Possibility City’s Back To Shooting Everyone

The future of a Louisville YMCA branch is in jeopardy as traffic at the Berrytown location continues to be low despite numerous efforts to boost attendance. [WDRB]

The more attention news directors give this troubled kid, the worse he gets. It’s almost worse than the way Louisville media folks try to eat each other alive out in fits of jealousy and bitterness. [C-J/AKN]

Two men accused in a Louisville bar attack say they were offered money to carry out the crime. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to appear in his courtroom Thursday and explain why she should not be held in contempt of court, according to Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins. All of her deputy clerks are supposed to join her, Watkins said. [H-L]

Police are investigating two shootings and are not yet saying if the two incidents are related. [WLKY]

All across the country, Americans are finding that the prices of the prescription drugs they need are soaring. Tragically, doctors tell us that many of their patients can no longer afford their medicine. As a result, some get sicker. Others die. [HuffPo]

A new festival is set to highlight a multitude of talented artists from Louisville and across Kentucky. The Golden Culture Art and Music Festival is making history as it brings attention to an often over-looked local music subculture: hip-hop. [WAVE3]

Homeschooling has been legal throughout the United States for about 25 years, but regulations vary dramatically by state. Only two states require background checks for parents who choose to homeschool, and just ten require parents to have a high school degree. [ProPublica]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

As many as 6.9 million Americans haven’t made payments on their student loans in nearly a year, which is up 6 percent from last year, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Education. A 2013 Federal Reserve Bank of New York report shows that the delinquency rate may actually be higher than people think because half of student loans are in forbearance, deferment or grace periods. [Think Progress]

By the time Tom Jurich, vice president and director of athletics for the University of Louisville, addressed the media at a news conference this morning, word had spread that U of L planned a $55 million expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [Business First]

In the small Parke County town of Rockville, population 2,591, police officers are donning new body cameras before they head out on patrol. [News & Tribune]

Sadly, There Won’t Be 40 Days Of Peace

The 2015 Dirt Bowl Championship was held Sunday at Shawnee Park, but basketball wasn’t the only reason for the event. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other community leaders helped announce a 40 Days of Peace Campaign, which will start Thursday. [WDRB]

When Jefferson County Public Schools launched a contest in 2013 for its “Schools of Innovation,” the plan was to find ideas for helping students so out-of-the-box that they could “make bureacrats gasp.” [C-J/AKN]

School starts on Wednesday for students in Jefferson County and officials are continuing the annual tradition of helping parents with making the bus commute smoother. [WHAS11]

More than 93 percent of teachers and 89 percent of education leaders who were evaluated have been rated “exemplary” or “accomplished” in the first year of statewide implementation of Kentucky’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness System. [H-L]

An area festival showcased the wide variety of hemp – a crop many are hoping to bring back to the Bluegrass. [WLKY]

Asked if his flat tax plan would further separate the haves from the have-nots, GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-WTF) said Sunday that income inequality is the result of some Americans working harder than others, rather than economic policies. [HuffPo]

A Kentucky non-profit organization is pushing for the legalization of medical marijuana. [WAVE3]

Robert Freeman has been helping people extract public information from New York state agencies for four decades. He is the executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government, a division of the New York Department of State that advises the public on the Freedom of Information Law — the state statute authorizing access to public records. [ProPublica]

Louisville home buyers and sellers interested in environmentally friendly elements and technology have a new way to identify those features on their homes. [WFPL]

Rand Paul in an interview Sunday called Donald Trump, who refused to rule out a third-party run during the first GOP debate, a “fake conservative.” [The Hill]

Nashville, Tenn., gets called a boomtown so frequently these days that it borders on cliche. Yet it’s clear that the city just three hours away down Interestate 65 has seen significant growth in the past several years. [Business First]

Options available for the city to address blighted commercial buildings, some of which have been shuttered for years, will be a topic during the next New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Apparently Another Horsey Thing Happened

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

After last month’s fire, stabilization work on Whiskey Row is now on schedule. [WDRB]

When it comes to preventing serious infections that people sometimes get at hospitals, many institutions in the Louisville area and Southern Indiana have some work to do, according to new ratings by Consumer Reports. [C-J/AKN]

Community members joined together at Shelby Park Sunday to bring a new energy to the space. This comes after a week of violence in the area, including two shootings, one ultimately ending in death. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Derby was very good for Churchill Downs, but Big Fish has been even better. The Louisville-based gambling and racetrack company announced late Wednesday that it had record revenue of more than $409 million in the quarter that ended June 30. [H-L]

No arrests have been made in connection with a deadly house fire last month in Old Louisville. [WLKY]

GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee is open to the idea of using federal troops and the FBI to stop women from having abortions. [HuffPo]

American Pharoah took an easy win at the Haskell Invitation on Sunday at Monmouth Park in New Jersey. [WAVE3]

Thursday marks the true opening salvo in the GOP presidential race, as the top 10 candidates are slated to face off in the long-awaited Fox News debate. [The Hill]

The Outskirts Festival, which seeks to highlight female-led or female-driven bands, has announced the lineup for its second year. [WFPL]

Matt Jones, the popular host of a radio sports talk show, stepped on some powerful toes Saturday while playing the part of Fancy Farm political speaking emcee in a non-traditional way. [Ronnie Ellis]

The new owners of the Republic Building in downtown Louisville plan to convert the historic structure into a hotel. [Business First]

How would you define success? Business suits, six figures and mortgages are likely the first answer for most Americans. Or maybe it’s a job that allows for enough free time to spend with loved ones. [News & Tribune]

Crime, Murder, More FOP Shenanigans

Rapper Master P made a special stop while he was in Louisville this weekend. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police officers and area youths held a frank conversation following a recent police shooting at a forum in the California Community Center on Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

A news release that Congressman John Yarmuth “will announce his intentions for the 2016 campaign” on Monday triggered a buzz among Kentucky Democrats this weekend speculating whether he will seek a sixth term in the U.S. House and, if not, who might step up to replace him. [WHAS11]

The Metropolitan Sewer District quietly paid a $228,000 fine earlier this year for illegal sewage discharges as part of its ongoing program to curb overflows into local waterways. [H-L]

Two pedestrians were hit by a car late Friday night in Louisville, police said. [WLKY]

A substantial share of America’s youth remains economically disconnected, even as the economy continues to recover. [HuffPo]

People in the South End have been freaking out over the cancellation of this festival. [WAVE3]

Community members have both a constitutional right and a responsibility to question authority. They have a right to understand the policies employed by police, the parameters for deciding when deadly force is appropriate, and the training received on de-escalation techniques. It is unjust to equate the upholding of these rights as “anti-law enforcement” or “race baiting.” [ACLU]

Under certain scenarios, a large percentage of Americans could subsist on a diet made up of mostly local food, according to a new study. [WFPL]

The Confederate flag was adopted to represent a short-lived rebellion to extend and protect white supremacy and black slavery. [Vox]

Discover Financial Services said it plans to lay off 460 workers as it closes its mortgage origination business to focus on its profitable direct banking products, where the company sees greater growth opportunities. [Business First]

Some residents asked New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey Thursday to apologize for remarks he made earlier this month that they felt were offensive to gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]

Here’s What Your Mayor Is Up To This Week

Instead of dealing with his scandal(s), actually leading or being the least bit transparent, Greg Fischer has taken his entire staff to the Kentucky Center for the week.

He’s spending every waking moment tweeting about it:


FROM TWITTER

Can you imagine how much progress this city could make if he spent as much time dealing with Louisville’s actual problems as he does playing dry erase board games at a conference?

It’s fine to promote and be proud of IdeaFest. But come on.

TV stations will hype his presence at the conference as being earth shatteringly important in 3, 2…

Is Everything In Clark County, Ind. Crazy Corrupt?

Does this stink of unnecessary fearmongering? On Wednesday morning, police say a student at Hite Elementary was approached by a stranger in the neighborhood behind her school. [WDRB]

It’s fine and dandy to profess your extreme level of transparency. That is — if you’re actually transparent and not cherry picking what gets released. Like with Metro Animal Services. Greg Fischer, like Jerry Abramson, is all talk and the entire community has finally realized it. [C-J/AKN]

One of the worst work place shootings ever took place in Louisville 25 years ago. On the morning of September 14, 1989, 47-year-old Joseph Wesbecker walked in to the Standard Gravure Plant on 6th and Broadway Streets. [WHAS11]

Leave it to some shyster judge in Jessamine County to fine a cyclist for riding responsibly and within the law. And you wonder why outsiders think Kentucky is still in the dark ages. [H-L]

It was perfect weather Saturday for one of the larger fall festivals in the Louisville area. [WLKY]

While the Islamic State group is getting the most attention now, another band of extremists in Syria — a mix of hardened jihadis from Afghanistan, Yemen, Syria and Europe — poses a more direct and imminent threat to the United States, working with Yemeni bomb-makers to target U.S. aviation, American officials say. [HuffPo]

Supporters of Alison Lundergan Grimes gathered in the west end of Louisville as the Democratic candidate for Senate opened a new campaign office with less than two months to go before the election. [WAVE3]

Why do Democrats keep trying to ban guns that look scary, not the guns that kill the most people? On the twentieth anniversary of the assault weapons ban, a look at why politicians and the public support a policy that showed no evidence of saving lives. [ProPublica]

The process of selecting a contractor to install the tolling system for the Ohio River Bridges Project takes another step Monday. The joint board for the bridges project will identify a potential toll systems provider, said Chuck Wolfe, a spokesman for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. [WFPL]

How superbugs hitch a ride from hog farms into your community. [Mother Jones]

University of Louisville President James Ramsey called the strategic goals he outlined Thursday to the board of trustees could be viewed as “crazy.” [Business First]

An inmate of the Clark County jail was removed from the facility last week to move furniture from a rental property that belongs to Clark County Circuit Court No. 2 Judge Jerry Jacobi. [News & Tribune]

NKL Continues To Mislead The General Public

No Kill Louisville can’t seem to stop misleading everyone 24/7.

The latest?

Pretending to be responsible for the Highlands Festival:


CLICK FOR THE FAKE

The REAL Highlands Festival:


CLICK FOR ORIGINAL

Even used the same photo of Baxter Avenue to spoof things.

Unreal.

No wonder Louisville Metro Animal Services is a disaster — it’s because organizations like this are so beyond gone and there’s nothing to keep LMAS in check.