Counting The Days Til Derby 2016 Is Over

Police have arrested the owner of a day care after a child under her care died after being left in a hot van. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is paying its employees “a premium” compared to similar school districts around the country, and those higher salaries mean Kentucky’s largest school district is paying out $105 million or more extra each year in salaries, according to a comprehensive salary review the district unveiled Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz talks about the future of coal during a meeting with the Herald-Leader editorial board on Thursday, April 21, 2016. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are on the scene of a shooting at Floyd and Woodbine streets. [WLKY]

If a cop kills an unarmed black person, and that person’s family then sues the police, how much can the city expect to pay? Six million dollars, give or take. [HuffPo]

So now all you have to do in order to be a Derby celebrity is steal a bunch of stuff, get arrested and appear on “reality” television? Seems to go well with all the fun and murder here in Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Donald Trump is bristling at efforts to implement a more conventional presidential campaign strategy, and has expressed misgivings about the political guru behind them, Paul Manafort, for overstepping his bounds. [Politico]

Louisville legislators may soon get their first chance to craft policy around the findings of an acclaimed study on the city’s urban heat island. [WFPL]

The United States is on the verge of a national crisis that could mean the end of clean, cheap water. [The Hill]

The Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft will reopen June 4 after being closed nine months for a multimillion-dollar renovation. [Business First]

When Clifford Owens walked into the Clark County Voter Registration office to request an absentee ballot for himself and his wife, Janet, he was surprised to find out they could both vote right away. [News & Tribune]

Another Compassionate Pedestrian Death

Another day, another pedestrian death in Compassionate City. Louisville Metro Police say a woman was killed after being hit by an SUV on Zorn Avenue. [WDRB]

Louisville Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens has been suspended from the bench as a state judicial disciplinary body considers misconduct charges against him. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! An agreement has been reached. Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens will be suspended with pay while both sides settle their differences. [WHAS11]

Luxco, the St. Louis-based liquor company that markets Rebel Yell, Blood Oath and Ezra Brooks bourbons, announced Monday that it will build a $35 million, 18,000-square-foot distillery in Nelson County that is expected to be fully operational by late 2017. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway in Jennings County after a body was found in a lake. [WLKY]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) appeared to offer a thinly veiled rebuke of liberal economist Paul Krugman on Wednesday by highlighting a “scary” too-big-to-fail ruling from federal bank regulators. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating after someone opened fire at an apartment that is across the street from where a child was hit and killed Friday. [WAVE3]

The Turd Cruz-Mitch McConnell slap fight is getting crazier by the minute. [The Hill]

Louisville Metro Councilwoman Jessica Green wants police officers to spend more time patrolling on foot and bike in an effort to build better relationships with communities. [WFPL]

Twelve state attorneys general have asked the federal Department of Education to revoke the recognition of the much-criticized Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. [ProPublica]

The Old Forester Distillery project will give a fresh look to some very old structures on Main Street in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

Gathered in the Nolan Solar Building, the former art students met with their teacher, chatted for a while and marveled at their finished product, a mural spanning an entire wall along a staircase. [News & Tribune]

Watch John Yarmuth Speak Some Truth

In the summer of 2008, David Kaelin attended a series of meetings on the future of land along the Floyds Fork creek, which flows about two miles from his eastern Jefferson County farm. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville’s Faculty Senate is set to discuss its views on the fate of embattled President James Ramsey behind closed doors. [C-J/AKN]

While police continue to investigate who shot and killed a UofL student, her friends and family at a local church are responding to her death. [WHAS11]

For the first time, the Kentucky Revenue Department this year is asking taxpayers to wait. Kentucky and other states are becoming more forthright, telling taxpayers they’ll have to be patient and allow time for verification before refunds are sent. [H-L]

A Jefferson County judge is asking the state to dismiss ethics charges against him. Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens has thrown out jury panels that lack diversity. [WLKY]

Landlords and property owners who exclude people with criminal records from renting or buying may be violating the law, according to new guidance released by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. [HuffPo]

Kentucky voters rarely have had clout in determining who the Democratic and Republican parties will nominate in the race for president. The Commonwealth has too few people and too few delegates at stake for a May primary to do little more than reinforce or contradict a result already reached. [WAVE3]

Even after years of education, training and experience as an obstetrician/gynecologist, I am never prepared to deliver the news that a pregnancy is abnormal. There is no good way to tell a pregnant woman — a woman who may already be wearing maternity clothes, thinking about names and decorating the nursery — that we have identified a fetal anomaly that can lead to significant, lifelong disability or even her baby’s death. [WaPo]

Like many folks, Louisvillians can be rebellious nostalgists, railing against the churn of urban change. [WFPL]

Few people are thanking the president for low unemployment. Instead, many discouraged workers are attracted to Donald J. Trump’s economic message. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville board of trustees and Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin reached a settlement last month in Franklin Circuit Court with the Kentucky Justice Resource Center Inc. regarding a racial imbalance on the board. [Business First]

An agreement for a development at 10th and Spring streets that’s been in the works since May has finally been signed. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Loves It Some Gun Violence

The Louisville Metro Planning Commission has stopped reviewing “conservation subdivisions” in Jefferson County while it looks into whether regulations approved in 2008 achieve a goal of saving green space. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police confirm that one woman has died and two men are injured after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey Calvin Borel, a three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby, has informed his agent, Larry Melancon, that he is retiring effective immediately. [H-L]

A bill giving death benefits to families of EMS workers killed in the line of duty has been signed into law by the governor. [WLKY]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

A man was shot in front of a Louisville clothing store on Saturday over a pair of new athletic shoes, Louisville Metro Police said. [WAVE3]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

This could be one of the dumbest moves from JCPS yet and Allison Martin isn’t helping matters. Jefferson County Public School officials are declining to discuss gang activity in local schools with a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

While Clarksville continues to focus on revitalizing the community through extensive development and redevelopment efforts, the town is making plans to ensure proper infrastructure is in place to improve conditions and handle growth. [News & Tribune]

Brown Gave Master Class In Throwing Shade

Community activist Angela Newby-Bouggess has died. [WDRB]

Nearly 500 sexual assault kits that would have continued to sit untested in the Louisville Metro Police property room will now be sent for lab testing after a shift in LMPD philosophy. The department is sending 1,386 untested rape kits to Kentucky State Police for testing – 463 more than originally intended. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “We have to start opening our eyes and reconciling the fact that these things happened,” says Attorney Larry Wilder, a statement he has repeated since October when his client’s book Breaking Cardinal Rules hit store shelves. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission has dedicated 88 acres to an existing preserve in Pulaski County. [H-L]

Another day, another fun pedestrian accident in Possibility Compassionate City! [WLKY]

The White House has narrowed its search for a Supreme Court nominee to three federal appeals court judges, Sri Srinivasan, Merrick Garland and Paul Watford, a source familiar with the selection process said on Friday. [HuffPo]

If she can do it, you can do it. One year after her story went viral, Asia Ford returned to the Rodes City Run 10K Saturday. [WAVE3]

Obama Administration transparency is a lot like Fischer Administration transparency. It’s not a real thing. Two years ago last month, I filed a public-records request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency as part of my reporting into the flawed response to Hurricane Sandy. Then, I waited. [ProPublica]

Kelly Downard has apparently turned into all bark and no bite. No clue what happened to him but he’s been entirely neutered. [WFPL]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A pair of sisters is opening a barber shop that will be a little different than most others. [Business First]

Two contracts up for a vote in April got some scrutiny by the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s board of trustees work session Monday. [News & Tribune]

The Sadiqa Reinvention Tour Is Underway

Turnaround efforts at Jefferson County’s eight chronically low-performing middle schools have presented ‘unique challenges’ when it comes to improving academic achievement and increasing student growth. [WDRB]

Pbbbbbbt. Louisville Urban League President and CEO Sadiqa Reynolds is pitching Mayor Greg Fischer’s office and Metro Council members on dedicating part of the city’s $10 million surplus to the civil rights group’s housing redevelopment program. [C-J/AKN]

One of Katina Powell’s attorneys, Bart McMahon, confirms she is scheduled to meet with NCAA investigators Monday afternoon, March 7. [WHAS11]

For many years, this editorial board’s position on the death penalty has been keep it but fix it, because some crimes are so heinous that no other punishment will do. We now must concede that the death penalty is not going to be fixed and, in fact, probably cannot be fixed at any defensible cost to taxpayers. [H-L]

Convenience stores and gas stations in Oldham County can now apply for a packaged liquor license after voters expanded alcohol sales in December. [WLKY]

After learning that Donald Trump apparently kept a volume of Adolf Hitler’s speeches at his bedside, Bill Maher made a scary comparison between the GOP front-runner at the German dictator on “Real Time with Bill Maher” on Friday. [HuffPo]

A firefighter’s widow claims Kentucky Retirement Systems is playing hardball with her in her time of need. [WAVE3]

Tim Cook got almost $400 million of restricted stock when he was named Apple chief executive in 2011, succeeding Steve Jobs. Regardless of whether Apple shareholders fared well or badly over the grant’s 10-year term, all Cook needed to do to collect that stock (worth about $700 million at today’s price) was keep his job. It was the kind of deal that pay mavens derisivelycall “pay for pulse.” [ProPublica]

Holy crap! After all the havoc Sadiqa Reynolds wreaked in Metro Government, she’s now trying to spin some tale of hopefulness. And media outlets are taking her seriously. We’ll take that hack seriously the day she takes responsibility for her role in the Metro Animal Services shenanigans. Spoiler alert: Sadiqa will never do that. [WFPL]

Regulations that limit heavy metal pollution from oil- and coal-fired power plants will continue to be enforced by the EPA — at least for now — thanks to Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. [ThinkProgress]

The nation’s largest pharmacy retailer is about to open a smaller location in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

Residents in need of a watchful eye now have three designated safe place locations under surveillance at the Clark County Government Center in Jeffersonville. [News & Tribune]

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Pedestrian Deaths, Shootings And JCPS Bus Crashes Are All The Rage In Compassionate City

No one thinks the Omni Hotel will live up to all the Fischer-pushed hype. Not even the people surrounding Fischer. [WDRB]

It’s now painfully clear that A Kentucky Newspaper’s education reporter will regurgitate whatever JCPS tells her without question. We had high hopes for her. Shame on us. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The students over at Bellarmine University are on a rescue mission. [WHAS11]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced Friday afternoon that he is retiring after 34 years with the agency. [H-L]

Another day, another JCPS bus crash. A Jefferson County Public Schools bus driver was injured Tuesday morning in a crash on Bardstown Road at Little Springs Boulevard, just south of the Gene Snyder Freeway. [WLKY]

The same crap is happening in Kentucky but the KDP is sitting on its hands. In South Dakota, Governor Dennis Daugaard is right this moment mulling over a bill sent to his desk by the legislature that would bar transgender students — kids often facing bullying and discrimination — from using bathrooms or locker rooms that correspond with their gender identity. [HuffPo]

Six months ago, Tracy Blue was waxing poetic about “Modern Louisville,” a new magazine geared to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities, the fourth print venture that her husband, University of Louisville trustee Jonathan Blue launched with her listed as publisher. [WAVE3]

Over a lifetime following government and politics as a spectator and for many years as a reporter, I’ve reached some conclusions. Campaigns matter. They tell us things about candidates and usually, though not always, what sort of office-holders they’ll likely be. Visions and philosophies are shared and promises made. Campaigns often reveal how the candidate operates under pressure as well as insights into character. [Ronnie Ellis]

There will be more court-appointed attorneys available to represent poor people in court under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget. [WFPL]

We started getting some clarity in the Republican and Democratic races Saturday night. Hillary Clinton squeaked out a win in Nevada — but did so in a way that suggests she has, despite Bernie Sanders’s strength, maintained her national advantage. Marco Rubio’s strong showing in South Carolina helped push Jeb Bush out of the race, giving Mr. Rubio a chance to unify the mainstream of the Republican Party and bring about a true three-way race. [NY Times]

A more than $6.2 million expansion could be coming to a senior living facility in southeast Louisville. [Business First]

For more than 14 years, foster parents William Yowell and Lizzette Steed-Yowell have opened their New Albany home to children whose lives have been turned upside down by neglect or abuse. The couple stresses the importance of providing a safe home for children in need, but there’s another ingredient they say is even more impactful: Open hearts. [News & Tribune]