Another Gag-Worthy Week For UofL

A job listing just posted online for Louisville Metro Police Department has some wondering if the city’s police force is short on officers. [WDRB]

It’s hilarious that Rick Pitino is defending Jim Ramsey, as if they’re both victims of things they can’t help. Both of these men are the worst of the worst in higher education. Pitino, with sex scandal after sex scandal. Ramsey, with financial corruption mess after financial corruption mess. Both should be relieved of their duties instead of allowing a bunch of kids to take the blame for crap that those two are ultimately supposed to take responsibility. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees member has resigned following months of questions surrounding its racial imbalance. [WHAS11]

Just eight years ago, most of the domestic violence deaths in Louisville were from strangulation. Today, more than 71 percent are from guns. [H-L]

How excited are you that the shootings are spreading to Southern Indiana? [WLKY]

Health care got some attention in Saturday night’s GOP presidential debate. And when it was Texas Sen. Turd Cruz’s turn to speak, he started by cataloging the alleged evils of “socialized medicine.” [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WAVE3]

Noting their excitement about “the energy that exists across campus,” Maribeth and Louis Berman, of Louisville, have pledged $1 million to Eastern Kentucky University to support a combination of academic and student-focused initiatives. [Richmond Register]

The Louisville Metro Council will soon consider measures to streamline the process for bringing ultra-fast Internet access, including a plan to condense the franchise-granting authority of Jefferson County’s suburban cities for communication services into one entity. [WFPL]

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ campaign has reportedly raised $3 million since Monday night’s Iowa caucuses. [The Hill]

A new study shows that Kentucky and Arkansas had the sharpest decline in the percentage of adult residents without health insurance from 2013 to 2015. [Business First]

Voters on both sides of the aisle will have options for the Clark County Council race, as 10 people signed up to run for the three At-large seats up for election in each party in May’s primary. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls Tolls

The principal of Stuart Middle School has been reassigned and transferred to Central High School as an assistant principal. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The University of Louisville announced Thursday that it’s kicking off a capital fundraising campaign for its previously announced plans to expand Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [C-J/AKN]

Labor leaders at Brown-Forman have filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board accusing the spirits maker of unfair labor practices. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto has formed a task force to advise him on what to do about a controversial mural in Memorial Hall. [H-L]

Another day, yet another JCPS bus crash. Everyone is numb to news like this. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama has said that a college degree “has never been more valuable.” But if you borrow to finance your degree, the immediate returns are the lowest they’ve been in at least a generation, new data show. [HuffPo]

In just a few short months, tolls across WAVE Country will be a reality. The price will range from $1 to $4 per way for everyday drivers, but getting that discounted rate may be harder than you think. [WAVE3]

Marlow Cook may forever be remembered by Louisvillians as the Jefferson County Executive who purchased the Belle of Louisville, but I remember him not only as my first boss, but also as someone who directly and significantly shaped my life and the lives of so many in public life [John Yarmuth]

The Louisville Metro Council will soon consider measures to streamline the process for bringing ultra-fast Internet access, including a plan to condense the franchise-granting authority of Jefferson County’s suburban cities for communication services into one entity. [WFPL]

In Kentucky, more men than women die pedestrian deaths. [Click the Clicky]

Jim Ramsey knows his days at the University of Louisville are numbered. [Business First]k

Clarksville has decided not to open its pool this year due to ongoing renovations. That decision should reap benefits for New Albany’s River Fun Water Park. [News & Tribune]

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If GLI Backs It, It’s Bad News Bears

More than 600 well-paying jobs could be coming to Louisville as an out-of-state company partners with a local non-profit to form a Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WDRB]

David Keith thought the fight to save his neighborhood was over. [C-J/AKN]

If GLI backs something, you know it’s the worst thing on earth. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt says that if Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget is approved by the General Assembly, the Department of Education will face $72 million in reductions over the next two years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville-based Passport Health Plan is partnering with Virginia-based Evolent Health to create the Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WLKY]

The FBI is joining a U.S. investigation into Flint, Michigan’s water contamination crisis, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

The Falls of the Ohio, a state park covered in fossils, is a perfect place to take pictures – expect for one thing. [WAVE3]

Legislation that would prohibit the General Assembly from diverting state lottery funds away from Kentucky’s need- and merit-based scholarship programs has cleared a House committee. [Press Release]

Jerome Perry doesn’t have many white neighbors. There are so few, in fact, that Perry can list the houses around him where white families live. Even the homes that are blocks away from his tidy yellow brick home on 45th Street in Louisville’s Westover neighborhood. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

Get ready to roll your eyes really hard at all the hype over this Omni hotel mess… [Business First]

After a little more than an hour of discussion Wednesday, the committee tasked with finding a possible compromise to the current weapons ban at the town’s municipal building came to some amicable starting points. [News & Tribune]

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Hold On To Your Wigs Cause It’s Friday

The Louisville Fire and Rescue Tower 2 and Engine 5 arrived on the scene at Kosair Children’s Hospital. But they weren’t there to fight a fire. Instead, they were eager to visit with children and deliver toys. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is eyeing the idea of using some of the money freed up in its latest budget proposal to create a therapeutic elementary school. [C-J/AKN]

It’s unreal that you still can’t buy alcohol on Sunday in Indiana. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin excluded K-12 schools from funding cuts in an austere state budget proposal that would slash funding to Kentucky’s public universities. [H-L]

The Clarksville Family Aquatic Center will not open this season. [WLKY]

In 2008, then-Senator Barack Obama promised to unite Washington and the nation behind progressive change. Then-Sen. Hillary Clinton mocked him. [HuffPo]

Neighbors in southwest Jefferson County are speaking out about a section of the Louisville Loop that could consequently take from their yards. [WAVE3]

The state’s minimum hourly wage would be raised to $10.10 over the next two and half years under a bill that cleared a House committee today. House Bill 278, sponsored by House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, would increase Kentucky’s current minimum wage of $7.25 an hour to $8.20 this August, $9.15 in July 2017 and $10.10 in July 2018. The increase would not apply to businesses that have a recent average annual gross volume of sales of less than $500,000. [Press Release]

An employee at a state juvenile-detention center failed to appropriately monitor a 16-year-old girl who was found dead earlier this month, the state Justice and Public Safety Cabinet said Wednesday. [WFPL]

Reminder: This is one of the guys Bevin trusts to cut 9% from the budget at his discretion. [Page One]

At least six bidders vied for Louisville-based GE Appliances, according to a new report from Reuters. [Business First]

State Sen. Erin Houchin filed as a candidate for United States Representative on the Republican primary ballot in Indiana’s 9th Congressional District. [News & Tribune]

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Bridge Tolls Are Coming. Freak Out.

Elizabethtown Police are investigating an early morning homicide. [WDRB]

A coalition of transportation advocates is pressuring the city to be more transparent about its application for a $50 million award to revolutionize roadways. [C-J/AKN]

The scene of a crash on Watterson Trail between Stone Bluff Road and Hurstbourne Parkway involving a JCPS school bus, #0853, has cleared. [WHAS11]

Food prices in Kentucky fell by 7.5 percent last year, according to the Kentucky Farm Bureau’s quarterly Marketbasket Survey. [H-L]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE?! [WLKY]

Donald Trump may be about to do something that has never been done in the modern presidential nominating era: Win a state primary without a single endorsement from a member of Congress. [HuffPo]

Sandra Mae Frank, a young woman from the Bluegrass, is making quite a mark on the Great White Way. [WAVE3]

If FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has his way, most people who subscribe to cable will stop paying a monthly fee to rent a set-top box from their provider. [NPR]

The chief executive of Aetna is optimistic about the future of the company and Louisville following the planned sale of Humana. [WFPL]

Reaction to Gov. Matt Bevin’s first budget proposal was mixed with Republicans approving and Democratic lawmakers asking for more details and expressing concerns. [The Morehead News]

When Kentucky and Indiana transportation officials debuted the new RiverLink brudge tolling system in November, they promised there would be plenty of discussion ahead on how the tolling system works. The system is a financing mechanism for the Ohio River Bridges Project, which will be completed later this year. [Business First]

An order banning weapons at the Clarksville Municipal Building is back on the table. [News & Tribune]

Freak Out: Your Water’s Prolly Poison

Louisville Metro Animal Services remains the worst place on earth and no one seems keen on improving the situation. Even Kelly Downard turned cowardly and gave up. Louisville firefighters were called to Louisville Metro Animal Services just after 10:30 Friday night, early reports indicated no animals were harmed. [WDRB]

This is fascinating coming from the newspaper that asked its arts reporter to prove her position mattered. Arts leaders and advocates are hearing reports that the state budget Gov. Matt Bevin is planning to reveal on Tuesday would eliminate the Kentucky Arts Council, which has a budget of $3.3 million. [C-J/AKN]

Many schools have already scheduled make-up days to recover the days lost during this week’s snow closings. [WHAS11]

Is anyone surprised? A year after state officials created a nationally recognized public-private partnership to build America’s best statewide broadband network, opponents are trying to kill it. Some telecom and cable companies that now provide Internet service around the state, along with several right-wing advocacy groups, are pushing legislators and Gov. Matt Bevin to rethink the project, called KentuckyWired. [H-L]

Even though LMAS is a disaster, you should still pitch in to help. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) really doesn’t like idea that President Barack Obama could use executive power to make more corporations disclose campaign spending. [HuffPo]

This is important news you can use. Mr. Peabody will ride almost anything. He loves to ride a bike. And on Thursday, he rode a sled in Louisville’s Seneca Park. [WAVE3]

Water authorities across the US are systematically distorting water tests to downplay the amount of lead in samples, risking a dangerous spread of the toxic water crisis that has gripped Flint, documents seen by the Guardian show. [The Guardian]

Isn’t it fun how Jim Ramsey continues to make excuses for all of his scandals? He’s still defending Robert Felner when he thinks there aren’t reporters around. [WFPL]

A ProPublica analysis of political fundraising shows conservative House Republicans have less and less in common with their party’s leaders, whose donors sometimes more closely resemble those of Democrats. [ProPublica]

How much do you pay for your Medicare Advantage premium? That number could go up for seniors enrolled on a plan from Louisville-based insurer Humana Inc. or Connecticut’s Aetna Inc., if the merger of those two companies goes through. [Business First]

Before he became judge, Brad Jacobs thought he knew the prevalence of Clark County’s substance abuse problem as one of the county’s busiest criminal attorneys. [News & Tribune]