No Compassion, No Transparency

Three Louisville lawmakers wrote a letter to Jefferson County Public Schools superintendent Donna Hargens on Monday raising “grave concerns” over the hiring of the district’s former lawyer as a teacher at Central High School. [WDRB]

First, Scott County became the epicenter of Indiana’s largest-ever HIV outbreak. Now, the health officer in the next county south — Clark — says he is leaning toward declaring a public health emergency given high rates of HIV and hepatitis C there. [C-J/AKN]

This is why we can’t have nice things, Louisville. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader just highlighted why it may not be a bad thing to let Republicans to take control of the statehouse. A couple years out of power would result in a number of Democratic resignations in leadership, a bunch of corrupt actors could be weeded out, giving the younger generations time to get their act together to once again lead. [H-L]

Murders happen on a seemingly daily basis but Greg Fischer’s still going on about compassionate this, compassionate that. [WLKY]

At no point in recent memory have consumers been as excited about bourbon as they are today. [HuffPo]

Eight shootings in a single weekend. Jones was shot and killed Saturday evening outside his home, one of eight weekend shootings that Louisville Metro Police are investigating. Jones and two other people, including a Louisville musician and a 60-year-old woman, died of their injuries. [WAVE3]

More than 150,000 U.S. families are homeless each year. The number has been going down, in part because of a program known as rapid rehousing, which quickly moves families out of shelters and into homes. [NPR]

Louisville firefighters will monitor through the night three historic Whiskey Row buildings that were extensively damaged by fire Monday afternoon. [WFPL]

Universal child care is becoming a central pillar of the liberal agenda — one that, if it is ever realized, could take its place alongside some of the great progressive reforms of the 20th Century, and possibly the Affordable Care Act, as a defining achievement of the Democratic Party. [WaPo]

The Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission voted 3-2 to negotiate with OTH Development LLC to develop a former American Legion property in the city. [Business First]

Utility companies that will be relocating infrastructure for the 10th Street widening project at their own cost want further assurance from the city that the project’s actually happening. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Is A Ton Of Awful Fun Again

JCPS officials have fired a teacher who was under investigation over accusations she had inappropriate contact with a student. [WDRB]

Former Jefferson County Board of Education member Debbie Wesslund says Adam Edelen’s JCPS audit was a fraud. Mainly because it was selective and manipulative, which everyone already knew. [C-J/AKN]

On June 23 Jefferson County Public Schools fired a bus driver, Melinda Sanders, who dragged a student, 7-year-old Ally Rednour, down a street by her backpack on May 15. [WHAS11]

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year and there are dozens of other events happening around the metro area to celebrate Independence Day. [WLKY]

You won’t believe this horrible Fox story about the homeless. Or maybe you will. [MMFA]

She was arrested, along with Louisville’s former Chief Financial Officer Steve Rowland, and charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct. The police report said they were engaged in “disruptive, provocative and intimate behavior.” [WAVE3]

They took a page out of Greg Fischer’s playbook. City workers and police cleared an encampment of homeless people from the west side of Baltimore on Friday morning, provoking a brief traffic-blocking protest and leaving some of the city’s homelessness services organizations chagrined at what they say was a surprise operation. [ThinkProgress]

James Blanton is the new director of the Louisville Free Public Library, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday. He takes over for retiring director Craig Buthod, who announced his resignation in November after 17 years on the job. [WFPL]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission has approved a settlement that reduces the base rate increases sought by Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. [Business First]

It starts with a professional rodeo and ends with a demolition derby. In between there will be a queen pageant, midway rides, interactive activities for children and exhibits to view. And yes, there will be plenty of animals. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Clowns Panic Over Needles

Why not work to educate the man? Maybe try to get him and people tossing about veiled threats and racist dog whistles to realize that crap isn’t okay? [WDRB]

One week into the opening of Louisville’s syringe exchange, health officials doled out 1,352 clean syringes to drug users and collected just 189. So get with the program, small town Kentucky! [C-J/AKN]

There is new information on a deadly night of crime sprees leading up to a Canadian tourist’s murder on Derby day. [WHAS11]

For Rand Paul, the rubber is meeting the road. In the wake of last week’s racist shootings in Charleston, S.C., the Republican Party has been torn on the issue of whether the Confederate flag should continue to fly on the grounds of the state Capitol in Columbia. [H-L]

Don’t worry, everything is puppies and rainbows with JCPS’ Donna Hargens! [WLKY]

After getting the cold shoulder, U.S. health insurer Anthem Inc. said it’s raising its offer to buy smaller rival Cigna Corp. for about $47 billion, including cash and stock. [HuffPo]

LMPD Chief Conrad promises real changes. We’ll believe it when we see it. [WAVE3]

Leave it to backwater Republicans to complain about Louisville’s needle exchange. [WKYT]

On any given night, as many as 300 people in Southern Indiana are sleeping in shelters, cars or on the street, according to a street count earlier this year. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a Los Angeles ordinance that lets police view hotel guest registries without a warrant violates the privacy rights of business owners, taking away what the city called a vital tool to fight prostitution and other crimes. [Reuters]

Greater Louisville Inc. said the 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly produced some definitive wins, but it also said that the state legislature missed key opportunities to move the state forward and help it become more business-friendly. [Business First]

After about two months on the job, new Jeffersonville Police Department Chief Kenny Kavanaugh says additional officers are needed to meet the demand of law enforcement within the city. [News & Tribune]

The Compassionate Murders Continue

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. LMPD homicide detectives are investigating after a man was shot and killed in Louisville’s Shawnee neighborhood early Tuesday. [WDRB]

In about six months Kentucky courts must offer emergency civil legal protections for a member of a dating couple in an abusive or violent relationship, but court officials across the state first must figure out how to make the new law work in their courts. [C-J/AKN]

Oldham County only needs about 1,200 signatures to expand packaged alcohol sales to groceries, convenience stores and liquor stores. [WHAS11]

Just in case you were wondering why nothing ever happens when legislators are unethical mountains of awful? John Schaaf, who has been legal counsel for the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission since 2004, will become its news executive director Aug. 1. [H-L]

Jeffersonville is breaking ground on a new, less expensive way to stop sewage overflow from being released into the Ohio River. [WLKY]

Tens of thousands of people are deported each year for minor drug offenses, even if they served their time long ago, because of draconian U.S. drug laws, according to a report released Tuesday by the international advocacy group Human Rights Watch. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man was taken into custody for allegedly shooting a father and his son. [WAVE3]

Nobody disputes the fact that Deng Manyoun attacked a Louisville police officer with a flag pole on Saturday afternoon. What is up for debate — among police and the public in Kentucky — is whether the officer’s split-second decision to respond by firing two bullets into the 35-year-old was justified. [WaPo]

In the coming weeks Louisville residents and visitors will have a new option to get around the city. [WFPL]

As the iconic American gun maker Colt Defense struggled to stay in business after losing a key contract to supply M4 rifles to the U.S. Army, the company was paying a range of political allies, including the National Rife Association, the consulting firm set up by retired Army General Stanley McChrystal, and other trade groups and lobbying outfits. [The Intercept]

After a successful event in Louisville in April, the VEX Robotics World Championship will return to the city for the next four years. [Business First]

The New Albany Human Rights Commission declined Friday to make a statement opposing comments made earlier this month by City Councilman Dan Coffey that some have labeled as demeaning toward gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]

Departing Eugene School District Superintendent Sheldon Berman has a new job more than 3,100 miles from Eugene. Berman will serve for one year as the Andover Public Schools interim superintendent in Andover, Mass., during the coming school year. Those “negative, untrue reports” he’s talking about? You already know they were backed up by government documents, telephone records and first-hand accounts. These shysters are why kids can’t have nice things. [Register-Guard]

Another Day, Another Compassionate Murder In Fischer’s Transparent City

MetroSafe dispatchers have confirmed that homicide detectives are investigating after a man’s body was found on the ground in the west end. [WDRB]

Activists said Sunday that the police shooting of a black man in Old Louisville a day earlier illustrates their claim that officers too often use excessive force to subdue people of color, and they said they hope it leads to police measures to increase transparency. [C-J/AKN]

Owning a home doesn’t come cheap and costs of maintenance and repairs to both inside as well as outside can add up. For the elderly and disabled, paying for the costs isn’t always easy. [WHAS11]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [H-L]

A Kentucky company that’s a top maker of whiskey and other spirits is buying a southern Indiana lumber mill that will turn out wooden segments for its bourbon barrels. Louisville, Kentucky-based Brown-Forman Corp. will spend $12 million to buy and expand that Owen County mill. [WLKY]

Any city struggling to house its residents should look no further than Houston for a few pointers. [HuffPo]

While facts began to surface about Saturday’s officer-involved shooting, local activists came together Sunday to discuss the fatal event. Their main concern is that they say the officer used unnecessary force. [WAVE3]

A group led by anti-gay pastor Rick Scarborough is vowing to defy any ruling by the Supreme Court that recognizes same-sex marriage. Louisville’s Six Flags Over Jesus is part of the group. [ThinkProgress]

A dramatic decline in Kentuckians earning GED diplomas over the last two years has led some lawmakers to question the current version of the test, which rolled out in January of 2014. [WFPL]

Workers are putting the finishing touches on rows of barracks in a 50-acre camp here, the largest immigration detention center in the country. It houses thousands of women and their children who were caught crossing the border illegally and are seeking asylum in the United States. [NY Times]

Nature’s Methane, an Indiana-based biofuel company, has plans to build not one but two biofuel facilities in west Louisville. [Business First]

The Louisville Metro Corrections officer who was charged with driving drunk along Spring Street and almost striking a patrol car before crashing through the Jeffersonville Overlook last year was sentenced to one year probation with a hefty price tag. [News & Tribune]

Murder Murder Murder Murder Murder

Police are looking for answers after a body was found in west Louisville early Thursday. [WDRB]

This has got to be the dumbest cat fight ever. We love art probably more than the next person. But come on. Your eyes will roll back in your head over this nonsense. [C-J/AKN]

The first needle exchange program in Kentucky is now underway in Louisville. The goal is to stop the spread of HIV and hepatitis C and ultimately curb drug use around the area. [WHAS11]

Health officials say more than 50 southern Indiana people exposed to a student with a confirmed case of tuberculosis have tested positive for the disease in preliminary tests. [H-L]

The University of Louisville continues to explore a possible $55 million expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [WLKY]

A recent draft of the health care transparency section of TPP released by Wikileaks on Wednesday reveals the deal would make Medicare vulnerable to legal challenges from pharmaceutical companies and jeopardize future attempts by the insurer to negotiate lower drug prices. [HuffPo & WikiLeaks]

The University of Louisville School of Medicine will be one of the first to pilot a program to train physicians in standard protocol for treating LGBT patients. [WAVE3]

Congressional Republicans are one step closer to blocking the Obama administration’s attempt to clarify the EPA’s regulatory powers under the Clean Water Act. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad on Wednesday asked the Metro Council to approve a near $170-million budget that includes funding for body cameras and more officers. [WFPL]

The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday voted to repeal meat labeling laws, which were widely backed by U.S. consumer groups, after Canada and Mexico threatened $3 billion in trade sanctions. [Reuters]

American Pharoah is gracing the cover of Sports Illustrated’s June 15 issue, but some people aren’t happy with the photo used for the front of the magazine. [Business First]

Civic organizations have already begun taking sides in regards to Greater Clark County Schools’ referendum plan — and the district won’t find friends amongst at least three of them. [News & Tribune]

River Gunshot City Morning Update

What, no mention of transfers and how those are handled? Nothing but TARC puppies & rainbows? Surely not. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is planning to boost participation in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program by assigning two health employees to reach new participants in the wake of eliminating half of their clinics. Probably too little, too late. [C-J/AKN]

One of two Louisville rappers shot early Monday morning after leaving a concert has died. [WHAS11]

Next week, the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees is expected to approve UK’s largest budget ever, a $3.4 billion document that reflects a burgeoning health care enterprise paired with continued reliance on tuition paid by out-of-state students. [H-L]

A 9-year-old boy who was shot in the leg Monday night continues to recover at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter announced Tuesday that the Pentagon has added “sexual orientation” as a protected class under its Military Equal Opportunity Policy. [HuffPo]

A community is left shaken more than 24 hours after a triple shooting alerted the Russell neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Coal companies and 14 states sued to stop a draft regulation to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, a priority for the Obama administration. [NY Times]

Preservationists are having difficulty finding a suitable site for the Old Louisville Water Co. building. [WFPL]

Officially, the U.S. has a high school graduation rate of 81 percent — a historic high. But our months-long investigation, in partnership with reporters at 14 member stations, reveals that this number should be taken with a big grain of salt. [NPR]

A section of vacant properties on West Main Street near the Louisville Slugger Museum and Frazier History Museum are the target of a major redevelopment that could top $20 million. [Business First]

A former bookkeeper at a Jeffersonville business is facing federal charges on allegations she used company credit cards to make personal purchases, including firearms, funeral services and Halloween costumes. [News & Tribune]