Another Day, Another Huge UofL Scandal

Indiana-based STAR BioEnergy wants approval to build a multi-million dollar methane plant at 17th and Maple Streets in west Louisville. But some think a plan that’s almost 33 years old could get in the way. [WDRB]

Making for another possible scandal at the University of Louisville, the FBI and university police are investigating whether its top health executive and two other officials misused federal grant money for non-university purposes. [C-J/AKN]

The 16-year-old who was shot Monday afternoon in Louisville’s California neighborhood is recovering. [WHAS11]

Acknowledging “a difference between campaigning and governing,” Republican Gov. Matt Bevin on Tuesday challenged Kentuckians to move past partisan rancor, unite with their neighbors and sacrifice for their communities in a 33-minute inaugural address that he delivered without a prepared speech. After every other speaker but his wife was filled with hatred, homophobia, xenophobia and disconnection from reality, of course. [H-L]

If Ford can support Dare to Care, so can everyone else. [WLKY]

The White House on Tuesday said Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump’s call for the United States to ban Muslims from entering the country disqualified him from becoming president and called on Republicans to reject him immediately. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man convicted of shooting a 12-year-old boy in the back during a neighborhood prank, was pardoned by outgoing Gov. Steve Beshear Monday night, angering the victim’s family. [WAVE3]

Spoiler alert for Matt Bevin: You can’t preach unity while having the state’s most notorious homophobe lead a prayer, while having Dakota Meyer scream about Syrian refugees in an Islamophobic meltdown, while allowing a coal billionaire and his made-up girlfriend in a fur coat to pretend to be everyday people. That is not unity. That is… just plain jacked up. [Page One]

Data released this week shows that Louisville is lagging in its effort to ensure that half the city’s residents have an associate’s degree or higher by 2020. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Turtle Shell) on Tuesday criticized Donald Trump’s proposal to bar Muslims from entering the country, his first outspoken criticism of the GOP presidential front-runner. [The Hill]

Louisville-based Yum! Brands Inc. says its CFO, Patrick Grismer, plans to resign, effective Feb. 19. [Business First]

U.S. Senate candidate and Republican Eric Holcomb expected to have a lot to think about Monday night following an idea-generating workshop hosted in Jeffersonville. [News & Tribune]

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Louisville Already Cringing Over Bevin

Louisville Metro Police say they’ve arrested two drug traffickers in southwest Louisville. [WDRB]

A coalition of social justice organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky and the Fairness Campaign, on Tuesday called on the Cordish Cos. to end dress codes at 4th Street Live! and acknowledge past racial profiling there. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Judge Denise Clayton says there is a better understanding of the racial makeup of Jefferson County jury pools although it’s impossible to know exactly the diversity of jury summons. [WHAS11]

Homeless two-parent families in Fayette County will soon have more housing options thanks to a new program designed to address a gap in Lexington’s homeless shelter system. [H-L]

The largest beer and wine wholesaler in Indiana is asking a state appeals court to find a law unconstitutional that prohibits beer wholesalers from seeking a permit to also distribute liquor. [WLKY]

With all the roadblocks thrown up by the Supreme Court, should school systems still try to pursue diversity? One district in North Carolina said yes and, as a new study shows, reaped solid rewards for the kids. [HuffPo]

When is it okay to go inside a stranger’s house and gawk at their furnishings and decorations? During the Old Louisville Holiday Home Tour, that’s when. [WAVE3]

Republican Gov.-elect Matt Bevin Tuesday named the head of a Louisville accounting firm as his budget director and said John Chilton will have much work to “get Kentucky’s financial crisis resolved.” [Ronnie Ellis]

A decision on whether pork processor JBS Swift can continue to use a Butchertown parking lot for truck staging has been pushed back once again. [WFPL]

As soon as Donald Trump announced that he’d gained the endorsement of 100 black ministers from across the country, there were skeptics. [NPR]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says it will create 2,000 jobs and invest $1.3 billion in its Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville. [Business First]

State Rep. Ed Clere, R-New Albany, has been removed as chairman of the Indiana House of Representatives Public Health Committee. [News & Tribune]

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Another Sword Attack! It’s Been A Bit

Possibility City! Picture it: A city — the most compassionate city ever — two downtown bridges. Both named after assassinated presidents. Makes sense and sends the message that it’s possible here… possible to be murdered. [Deep Bridge Thoughts]

Police say a suspect tried to assault a man with a sword on Thanksgiving night — but the victim also had a weapon. [WDRB]

The Metropolitan Sewer District board has authorized engineering work on two underground basins to hold a combination of rain and raw sewage during wet weather. [C-J/AKN]

An attorney fighting the release of the book, Breaking Cardinal Rules, is working to find out how many copies were sold in Kentucky. [WHAS11]

When Gloria Maldonado was still at Bryan Station High School, she remembers college reps coming to talk about the University of Kentucky. The first in her family to plan to go to college, “I didn’t even know what an alumni was,” she recalled. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Protesters from the Black Lives Matter movement are camped out in front of the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office in Louisville. [WLKY]

World leaders are meeting in Paris this month in what amounts to a last-ditch effort to avert the worst ravages of climate change. Climatologists now say that the best case scenario — assuming immediate and dramatic emissions curbs — is that planetary surface temperatures will increase by at least 2 degrees Celsius in the coming decades. [HuffPo]

Saturday night, as Louisville added another murder to its yearly total, more than 50 people gathered in the Russell neighborhood to hold a vigil for peace. [WAVE3]

Governor Steve Beshear [yesterday] presented a ceremonial check representing $1.5 million in federal funding for a project to improve conditions in downtown Louisville for pedestrians and people with disabilities, among others. [Press Release]

A group of 13 protesters on Monday attempted to occupy Jefferson County Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine’s office at Sixth and Liberty streets in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

“We’re not gonna take it anymore,” a crowd of thousands sang as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump entered a South Carolina convention center on Tuesday night as a 1980s heavy metal song by the band Twisted Sister blared from speakers. The billionaire real-estate developer’s packed rallies have been among the liveliest events in the long build-up to the November 2016 U.S. presidential election. But they are increasingly becoming known for their undercurrent of aggression, which escalated into a physical altercation over the weekend when white Trump supporters attacked a black protester at his rally, to the candidate’s approval. [Reuters]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says labor costs will increase by 1.5 percent annually during the next four years as a result of a new labor agreement with the United Auto Workers union. [Business First]

Animal control services were immediately restored to Floyd County on Friday, but neither the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Control Authority, the city nor the county are closer to resolving disagreements on funding. [News & Tribune]

It’s Frigid. People Are Homeless. Step Up.

Only two years ago, one in every five patients who sought care at University of Louisville Hospital had no health insurance. [WDRB]

Wildlife in Need is again under fire from animal-rights group PETA after a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection revealed abuse of its animals and unsafe conditions for visitors. [C-J/AKN]

There are over $8 million dollars worth of improvement planned scheduled for the Louisville International Airport in 2016. [WHAS11]

Lexington and Louisville are getting out of the taxi cab regulation business. Mostly. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s been more than week since an elderly woman was attacked and carjacked just feet from her front door. [WLKY]

Pushing back against efforts to bar Syrian refugees from resettling in the U.S., President Barack Obama vowed Saturday that his country will be a welcoming place for millions fleeing violence around the world “as long as I’m president.” [HuffPo]

Saturday morning, volunteers took more than 5,000 new, or gently-used, blankets to more than two dozen drop-off points. They’ll hand out equally as many next month. [WAVE3]

We’re looking at you, Rand Paul, and the rest of the bigoted cowards this state sends to Washington. Acutely aware of the consequences to Jews who were unable to flee Nazism, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum looks with concern upon the current refugee crisis. While recognizing that security concerns must be fully addressed, we should not turn our backs on the thousands of legitimate refugees. [United States Holocaust Memorial Museum]

Ford workers across the country have voted in favor of a new four-year contract. The United Auto Workers union said late Friday that the contract passed with a 51.4 percent vote. [WFPL]

It is one of the central political puzzles of our time: Parts of the country that depend on the safety-net programs supported by Democrats are increasingly voting for Republicans who favor shredding that net. [ProPublica]

Two major Louisville developments have received financial backing from state tourism officials. [Business First]

Another Jeffersonville City Council At-large winner’s eligibility to serve has been challenged in a recount petition. [News & Tribune]

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Fun Fischer Tax Hikes & Horrible Bigots

There’s a new statue on Louisville’s Museum Row. [WDRB]

Just what Louisville’s working poor need! Once they lose access to health care, they can pay more taxes for the crap that Greg Fischer and his rich daddy want to build and/or destroy. [C-J/AKN]

Bourbon has become such a big tourism draw that the Louisville Filson Historical Society celebrates the day prohibition was repealed more than 80 years ago. [WHAS11]

The water tower in Lebanon is about to get a new mural that should make it very popular on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. The tower will be graced by a bottle of bourbon, making it look like the world’s largest Maker’s Mark pour. The city’s 135-foot water tower will be getting a mural by internationally recognized muralist Eric Henn, who will paint it to look like the neck of a gigantic bottle, complete with signature red wax, is pouring bourbon straight down. [H-L]

The Muhammad Ali Center marked a milestone this week — 10 years in Louisville. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama is accusing Republicans who oppose allowing Syrian refugees into the U.S. of being scared of widows and orphans. He says the political posturing “needs to stop.” [HuffPo]

This story will cause area bigots to lose their minds. [WAVE3]

U.S. consumer prices increased in October after two straight months of declines as the cost of healthcare and other services rose, evidence of firming inflation that further supports views that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month. [Reuters]

Amid city efforts to develop a system for reusing elements of historical buildings, stakeholders and city officials met Monday to discuss potential uses for preserved parts of the old Board of Trade building. [WFPL]

Poverty does not treat men and women equally, especially in old age. Women 65 years old and older who are living in poverty outnumber men in those circumstances by more than 2 to 1. And these women are likely to face the greatest deprivation as they become older and more frail. [NPR]

Ford Motor Co.’s 9,000 UAW members have voted to reject a new contract that would have set working conditions and raises through the next four years. [Business First]

Indiana bigots are apparently just like Kentucky bigots. Two Syrian refugee families who had been approved to be moved to the United States and were scheduled to arrive in Indianapolis on Thursday have been officially told they are not welcome. [News & Tribune]

Another Reason To Think Swift Is Gross

If Greg Fischer’s involved in discussing the future of the South End, you know it’s doomed. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority ended its total ban on firearms and agreed Monday to give promoters and booking agents of events at the KFC Yum! Center the right to decide whether ticketed visitors can carry firearms into the downtown arena. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you need another reason to distrust Greg Fischer and his people to protect anything. Quite a fascinating trip down memory lane. [WHAS11]

Veterans and active duty military personnel are invited to visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs free of charge on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day. [H-L]

A case of tuberculosis at the JBS Swift processing plant is being investigated by the health department. [WLKY]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

The UAW says Ford’s investment in U.S. plants of $9 billion will create or keep about 8,500 jobs over the next four years. [WAVE3]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Yum Brands Inc. again is getting negative press for its food-supplier practices. This Washington Post story from today identifies Yum — which owns the KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut brands — as the last major fast food company not to embrace higher-quality food sourcing that takes animal welfare into account. [Business First]

An ordinance to give $75,000 to a local organization aimed at eliminated homelessness advanced at Thursday night’s New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Leadership Is Still The Worst

Everyone pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster that someone with no ties to Greg Fischer runs this program so it stays on track and comes to fruition. Google Fiber announced it was considering bringing its high speed internet service to Louisville earlier this month and now the company is hiring managers for the project. [WDRB]

It looks like Louisville may go another year without a monitoring program for airborne toxic chemicals, as city and state officials keep looking at each other as the future funding source. [C-J/AKN]

Family members of five people who died when a boat capsized on the Ohio River say in federal court documents that the placement and condition of a construction barge caused the tragedy. [WHAS11]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

She’s old enough for that? Jennifer Lawrence is the latest Louisville native to be honored by the Greater Louisville Pride Foundation’s Louisville Hometown Heroes series. [WLKY]

Daniel Suddeath has been hired as editor of the Glasgow Daily Times, effective Tuesday, Sept. 29. Suddeath, a staff writer for the News and Tribune in Southern Indiana for the past seven years, also served as editor for Southern Indiana Business Source magazine during that time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Neighbors who say there has been an increase in crime in their area are frustrated and now they are taking action by starting a neighborhood watch. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called homelessness an “emergency” in the city and proposed spending $100 million to provide permanent housing and shelters for the city’s 26,000 indigent. [Reuters]

State Auditor Adam Edelen says he’s looking into the financial management of the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the university’s $1.1 billion endowment, and the university’s board of trustees as part of an ongoing investigation. [WFPL]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

It looks like another expansion is on the way at Ford Motor Co.’s Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The city’s mayoral candidates did not hold back during Thursday night’s League of Women Voters debate, answering moderated questions and sending accusations the other’s way. [News & Tribune]