Council Holding Fischer Accountable

A bipartisan group of Louisville Metro Council members wants more information about how Mayor Greg Fischer nominates people to scores of city boards and commissions. But not David Yates — he cowardly removed his name as a sponsor. [WDRB]

How do people even have kids knowing this crap can happen? Too terrifying to think about. [C-J/AKN]

For the first time the public is seeing a second incident where a school resource officer appears to punch a middle school student. [WHAS11]

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is calling for a 140-mile extension of the Mountain Parkway from Prestonsburg to Beckley, W.Va., at a cost of $8 billion to $10 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood that left one man hospitalized. [WLKY]

College graduates, brace yourselves for some disappointing news. Wages for university grads are 2.5 percent lower than what they were 15 years ago, according to the latest edition of the Economic Policy Institute’s annual report on the labor market prospects of new workers. [HuffPo]

A New Albany councilman referred to a colleague as a “lying piece of (expletive)” during a debate over public prayer on Monday. Councilman Dan Coffey made the comment into an open microphone, yet denied using the curse word during a brief, tense interview after the meeting. [WAVE3]

On Wednesday, when President Barack Obama spoke at the US Coast Guard Academy’s commencement ceremony, he called climate change “an immediate risk to our national security.” In recent months, the Obama administration has repeatedly highlighted the international threats posed by global warming and has emphasized the need for the country’s national security agencies to study and confront the issue. [Mother Jones]

The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced more than $54 million in grant funds to clean up contaminated brownfields sites around the country, and one of the projects getting funding is in Louisville. [WFPL]

The lawyer for the man who alleges that Ahmed Zayat has not paid a $2 million gambling debt filed a $10 million libel suit on Monday against Zayat, the owner of American Pharoah. [NY Times]

Cecilia Henderson, the 71-year-old widow of Angel’s Envy bourbon creator Lincoln Henderson, is suing her son, saying that Wesley Henderson has “effectively stolen” her share of proceeds from a recent sale to Bacardi Ltd. [Business First]

A community that successfully addresses homelessness is a united one, according to Michael Stoops, the director of community organizing at the National Coalition for the Homeless. [News & Tribune]

Thank Goodness The Primary’s Over

The company that owns Churchill Downs is suing the Daily Racing Form, alleging the publication’s online wagering service illegally took bets on races at the Louisville track during Kentucky Derby weekend. [WDRB]

You might say Louisville is more flabby than fit. The American College of Sports Medicine has again ranked the area near the bottom for fitness among the nation’s 50 largest metropolitan areas in its just-released 2015 American Fitness Index, which combines health behaviors, rates of chronic health problems and community indicators such as recreational facilities and farmers’ markets. [C-J/AKN]

Package-delivery giant UPS will pay more than $25 million to settle charges it submitted false claims to the federal government in connection with delivery of Next Day Air overnight packages, the Department of Justice said Tuesday. [WHAS11]

You should check out this interactive map of last night’s vote results from across Kentucky. [H-L]

The teevee folks claimed no problems were reported while voting yesterday even after the Office of the Attorney General issued press releases listing the number of calls regarding problems per county. [WLKY]

After hearing story after story from voters on the campaign trail about heroin’s toll, Hillary Clinton instructed her policy team to draw up solutions to the burgeoning opiate epidemic. [HuffPo]

JCPS is really good at being awful when it comes to buses. A parent of a Jefferson County Public Schools student is suing the district, claiming a school bus dragged his son along a St. Matthews road in 2013. [WAVE3]

Kentucky hates old people. States with at least 40 percent of homes ranked on the bottom two rungs include North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. [Newsweek]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees’ Audit Committee has approved giving a Louisville auditing firm a $65,000 contract to see through changes to tighten the university’s financial controls and make it less prone to fraud. [WFPL]

Obese young adults may be more likely to have a stroke than people who aren’t overweight, a U.S. study suggests. [Reuters]

Humana Inc. is continuing its commitment to hire an average of 500 veterans and military spouses each year. [Business First]

Though the closure is only expected to last until construction is completed on the new Farmers Market pavilion, some business owners chided the city for shutting down a second block of Bank Street so that vendors could set up booths. [News & Tribune]

Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]

Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Only 50 Weeks Til City’s Next Cleanup

All of these resignations are the result of not just Helene Kramer but Donna Hargens. Don’t let anyone try to tell you otherwise. And if you think Hargens’ push to hire an outside law firm isn’t another effort to avoid accountability, you’re lost. You’re going to love what comes out over the next few weeks. [WDRB]

As Jefferson County Public Schools works to simplify and provide more parity in its magnet application process, duPont Manual High is proposing one solution: Let Manual pick its students first. [C-J/AKN]

Police are investigating the death of a man found in Phillips Lane. [WHAS11]

Gerald and Nancy Barton are in a fix. After an April 3 storm flooded their Louisville home, they had to tear out the floorboards and the bottom half of the wallboards. But they can’t get the permits they need to repair the damage. [H-L]

The mother of a Louisville man found shot to death Wednesday morning spoke to WLKY. Cordell Richardson, 28, was discovered inside a car parked at an apartment complex on Navaho Court in north Radcliff around 6:40 a.m. [WLKY]

Famously animal-loving Jon Stewart is said to have bought a farm in New Jersey, for purposes of giving home to rescued farm animals. [HuffPo]

Two men are suing a Catholic priest, the Louisville archdiocese and a Dominican nun, claiming they were sexually abused by the priest in the 1970s and the church failed to protect them. [WAVE3]

What the Kentucky Derby owes to China. If it weren’t for KFC’s giant Asian consumer base, the annual classic would be a much poorer event. [Politico]

The names for these prize-winning racehorses might be whimsical, but the name-approval process is fairly dull and bureaucratic. A racehorse owner must first submit the preferred name to The Jockey Club, the body that governs horse racing, says Claire Novak, online features editor for The Blood Horse magazine. [WFPL]

It was a record-breaking 141st running of the $1 million Longines Kentucky Oaks (Grade I) at Churchill Downs Racetrack which culminated as 123,763 fans, the highest attendance of all time, watched a memorable win by Lovely Maria. The prior attendance record was 116,046, set in 2010, during the 136th running of the Kentucky Oaks. [Press Release]

Anybody at Churchill Downs Racetrack yesterday can attest that it was an absolutely gorgeous day to watch the Kentucky Derby and experience the grandeur of it all. [Business First]

Growth is the common theme underscoring the mayoral primary election for a city councilman and the incumbent who each face challenges Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

A Roundup Without A Bunch Of Murders! What A Rarity!

The Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency, awarded the Portland Museum a “Museums for America” grant of $24,652 for a series of Young Curators projects in the Portland neighborhood. The Museum plans two project series – one from elementary age school students and the other for middle school students. The programs will provide enriching cultural experiences to youngsters. [Press Release]

Louisville Metro Police are moving forward with a road side drug testing pilot program. [WDRB]

Kentucky lottery sales continue to show mixed results, but the sale of instant tickets has been especially strong, the lottery corporation directors were told at a recent board meeting. [C-J/AKN]

You already know Louisville is the allergy devil. [WHAS11]

Southern Indiana officials say a construction worker was rescued from a trench after a soil collapse left the man partially buried for several hours. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating an attempted abduction of an 11-year-old girl after a woman said a man attempted to abduct her grandchild at a bus stop. [WLKY]

Kentucky Fried Chicken may have changed its name to KFC years ago to downplay its cooking method in a more health-conscious consumer market, but the world’s second-largest fast food chain didn’t stop frying. [HuffPo]

You’ll probably need some tissues when you watch this video from Home of the Innocents that’s going viral. [WAVE3]

We may not want to believe it, but the United States is now the most unequal of all Western nations. To make matters worse, America has considerably less social mobility than Canada and Europe. [Salon]

Kentucky state regulators are set to consider whether to raise Louisville-area utility bills, in response to a proposed rate increase by Louisville Gas and Electric. The Public Service Commission held a public meeting last night to take comments; about 50 people showed up, and unsurprisingly, no one testified in favor of the rate increase. [WFPL]

Oil prices might be very low, but that’s not going to take away from investments in renewable energy. [ThinkProgress]

David Lehr is retiring as track superintendent of Louisville’s Churchill Downs Racetrack in May, marking the first time in 48 years that a member of the Lehr family will not be part of the track maintenance team. [Business First]

The numbers are staggering. The Blessings in a Backpack program feeds 1,960 children each week in Floyd County. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is In The National Spotlight Again

It has been 10 years since the exterior of Louisville’s U.S. Marine Hospital in the Portland neighborhood was restored, but the inside remains unfinished. [WDRB]

Violent crime in Louisville was up about 10 percent in 2014, breaking a downward trend the city had seen since 2012, police data shows. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out… President Barack Obama will be coming to Louisville April 2. [WHAS11]

“I’m going to move on my casino bill and ask for hearings on it during the interim. It’s part of my personal agenda,” Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said after the 2015 session ended. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Fifteen people have been charged as the result of a major securities fraud investigation conducted by the Indiana Securities Commission and announced Monday by Floyd County prosecutor Keith Henderson. [WLKY]

A new Virginia law may put PETA’s high-kill animal shelter out of the euthanasia business. [HuffPo]

Police are investigating a homicide after a man was found shot to death in a car. [WAVE3]

Ever since a court forced them to integrate in the 1970s, the city of Louisville and surrounding Jefferson County have tried to maintain diverse schools. [The Atlantic]

The Louisville Metropolitan Service Area’s population has increased by 2.8 percent since 2010, according to U.S. Census data released Thursday. “Most of the growth is happening on the periphery,” he said. “If you were in, what we call, the city, you’re not seeing any change at all.” [WFPL]

Democrats are apparently seething over this one. A Louisville woman has been appointed to serve on the newly created National Women’s History Museum Commission. Bridget Bush, a lawyer, was appointed by Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell. [WLEX18]

$2.1 billion. That’s how much revenue Louisville-based Humana Inc. garnered from provider services — that is, services provided by doctors or other health care professionals —in 2014, according to its latest financial statement. [Business First]

“Get your bearings, Marine.” It’s the only phrase that can steady Cpl. Jerry Rochefort when he is on the verge of a psychogenic seizure, borne from the military service that causes his episodes. [News & Tribune]

Bonus: Another day, another JCPS school bus accident. [More WLKY]