisville Metro Animal Services story yet? Have at it. The worst in eight years of our LMAS coverage. Everyone from Greg Fischer on down are to blame and should be prosecuted. [The ‘Ville Voice]

When you’re rated worse than Katie King (the girl whose daddy bought her a judgeship), you know you ought to just give up and get a job at Walmart. McLaughlin, a Jefferson County district court judge, is the lowest-rated judge in the county by a wide margin, according to a recently released survey by the Louisville Bar Association. [WFPL]

Just before approving a rate increase of 5.5 percent to raise about $9 million, the Metropolitan Sewer District board Monday voted to spend up to $600,000 on bonuses to most of the agency’s 600 employees. [More C-J/AKN]

A proposal to convert Colston Park in Jeffersonville into a housing development is facing opposition from nearby homeowners. [Business First]

If you live in Southern Indiana, you need to comment on this transportation plan. [News & Tribune]

LG&E Gets Fined Every Waking Minute, Probably

Another day, another bus accident, nothing to see here, move along. [WDRB]

Tax-increment financing districts and property tax caps continued to have a negative effect on Greater Clark County Schools last year, as assessed property values dropped about $50 million to $2.3 billion, according to the district’s chief financial officer, citing its latest annual report released this week. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky bourbon makers are churning out larger volumes of whiskey being stored for aging. The Kentucky Distillers’ Association said Tuesday the state’s bourbon inventory has topped 5 million barrels for the first time since 1977. [WHAS11]

A pilot project to capture carbon dioxide from emissions at a coal-fired power plant in Mercer County could play a role in the future of coal, not just in Kentucky but elsewhere, officials said Monday. [H-L]

Possibility City is turning into fire city and it is terrifying. [WLKY]

Homeless man who sold sketches of his dog now has his own art show and credits his ‘guardian angel’ pup. [HuffPo]

We told you about this high-speed internet thing at Metro Council on the twitter the other day. Sadly, we’re not holding our breath just yet. [WAVE3]

Obamacare in Kentucky: The luxury of seeing a doctor. This should be required reading. [BBC]

Louisville Gas and Electric has been fined again for issues at the company’s Cane Run Power Station. [WFPL]

Want to read the most scandalous Louisville Metro Animal Services story yet? Have at it. The worst in eight years of our LMAS coverage. Everyone from Greg Fischer on down are to blame and should be prosecuted. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Gannett Co. Inc. has reported an increase in its TV and digital revenues, while print revenues continue to slump. [Business First]

Changes have been made to the Clark County Drug Treatment Court participant handbook that will allow those in the alternative-to-prison initiative to more easily succeed in the program, officials say. [News & Tribune]