NEVER FORGET! Julie Tam’s Blue Glove

Not since Julie Tam’s blue glove freakout a decade ago has a story so dumb been produced in Louisville. [WDRB]

It sure is fun watching Debby Yetter ignore the reality that Nancy Rodriguez misreported and/or ignored shenanigans in the Felner Scandal until she had egg all over her face. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Record breaking numbers for the Kentuckiana Pride Parade as thousands of people walked down Main Street in downtown Louisville. [WHAS11]

Jim. Ramsey. Schadenfreude. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man arrested in Florida, accused of shooting a Louisville police officer, made his first court appearance. [WLKY]

Apple will not contribute funds or other resources for the Republican National Convention due to presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump’s prejudiced remarks, Politico reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

World Refugee Day is Monday, but Louisville celebrated in a creative way Saturday night. [WAVE3]

In the days following the slayings of 49 people at a gay nightclub, members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community pulled together in prayer vigils and benefit drag shows and basked in a broad showing of support many said they had never experienced. [Reuters]

University of Louisville’s president and its entire governing board are out. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama on Thursday demanded that lawmakers put politics aside and move forward on the longstanding impasse over gun legislation in the wake of the latest tragedy. [Politico]

We’re fans of both Craig Greenburg and Emily Bingham but let’s get something straight. They’re only able to speak their minds on the UofL mess because they can afford to speak their minds. Maybe things would change for the better at UofL if the powerful were ever people who aren’t mega-wealthy. [Business First]

It looks as though new speed limits are on the horizon soon for Clarksville, although the details haven’t been ironed out yet. [News & Tribune]

Gun Nuts Visited Murder City This Weekend

Louisville Metro Police are investigating a double homicide in the 4000 block of River Park Drive, near South 40th Street. [WDRB]

It’s a prime example of infill – using land in already developed areas for new homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! And not far away from the Expo Center, dozens gathered to pray for victims of gun violence. [WHAS11]

Donald Trump brought his brand of feel-good fascism back to Louisville to receive an endorsement from National Rifle Association leaders and to speak to its national convention. [Tom Eblen]

Police were called to the scene of a shooting near Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

Exaggerator took advantage of sloppy conditions and a “dream trip” to win the 141st running of the Preakness Stakes by 3-1/2 lengths in Baltimore on Saturday, ending Kentucky Derby winner Nyquist’s bid for the Triple Crown. And two horses died because of course they did. [HuffPo]

Many people gathered around the city Saturday at different events promoting unity and safety. [WAVE3]

A new study by the Pew Research Center spurred a rash of headlines last week about “the dying middle class.” But the word “dying” might be more appropriate if we were watching the regrettable-but-inevitable effects of natural forces at work. We’re not. We’re seeing the fruits of deliberate action – and sometimes of deliberate inaction – at the highest levels of power. The great American middle was never large enough, even at its height. It always excluded too many people – sometimes, shamefully, merely for their skin color. And now, instead of growing and becoming more inclusive, it’s fading away instead. [Bill Moyers]

Exaggerator has taken home the second gem in horse racing’s triple crown. The colt won a mud-filled Preakness Stakes on Saturday, handing rival Nyquist the first loss of his career and effectively ending his shot at a triple crown. [WFPL]

A powerful array of the Republican Party’s largest financial backers remains deeply resistant to Donald J. Trump’s presidential candidacy, forming a wall of opposition that could make it exceedingly difficult for him to meet his goal of raising $1 billion before the November election. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville is expanding its Enterprise CarShare program to downtown, offering the service for the public at its Health Sciences center. [Business First]

The Floyd County Commissioners voted 3-0 to fund LifeSpring Health System and Rauch, Inc. from the tax levy instead of the general fund. But minutes after taking that vote Tuesday, they reversed it, voting 2-1 to keep the two out of the levy. [News & Tribune]

Hot Brown Spring Rolls? Someone Should Be Punished Quickly And Harshly

Another day, another fun double shooting in Compassionate City! And just before Derby, no less. [WDRB]

With litigation pending, a potential buyer of the Galt House and possibly other large real estate holdings owned by the Al J. Schneider Co. is finding it difficult to secure title insurance needed to finance the purchase of the property. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Claudia Catfish is back on the teevee again and this time she’s got a story about JCPS. Here’s hoping she’s got her ducks in a row this time. [WHAS11]

House Speaker Greg Stumbo raised concerns Thursday about how Gov. Matt Bevin handled vetoes of several bills approved by the state legislature and indicated he may ask a court to determine if the governor acted properly. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Teachers across Jefferson County protested a potential wage freeze at several JCPS schools.[WLKY]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) vowed to take his fight for the Democratic presidential nomination all the way to the party’s convention in July, promising not to give up even if he continues to trail Hillary Clinton in pledged delegates. [HuffPo]

Okay. Enough is enough. Hot Brown SPRING ROLLS? Jesus H, what is this world coming to?! [WAVE3]

House Republicans threw a temper tantrum over a rule that bans financial advisers from scamming retirees. [ThinkProgress]

The seven Democratic candidates vying for the District 8 seat on Louisville’s Metro Council don’t disagree on much. [WFPL]

ProPublica is launching a new interactive database that will help you keep track of the officials who represent you in Congress. [ProPublica]

A national retailer is set to open its first store in Louisville at Shelbyville Road Plaza. [Business First]

No plans for Pleasant Ridge Subdivision redevelopment or revitalization are on the books yet, though city officials likely will present their version soon. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Counting The Days Til Derby 2016 Is Over

Police have arrested the owner of a day care after a child under her care died after being left in a hot van. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is paying its employees “a premium” compared to similar school districts around the country, and those higher salaries mean Kentucky’s largest school district is paying out $105 million or more extra each year in salaries, according to a comprehensive salary review the district unveiled Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz talks about the future of coal during a meeting with the Herald-Leader editorial board on Thursday, April 21, 2016. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are on the scene of a shooting at Floyd and Woodbine streets. [WLKY]

If a cop kills an unarmed black person, and that person’s family then sues the police, how much can the city expect to pay? Six million dollars, give or take. [HuffPo]

So now all you have to do in order to be a Derby celebrity is steal a bunch of stuff, get arrested and appear on “reality” television? Seems to go well with all the fun and murder here in Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Donald Trump is bristling at efforts to implement a more conventional presidential campaign strategy, and has expressed misgivings about the political guru behind them, Paul Manafort, for overstepping his bounds. [Politico]

Louisville legislators may soon get their first chance to craft policy around the findings of an acclaimed study on the city’s urban heat island. [WFPL]

The United States is on the verge of a national crisis that could mean the end of clean, cheap water. [The Hill]

The Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft will reopen June 4 after being closed nine months for a multimillion-dollar renovation. [Business First]

When Clifford Owens walked into the Clark County Voter Registration office to request an absentee ballot for himself and his wife, Janet, he was surprised to find out they could both vote right away. [News & Tribune]

Another Compassionate Pedestrian Death

Another day, another pedestrian death in Compassionate City. Louisville Metro Police say a woman was killed after being hit by an SUV on Zorn Avenue. [WDRB]

Louisville Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens has been suspended from the bench as a state judicial disciplinary body considers misconduct charges against him. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! An agreement has been reached. Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens will be suspended with pay while both sides settle their differences. [WHAS11]

Luxco, the St. Louis-based liquor company that markets Rebel Yell, Blood Oath and Ezra Brooks bourbons, announced Monday that it will build a $35 million, 18,000-square-foot distillery in Nelson County that is expected to be fully operational by late 2017. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway in Jennings County after a body was found in a lake. [WLKY]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) appeared to offer a thinly veiled rebuke of liberal economist Paul Krugman on Wednesday by highlighting a “scary” too-big-to-fail ruling from federal bank regulators. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating after someone opened fire at an apartment that is across the street from where a child was hit and killed Friday. [WAVE3]

The Turd Cruz-Mitch McConnell slap fight is getting crazier by the minute. [The Hill]

Louisville Metro Councilwoman Jessica Green wants police officers to spend more time patrolling on foot and bike in an effort to build better relationships with communities. [WFPL]

Twelve state attorneys general have asked the federal Department of Education to revoke the recognition of the much-criticized Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. [ProPublica]

The Old Forester Distillery project will give a fresh look to some very old structures on Main Street in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

Gathered in the Nolan Solar Building, the former art students met with their teacher, chatted for a while and marveled at their finished product, a mural spanning an entire wall along a staircase. [News & Tribune]

Watch John Yarmuth Speak Some Truth

In the summer of 2008, David Kaelin attended a series of meetings on the future of land along the Floyds Fork creek, which flows about two miles from his eastern Jefferson County farm. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville’s Faculty Senate is set to discuss its views on the fate of embattled President James Ramsey behind closed doors. [C-J/AKN]

While police continue to investigate who shot and killed a UofL student, her friends and family at a local church are responding to her death. [WHAS11]

For the first time, the Kentucky Revenue Department this year is asking taxpayers to wait. Kentucky and other states are becoming more forthright, telling taxpayers they’ll have to be patient and allow time for verification before refunds are sent. [H-L]

A Jefferson County judge is asking the state to dismiss ethics charges against him. Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has thrown out jury panels that lack diversity. [WLKY]

Landlords and property owners who exclude people with criminal records from renting or buying may be violating the law, according to new guidance released by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. [HuffPo]

Kentucky voters rarely have had clout in determining who the Democratic and Republican parties will nominate in the race for president. The Commonwealth has too few people and too few delegates at stake for a May primary to do little more than reinforce or contradict a result already reached. [WAVE3]

Even after years of education, training and experience as an obstetrician/gynecologist, I am never prepared to deliver the news that a pregnancy is abnormal. There is no good way to tell a pregnant woman — a woman who may already be wearing maternity clothes, thinking about names and decorating the nursery — that we have identified a fetal anomaly that can lead to significant, lifelong disability or even her baby’s death. [WaPo]

Like many folks, Louisvillians can be rebellious nostalgists, railing against the churn of urban change. [WFPL]

Few people are thanking the president for low unemployment. Instead, many discouraged workers are attracted to Donald J. Trump’s economic message. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville board of trustees and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin reached a settlement last month in Franklin Circuit Court with the Kentucky Justice Resource Center Inc. regarding a racial imbalance on the board. [Business First]

An agreement for a development at 10th and Spring streets that’s been in the works since May has finally been signed. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Loves It Some Gun Violence

The Louisville Metro Planning Commission has stopped reviewing “conservation subdivisions” in Jefferson County while it looks into whether regulations approved in 2008 achieve a goal of saving green space. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police confirm that one woman has died and two men are injured after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey Calvin Borel, a three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby, has informed his agent, Larry Melancon, that he is retiring effective immediately. [H-L]

A bill giving death benefits to families of EMS workers killed in the line of duty has been signed into law by the governor. [WLKY]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

A man was shot in front of a Louisville clothing store on Saturday over a pair of new athletic shoes, Louisville Metro Police said. [WAVE3]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

This could be one of the dumbest moves from JCPS yet and Allison Martin isn’t helping matters. Jefferson County Public School officials are declining to discuss gang activity in local schools with a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

While Clarksville continues to focus on revitalizing the community through extensive development and redevelopment efforts, the town is making plans to ensure proper infrastructure is in place to improve conditions and handle growth. [News & Tribune]