What On Earth Is Wrong With JCPS These Days?

Everything people want to know about the Ohio River Bridges Project can now be learned in one hour. [WDRB]

An attorney for Louisville Water Co. chief executive Jim Brammell wants a judge to throw out the results from a breathalyzer that was used following his August arrest and determined Brammell’s breath alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit allowed to drive in Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

The bleachers were filled at Stopher Elementary School with Lauren Eason’s students. 130 are in her class this year but almost all will pass through her inventive classroom before they go to middle school. She wants no students left out. [WHAS11]

The bourbon was flowing and, at least in one Washington ballroom, a spirit of bipartisanship broke out Tuesday night, courtesy of Kentucky’s distillers. [H-L]

Jefferson County Public Schools officials are responding to what police say is surveillance video showing a school resource officer twice assaulting students. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama’s budget for fiscal year 2016 includes a major change for legally married same-sex couples, making them eligible to receive Social Security spousal benefits regardless of where they live. Currently, these couples are unable to get such benefits if they live in a state that does not recognize their marriage. [HuffPo]

What the heck is wrong in Clark County? A woman was trusted with the care of hundreds of inmates, until she became one of them. [WAVE3]

A group of Republican and Democratic lawmakers will begin their second attempt on Wednesday to introduce a bill that would reform the Renewable Fuel Standards (RFS) program in the United States, targeting an end to ethanol fuel-blending mandates. [Reuters]

Rose Mollyhorn, 52, has spent most of her life within a 12-block area of Louisville’s Portland neighborhood, and she’s seen drastic change over those years. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says Common Core contains anti-American history… but it doesn’t have history requirements. [Think Progress]

Some Ford Motor Co. employees in Louisville will be kicked into a higher pay bracket because of the automaker’s plans to hire workers elsewhere in the U.S. The raise will amount to an approximately $9 per hour increase. [Business First]

Clark County Commissioner Rick Stephenson appeared in Jeffersonville City Court on Friday for a hearing following his drunken-driving arrest on Christmas Eve. [News & Tribune]

Hargens Doesn’t Have JCPS Under Control

Another day, another dumb JCPS incident. No threat was found after police conducted a sweep at Eastern High School this morning after reports that a student planned to bring a gun to school. [WDRB]

Ford Motor Co.’s billion-dollar gamble on manufacturing its full-size pickup trucks with aluminum alloy is about to bring big changes to Louisville’s Kentucky Truck Plant. [C-J/AKN]

It’s a survey that reaches out to staff, students and every parent within the Jefferson County Public Schools’ district and it will collect feedback on everything from academics to to school safety to job satisfaction. [WHAS11]

Consultants are finishing a report that examines how Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act has impacted Kentucky’s health care system. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police detectives have their ninth homicide case of the year after being called to the Parkland neighborhood early Monday morning. [WLKY]

Have scientists discovered a new species of primitive human? [HuffPo]

When fire tears through a home, it could be easy for firefighters scrambling to control the blaze to overlook pets trapped by the flames, especially if they don’t have the tools to rescue small animals. [WAVE3]

President Obama on Monday sent Congress a nearly $4 trillion budget blueprint for 2016 that would raise taxes on the wealthy and businesses while boosting spending on infrastructure and education. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s Bourbon Trail had another record-breaking year in attendance. The trail’s nine participating distilleries had 627,032 visitors in 2014, an increase of 10 percent over the previous year. [WFPL]

During the Frack Free Foothills community forum Tuesday, several speakers disagreed with statements submitted to media before the meeting by the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association (KOGA). [Richmond Register]

In the last quarter of 2014, 617 residential building permits were issued in the Louisville area, up 15 percent from the 529 permits issued in the fourth quarter of 2013. [Business First]

If House Bill 1110 becomes law, the Clark County Circuit Court will be authorized to appoint a new magistrate. On Thursday, Circuit Court No. 4 Judge Vicki Carmichael said the new magistrate would likely handle the county’s juvenile docket. [News & Tribune]

Abramson Having Fun Getting Lost In Warshington

Just on the other side of Interstate 65 from the University of Louisville campus, a block that once contained an aging apartment building and unkempt rental houses is now the latest example of the student-housing arms race at U of L. [WDRB]

Ford Motor Co. announced Thursday morning that hourly workers would receive an average profit-sharing check of $6,900. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville police continue to investigate a stabbing that took place on Muhammad Ali Boulevard near 26th Street around 5:30 Saturday night. [WHAS11]

With welders on site, members of Habitat for Humanity made strides toward history for the state organization as they recently worked to convert a shipping container into a home. [H-L]

WARNING!RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Clark County officials continue to crack down on contraband through raids at the county jail. [WLKY]

Does your member of congress have policies in place protecting LGBT staffers from discrimination? [HuffPo]

Jerry Abramson says five terms as Louisville’s mayor gave him the experience to assist President Barack Obama’s administration. [WAVE3]

Kentuckians want to see their governors in the flesh and in their hometowns. And they expect him or her to be “one of us.” That’s a challenge for the stiff and stylish Louisville Democrat. [Ronnie Ellis]

As a national debate about law enforcement practices gripped the nation, formal complaints by community members against Louisville Metro Police were at a five-year low. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s fiscal 2016 budget would impose a one-time 14 percent tax on some $2 trillion of accumulated U.S. corporate profits earned abroad and set up a 19 percent tax on future foreign earnings, a White House official said on Sunday. [Reuters]

Restaurants and food establishments are graded on a number of criteria, including cleanliness, food temperatures and labeling. [Business First]

A study conducted on parking and traffic in downtown Jeffersonville shows that the 20-block area will be seriously lacking in parking spots as future development continues. [News & Tribune]

Lynn Winter Must Live In An Alternate Universe

Jeffersonville Police have a new multimillion dollar building on 10th Street, but there’s already a problem that will cost tens of thousands to fix. [WDRB]

Ugh, really, Lynn Winter? Just ugh. [C-J/AKN]

What could be a simple scenic ride on River Road east of downtown Louisville, may not always be that simple. [WHAS11]

Ross Zirkle, a printmaker and University of Kentucky art professor, was known for his devotion to students. Even when he died from cancer in 2007 at the age of 52, he continued to teach, donating his body to UK’s anatomy department to help train future doctors, dentists and nurses. But Zirkle’s family was dismayed recently to learn that his cremated remains had been sitting on a shelf at UK since 2012. He was not buried at the Lexington Cemetery until December, nearly eight years after his death. [H-L]

Two men were arrested early Thursday morning in connection with a Wednesday slaying. [WLKY]

Americans largely think the current tax system favors the wealthy and needs to be reformed, but not very many expect to be personally affected by President Barack Obama’s proposed reforms. [HuffPo]

Clarence Williams, who has led Metro Government’s Youth Detention Services since 2002, announced his resignation on Wednesday. [WAVE3]

Across the commonwealth, volunteers will be looking high and low to get the most accurate count possible the help understand how many homeless people are living in different areas. [Ashland Independent]

The State of the City fro the perspective of Louisville residents. [WFPL]

Ford Motor Co on Thursday said it would keep relying on North America for its profit this year as the No. 2 U.S. automaker signaled that losses in Europe would be more than previously forecast. [Reuters]

A New York-based pharmaceutical provider for holistic oncology and hematology care is considering an expansion into Louisville. [Business First]

Two-term New Albany City Councilman Kevin Zurschmiede will run for mayor this year, and he’s expected to be the lone Republican candidate seeking the position. [News & Tribune]

Will Walmart Ever Get Built In The West End?

Kentucky farmers have filed more than 20 federal lawsuits alleging a Swiss company distributed genetically-modified corn before gaining approval to sell it to China, harming exports to a leading buyer of U.S. corn. Sen. Paul Hornback, who chairs the state Senate’s agriculture committee, is among those who has sued Syngenta Corp. and its affiliates since Jan. 1 in U.S. District Court in Kentucky. Two lawsuits have been filed in Indiana and at least 300 nationwide against Syngenta already this year. [WDRB]

A Ford Motor Co. executive on Friday carefully skirted high-stakes questions about how the resurging automaker will handle labor contract negotiations this year with its hourly workers. [C-J/AKN]

Dozens gathered for a prayer vigil Wednesday afternoon hoping nothing will stand in the way of a proposed Walmart headed for west Louisville. [WHAS11]

State officials say highway fatalities in Kentucky increased last year after a record low in 2013. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another damn murder in Possibility City. [WLKY]

Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch attempted on Wednesday to tread a fine line on immigration, telling senators she believes President Barack Obama acted within his powers on deportation relief, but that she would respect the courts if they find his actions unconstitutional. [HuffPo]

A student from Breckinridge Metropolitan High School was severely injured on Tuesday after she fell out of a moving school bus, according to Ben Jackey, a spokesman for Jefferson County Public Schools. [WAVE3]

An attorney representing Democratic House Whip Johnny Bell of Glasgow says a motion sought in Franklin Circuit Court seeking to include Bell in a sexual harassment suit and accusing him of improperly dismissing a legislative staffer and illegal drug activity has “no basis whatsoever.” [Glasgow Daily Times]

More people than ever will help with an annual count of homeless in Louisville this week. [WFPL]

Matt Bevin, the Republican Louisville investment manager who unsuccessfully challenged U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell in last year’s Republican primary, is making another run at statewide office, this time for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

GE Appliances CEO Chip Blankenship helped announce the formation of a new work-force development program called KY FAME at an event Wednesday at Jefferson Community and Technical College. [Business First]

The first hearing between the city of Jeffersonville and MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. regarding MAC’s asphalt plant has been pushed back. [News & Tribune]

Southern Indiana & Sewer In The Same Sentence

Seventy-eight years ago this month, Louisville suffered from what’s considered to be the largest natural disaster in the city’s history. The flood of 1937 devastated the city. [WDRB]

Emissions of the cancer-causing chemical 1,3-butadiene doubled in Louisville in 2013 over the year before, but they still were substantially less than before the city enacted a new pollution control plan a decade ago. [C-J/AKN]

There was not an empty seat at the Capitol, Senator Wendell Ford is the 21st person to lie in state. [WHAS11]

Interest groups spent a record-breaking $18.4 million to lobby the Kentucky General Assembly in 2014, the state’s Legislative Ethics Commission said Friday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police are investigating after a man was murdered in the Portland neighborhood. [WLKY]

The average price of a gallon of gasoline in the United States fell 13.3 cents in the past two weeks, falling to its lowest level since late April 2009, but the end of a months-long slide may be near, according to the Lundberg survey released Sunday. [HuffPo]

University of Louisville students completed a project on Sunday that will last a life time, spending the morning putting up birdhouses. [WAVE3]

U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has directed agency staff to create and deliver an updated Animal Welfare Strategy plan within 60 days, according to an internal email reviewed by Reuters. [Reuters]

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana officials say a new mentoring program launched this school year has been a success and will be expanded next year. [WFPL]

Greg Stumbo keeps pushing for the release of that LRC report. So what’s not in the report that he’s so excited about? Remember, the LRC released a report about the Kent Downey Sexytime Condom Tree Scandal that helped House leadership escape the mess. You can probably expect the same sort of whitewash here. [WKYT]

A Ford Motor Co. executive said Friday that a “critical” goal for the company in this year’s contract negotiations with the United Auto Workers union is to “maintain a competitive environment.” [Business First]

The town of Clarksville stands to save about $500,000 by refunding sewer bonds it issued in 2005. [News & Tribune]

Of Course They’re Going To Dig Up Those Trees

The Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission this week issued the reprimand to Jefferson District Court Judge Sandra McLaughlin for comments that were “unnecessary, undignified and inconsistent with the presumption of innocence,” according to the Dec. 29 order. [WDRB]

A federal judge in Michigan has dismissed a suit filed last summer by Ford Motor Co. hourly employees, several working at the Louisville Assembly Plant, who alleged that the International United Auto Workers had breached a duty of fair representation. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. Police are investigating in the Parkland Neighborhood after a man’s body was found inside a home Tuesday. [WHAS11]

Time Warner Cable holds the bottom two spots in the latest list of companies on the American Customer Satisfaction Index. [H-L]

The coroner has identified a man killed Tuesday in a shooting in the Parkland neighborhood. [WLKY]

While few people say they’ve completely recovered from the recession, many are beginning to notice a change. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet officials plan to dig up trees they say someone mistakenly planted along Brownsboro Road, ending a controversy that will cost taxpayers thousands of dollars. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles gave America the modern street gang. Groups like the Crips and MS-13 have spread from coast to coast, and even abroad. But on Southern California’s streets they have been vanishing. Has L.A. figured out how to stop the epidemic it set loose on the world? [Pacific Standard]

Even before police practices came under national scrutiny, Louisville Metro Police leaders were exploring a new technology that police critics and advocates alike say would improve relations between officers and the public. Body cameras have been under consideration in LMPD for nearly two years, police officials said. [WFPL]

The number of Americans filing new claims for jobless benefits rose more than expected last week, but the trend remained consistent with sustained strength in the labor market. [Reuters]

In recent years, Louisville Water Co. officials have started thinking regionally as a means to take advantage of the company’s vast Ohio River water supply and make money to offset reductions in everyday water usage. [Business First]

The same commission that New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook petitioned in May for help voted unanimously Monday to fire the 20-year veteran of the department for improper conduct. [News & Tribune]