Ramsey Continues To Muck Things Up

In November, the University of Louisville Board of Trustees filed a motion in Franklin Circuit Court to dismiss a lawsuit by the Kentucky Justice Resource Center contending the board has too few minority members in violation of state law. [WDRB]

The city must pay former Jefferson County Constable David Whitlock about $33,000 in wages for more than five years of unpaid work, a Jefferson Circuit Court judge has ruled, and may owe other peace officers similar back salaries. [C-J/AKN]

A man whose drone was shot down over a Bullitt County home is now suing that shooter in federal court. [WHAS11]

Really, there aren’t more pressing educational issues to tackle instead of pandering in an election year? A Kentucky Republican state senator from London has introduced a bill that he said could have prevented biblical references from being cut from a presentation of A Charlie Brown Christmas at a Johnson County elementary school. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some southern Indiana families face an uncertain future after city officials in Charlestown revived controversial plans that could lead to tearing down a neighborhood. [WLKY]

The nation’s largest LGBT civil rights organization, Human Rights Campaign, endorsed Hillary Clinton for president on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

A routine appointment vote this month for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board was anything but routine after a Louisville Metro councilman asked to table or postpone a vote to reappoint two people to that board. [WAVE3]

A federal judge on Tuesday ruled President Obama cannot use executive privilege to keep records on the “fast and furious” gun-tracking program from Congress. [The Hill]

Superintendent Donna Hargens says Jefferson County Public Schools is working to ensure that Louisville families are aware of its offerings in anticipation of a new push for state charter school legislation. [WFPL]

One European country can’t seem to stop breaking records when it comes to wind power. [ThinkProgress]

Is your favorite Louisville restaurant making the grade? [Business First]

The Clark County Clerk’s office was granted an $10,800 additional appropriation this week in part to help with transferring the influx of Jeffersonville city court cases that are coming in. [News & Tribune]

Out-Of-Control Local Media Hype

There was a definitely-not-rare shooting in Louisville yesterday and everyone at WDRB lost their damn mind. Education reporter Toni Konz was there with bells on, scaring the shit out of her teenage followers. All because it was a slow news day. [WDRB]

Congress has effectively lifted the nation’s longstanding ban on federal funding for needle exchange programs, which allow intravenous drug addicts to trade dirty syringes for clean ones in the hopes of preventing disease. [C-J/AKN]

The folks at WHAS11 weren’t quite as bad when it came to freaking out over the shooting. That station is no longer run by a delusional teabagger, so it’s the least hype-y station in town. [WHAS11]

A proliferation of threats at schools across the state has officials working with police to determine best responses and prevention techniques. [H-L]

WLKY was also beside itself with the shooting coverage. Just not quite as insane as WDRB. [WLKY]

The economy generated almost 300,000 jobs last year and cut the nominal unemployment rate to five percent. But family incomes for most people are still deeply depressed. [HuffPo]

Don’t worry, WAVE3 also got in on the shooting hype action. The tea people in charge there made sure they hyped it up plenty. [WAVE3]

Swedish home appliance maker Electrolux said on Monday its CEO Keith McLoughlin would retire and be replaced by senior executive Jonas Samuelson, just a month after the biggest deal in the company’s history collapsed. [Reuters]

This is what happens when people like WDRB’s education reporter hype the hell out of something, keeping people scared. Sure, she and her colleagues freak out when their actions are questioned, but they’re still to blame. CALM DOWN BEYONCE! [WFPL]

In 10 months, Americans will go to the polls to pick the next U.S. president. When they cast their ballots, those votes will likely hinge on how they feel about the issues most important to them. But what are those issues? [NPR]

A pair of creditors is looking to force the troubled Bullitt Utilities Inc. into Chapter 7 bankruptcy, claiming it is their best hope of getting paid what they’re owed. [Business First]

Indiana politics are just as dumb as Kentucky politics. The first meeting the New Albany City Council in 2016 had little drama, except for one announcement from the councilman who is beginning his fifth term. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

How Compassionate! Another Child Dead

Ugh, people are the absolute worst. Especially when they’re the type of Christianist who would attack someone for cracking a damn joke. [WDRB]

Nope, hot brown doesn’t put Louisville on any culinary list. The city is filled with amazing, affordable restaurants but get a damn grip on the hot brown front. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another child shot dead in Possumbilly Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

On a scale of 1 to 10, how disconnected from reality is the Metro Council? 30? 50? Youth curfews only make rich white people in St. Matthews feel safer. [H-L]

It’s an effort aimed at keeping youngsters on the right track. My Brother’s Keeper is sponsored by the Catholic Enrichment Center. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama has invited a businessman who helps low-income residents afford solar panels to the State of the Union. [HuffPo]

Maybe it’s time for people to calm down? Graffiti, including what appears to be Arabic text, was found spray painted on the wall of Fairdale High School on Saturday morning, JCPS officials confirmed. [WAVE3]

For the first time, you can easily search whether your hospital, clinic, pharmacy or health insurer has been named in patient privacy complaints, breaches or violations. [ProPublica]

The Louisville Affordable Housing Trust Fund is looking for a new executive director after the departure of Rachel Hurst. [WFPL]

US jobs growth remained solid in December as the economy added 292,000 jobs, beating expectations. [BBC]

Because there’s nothing more pressing at the University of Louisville. [Business First]

A decision on what company will carry out the facilities and feasibility studies for West Clark Community Schools’ referendum project will come next week, after the board interviewed six firms Thursday night. [News & Tribune]

Local Media Mall Freak Out Continues

UofL can’t go a dang week without SOME sort of scandal. And this guy potentially put peoples’ lives at risk. [WDRB]

Really? The mall needs a parental escort policy? Kids have been going to the mall since it opened but people are only now freaking out about it? Get a damn grip, Louisville. Enough with the panic. [C-J/AKN]

Ready for the Christian Taliban (Hal Heiner and his wife, Frank Simon, Jerry Stephens) to take over education in Kentucky? [WHAS11]

In 1970, a female couple filed a lawsuit in Louisville that may have been a precursor of the 2015 Supreme Court decision to strike down the limitations on gay marriage. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new Fund for the Arts program called Arts for Kosair Kids is giving local children opportunities they wouldn’t normally have. [WLKY]

The National Catholic Reporter has named two of the men at the heart of the Supreme Court’s landmark same-sex marriage case its “persons of the year.” Greg Bourke and Michael DeLeon were two of the several dozen plaintiffs in the case Obergefell v. Hodges. In June, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of these couples and legalized marriage equality nationwide. [HuffPo]

An LMPD officer is recovering from injuries at UofL Hospital following a crash while on duty early Tuesday morning. [WAVE3]

For the poor in the Deep South’s cities, simply applying for a job exposes the barriers of a particularly pervasive and isolating form of poverty. [WaPo]

“We’re afraid that with the implementation of a plan like the Indiana plan, we will see a reduction in the number of those who have Medicaid coverage and an increase in the number of uninsured and an increase in the uncompensated care that we provide,” Wagner said. [WFPL]

The Kentucky attorney general’s office has issued an opinion stating that the state racing commission cannot delegate rule-making authority to private companies like racetracks, putting in jeopardy a plan by Keeneland to write races in which the race-day administration of the regulated medication Lasix would be prohibited. The Kentucky attorney general, Jack Conway, is the son of a racing commissioner, Thomas Conway, who has supported race-day Lasix use. Jack Conway is leaving office in January, to be replaced by Andy Beshear, the son of Steve Beshear, who said in a recent speech that he supports restrictions on medication use. [DRF]

Oh, look, now Business Fart is getting in on the Mall St. Matthews hype! It’s like WDRB’s print counterpart. [Business First]

After months of waiting, Floyd County officials received information they requested regarding finances of the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Go To The Falls Visitor Center! It’s A Hidden Gem In The Metro

It seems the fight is over for a seat on Jeffersonville’s City Council, but that hasn’t stopped one candidate from throwing some verbal punches. [WDRB]

Oh, god, Lynn Winter is at it again. It’s time for Louisville to move on. Living in the past is not working. [C-J/AKN]

The warm winter that we have been seeing is bad for business in Paoli, Indiana. [WHAS11]

Fewer people in the state are getting their GED because of more rigorous standards and the move to a computer-based test, according to a report released Tuesday by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [H-L]

Thursday marks the third anniversary of the fatal Christmas Eve attack on a young man in west Louisville. [WLKY]

The federal government’s case against the man suspected of helping the San Bernardino shooters would be weaker if the NRA and other gun rights groups had their way in court. [HuffPo]

It’s absolutely terrible that this guy got shot. But his claim not to know why he was shot? Really? Sure, it could be an accident here in Compassionate City because there’s a new gun murder every five seconds. Just unlikely the son of a high-profile attorney doesn’t know why he got shot. [WAVE3]

With all that’s going on in the world — from record-breaking warm spells to rapidly melting ice sheets — it’s easy to ignore something so seemingly mundane as dirt. But scientists at the University of Sheffield’s Grantham Center for Sustainable Futures suggest that we ignore dirt at our own peril. [ThinkProgress]

Norton Healthcare and the University of Louisville have released the details of the agreement the parties reached Friday to settle an ongoing dispute over Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WFPL]

The Pittsburgh City Council on Monday voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, falling in line with a growing number of municipalities that have taken similar actions in recent years, city officials said. Meanwhile, Kentucky twiddles its thumbs. [Reuters]

The city of Louisville has green-lighted a contract with CTC Consultants in order to chart how to best connect Louisville to the KentuckyWired fiber optic Internet cable network. [Business First]

Visitors to the new Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at and after its grand reopening Jan. 8 can expect an immersive learning experience as they travel through the history of the falls and the affects and relation to the region. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

You Keeping Up With SoIN Politics?

A dangerous intersection where three teens were killed by a train has new railroad crossing gates. [WDRB]

Acknowledging some furor and confusion over a budget plan that could increase class sizes at some Jefferson County Public Schools, JCPS’ chief business officer has released a statement saying the district’s budget process “will not reduce the number of classroom teaching positions.” [C-J/AKN]

There’s been a cry out to the mayor to abandon the methane plant that’s planned for the California neighborhood and it’s coming from people who do not live in West Louisville. [WHAS11]

The $1.1 trillion spending package passed by both houses of Congress on Friday includes $30 million for Kentucky’s coal producing regions to redevelop abandoned mine sites with an eye toward boosting the economy. [H-L]

Congressman John Yarmuth gave back to the homeless. But leave it to mouth-breathers to freak out like always. [WLKY]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich trolled Republican presidential rival Donald Trump on Saturday after the real estate mogul publicly traded compliments with Russian President Vladimir Putin. [HuffPo]

The man shot after dropping off his son at school on Friday has been identified as Aubrey Williams Jr. [WAVE3]

I grew up in rural Barren County collecting as many characters as I could find. Fortunately God blessed that place and time with an abundance of them. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro Public Health can provide new syringes to people regardless of whether used syringes are exchanged, according to the state Attorney General’s Office. [WFPL]

Seems like only yesterday Mitch McConnell was touting these plans as the savior. Despite facing mounting evidence federal officials were overpaying some Medicare health plans by tens of millions of dollars a year, the government dialed back efforts to recover as much of the money as possible, newly released records show. [NPR]

The Louisville branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis announced a new board member, effective Jan. 1, 2016. That member is Ben Reno-Weber, CEO of Kentucky YMCA Youth Association in Frankfort and project director of the Greater Louisville Project. [Business First]

Heated opposition from landlords led to the tabling of a rental property ordinance at the last meeting of the year for the New Albany City Council. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Another Compassionate Holiday Murder (Maybe)

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found dead in the 2100 block of Dahlia Avenue, near the intersection of Bardstown Road and Lancashire Avenue, early Monday. [WDRB]

In a unanimous vote, the Louisville Metro Council moved to hold a significant chunk of Louisville’s $18.9 million surplus on Thursday in order to consider other uses for the funds. The decision came after members from both parties complained Mayor Greg Fischer’s office was not forthcoming with the full surplus amount and didn’t give council members much say over how the money should be allocated. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) is on Winter Break until classes resume on January 4. For many in our community who are busy during this time, school is not something at the forefront of their planning calendar. [WHAS11]

Some in Lexington may have Internet access about 22 times faster than their neighbors. Cable and Internet provider Windstream announced a 1-gigabit-per-second Internet service trial in Lexington on Friday, with the potential for a full launch during the first half of 2016, according to a company press release. [H-L]

Guess Cordish was desperate for some positive press? No, really, this is a good thing. Donated food and supplies were handed out to military and families in need Monday morning as part of the 11th annual Christmas Angel Program at Fourth Street Live. [WLKY]

The latest report on the Arctic by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration finds dwindling sea ice and temperatures as much as 3 Celsius (5.4 Fahrenheit) above average are disrupting walrus and fish populations and having major impacts on the ecosystem. [HuffPo]

Less than two weeks before the end of one of the deadliest years in Louisville’s history, roughly 100 people marched to remember the city’s murder victims Sunday afternoon. The Louisville Urban League hosted the walk. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama urged Americans to remain vigilant against the potential threat of homegrown Islamic State militants on Friday, acknowledging the difficulty of tracking “lone wolf” attackers like those who went on a shooting spree in California. [Reuters]

A Louisville state representative wants to tax electronic cigarette equipment and the liquid nicotine that the devices turn into smokeable vapor. [WFPL]

The Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the first time in nine years Wednesday. NPR’s Audie Cornish talks to Megan Greene, chief economist at John Hancock, about what this means for consumers. [NPR]

A Utah company has expanded in the Louisville market with the purchase of two senior-care facilities, effective Dec. 2. [Business First]

A meeting designed to answer questions about the 2015 Floyd County budget shortfall only created more Tuesday afternoon at the Pine View Government Center. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]