Seeing “Cordish” Is Like Seeing A Big Car Crash On The Side Of The Road

Because the company doesn’t investigate, it just covers things up and pays people off. However, Smith refused to explain how the company investigated the allegations on their own. “I will not go into that,” Smith said when he was asked how the company does it’s own investigations. [WDRB]

Dismayed by allegations of racial discrimination at 4th Street Live, activists denounced the entertainment district and its developer on Wednesday, suggesting that the developer has some civil rights groups in its pocket. [C-J/AKN]

The person police said is behind a threatening note left at the Louisville Jewish Community Center is now behind bars. [WHAS11]

Brown-Forman CEO Paul Varga said Wednesday that the company aspires to grow Woodford Reserve, Old Forester, the Herradura tequila family and other major labels into billion-dollar brands. [H-L]

Property owners near GE Appliance Park have until Saturday, Aug. 1 to submit claims for cleanup costs related to April’s six-alarm fire. [WLKY]

It’s a whole new day for Republican presidential contenders making their second bid for the White House. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is making serious efforts to woo black voters, and is becoming one of the fiercest critics of real estate mogul Donald Trump. Meanwhile former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, known for his stringent opposition to same-sex marriage, is softening his rhetoric about gay people. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? A dog left inside a car in the hot sun died from heat exhaustion, leading to the arrest of an Oldham County woman. [WAVE3]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

Barry Barker would rather not talk about some buses in TARC’s fleet. They’re buses like the one Metro Councilman Tom Owen rode into downtown early Tuesday morning. That bus stalled and had to be banged, slammed and shoved by the driver to get running again, Owen said. [WFPL]

Even as immigration remains a hot topic in the U.S. presidential campaign, the number of people emigrating from Mexico to the United States, legally and illegally, has dropped sharply in recent years, research published Wednesday shows. [Reuters]

U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best Hospitals List Tuesday, which ranks hospitals on medical specialties such as cancer, cardiology, orthopedics and so on. [Business First]

The state will pay $124,500 to end a lawsuit brought by a man who wasn’t provided with a sign language interpreter during his mother’s criminal hearings in 2010 and 2011. In March, the U.S. District Court Southern District of Indiana in New Albany found in favor of Steven Prakel after he claimed courts and judges in Dearborn County failed to hire an interpreter during his mother’s hearings related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated and driving on a suspended license charges. [News & Tribune]

Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]

All Of The Most Compassionate Deaths

Even before a pontoon boat struck a barge on the Ohio River on July 4, killing five people in Louisville, Kentucky was on pace to have the most boating-related deaths since 2010, federal and state data show. [WDRB]

Lawyers for the Sierra Club and LG&E on Thursday argued for two hours over the meaning the word “occasional” in a federal court hearing stemming from a pollution lawsuit filed last year involving the Mill Creek power plant. [C-J/AKN]

The NAACP is calling out the governor for his decision to not reappoint the only African-American of UofL’s Board of Trustees. Raoul Cunningham said this makes the first time in 45 years that there is not an African-American on the 17-member board. [WHAS11]

If this is the worst thing Kentucky Democrats can come up with, they probably ought to just hand over the governor’s mansion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! One week after flames tore through a building in Old Louisville, more information on the investigation has been released. [WLKY]

Kim Davis is officially a national embarrassment. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School teacher has been fired following an investigation into a inappropriate relationship with a student. [WAVE3]

Heroin use in the US has surged in the past decade as experts say people using opioid painkillers are increasingly turning to heroin as a cheaper high. [BBC]

Health officials, confronted with a shocking increase in heroin abuse, are developing a clearer picture of who is becoming addicted to this drug and why. The results may surprise you. [WFPL]

There’s reason to celebrate declines in deaths from colon cancer in the United States — unless you live in three areas that are still lagging behind, a new report finds. Hint: This is bad news for Kentucky. [CBS News]

Kentucky’s Innovation Center, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, announced that it is in the process of transforming a rundown nightclub spot at 252 E. Market St. into a new home for Code Louisville, a code training program operated by KentuckianaWorks, and a new coding boot camp run by The Learning House Inc., an education technology provider. [Business First]

This is a thing you should do in Indiana. On Saturday, July 11, the Georgetown Twin Drive-In Theater is opening its gates to four-legged family members, allowing dogs on a leash to attend for a $2 admission fee. [News & Tribune]

The TV Folks Love Scaring Meemaws

Instead of scaring the absolute living shit out of the elderly people watching television, maybe start educating the community about needle exchanges? Maybe do something about educating folks on the proper way to discard used needles? [WDRB]

After working into the early hours of last Wednesday morning, paramedic Jon Tyson wheeled into his garage, plugged a large black power cord into his electric-powered Nissan Leaf and hit the sack. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe if we keep killing people we won’t have to worry about the poor or the sick. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul led a successful effort to block renewal of the Patriot Act early Saturday morning, followed by a deeply divided Senate leaving Washington without taking action on the National Security Agency’s soon-to-expire power to collect Americans’ phone records. [H-L]

The Indiana attorney general’s office says the state had to pay more than $1.4 million in fees to plaintiffs’ attorneys in its unsuccessful attempt to maintain its ban on same-sex marriages. [WLKY]

With more and more U.S. states facing public transit funding cuts despite record-breaking commuter demand, many transit systems are being forced to consider service cuts or fare hikes, both of which disproportionally impact low-income riders and neighborhoods. [HuffPo]

A family who lost their son has spent years turning their personal tragedy into a community event to spread positivity. [WAVE3]

The sleepy United States senators thought they were done voting. But then, around 1 a.m. on the Saturday before Memorial Day, Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky and presidential candidate, marched spryly to the Senate floor to let it be known that, no, he would not agree to extend the federal government’s bulk collection of phone records program. Not even for one day. [NY Times]

Louisville residents use public transportation at one of the lowest rates among the nation’s largest cities, according to new research from the University of Michigan. [WFPL]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

It’s time for a reminder about Adam Edelen and educational audits. An audit is NOT a forensic accounting investigation. It’s typically a random sampling that gets reviewed unless specific concerns are brought to light. Or, in the case of Montgomery County, not. Because specific concerns were deliberately ignored by Edelen’s team. When he says there was no fraud discovered? Remember: not a forensic accounting, not an in-depth investigation of every nook and cranny. [Business First]

Michael Crone asked who in the room knew a bully or a victim or a witness to bullying. Only a few hands raised. Crone knew better. [News & Tribune]

Glad A Local Will Be Your Governator?

Portland neighbors say they’re drowning in water bills that are twice the normal cost. The problems on one block uncovered a bigger issue for Louisville Water Company customers. [WDRB]

Which David Jones crony will get the job this time? Weeks after Superintendent Donna Hargens informed Helene Kramer that her contract was not being renewed, Jefferson County Public Schools has posted the position for its chief communications and community relations officer. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters, police and Animal Control entered a home in the 2200 block of Beargrass Avenue just off Bardstown Road after hearing from multiple neighbors Tuesday. Neighbors were concerned after finding pet abandonment notices on the door, overgrown weeds in the yard and hearing constant barking inside the home. [WHAS11]

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five greater Clark County schools may close as part of a plan the superintendent believes will help the district. [WLKY]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

Some people are just the absolute worst. [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering what really happened to Jamie Comer in the gubernatorial primary? It’s much more simple than he would have you believe. [Page One]

Once again, Louisville has ranked poorly on the annual ranking of city park systems from a national group. [WFPL]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

Too many tables and too little kitchen space — that’s been a pain point for Big Four Burgers & Beer in Jeffersonville since it opened in December 2013. [Business First]

Samuel pointed to tattoos on his forearms and chest to count how many times he’s been incarcerated in Clark County jail. [News & Tribune]

Flood Gates Opened Against Norton

They may only stand a couple feet off the ground, have four legs and wet noses, but their lives might save the life of a veteran. [WDRB]

A man says in a lawsuit that Norton Healthcare lost a piece of his brain. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering just how terrible Donna Hargens’ communication skills are? Just check out this latest mess. A Louisville neighborhood remains shaken following a horrific accident Friday evening involving a young elementary student and her school bus. [WHAS11]

One wants to abolish the state office he is trying to win. Another started her own business at age 9. Four have state legislative experience, and two are Louisville businessmen. [H-L]

Police are investigating a fatal crash at Dr. W.J. Hodge and Magazine streets early Sunday morning. [WLKY]

If Flint, Michigan can run a pig for mayor, surely Louisville can run something similar. [HuffPo]

FEMA will soon open a second office in Jefferson County to help those recovering from spring flooding. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah is the king of the nation’s horse races this month: in a driving rain, the Kentucky Derby winner took home top prize at the Preakness Stakes Saturday. [NPR]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

For thousands of years, religious people have gathered together in houses of worship to sing songs, celebrate sacred rituals, and lift up prayers to God(s) on high. And on July 1, a new religious group in Indiana intends to do just that — but with a lot more emphasis on the “high” part. [ThinkProgress]

Expect to see Norton Healthcare Inc. and the University of Louisville back in court on June 10. That’s as a long-running legal dispute between the two organizations continues to play out. [Business First]

Former Indiana state schools Superintendent Tony Bennett won’t face any criminal charges after an investigation into whether he misused state resources for his 2012 re-election campaign. [News & Tribune]

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]



How’ll That Waterfront Property End Up?

Have you seen this puppies and rainbows b.s. with Donna Hargens? Giving this woman a free pass is the last thing Louisville needs right now. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Police Department has ordered 988 body cameras from Arizona-based TASER International ahead of its upcoming body camera pilot program, the department confirmed Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

It’s a building and a company that dominates the downtown Louisville skyline and the city’s business community. For more than five decades, the healthcare giant Humana and its employees have remained an important piece of this area’s economic fabric. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader endorsed Hal Heiner over Jamie Comer, which is likely to push Comer over the edge behind closed doors. [H-L]

Researchers say children in Louisville are being sold for sex. The KristyLove Foundation is a first-of-its-kind shelter in Louisville created by a woman who escaped the sex trade and turned her heartbreak into healing. [WLKY]

Faith in humanity, restored. A worker in a Qdoba fast food restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky was caught on video feeding a customer who was unable to feed herself. [HuffPo]

A Louisville police chief says there’s a lot of work to be done to ease tensions between law enforcement and the community. He believes body cameras could be part of the answer. [WAVE3]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Waterfront Development Corp. wants two of its downtown properties just south of Waterfront Park to be developed. The agency asked on Thursday for development proposals for the properties. [WFPL]

Ha! Daniel Grossberg has an ad highlighting Jacob Conway’s blackmail/extortion/threat attempt. [Click the Clicky]

American Pharaoh strolled out of his trailer and into the stables with ease when he arrived at Pimlico Race Course Wednesday afternoon. [Business First]

The Floyd County Council voted 5-2 last week to cut $150,000 from the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter budget to help balance the county’s 2015 general fund. That won’t end well. [News & Tribune]