School Board Made Anti-Transparency Move, Horne & Jones The Ringleaders

On Thursday, February 11th, there will be an Open Records Training Session for members of the Metro Council and their staff in Council Chambers beginning at 12:30pm. This session will be for informational and instructional purposes only and will update any changes in the Open Records Law of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It will also cover Metro Government Guidelines for Social Media. [Press Release]

Surprise! David Jones, Stephanie Horne and crew want to stifle open discussion of issues at Jefferson County Board of Education meetings. [WDRB]

The agency that Metropolitan Sewer District Executive Director Tony Parrott led in Cincinnati before coming to Louisville is going to get a state audit following a Gannett newspaper’s investigation of its finances. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting here in Compassionate City! This time it was a postal worker in the West End. [WHAS11]

Less than a week after Rand Paul ended his presidential campaign, some of the Kentucky senator’s top supporters in the state legislature have backed Marco Rubio ahead of the state’s Republican presidential caucus next month. [H-L]

What a fun day of shooting yesterday turned out to be. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton is concerned for the future of women’s reproductive rights. [HuffPo]

A new mayor was elected in Shepherdsville, hours after the former mayor resigned. [WAVE3]

Jefferson County Public Schools superintendet Donna Hargens wants authority to hire principals without Site-Based Decision-Making council input. But we discovered Hargens has a terrible track record of hiring the worst of the worst when there’s no SBDM accountability. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Federal officials say Kentucky could have to return more than $57 million in unused grant money because of Republican Gov. Matt Bevin’s decision to dismantle kynect. [WFPL]

Much has been said about the dangers of oil trains following several high-profile accidents, including a fiery 2013 crash in Quebec that killed 50 people. Now a report from Greenpeace points to another potential hazard that could be even deadlier: chlorine trains. [Click the Clicky]

Louisville-based Al J. Schneider Co. has hired Louisville real estate firm CBRE Group Inc. of Louisville to assess the possible sale of its downtown Louisville office properties, which includes the 25-story Waterfront Plaza and One Riverfront Plaza on Main Street. [Business First]

River Valley Middle School eighth-graders got a close look Friday at what careers in STEM fields could look like. [News & Tribune]

Awful Jim Ramsey-UofL Soap Opera

All the sudden we’re just supposed to trust that Metro Animal Services is going to solve this dog shooting problem? Just like that? What the heck kind of short memory does this city even have? [WDRB]

Raising the stakes for University of Louisville President James Ramsey, two members of the board of trustees announced Thursday that they no longer support his presidency while the board’s chairman said he favors reducing the president’s powers. Don’t forget that Greenberg has never cared about Ramsey in the past. Not during any number of other scandals. Fascinating to see this turn. [C-J/AKN]

The Kennedy Bridge is shutting down for half a year and everyone is losing their mind. [WHAS11]

Louisville-based Brown-Forman announced on Thursday it is selling the Southern Comfort label, as well as Tuaca liqueur to New Orleans-based Sazerac, owner of Buffalo Trace, for a combined $543.5 million. [H-L]

The men police say brutally beat a woman and then dumped her body in a shallow grave faced a judge Thursday. [WLKY]

A former federal regulator and Elizabeth Warren acolyte who has repeatedly questioned the Obama administration’s treatment of student loan borrowers just took a job with the Department of Education. [HuffPo]

Tyler Russell was pronounced dead at University Hospital after being shot near the intersection of 20th Street and Market Street around 9:40 p.m. Wednesday. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama has vigorously defended his legacy while striking an optimistic note for America’s future in his final State of the Union address. [BBC]

St. Matthews City Council members are distancing themselves from that city’s police department claim that juvenile crime is spiking in the Louisville suburb. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell’s life mission is to do anything and everything to be a roadblock for President Barack Obama. Even if that means screwing over his constituents. Because most of them are too disconnected and scared to notice. [Politico]

How much do you know about Kentucky Towers, Barrington Place and Crescent Centre? They think stories like this are worth paying for and they wonder why they’re still dying. [Business First]

City Controller Amy Deering is stepping down from her position with the city of Jeffersonville and taking a job with Louisville Metropolitan Government, said Mayor Mike Moore. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Brown Puts Her Money Where Her Mouth Is And Other Wealthy Scions In The City Should Follow Her Dang Lead

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

The transformation of a former public housing complex in Louisville is almost finished. Construction is continuing at the renovated Sheppard Square in Smoketown. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Board of Education Chairman David Jones Jr. said he wants to hear more information on the idea of bringing in an outside operator to run some of the district’s lowest-performing schools. [C-J/AKN]

The Judge Stevens slap fight is getting out-of-control crazy. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics will receive a $12 million gift from Papa John’s Pizza founder and CEO John Schnatter and the Charles Koch Foundation, officials announced Tuesday. [H-L]

Seriously, Tom Wine is in teabagger meltdown mode. What on earth? How dare anyone bring up race in Possibility City! A legal battle between a local judge and a top prosecutor is heating up again, and the prosecutor is asking for the judge’s removal. [WLKY]

ICYMI: Bill sits down with former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear to discuss his time in office and his plans for the future. [KET]

The hotel will bring 140 more hotel rooms to Louisville and will be in one of the city’s trendiest neighborhoods. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission (KSNPC) has presented its Biological Diversity Protection Award to Christy Lee Brown of Louisville. The annual award is given to an individual or organization that has made a significant contribution to the knowledge and protection of Kentucky’s biodiversity. “Brown is truly an international leader promoting a holistic understanding and appreciation of the earth and its environs,” said Don Dott, executive director of the KSNPC. “She leads and inspires others in the fields of sustainable food production, environmental quality and its fundamental role in human health, the interrelatedness of our natural systems, and of biodiversity protection and the conservation of land.” [Press Release]

Horrible walrus Jim Gooch has returned to embarrass the Commonwealth. A bill pre-filed in the General Assembly would declare Kentucky a “sanctuary state” for people and companies who don’t want to follow federal environmental laws that will restrict carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC) has affirmed its earlier approval of combustion waste landfills at power plants operated by the state’s two largest electric utilities, despite sharp increases in the cost of the facilities. But the PSC, in an order issued today, declined requests by Kentucky Utilities Co. (KU) and Louisville Gas & Electric Co. (LG&E) to extend that approval to future expansions of the landfills. The landfills are at the Trimble County Generating Station and at the Ghent Generating Station in Carroll County. [Press Release]

LG&E and KU Energy LLC wants to get much more involved in the solar energy world. To make this happen, the utility company plans to offer individual, renewable solar-generation facilities to industrial and business customers. [Business First]

The possibility of arming a trained teacher in a school was discussed at West Clark Community Schools board meeting this week. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Revisiting Ramsey’s Big Reality Disconnect

You may have to watch your step more closely when crossing at least one downtown street. A pedway allowing easy access to the convention center will be going away. [WDRB]

How many scandalous hires does this make for Greg Fischer? The man has no concept of vetting new hires. Where are the liberal hand-wringers now? Every time a shitty hire is revealed, they freak out and attack. Every. Time. But suddenly they’re quiet. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! School time horror stories. “I had a chair thrown across the room and the kid looked at me–this is second grade–and said “what the f*** did I do b****,” Lucretia Gue, a former first grade teacher at Frayser Elementary School said. [WHAS11]

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

Local teevee folks are still freaking out about a white lady married to a preacher. When was the last time they freaked out like this over a person of color? Or over someone not tied to some random church? [WLKY]

Here’s one more indication that American teachers work really, really hard — and don’t make nearly enough. An analysis released Tuesday by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development looks at the state of education around the world, examining everything from intergenerational mobility in education to graduation rates to teacher pay. [HuffPo]

The YMCA of Louisville and the YMCA of Southern Indiana are merging, organization leaders announced during the 25th annual YMCA Mayor’s Thanksgiving Breakfast. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, R-Cookie Tree, said after a town hall at the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center he is in conversations with the CEO of AK Steel about how to keep hundreds of jobs at Ashland Works afloat. [Ashland Independent]

James Ramsey has been thinking a lot lately about stepping down from his role as president of the University of Louisville. That’s all it took for him to think about resigning? Not the myriad scandals, people going to prison, tens of millions of dollars swindled?! [WFPL]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

Electrolux announced plans to buy General Electric Co.’s Louisville-based appliance division for $3.3 billion last year. But the government sued to block the deal in July, citing concerns that it would suppress competition. [Business First]

A bill to include LGBT people in existing anti-discrimination laws is on the slate for the State Senate’s upcoming legislative session. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Sadly, There Won’t Be 40 Days Of Peace

The 2015 Dirt Bowl Championship was held Sunday at Shawnee Park, but basketball wasn’t the only reason for the event. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and other community leaders helped announce a 40 Days of Peace Campaign, which will start Thursday. [WDRB]

When Jefferson County Public Schools launched a contest in 2013 for its “Schools of Innovation,” the plan was to find ideas for helping students so out-of-the-box that they could “make bureacrats gasp.” [C-J/AKN]

School starts on Wednesday for students in Jefferson County and officials are continuing the annual tradition of helping parents with making the bus commute smoother. [WHAS11]

More than 93 percent of teachers and 89 percent of education leaders who were evaluated have been rated “exemplary” or “accomplished” in the first year of statewide implementation of Kentucky’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness System. [H-L]

An area festival showcased the wide variety of hemp – a crop many are hoping to bring back to the Bluegrass. [WLKY]

Asked if his flat tax plan would further separate the haves from the have-nots, GOP presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-WTF) said Sunday that income inequality is the result of some Americans working harder than others, rather than economic policies. [HuffPo]

A Kentucky non-profit organization is pushing for the legalization of medical marijuana. [WAVE3]

Robert Freeman has been helping people extract public information from New York state agencies for four decades. He is the executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government, a division of the New York Department of State that advises the public on the Freedom of Information Law — the state statute authorizing access to public records. [ProPublica]

Louisville home buyers and sellers interested in environmentally friendly elements and technology have a new way to identify those features on their homes. [WFPL]

Rand Paul in an interview Sunday called Donald Trump, who refused to rule out a third-party run during the first GOP debate, a “fake conservative.” [The Hill]

Nashville, Tenn., gets called a boomtown so frequently these days that it borders on cliche. Yet it’s clear that the city just three hours away down Interestate 65 has seen significant growth in the past several years. [Business First]

Options available for the city to address blighted commercial buildings, some of which have been shuttered for years, will be a topic during the next New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Short-Term Rental Cat Fight Takes Shape

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Leaders with Louisville Metro Council are asking for additional input while they work out details of an ordinance aimed at creating more regulatory oversight in the short term housing market. You should at least have to live in the homes you’re renting out like a hotel. [WDRB]

Another guy without a gun was shot and killed by police officers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Stop signs will soon be placed at a railroad crossing where two people were seriously injured this week in Buechel on Crawford Ave. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Department of Education is seeking public feedback on dozens of proposed social studies standards. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two years after Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis was killed in the line of duty, police continue to investigate. [WLKY]

Bloomberg Philanthropies on Wednesday announced the first eight cities it has selected to participate in a new pilot program to improve life in America’s cities. Chattanooga, Tennessee; Louisville, Kentucky; Kansas City, Missouri; Mesa, Arizona; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Jackson, Mississippi; Seattle and New Orleans will be the first to benefit from the What Works Cities Initiative. The project intends to spend $42 million over three years to help U.S. cities address issues like economic development, public health, crime and transportation. [HuffPo]

The developers tasked with rehabbing the iconic 800 Building in downtown Louisville want the taxpayers to help foot the bill. Now, that is a step closer to happening. [WAVE3]

In the early morning hours of June 30, 1995, a fire sparked to life in Kristine Bunch’s mobile home. It fanned out across the floor and climbed up the walls, then formed an impassable barrier across the middle of the trailer. Bunch, 21, snapped awake in the living room. Her three-year-old son, Tony, shrieked for her on the other side of the flames. [Mother Jones]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

Later this month, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will escape for a family retreat to mourn his late son, Beau, but also to mull, as his dying son urged him to do, a campaign for president. Some of Mr. Biden’s friends and allies worry that he will decide it is a good idea. [NY Times]

Greater Louisville Inc. has named Deana Epperly Karem vice president of economic development. Karem is the current executive director of the Oldham County Chamber and Economic Development. She’ll start work at GLI on Sept. 1. [Business First]

When Floyd County Solid Waste Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley receives a complaint about the two mobile recycling sites that were closed recently due to budget cuts, she refers them to the people who ordered the reductions. [News & Tribune]

Apparently Another Horsey Thing Happened

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

After last month’s fire, stabilization work on Whiskey Row is now on schedule. [WDRB]

When it comes to preventing serious infections that people sometimes get at hospitals, many institutions in the Louisville area and Southern Indiana have some work to do, according to new ratings by Consumer Reports. [C-J/AKN]

Community members joined together at Shelby Park Sunday to bring a new energy to the space. This comes after a week of violence in the area, including two shootings, one ultimately ending in death. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Derby was very good for Churchill Downs, but Big Fish has been even better. The Louisville-based gambling and racetrack company announced late Wednesday that it had record revenue of more than $409 million in the quarter that ended June 30. [H-L]

No arrests have been made in connection with a deadly house fire last month in Old Louisville. [WLKY]

GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee is open to the idea of using federal troops and the FBI to stop women from having abortions. [HuffPo]

American Pharoah took an easy win at the Haskell Invitation on Sunday at Monmouth Park in New Jersey. [WAVE3]

Thursday marks the true opening salvo in the GOP presidential race, as the top 10 candidates are slated to face off in the long-awaited Fox News debate. [The Hill]

The Outskirts Festival, which seeks to highlight female-led or female-driven bands, has announced the lineup for its second year. [WFPL]

Matt Jones, the popular host of a radio sports talk show, stepped on some powerful toes Saturday while playing the part of Fancy Farm political speaking emcee in a non-traditional way. [Ronnie Ellis]

The new owners of the Republic Building in downtown Louisville plan to convert the historic structure into a hotel. [Business First]

How would you define success? Business suits, six figures and mortgages are likely the first answer for most Americans. Or maybe it’s a job that allows for enough free time to spend with loved ones. [News & Tribune]