If GLI Backs It, It’s Bad News Bears

More than 600 well-paying jobs could be coming to Louisville as an out-of-state company partners with a local non-profit to form a Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WDRB]

David Keith thought the fight to save his neighborhood was over. [C-J/AKN]

If GLI backs something, you know it’s the worst thing on earth. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt says that if Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget is approved by the General Assembly, the Department of Education will face $72 million in reductions over the next two years. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville-based Passport Health Plan is partnering with Virginia-based Evolent Health to create the Medicaid Center of Excellence. [WLKY]

The FBI is joining a U.S. investigation into Flint, Michigan’s water contamination crisis, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

The Falls of the Ohio, a state park covered in fossils, is a perfect place to take pictures – expect for one thing. [WAVE3]

Legislation that would prohibit the General Assembly from diverting state lottery funds away from Kentucky’s need- and merit-based scholarship programs has cleared a House committee. [Press Release]

Jerome Perry doesn’t have many white neighbors. There are so few, in fact, that Perry can list the houses around him where white families live. Even the homes that are blocks away from his tidy yellow brick home on 45th Street in Louisville’s Westover neighborhood. [WFPL]

The United States is still lagging the world in the rollout of broadband. Look at the map and you’ll hate people like Brett Guthrie, Jim Waters and anyone associated with them even more than you already do. You’ll rage against just about any telecom-tied lobbyist you can think of after seeing it. Disgusting. [The Register]

Get ready to roll your eyes really hard at all the hype over this Omni hotel mess… [Business First]

After a little more than an hour of discussion Wednesday, the committee tasked with finding a possible compromise to the current weapons ban at the town’s municipal building came to some amicable starting points. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Enjoy The Snowpocalypse While It Lasts

Three people were murdered in Louisville Wednesday night, and homicide detectives are investigating a double shooting that left a woman gravely injured. [WDRB]

In a decision filed Jan. 11, an Administrative Law Judge ruled that the U.S. Department of Agriculture failed to prove that Wildlife in Need director Tim Stark was unfit to hold a federal exhibitor’s license. [C-J/AKN]

Big-box grocery chains and liquor store lobbyists continue to scuffle over the latest attempt to lift Indiana’s longtime ban on Sunday carryout alcohol sales. [WHAS11]

The Republican-controlled state Senate has approved a bill that requires a woman to have a face-to-face meeting with a doctor before having an abortion. [H-L]

An investigation is underway after a man’s body was found in a home Wednesday night. [WLKY]

That awkward moment when your dad thinks your rival will best you in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) must have been pretty bummed when his father, former Congressman Ron Paul, admitted that it’s likely Donald Trump will become the GOP’s candidate for president. [HuffPo]

The first major snowfall of the season serves as a good reminder to always be prepared when you are driving. [WAVE3]

Last year looks like it was an unwelcome watershed for the embattled U.S. coal industry. Power companies in 2015 for the first time may have burned more natural gas than coal to generate electricity, according to analysts who attribute it to the cheapest gas prices in 16 years and a record number of coal-fired plants retired from service because of the high cost of meeting environmental regulations. [Reuters]

A legislative panel has passed a bill that would allow Louisville Metro Police officers to work more than 40 hours a week without being paid overtime. [WFPL]

Kevin Schiller had no idea what hit him. With 21 years on the job, the building engineer for Macy’s department stores had been in and out of every nook and cranny of many of the retail giant’s Texas stores, including the storage room in the Macy’s in Denton, Texas. [NPR]

If you’re a Kroger customer, you soon could be grocery shopping from the comfort of your home. [Business First]

For about $30,000, Performance Services was hired to perform the facilities study for West Clark Community Schools in preparation for their November 2016 referendum. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Ramsey Continues To Muck Things Up

In November, the University of Louisville Board of Trustees filed a motion in Franklin Circuit Court to dismiss a lawsuit by the Kentucky Justice Resource Center contending the board has too few minority members in violation of state law. [WDRB]

The city must pay former Jefferson County Constable David Whitlock about $33,000 in wages for more than five years of unpaid work, a Jefferson Circuit Court judge has ruled, and may owe other peace officers similar back salaries. [C-J/AKN]

A man whose drone was shot down over a Bullitt County home is now suing that shooter in federal court. [WHAS11]

Really, there aren’t more pressing educational issues to tackle instead of pandering in an election year? A Kentucky Republican state senator from London has introduced a bill that he said could have prevented biblical references from being cut from a presentation of A Charlie Brown Christmas at a Johnson County elementary school. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some southern Indiana families face an uncertain future after city officials in Charlestown revived controversial plans that could lead to tearing down a neighborhood. [WLKY]

The nation’s largest LGBT civil rights organization, Human Rights Campaign, endorsed Hillary Clinton for president on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

A routine appointment vote this month for the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board was anything but routine after a Louisville Metro councilman asked to table or postpone a vote to reappoint two people to that board. [WAVE3]

A federal judge on Tuesday ruled President Obama cannot use executive privilege to keep records on the “fast and furious” gun-tracking program from Congress. [The Hill]

Superintendent Donna Hargens says Jefferson County Public Schools is working to ensure that Louisville families are aware of its offerings in anticipation of a new push for state charter school legislation. [WFPL]

One European country can’t seem to stop breaking records when it comes to wind power. [ThinkProgress]

Is your favorite Louisville restaurant making the grade? [Business First]

The Clark County Clerk’s office was granted an $10,800 additional appropriation this week in part to help with transferring the influx of Jeffersonville city court cases that are coming in. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]

Council’s Following Frankfort Off A Cliff

The principal at a top performing JCPS school is concerned about losing teachers. [WDRB]

In a stunning move, Democrat David Tandy said Tuesday he will not seek a fourth term and will forgo a bid to serve a second consecutive term as Metro Council president. Most political observers were the opposite of stunned. Tandy’s been attacked the past year by the Stumbo Democrats – the anti-progressives who learned how to play dirty at the hands of David Yates, Stumbo’s former deputy. On top of that, Tandy has a history of running from fights. Reference: Cordish, everything Abramson ever tried, nearly everything the corrupt Jim King pushed. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. Nothing’s new in 2016. [WHAS11]

Mitch McConnell says a Republican takeover of the statehouse is inevitable. He’s right. But it’ll only last a few years. [H-L]

Making an already difficult system worse. TARC will be adjusting service on seven bus routes beginning Jan. 31. Most of the service changes involve minor adjustments to pick-up times in response to traffic conditions and delays. [WLKY]

Of course Indiana bigots want to fine transgendered individuals for using the “wrong” restroom. [HuffPo]

There’s a new rally cry to help prevent juveniles from getting into trouble late at night. Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad has been asking for a curfew law that is easier for officers to enforce for nearly two years. Now, Louisville Metro Council Members are asking questions. [WAVE3]

A foreclosure case involving Land of Tomorrow Productions LLC, the company that owns the Funtown Mountain property in Cave City, is moving forward, according to action taken during Barren Circuit Court on Monday morning. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Just what Louisville needs, another Greg Fischer protege! [WFPL]

An emotional US President Barack Obama has unveiled new restrictions on gun purchases, saying the “constant excuses for inaction” have to stop. [BBC]

Just a few days before Christmas, the Oldham Chamber and Economic Development named a new leader it believes can march the county toward new heights. [Business First]

Clark County is soon to undergo an inventory and assessment of signs in the county, to comply with federal regulations. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Will Ruin Your Wednesday

Median household income was flat or declined in all but four of Kentucky’s 120 counties in the years following the Great Recession, according to new Census Bureau data. [WDRB]

Kentucky State Reformatory was overcrowded and hazardous for inmates and staff before inmates’ federal lawsuit. [C-J/AKN]

Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. [WHAS11]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

A program that allows Lexington parking ticket recipients to cover their fines with canned goods for the hungry has collected 5 tons of food during the holidays. [WLKY]

The Obama administration on Monday defended its deportation tactics and confirmed it has begun raids on families, despite Democratic candidates and immigrant advocates saying officials could be sending mothers and children to their deaths. [HuffPo]

Twenty-eight bottles of the most sought-after bourbon will be available to the public, after it is released from the court. [WAVE3]

Or will they? Franklin County’s sheriff says the bourbon will be destroyed. [H-L]

Mega road fund cuts were initiated by Matt Bevin and almost no one noticed. But we did. [Page One]

A pair of community groups are hosting a forum next week that aims to discuss the state of race relations in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. manufacturing contracted further in December as lower oil prices undercut spending in the energy sector while construction spending fell in November for the first time in nearly 1-1/2 years, suggesting the economy ended 2015 with less momentum. [Reuters]

Springhurst Health and Rehab is undergoing a $5.2 million expansion project that should be done by mid-2016. [Business First]

Patti Hall saw a need in her Sellersburg community that wasn’t being fulfilled, so about two years ago, she decided to fill it. [News & Tribune]