The Swift Plant Is Still Beyond Disgusting

Officials with the Kentucky State Fair say attendance numbers for this year increased from 2014. [WDRB]

The West End Wal-Mart Supercenter is inching forward by filing a new landscaping plan, but a company spokesman said the retailer is waiting for settlement of a lawsuit against its proposed suburban-style design. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a gaping hole in Jeffersonville and we’re apparently not talking about that city’s mayor. [WHAS11]

About two weeks ago, as the golfers were finishing their rounds at Bardstown Country Club, Jack Conway stood in a clubhouse dining room and saw the end of summer approaching and with it, an end to some of the issues that threatened to derail his Democratic campaign for governor. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville is preparing to welcome the region’s largest international festival for the 13th year. [WLKY]

If you’re a working-age person without a job, a disability or a kid, then soon you’re not going to have access to food stamps, either. In another sign of eroding sympathy for the jobless amid a tepid economic recovery, states are restricting benefits for the unencumbered unemployed. [HuffPo]

It’s always inspirational when a child has a dream and is able to turn that dream into a reality. That’s what Rachel Ritchie from Vine Grove, KY is doing. [WAVE3]

No one will be surprised to learn that the campaign to build a national movement against gentrification is being waged out of an office in Brooklyn, New York. [The Atlantic]

The former director of Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District says she believes Metro government should be regulating diesel pollution from a lot owned by pork producer JBS Swift. Lauren Anderson said this week she thinks there’s a valid legal argument to be made for the regulation, but her former agency disagrees. [WFPL]

Tolls sure are going to be awesome for Louisville. The Chicago Skyway is a key conduit for drivers in the Chicago area looking for a weekend getaway. But on this Labor Day weekend, trips to Lake Michigan might be a lot messier than usual. [ThinkProgress]

Appears BF has turned into a publication about whatever whim Jonathan Blue and his relatives decide to play with in a given week. [Business First]

Indiana University Southeast was recognized as one of the country’s safest campuses on a national website. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun(?) Educational Roundup Things

Eastern High School staff physically and verbally harassed a football player over accusations of smoking marijuana, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. [WDRB]

Amid growing protests claiming the building of a methane plant in western Louisville continues a legacy of environmental racism, Mayor Greg Fischer says the Fort Wayne, Ind.-based company behind the project will spend the next two months listening to community concerns before seeking construction approval. [C-J/AKN]

The Highlands Neighborhood Association is encouraging Councilmen David Tandy and Tom Owen to permanently revoke the license of Cahoots which is located on Bardstown Road. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to move five candidates forward in the search for the next state education commissioner. The candidates, who have not been named, are in-state and out-of-state educators. However, the board did not preclude adding finalists when it meets Friday in Lexington, before the start of second-round interviews. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews are quickly restoring Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home, with big plans for it to attract visitors from around the world. [WLKY]

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. [HuffPo]

With its largest-ever incoming class starting school Monday, Spalding University celebrated the growth by rebranding and renaming its new Kentucky College of Art and Design. [WAVE3]

Applications for U.S. home mortgages edged up last week as interest rates declined, an industry group said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

A neighborhood group is hoping concerns about public health and the environment will factor into a city board’s decision to grant a conditional use permit to pork producer JBS Swift. [WFPL]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

Students at Mount Tabor Elementary in New Albany can now use a finger scanning system from Horizon Software to pay for school meals, but some parents are worried about the new technology. [Business First]

Community Montessori High School senior Nick Vaughn narrowly lost in the May New Albany City Council District 6 Republican Party primary. He had a plan to start a work program to benefit disadvantaged residents, and though it won’t be implemented yet in a governmental platform, Vaughn has launched a nonprofit aimed at ushering low-income families out of poverty. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Hating The Gays Is Really Expensive

Horse racing fans can now purchase their tickets to Churchill Downs races through Ticketmaster, according to a press release from the racetrack. [WDRB]

Louisville leaders have spent decades preaching about the need for a better-trained workforce to strengthen the local economy and improve prospects for workers facing increasingly complex and technologically advanced workplaces. [C-J/AKN]

The Cardinals have returned to their nest. The University of Louisville is once again bustling with students on the first day of classes. [WHAS11]

The private attorneys whom Beshear hired to handle the state’s appeals have a $260,000 contract, of which $231,348 had been paid by July 20, according to state records. Total cost to taxpayers: $2,351,297. [H-L]

The coroner has released the name of a teenager found fatally shot Saturday night outside a southwest Jefferson County apartment building. [WLKY]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]

Be prepared: the living dead are ready to take over Louisville. And they’re not talking about the way you feel after listening to Greg Fischer speak. [WAVE3]

If you’ve followed the saga involving Joshua Powell and Montgomery County Schools? This episode of This American Life will send chills down your spin. [This American Life]

Louisville’s new effort to make dangerous intersections safer could have unforeseen consequences. Metro Police have begun ticketing jaywalking pedestrians and motorists who don’t yield at crosswalks. Rolf Eisinger, the city’s bicycle and pedestrian coordinator, said Metro government is seeking to prevent pedestrian deaths. But the crackdown could have a disproportionate effect on minorities and low-income people. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama has been briefed on developments in global financial markets, the White House said on Monday after world stock markets plunged. [Reuters]

When more than 1,500 acres inside the 6,000-acre River Ridge Commerce Center recently received megasite certification, it did so under the exacting standards of the automotive industry. [Business First]

During a strategic plan update, Greater Clark County Schools Superintendent Andrew Melin said whichever way the district’s referendum shakes out, administrators will be busy after November. [News & Tribune]

Some People Shouldn’t Have Children

What the hell is wrong with people? How are they able to walk without falling down? How are they able to tie their shoes while breathing? [WDRB]

Humana’s board of directors began weighing how the company might survive the rapidly changing landscape of the managed care industry and ultimately decided maintaining a stand-alone company wasn’t the best option. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, amongst others, was on hand to dedicate a new memorial garden to the late Metro Council President. Located near the Sullivan University Bakery on Bardstown Rd., the garden will serve as a memory not just to King as a city leader, but as a family man as well. [WHAS11]

This summer, Zachary Schwarzkopf spent five weeks at Morehead State University in the prestigious Governor’s Scholars Program. In addition to enrichment classes in civics, economics and leadership, the program provides a huge perk: a $40,000 Presidential Scholarship to the University of Kentucky, provided you have a 28 ACT score and a grade-point average of 3.3. [H-L]

The West Louisville FoodPort project will move forward in the Russell neighborhood without plans for a methane plant previously planned for the site. [WLKY]

Less than eight months into 2015, humans have already consumed a year’s worth of the Earth’s resources. [HuffPo]

Metro Council members are frustrated by eight-foot-tall grass growing in the medians of some state roads in Louisville, yet city officials were divided about how to tackle the problem. [WAVE3]

The stupid is still thick with Kim Davis. She employs Nathan Davis just like her mother employed her — nepotism runs in the family. A Kentucky clerk’s office turned away a gay couple seeking a marriage license on Thursday, defying a federal judge’s order that dismissed her argument involving religious freedom. [AP]

The Liberty Tire recycling center in Southwest Jefferson County was the site of a massive tire fire in November that prompted a 36-hour shelter-in-place for those who live within a mile of the building on Bohannon Avenue. Now, the recycling facility in Southwest Louisville is vacant. [WFPL]

Billionaire Donald Trump is firing back against Sen. Rand Paul (R-Hopeless), saying Paul “has no chance” of winning the White House in 2016 in the latest salvo between the GOP presidential candidates. [The Hill]

Hundreds were in attendance for the Leadership Louisville Center’s annual luncheon Tuesday afternoon, where Nashville Mayor Karl Dean was the keynote speaker. We ate our vegetables, but we also had dessert — both literally and figuratively. [Business First]

So far, 31 counties in Indiana have said “yes” to joining a Regional Development Authority. Floyd County is not one of those counties. [News & Tribune]

No Puppies & Rainbows This Morning

The Clark County Sheriff suspended the county jail’s work program after investigators uncovered a plan to deliver drugs and cell phones to inmates involved. [WDRB]

Upset over plans to build methane plants in residential neighborhoods, the Coalition for Sustainable West Louisville announced Tuesday that it is calling for a boycott of suppliers of the planned food hub on 30th Street. [C-J/AKN]

This is worth reviewing again. The Century Foundation released a report that puts Louisville as the tenth worst city in the US for concentrated black poverty. [WHAS11]

Let’s all just bite our tongues and allow our eyes to roll back in our heads. Democratic state Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was the odd man out of statewide elections this year, unable to seek re-election because of term limits while some of the biggest names in Kentucky politics are campaigning for governor and attorney general. But the 55-year-old hopes to stay in public office as he filed Tuesday to run for district judge in the 30th judicial district of Jefferson County. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WLKY]

An ambitious pilot program to help former chronically homeless people in Utah has proven to be successful despite some legal challenges. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility City. Maybe Emperor Fischer can appoint someone just as incompetent as Sadiqa Reynolds to figure this out. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, whose campaign is struggling with deep fundraising and organizational problems, has fixated on throwing grenades at GOP frontrunner Donald Trump, hardly the strategy of a thriving campaign. [Politico]

A new, more rigorous version of the GED test has led to a dramatic drop in the number of Kentuckians receiving a high school equivalency diploma. Final numbers from the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education show there were 1,663 GED diplomas awarded in the 2015 fiscal year. That’s down from 7,083 — a 77 percent decline — in 2014, and a drop of 81 percent in 2013, the last full year the old version of the test was used. [WFPL]

Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin and the state House GOP caucus are calling for de-funding of Planned Parenthood in Kentucky. But Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear and his health secretary say the Republicans don’t understand how federally funded family planning and women’s health services work. [Richmond Register]

A new Securities and Exchange Commission filing shows that Humana Inc. started pursuing a partner in October, and Aetna Inc. wasn’t the first to be involved. [Business First]

While some city leaders touted the health of New Albany’s tax-increment financing districts Tuesday, State Rep. Ed Clere warned spending TIF dollars on projects such as an aquatic center could leave taxpayers “swimming in debt.” [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]