JCPS Bus Crash Marathon Continues

Another day, another fun Jefferson County Public Schools bus crash. [WDRB]

Louisville had the sharpest increase of any U.S. city in terms of residents age 65 or older who are scrapping by to pay their rent, according to findings released Monday by a national affordable housing group. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Now that plans for a methane plant in West Louisville are off the table, Heaven Hill has announced new plans for the property at 17th and Maple Streets in the California neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Cheers, Kentucky: Bourbon and American whiskey sales in the United States were up 7.8 percent to $2.9 billion in 2015, according to figures released Tuesday morning by the Distilled Spirits Council of the U.S. Looking at exports, sales of American whiskey were up 4 percent by volume, although the value fell 2.7 percent to about $1 billion, putting total sales of American whiskey at just less than $4 billion for 2015. [H-L]

Another day in Compassionate City means it’s time for another pedestrian to be struck! This time it’s a child. [WLKY]

Real estate mogul Donald Trump accused Ted Cruz of fraud on Wednesday, claiming the Texas senator “stole” the Iowa caucuses and arguing that “either a new election should take place or Cruz results nullified.” [HuffPo]

As the HIV crisis around Louisville and southern Indiana worsens one organization is doing what it can to stop it. [WAVE3]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) is suspending his campaign for president after a disappointing finish in Iowa, turning his focus now to his Senate re-election bid. [NPR]

You can’t fix stupid in Frankfort. The State Senate voted to defund Planned Parenthood. Because the entire body is filled with mouth-breathers who believe everything that scares them on Fox News. [WFPL]

If you missed it, some disgusting stuff has gone on in Shelby County for several years. But legal action has been taken to hold people accountable for atrocious animal abuse and torture. [Page One]

You might not think much about the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville, but there’s a lot going on there. More than ever, in fact. [Business First]

To capture more revenue from a growing local economy, the Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission is hoping to significantly expand one of its tax-increment finance districts. [News & Tribune]

Pay Attention To The Homeless Count!

For more than a decade, elected leaders in Louisville and Southern Indiana have urged Norfolk Southern Corp. to consider opening part of the K&I Bridge over the Ohio River to walkers and cyclists. [WDRB]

Every year, hundreds of volunteers bundle up and head to hotels, emergency shelters, camps and soup kitchens, determined to answer two questions: how many people are homeless in the Louisville area and who are they? [C-J/AKN]

If you didn’t know, your new governor is a hot garbage fire. [WHAS11]

A problem in the solicitation to build a high-speed broadband network across Kentucky has jeopardized funding for the project, a top administration official said Thursday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! He was a pioneer: A civil rights lawyer who became Jefferson County’s first African-American Circuit Court judge. Benjamin Shobe died Friday at a local hospital. []

Both the Democratic and Republican races are close contests in Iowa, and pollsters say surprises are likely. [HuffPo]

A trial date has been set for a former gun shop owner who is charged with murder after two brothers were shot in a Valley Station parking lot. [WAVE3]

Most of the time when we talk about homelessness, big cities come to mind. But about seven percent of homeless people live in rural areas, where access to help is much harder to come by. [NPR]

Former Kentucky state Sen. Georgia Powers has died. Powers was the first African-American and first woman elected to the Kentucky Senate, where she served for 21 years beginning in 1968. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

We got to talking about lots of different economic development topics this morning at The Pointe in Butchertown. [Business First]

Attorney Amy Wheatley can’t help but laugh at her newfound reputation as being the first attorney to use the Clark County Clerk’s new e-filing system. As only one of two counties in Indiana to switch to electronic filing, Clark County and Wheatley share a similar claim to fame. [News & Tribune]

Bridge Tolls Are Coming. Freak Out.

Elizabethtown Police are investigating an early morning homicide. [WDRB]

A coalition of transportation advocates is pressuring the city to be more transparent about its application for a $50 million award to revolutionize roadways. [C-J/AKN]

The scene of a crash on Watterson Trail between Stone Bluff Road and Hurstbourne Parkway involving a JCPS school bus, #0853, has cleared. [WHAS11]

Food prices in Kentucky fell by 7.5 percent last year, according to the Kentucky Farm Bureau’s quarterly Marketbasket Survey. [H-L]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE?! [WLKY]

Donald Trump may be about to do something that has never been done in the modern presidential nominating era: Win a state primary without a single endorsement from a member of Congress. [HuffPo]

Sandra Mae Frank, a young woman from the Bluegrass, is making quite a mark on the Great White Way. [WAVE3]

If FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has his way, most people who subscribe to cable will stop paying a monthly fee to rent a set-top box from their provider. [NPR]

The chief executive of Aetna is optimistic about the future of the company and Louisville following the planned sale of Humana. [WFPL]

Reaction to Gov. Matt Bevin’s first budget proposal was mixed with Republicans approving and Democratic lawmakers asking for more details and expressing concerns. [The Morehead News]

When Kentucky and Indiana transportation officials debuted the new RiverLink brudge tolling system in November, they promised there would be plenty of discussion ahead on how the tolling system works. The system is a financing mechanism for the Ohio River Bridges Project, which will be completed later this year. [Business First]

An order banning weapons at the Clarksville Municipal Building is back on the table. [News & Tribune]

Enjoy The Snowpocalypse While It Lasts

Three people were murdered in Louisville Wednesday night, and homicide detectives are investigating a double shooting that left a woman gravely injured. [WDRB]

In a decision filed Jan. 11, an Administrative Law Judge ruled that the U.S. Department of Agriculture failed to prove that Wildlife in Need director Tim Stark was unfit to hold a federal exhibitor’s license. [C-J/AKN]

Big-box grocery chains and liquor store lobbyists continue to scuffle over the latest attempt to lift Indiana’s longtime ban on Sunday carryout alcohol sales. [WHAS11]

The Republican-controlled state Senate has approved a bill that requires a woman to have a face-to-face meeting with a doctor before having an abortion. [H-L]

An investigation is underway after a man’s body was found in a home Wednesday night. [WLKY]

That awkward moment when your dad thinks your rival will best you in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) must have been pretty bummed when his father, former Congressman Ron Paul, admitted that it’s likely Donald Trump will become the GOP’s candidate for president. [HuffPo]

The first major snowfall of the season serves as a good reminder to always be prepared when you are driving. [WAVE3]

Last year looks like it was an unwelcome watershed for the embattled U.S. coal industry. Power companies in 2015 for the first time may have burned more natural gas than coal to generate electricity, according to analysts who attribute it to the cheapest gas prices in 16 years and a record number of coal-fired plants retired from service because of the high cost of meeting environmental regulations. [Reuters]

A legislative panel has passed a bill that would allow Louisville Metro Police officers to work more than 40 hours a week without being paid overtime. [WFPL]

Kevin Schiller had no idea what hit him. With 21 years on the job, the building engineer for Macy’s department stores had been in and out of every nook and cranny of many of the retail giant’s Texas stores, including the storage room in the Macy’s in Denton, Texas. [NPR]

If you’re a Kroger customer, you soon could be grocery shopping from the comfort of your home. [Business First]

For about $30,000, Performance Services was hired to perform the facilities study for West Clark Community Schools in preparation for their November 2016 referendum. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]

Been To The Falls? No? JUST GO!

It was not icy roads but a strong odor that people in Southern Indiana were complaining about on Monday morning. Most people say it smelled like propane or natural gas but emergency officials don’t think it’s anything that hazardous. [WDRB]

Standing in front of dozens of Jefferson County Public Schools principals, the district’s chief business officer acknowledged that JCPS has done a “horrible job of communicating” its proposed budget changes that could cut hundreds of thousands of dollars from some schools’ budgets. [C-J/AKN]

An exhibit featuring family photographs of Anne Frank has opened at Louisville Free Public Library and continues through Feb. 27. [WHAS11]

Virginia Kraft Payson’s conviction has won more battles than any list of her achievements can do justice to, whether it documenting outdoor exploits as a journalist for Sports Illustrated or crafting bloodlines as one of Thoroughbred racing’s most noted owner/breeders. [H-L]

Two years ago, WLKY did a story on T.J. Floyd — a young boy who suffers with what’s called an invisible injury. [WLKY]

Solar is the energy employer of the future — or at least that’s how the numbers look today. A new report on the state of the solar industry out Tuesday from the nonprofit Solar Foundation shows that the number of jobs in the United States in the solar industry outpaced those in the oil and gas industries for the first time ever. [HuffPo]

Parents and principals showed up at Monday’s board meeting to express concern for budget allocations that aim to make Jefferson County Public Schools a more equitable school system by shifting funding between schools. [WAVE3]

The EPA’s own advisory board says the agency needs to clarify its findings on fracking. [ThinkProgress]

Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee joined the field for the Kentucky Republican presidential caucus before the Thursday deadline, bringing the total of candidates to 11. [WFPL]

Of course Matt Bevin is the butt of national jokes. Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has notified U.S. authorities that he plans to dismantle the state’s health insurance exchange created under the Obama Administration’s Affordable Care Act. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Crossdock Development is at it again in Jeffersonvile’s River Ridge Commerce Center. [Business First]

Holly Kelley and her family were among the first to experience the new interactive exhibits in the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at its reopening Friday. [News & Tribune]