Another Week of UofL Messes Begins

Leaders at the University of Louisville and its affiliated foundation agreed Friday on the process for hiring a special auditor to examine questionable spending by the foundation – a move that averts a potential lawsuit by the university against the foundation. [WDRB]

A group will host a series of eight public forums statewide to alert people about possible changes to the state Medicaid program and seek comments, with the first one scheduled Sept. 26 in Morehead. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Smoketown neighborhood was buzzing Friday morning, Sept. 23. Hundreds of people volunteered as part of Habitat for Humanity’s “Love Your Neighborhood” initiative, building two new Habitat for Humanity homes, cleaning up sidewalks and parks, and doing repairs on existing homes. One of those homes belongs to Ellen Sloan, who moved into her Habitat house seven years ago. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Supreme Court dealt a decisive blow to Gov. Matt Bevin’s executive power Thursday, finding that he exceeded his statutory authority by cutting state universities’ budgets by 2 percent last spring, after the General Assembly had already appropriated their funding. [H-L]

A new law meant to give some felons a second chance by expunging their criminal records is causing confusion and disagreement. [WLKY]

Donald Trump said Wednesday he finally gave up pushing conspiracy theories about President Barack Obama’s birthplace because it was politically convenient to do so. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Councilwoman Mary Woolridge got stuck in an elevator at City Hall. [WAVE3]

A new study that examines some major health care proposals from the presidential candidates finds that Donald Trump would cause about 20 million to lose coverage while Hillary Clinton would provide coverage for an additional 9 million people. [AP]

Leaders of the University of Louisville and its foundation pledged Thursday to continue working through their differences even amid more public dissent. [WFPL]

As his two-term presidency draws to a close, Barack Obama is looking back—at the legacies of his predecessors, as well as his own—and forward, to the freedom of life after the White House. In a wide-ranging conversation with one of the nation’s foremost presidential historians, he talks about his ambitions, frustrations, and the decisions that still haunt him. [Vanity Fair]

Members of the University of Louisville board of trustees and the University of Louisville Foundation board of directors sparred Thursday about oversight of a special audit of the foundation’s finances. [Business First]

Concerns about vacation time and caseload led to an investigation into Clark County Chief Public Defender Amber Shaw, who last week was asked to resign less than three months after being hired. [News & Tribune]

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Fight The Urge To Roll Your Eyes At The UofL Foundation…

As LMPD Chief Steve Conrad met with neighbors at a peace walk in the California neighborhood Tuesday night, some of the rank and file met with their union. [WDRB]

Promising a “new era of harmony” between the University of Louisville and its foundation, the foundation’s new chairwoman has announced she’s formed a committee to review its governance and create “a structure of which the entire community can be proud.” [C-J/AKN]

The University of Louisville Foundation will meet for the first time Friday with its newly elected chairwoman. [WHAS11]

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission wants more time to complete its environmental review of a proposed conversion of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline that runs through Kentucky. [H-L]

The Louisville Water Company has scheduled another public meeting on a controversial power generator. [WLKY]

The entire full-time University of Kentucky journalism faculty is calling for UK President Eli Capilouto to drop his suit against the school’s student newspaper and apologize for criticism leveled at the paper and its editor at a Board of Trustees meeting last Friday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro police are investigating whether someone with a weapon followed a Jefferson County Public School bus on its after school route. [WAVE3]

Police in Florida and other states are building up private DNA databases, in part by collecting voluntary samples from people not charged with — or even suspected of — any particular crime. [ProPublica]

A new report says some Kentuckians could be drinking a cancer-causing chemical called chromium-6. [WFPL]

If you’re a voter who cares about stopping climate change, you really need to read Donald Trump’s newest economic policy plan. [ThinkProgress]

Developers of the $60 million South Pointe Commons in Fern Creek are wasting no time after winning a major court battle last month. [Business First]

Legislation up for consideration could cause budget headaches for Greater Clark County Schools — and other districts across the state — as it prepares to finalize 2017 budgets next month. [News & Tribune]

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Maybe Stop The Whitewast That Is Claiming Louisville Is Mega-Super-OMG Compassionate And Focus On Crime? That’d Be A Good Place To Begin

We all want gun violence to end but when will we give people a reason to end it? [WDRB]

After a school security monitor slammed a girl’s head into a table at Breckinridge Metropolitan High School, her blood poured from a cut and pooled on the gym floor, a Jefferson County Public Schools investigator found. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s become a hotspot for crime and now some residents in Louisville’s Taylor Berry neighborhood say they are living in fear. [WHAS11]

Only 6 percent of Kentuckians lacked health insurance in 2015, a drop of 8.3 percentage points since 2013, according to fresh data from the U.S. Census Bureau. [H-L]

Metro police are investigating an overnight shooting in Pleasure Ridge Park. [WLKY]

New national polls show the presidential race close, but Clinton remains consistently ahead. [HuffPo]

There are reports of growing unrest among officers within the Louisville Metro Police Department. [WAVE3]

A national campaign led by Walmart, Lowe’s and other big companies to let employers opt out of workers’ comp insurance was dealt a blow after the Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled such plans unconstitutional. [ProPublica]

People fighting a proposed affordable housing development in Norton Commons are not getting the support of their Louisville Metro Council representative. [WFPL]

Turns out that when it comes to fighting climate change, most Americans are willing to pay a little more to get the job done. [ThinkProgress]

United Parcel Service Inc. is looking to hire 2,500 people in the Louisville area. The openings are a combination of seasonal and permanent jobs , and they include part-time package handlers, drivers and driver-helpers. [Business First]

When Joshua Rose and Adam Miller started the Family and Friends Community Center, it was with the the hope that people of all faiths and non-faiths, with various backgrounds, could come together to share ideas to help the community. [News & Tribune]

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Praying To End Violent Crime Is Like Wishing In One Hand, Taking A You-Know-What In The Other

Uh, sure, that’s going to work… because he has so many other times it’s been tried. Louisville Metro Police representatives say it’s time to get the city’s clergy involved in curbing recent violence. [WDRB]

Splitting up West Clark Community Schools could be messy, experts say, but some board members are willing to support such a move under the right financial conditions and if it’s what the community wants. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police are investigating a shooting in the Taylor-Berry neighborhood. [WHAS11]

One of the most scandalous people to ever work at UK is finally biting the dust. Michael Karpf, who led UK HealthCare as it mushroomed in size over the past 13 years, has announced he will retire next year. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WLKY aired a commercial-free, in-depth discussion on Saturday examining the critical racial issues facing the Louisville community. [WLKY]

These racists just won’t quit. Add Islamophobia to Republican lawmaker Steve King’s growing resume of ignorance. [HuffPo]

A man was fatally shot near the Newburg neighborhood late Sunday night. [WAVE3]

Ford Motor Co’s 2017 financial performance will decline from this year as it increases spending on “emerging opportunities” like self-driving cars and other costs rise, the No. 2 U.S.-based automaker said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin says a scheduled court hearing on the University of Louisville’s accreditation is “pointless” and says he will not present expert testimony as requested by a judge. [WFPL]

President Obama highlighted the world’s oceans Thursday as both a unique victim of climate change and a key resource in the fight against it. [The Hill]

21c Museum Hotels is partnering with a major investor that will allow it to develop $250 million in new hotel projects. [Business First]

To many residents who live along Spring and Elm streets, one-way to two-way street conversions downtown are more than a matter of convenience. [News & Tribune]

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Is The Ramsey Hangover Gone Yet?

One-hundred bicycles were given to children Saturday in memory of boxing legend Muhammad Ali. [WDRB]

Members of the county’s teachers union have voted to approve a tentative two-year salary agreement with Jefferson County Public Schools that would give teachers additional raises in addition to their experience-based step raises. [C-J/AKN]

WARING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Several major developments highlighted the University of Louisville Foundation gathered for its annual meeting Friday with the resignation of Dr. James Ramsey being as big as any. [WHAS11]

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is unlikely to approve changes to Kentucky’s Medicaid program that would interfere with its “extremely successful” progress at helping more people get health insurance, a top official said Wednesday. [John Cheves]

Bond is set at $100,000 for a man police say led them on a high-speed chase after a shooting. [WLKY]

Police shot and killed a teenager in Columbus, Ohio, on Wednesday night following a reported armed robbery. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Kentucky Harm Reduction Coalition is offering overdose prevention training and free Narcan kits on Monday. [WAVE3]

Of course Brown-Forman is fighting the legalization of marijuana – if not with dollars, then with ignorance like this. [The Intercept]

[Yet Another] study shows that Kentucky has the worst-funded pension system in the nation, compounded by the fact that of all the states, the commonwealth is doing the worst at paying off its pension debt. [WFPL]

Guess which borderline racist, definitely homophobic PR guy pushed this story on Reid Wilson. In November 2014, days after Republicans recaptured control of the U.S. Senate in the midterm elections, Mitch McConnell called Kentucky state Rep. Jonathan Shell to complain. McConnell had just scored a huge reelection win, and when the 114th Congress gaveled into session, he would fulfill his lifelong goal of becoming majority leader. [The Hill]

Fifth Third Bancorp plans to close another 44 branches across its footprint, marking its second major round of branch closings in the past year. [Business First]

Clark Memorial is offering a flu shot clinic from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, in the main lobby of the hospital. [News & Tribune]

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Did You Survive The Weekend Again?

Who does this mean think he is lecturing? LMPD Chief Steve Conrad sat down with WDRB on Thursday, and he talked about what every parent should be doing to keep Louisville’s kids out of gangs. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is considering doing a comprehensive review of its student assignment plan that determines where students attend school. [C-J/AKN]

Under the leadership of University of Louisville Foundation President James Ramsey, the value of the university’s foundation – adjusted for inflation – dropped 19 percent, or $131 million, from 2006 through April this year. [More C-J/AKN]

Woah, it’s been a minute since Louisville has seen a pedestrian death – at least a few days. A pedestrian was struck by a vehicle on East Main Street near Slugger Field. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees are threatening to sue the school’s foundation for what they see as a lack of accountability in the university’s fundraising arm. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The University of Louisville board of trustees passed a resolution Friday threatening to sue the U of L Foundation if the latter body does not release financial information requested by the trustees and submit to an external audit. [WLKY]

A major ruling expected Friday from a federal judge could derail construction of a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Starting in November, the Louisville Water Company will begin a three year project to replace one of the company’s oldest water mains. [WAVE3]

The notes are handwritten on a legal pad and provide a verbatim account of the shock, pain and grim determination aboard Air Force One on Sept. 11, 2001. [Reuters]

In an effort to clean up a “culture of secrecy,” the University of Louisville Board of Trustees voted Friday to potentially sue its own foundation. [WFPL]

At last, Bill Clinton could not help himself. He paced the stage during a speech on Tuesday in North Carolina, holding his microphone close. He raised his left index finger. And at once, the meandering address turned sharply, and without prompting, to his charitable foundation, a magnet for criticism in recent weeks. [NY Times]

Big insurers say they don’t want the government to release data on what they bid to provide Medicare Advantage plans. [News & Tribune]

Teresa Bottorff-Perkins will remain as a candidate for Greater Clark County Schools’ board after her candidacy was challenged before the Clark County Election Board in a meeting Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

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Violence & Poverty In Compassionate City? Surely That’s Not Our Reality

Violence and poverty took center stage at a west Louisville forum on Wednesday. [WDRB]

A war between two rival gangs has left several wounded and dead this summer, including a 14-year-old and 21-year-old whose funerals are Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Thursday, August 18 started as a normal day on the job for Metro Parks and Recreation workers’ Ricky Duncan and Bryan Haynes.
“Clean up the park, pick up paper, deliver picnic tables, clean grills,” said Duncan.
[WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky violated the state’s Open Records Act by refusing to disclose documents the Herald-Leader requested concerning a Hazard cardiology practice that UK once owned, the attorney general’s office has ruled. [John Cheves]

Blaine Hudson may be a big deal for some but don’t forget that he allowed – literally – most of what Robert Felner did to occur. He knew it was happening and enabled the shenanigans. [WLKY]

Donald Trump paid the IRS a $2,500 penalty this year, an official at Trump’s company said, after it was revealed that Trump’s charitable foundation had violated tax laws by giving a political contribution to a campaign group connected to Florida’s attorney general. [WaPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Interim University of Louisville President Dr. Neville Pinto sounded off Wednesday over letters from donors threatening to withhold millions of dollars in donations. [WAVE3]

Three federal prisons in California and others nationwide appear to be falling short in preparing inmates for safe release into society, investigators are warning. [McClatchy]

Work is beginning in earnest to develop a plan to take Louisville into the next two decades. [WFPL]

Donnie Gaddis picked the wrong county to sell 15 oxycodone pills to an undercover officer. If Mr. Gaddis had been caught 20 miles to the east, in Cincinnati, he would have received a maximum of six months in prison, court records show. In San Francisco or Brooklyn, he would probably have received drug treatment or probation, lawyers say. [NY Times]

The 11-day Kentucky State Fair attracted an attendance of 564,937 for its 112th outing, held at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville. That’s down slightly from the recorded 2015 attendance of 601,672. [Business First]

Democratic candidate Shelli Yoder, running for the Ninth Congressional District, released the last five years of her tax returns, and she is calling on her opponent, Trey Hollingsworth, to do the same. [News & Tribune]

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