At Least Fischer Isn’t A Xenophobe/Bigot

Good grief, you can’t even hide in the ceiling these days without getting arrested. [WDRB]

This story originally ran in late January. Twenty-one Syrian refugees will arrive in Louisville over the next two weeks, a figure expected to increase in Kentucky and beyond as the U.S. begins to take in an expanded number of refugees fleeing Syria’s bloody civil war. [C-J/AKN]

A week after the deadly terrorist attacks that rocked Paris, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is urging the community to stand in solidarity with refugees and those affected by the horrific acts. [WHAS11]

The American Civil Liberties Union says a Kentucky county clerk’s office should reissue altered marriage licenses even though the governor has promised to recognize them as valid. [H-L]

Your tax dollars are paying for Jerry Abramson’s pals to conduct media boat tours. [WLKY]

The nation’s capital is receiving a wonderful gift this holiday season. Atlanta’s Homeward Choir, a group of men from the city’s Central Night Shelter, have been invited to perform at the White House Open House Holiday Celebration on Dec. 21. [HuffPo]

As temperatures drop back into the 20s, homeless shelters across Louisville are starting Operation White Flag. [WAVE3]

First-hand accounts like this won’t deter pandering bigots like Rand Paul and Matt Bevin. Until last year, I was one of 4.3 million people at the mercy of the legal immigration system, waiting for the chance to stay in the U.S. for good. [BuzzFeed]

A group of about 80 people gathered on Friday afternoon to call on the Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney to cease his efforts to have Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens removed from all criminal cases pending before him. [WFPL]

NPR’s Rachel Martin speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, about the screening process refugees go through before entering the United States. [NPR]

The Louisville Arena Authority has a new member and a new chairman after the resignation earlier this month of chairman Larry Hayes. [Business First]

Sheriff Frank Loop said he had no idea the Floyd County Animal Control Board voted Thursday to suspend services to residents living outside the city limits for the rest of 2015. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Powell’s The Devil & Not Athletics Honchos?

A Missouri company has dropped plans to buy land near Louisville International Airport viewed as a potential site for one of the city’s largest industrial buildings. [WDRB]

Facing a gauntlet of questions from western Louisville residents, the head of the Metropolitan Sewer District said his agency favors putting a proposed 20 million gallon underground waste basin in Shawnee Park’s Great Lawn rather than a more intrusive maintenance site closer to neighbors’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Katina Powell said she has no problems admitting to her involvement in the alleged strip shows and sex acts she said happened at UofL Minardi’s Hall from 2010-2014. [WHAS11]

The owner of KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell plans to spin off its China business into a separate, publicly traded company. [H-L]

With U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell urging a boycott of a federal rule to cut carbon emissions from power plants, a Kentucky citizen’s group is coming up with its own plan. And it’ll get absolutely nowhere because this is Kentucky, not the real world. [WLKY]

After a recent federal report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration called for an end to conversion therapy for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth, survivors of the practice joined HuffPost Live last week to discuss their traumatic experiences. [HuffPo]

What? WAVE slut-shaming someone for revealing what goes on at the University of Louisville? SURELY NOT! [WAVE3]

Civil rights lawyers are using a new strategy to change a common court practice that they have long argued unfairly targets the poor. At issue is the way courts across the country sometimes issue arrest warrants for indigent people when they fall behind on paying court fees and fines owed for minor offenses like traffic tickets. [NPR]

Jefferson County is vying for part of a huge pot of federal money meant to make communities more resilient during natural disasters. [WFPL]

The myth of welfare’s corrupting influence on the poor. Does welfare corrupt the poor? Few ideas are so deeply ingrained in the American popular imagination as the belief that government aid for poor people will just encourage bad behavior. [NY Times]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will close its doors after Halloween wraps up at the end of this month, and construction could start on the next phase for the property by January. The owners of Industrial Terrorplex, Todd Moore and Terry Campbell, agreed to sell the property last year to Jeffersonville-based New Hope Services Inc., which planned to renovate the building into a senior housing facility. [Business First]

Stemming from two outstanding payments from the County Council, the option of suspending services to parts of the county will come to the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter at the Animal Control Authority meeting next month. [News & Tribune]

When Will JCPS Get A Non-Awful Supe?

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee tabled a motion on Wednesday to change the city’s public nuisance law. [WDRB]

Another battle is brewing between County Attorney Mike O’Connell and a district court judge over Drive Safe Louisville, O’Connell’s revenue-generating traffic school. [C-J/AKN]

New data released by the Kentucky Department of Education shows mixed results for JCPS scores. Donna Hargens and her PR firm friends you’re paying for can’t hype this up. [WHAS11]

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

Is TARC the devil? Probably. A bicyclist was injured Thursday morning in an accident involving a TARC bus. That comes on the heels of a TARC-school bus accident. [WLKY]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]

A recent murder has put Old Louisville in the spotlight as residents push for more police. Several complaints have already been made to police by people who live in the area. Those residents say they are frustrated over the lack of response. [WAVE3]

We might not be able to remember every stressful episode of our childhood. But the emotional upheaval we experience as kids — whether it’s the loss of a loved one, the chronic stress of economic insecurity, or social interactions that leave us tearful or anxious — may have a lifelong impact on our health. [NPR]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Congress is blocking legal marijuana in Washington, D.C. and maybe causing a spike in murders. [Mother Jones]

Let’s quit acting like Steve Beshear doesn’t already have someone picked to serve on UofL’s board of trustees. [Business First]

Floyd County has to submit a budget to the state by Oct. 28. And as of Monday night, it is still unknown how much will be set aside for the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter in 2016. [News & Tribune]

Where’s The Condemnation From Your Statewide Candidates Over This Islamophobia?

The Islamic Center in Louisville on River Road has been targeted by vandals and Mayor Greg Fischer is asking the community to help clean it up. [WDRB]

Wait, didn’t everyone determine years ago that the VA overpaid for that site because of shady politics? Let’s all turn a blind eye as our leaders figure out a way to make this disappear. [C-J/AKN]

Proposed changes to a city ordinance could make shutting down businesses that are the source of community complaints a lot easier. [WHAS11]

Watch it happen there before it happens in Louisville. Lexington will announce soon a plan to build a fiber-optic network to increase Internet speeds across the city, Mayor Jim Gray said Thursday. [H-L]

Scandal after scandal went down at Metro Animal Services over the last decade and all the teevee folks can come up with is a story about a stolen puppy. [WLKY]

Louisville is apparently the third most affordable place to live in the country. [HuffPo]

If you want to see privilege in action, watch these people freak out over a golf course. [WAVE3]

A U.S. watchdog office urged Congress on Wednesday to empower regulators to extend a Dec. 31 deadline for freight and passenger railroads to adopt new safety technology that could prevent major derailments and other deadly crashes. [Reuters]

Oh, look, Greg Fischer still thinks he’s going to successfully run for higher office. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer has declined to join other mayors around the country in signing a letter to President Obama supporting stricter national standards for smog. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell acknowledged Wednesday that he and the House Speaker are discussing a short-term government funding bill to avoid a shutdown on Oct. 1. [The Hill]

Plans for major improvements at the Jerry E. Abramson Terminal at the Louisville International Airport have been approved. [Business First]

A Clark County Sheriff’s Department captain agreed to a demotion to lieutenant and a pay reduction in lieu of a merit board hearing concerning allegations of misconduct. [News & Tribune]

You Already Know What JCPS Has Done

Jack Conway’s office says JCPS broke the law with too many redactions. But here’s the deal: Helene Kramer was allegedly trash-talking re: that high-level employee’s sexual orientation and Donna Hargens allowed it to occur. She didn’t stop it. She’s never taken it seriously and refuses to admit that real harm was done. Everyone wants to piss and moan and bicker over whether or not those details should be revealed. I’m not gonna identify the individual until they decide to come forward but let’s get real here. That’s what happened. Several of us in the local media world have had the allegations in our possession for months and months and everyone’s just been sitting on it while trying to find a way to get JCPS to cough up the specifics. And all the mainstream media outlets have been afraid to reveal what the victim claims off-the-record occurred. [WDRB]

The Administration for Children and Families has given Jefferson County Public Schools the all-clear after the agency last year found a deficiency in the school district’s Head Start program. [C-J/AKN]

Where’s the media outrage over this murder? The victim’s life is no less valuable than that of anyone else. [WHAS11]

Under most circumstances, global stock market volatility would be enough to unnerve those in a commercial arena preparing for its bellwether exercise. But both the strength of key indictors and a wave of industry momentum heading into the Keeneland September Yearling Sale make for a positive forecast for the 12-day auction when it begins Monday. [H-L]

Muhammad and Lonnie Ali have made a donation to the University of Louisville Athletics. [WLKY]

More than half of the tax cuts proposed in former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s (R) tax plan would flow to America’s wealthiest citizens, according to a report released by the nonpartisan group Citizens for Tax Justice, which advocates for “requiring the wealthy to pay their fair share.” [HuffPo]

All the WAVE gays freaked out over Cher. Like lost their minds freaked out. It was kind of a big gay deal. [WAVE3]

The Obama administration has said it will allow 10,000 Syrian refugees to resettle in the US over the next year. Is this enough? And are there any risks? [BBC]

The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services released a comprehensive plan to reduce health disparities earlier this week, and efforts are already under way in Louisville that address some of the findings. [WFPL]

Every day in America, mortgage companies attempt to foreclose on homeowners using false documents. It’s a byproduct of the mortgage securitization craze during the housing bubble, when loans were sliced and diced so haphazardly that the actual ownership was confused. [The Incercept]

Earlier this week, I took a tour of Norton Commons, the self-contained urbanist community in northeastern Jefferson County that eventually will extend into Oldham County as it is completed in the next 10 to 15 years. [Business First]

The New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter has launched a unique fundraising effort to benefit local animals. [News & Tribune]

Let’s All Freak Out Over Google Fiber!

Officials at U of L say they are going to make medical care for transgendered persons a priority. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools wants to extend its contract to keep its $190/hour spokeswoman. Way to go, Louisville, for screwing things up again. [C-J/AKN]

Bardstown Police issued a short release Thursday morning saying that one of their officers has been suspended. [WHAS11]

Boy, is this guy in for a real treat. David A. Byerman, who has served two terms as Nevada’s Senate secretary, is the choice of a search committee to be director of the Kentucky Legislative Research Commission. [H-L]

This kind of fluff is why people apparently still turn to this website for Louisville Metro Animal Services news and not the teevee folks. [WLKY]

The 16 NFL stadiums that will host NFL games this weekend have cost taxpayers nearly $3 billion, a new analysis found. [HuffPo]

Family members are desperately searching for answers after a driver hit and killed their loved one and severely injured another woman in Valley Station over Labor Day weekend. [WAVE3]

Maybe this means Louisville is going to get some sweet, sweet GOOGLE FIBER sometime soon. [Click the Clicky]

Mary Cooksey had a tough time getting a pizza delivered to Kingston Park apartments. “They said they won’t come in Kingston,” she said. [WFPL]

Federal immigration officials are issuing far fewer detainer requests, also known as immigration holds, to state and local law enforcement agencies seeking immigrants who are in this country illegally. At the same time, the requests that are issued don’t appear to be targeting serious, or convicted, criminals. [NPR]

If you have driven down Third or Fourth streets south of Broadway lately, you might have noticed a pile of concrete and dirt on Spalding University’s campus. [Business First]

The New Albany police union won portions of its arbitration case against the city, but both sides labeled the decision as essentially a split. [News & Tribune]

A Week Without Murders Would Be Great

Louisville Metro Police say they are investigating after the body of a 50-year-old woman was found inside a garbage can Friday afternoon. [WDRB]

Representatives with Heaven Hill distillery are reaching out to Louisville activists opposed to bringing a methane plant to the California neighborhood. [C-J/AKN]

A West Buechel man charged with animal cruelty after police say he allowed his dog to freeze to death. [WHAS11]

A new brand ambassador is quietly making his mark at Woodford Reserve. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police arrested a man Tuesday in connection with a shooting on East Caldwell Street earlier this month. [WLKY]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A huge array of ice age fossils, including the bones of mammoths, turtles and horses, were uncovered at a Southern California construction site this summer. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro police are conducting a death investigation after a 50-year-old woman was found dead in West Louisville, but neighbors said they don’t believe her death was an accident. [WAVE3]

Dawn Johnson and her domestic partner, Mohamed Diallo, used to live in a shabby Bronx apartment, supported by his job as a mechanic. The building owner allowed the apartment to go weeks without running water and more than a year without heat. [NY Times]

Louisville housing advocates are concerned that the city is being shortchanged in the state’s distribution of federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, which are used to build or rehabilitate affordable rental housing. [WFPL]

As Congress gets back to work this week, it’s facing a nearly unprecedented number of deadlines and political dramas. [WaPo]

The leadership of the Louisville-based Independent Pilots Association, which represents pilots flying for Louisville-based UPS Airlines, has called on its members to authorize a strike against the company. [Business First]

Clark County Commissioners overstepped their authority by ordering landfill funds be used to foot a raise for Highway Superintendent Jim Ross, who said later he felt pressured not to reveal what he knew in order to keep his job. [News & Tribune]