You Can Feel The Derby Fest Excitement

Violent, detailed posts about a planned shooting at New Albany High School are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to a young woman’s Facebook account that’s out of her control. [WDRB]

Investigators are still days from getting a closer look inside General Electric’s Appliance Park’s Building 6, but plan to start with the massive structure’s southwest corner. [C-J/AKN]

This is the important news the folks at WHAS11 thought you needed. A British politician was caught eating a hot dog with a knife and fork. [WHAS11]

Jefferson County Public Schools is asking for a waiver to keep the test scores of some immigrant students who are not proficient in English from being counted against their schools. [H-L]

On Wednesday morning, Louisville paddles closer to the Great Steamboat Race. [WLKY]

A federal appeals court on Tuesday said Larry Flynt, the publisher of Hustler magazine, had a right to weigh in on two lawsuits challenging how Missouri conducts executions. [HuffPo]

A crowd of some 1,500 Paul supporters attended his 2016 Presidential campaign kickoff that included three of the four Republicans running to become Kentucky’s next Governor. [WAVE3]

Kentucky senator Rand Paul announced Tuesday his plans to run for president in 2016, with the libertarian becoming the second Republican to officially declare his candidacy. Here are some key facts to know about the first-term senator. [The Onion]

On the first day of its new HIV clinic, the Community Outreach Center in Austin, Ind., is quiet. [WFPL]

An interview with Sen. Rand Paul on Wednesday got testy as the libertarian-leaning Kentucky senator, fresh off launching his presidential campaign, battled suggestions he had changed his views on foreign policy. [The Hill]

Friday morning’s fire at GE’s Appliance Park has affected more than just the company, its employees and nearby residents. [Business First]

Democratic Party Chairman Tom Galligan believes the newest addition to the Clark County Sheriff’s Merit Board is problematic on a number of levels, but Sheriff Jamey Noel doesn’t see an issue. [News & Tribune]

LMPD’s WASP Problem Is Front & Center

The building formerly occupied by the restaurant Taco Punk in the NuLu neighborhood has a new owner. [WDRB]

Three teachers from duPont Manual High are challenging longtime Jefferson County Teachers Association leader Brent McKim in the union’s presidential election, saying they want to see the union push harder to fix the state’s woefully underfunded teacher pension system. [C-J/AKN]

Students at Brooklawn School will soon be getting their hands dirty all part of the learning process. [WHAS11]

Five barrels seized last week from behind a shed in Franklin County do contain Wild Turkey bourbon, according to a statement from Gruppo Campari, the distillery’s parent. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city apparently can’t get enough of this story. A 73-year-old Louisville woman was found dead in an old septic tank Tuesday night. [WLKY]

These bills, it turns out, are essentially efforts to undermine Wall Street reform and Obamacare while greenlighting pollution. [HuffPo]

Oh, looky, LMPD has begun its revisionist history tour with its religious pretty boy who fancies himself an actor. [WAVE3]

When a four-year-old comes home from Pre-K proudly announcing that she spent her “choice time” playing on the computer, what’s a parent to do? [NPR]

Louisville Gas and Electric is still on track to open the company’s natural gas-fired power plant in Louisville in May, as it retires the current Cane Run coal power plant. The new power plant won’t produce coal ash, but 60 years worth of old ash will remain on site. [WFPL]

Several battleground states are planning ballot measures that could force presidential contenders to take firm stances on marijuana legalization. [The Hill]

Clifton’s Pizza Co. has been a Louisville and Frankfort Avenue institution for more than two decades and will celebrate its 25th anniversary this weekend. [Business First]

An appeal hearing over the New Albany Police Merit Commission’s decision to fire Officer Laura Schook has been continued at her request. [News & Tribune]

Abramson Having Fun Getting Lost In Warshington

Just on the other side of Interstate 65 from the University of Louisville campus, a block that once contained an aging apartment building and unkempt rental houses is now the latest example of the student-housing arms race at U of L. [WDRB]

Ford Motor Co. announced Thursday morning that hourly workers would receive an average profit-sharing check of $6,900. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville police continue to investigate a stabbing that took place on Muhammad Ali Boulevard near 26th Street around 5:30 Saturday night. [WHAS11]

With welders on site, members of Habitat for Humanity made strides toward history for the state organization as they recently worked to convert a shipping container into a home. [H-L]

WARNING!RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Clark County officials continue to crack down on contraband through raids at the county jail. [WLKY]

Does your member of congress have policies in place protecting LGBT staffers from discrimination? [HuffPo]

Jerry Abramson says five terms as Louisville’s mayor gave him the experience to assist President Barack Obama’s administration. [WAVE3]

Kentuckians want to see their governors in the flesh and in their hometowns. And they expect him or her to be “one of us.” That’s a challenge for the stiff and stylish Louisville Democrat. [Ronnie Ellis]

As a national debate about law enforcement practices gripped the nation, formal complaints by community members against Louisville Metro Police were at a five-year low. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s fiscal 2016 budget would impose a one-time 14 percent tax on some $2 trillion of accumulated U.S. corporate profits earned abroad and set up a 19 percent tax on future foreign earnings, a White House official said on Sunday. [Reuters]

Restaurants and food establishments are graded on a number of criteria, including cleanliness, food temperatures and labeling. [Business First]

A study conducted on parking and traffic in downtown Jeffersonville shows that the 20-block area will be seriously lacking in parking spots as future development continues. [News & Tribune]

No Poverty? Thousands Can’t Pay Their LG&E Bill

Louisville Metro Council elected leadership Monday night and there’s a few familiar faces in the leadership positions. [WDRB]

The local paper finally did a story about the minimum wage increase and this is what they came up with. [C-J/AKN]

Should everyone be skeptical about the new hotel plans? [More C-J/AKN]

Mayor Rick Richards pleaded guilty to drug trafficking but says that he is still innocent. [WHAS11]

Kentucky taxpayers will fork over about $3.56 million to pay for the 2015 General Assembly, which begins at noon Tuesday. Most of the money will go for legislative compensation. [H-L]

An investigation is underway into a garage fire near the Bullitt-Jefferson County line. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell are warily looking for areas of agreement as they begin a new chapter in a relationship that is likely to remain frosty but businesslike. [HuffPo]

Monday’s cold temperatures left some parents wondering if it was too cold for students, especially bus riders, to go to school. [WAVE3]

The cost of US war-making in the 13 years since the September 11 terrorist attacks reached a whopping $1.6 trillion in 2014, according to a recent report by the Congressional Research Service (CRS). [Mother Jones]

Thousands of Jefferson County residents in jeopardy of having their heat cut off during the winter months will soon be allowed to apply for the Low-Income Heating Assistance Program. [WFPL]

Representative Phil Moffett, R-Louisville (32nd District) announced Monday his intention to file a bill for the 2015 session of Kentucky’s General Assembly that if passed would direct all counties that currently do not have an operating jail to consolidate their local jailer’s office with the county sheriff’s office. The proposal is the first bill filed by the newly elected House Republican. [Press Release]

Cunningham’s Restaurant on South Fourth Street closed Sunday night, but its owner is now saying that it’s not gone for good. [Business First]

A donation drive in December yielded much-needed supplies and even some cash for the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Begins 2nd Term Of Transparency & Compassion, Looks For New Scandals

Greg Fischer was sworn in for his second term as mayor. Just imagine what life would be like if he had a credible opponent. [WDRB]

After suspending his chief financial officer over the weekend following his arrest, Mayor Greg Fischer appointed Daniel Frockt as the interim chief. [C-J/AKN]

Finally, some news you can use. Drumroll please. The Girl Scouts are adding three new cookie varieties to their delicious ranks this year. [WHAS11]

What is now a row of dilapidated houses on York Street could soon become the anchor of Lexington’s first “live-work” community. The project, spearheaded by the North Limestone Community Development Corporation, would allow artists and craftsmen to live, work and sell goods out of their homes. [H-L]

Some businesses in southern Indiana have seen a dip in business lately and they’re blaming all the road construction taking place near the river. A new ad campaign is in the works aimed at giving those businesses a boost. [WLKY]

A member of the grand jury that ultimately decided not to indict former Ferguson, Missouri, Police Officer Darren Wilson in the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown is suing the prosecuting attorney in St. Louis County, accusing Robert McCulloch of mischaracterizing the grand jury process. [HuffPo]

Woah, this place was still alive? Cordish kills everything it gets near. A longtime downtown Louisville restaurant located on Fourth Street is closing its doors – at least for now. [WAVE3]

Kentuckians will soon be breathing a little easier. Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky, with help from Waste Services of the Bluegrass, is converting methane from a local landfill into renewable electricity to power Toyota’s Georgetown assembly plant. [Biomass Magazine]

The chief financial officer for Louisville Metro Government is on unpaid leave following his arrest Friday night on public intoxication and disorderly conduct charges. [WFPL]

The U.S.-led coalition launched 20 more air strikes against Islamic State in Syria and Iraq on Sunday and Monday, targeting fighters for the militant group and hitting its crude oil operations, according to the Combined Joint Task Force leading the operations. [Reuters]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. has completed its $195 million acquisition of Centerre Healthcare Corp., a Franklin, Tenn.-based company that operates inpatient rehabilitation hospitals. The deal was first announced in November. [Business First]

One thought dominated Paul Angela’s mind in the months leading up to his prison release: where he was going to live as a free man. [News & Tribune]

Housing Continues To Be An Afterthought Here

In November 2013, Mayor Greg Fischer formally declared Louisville’s interest in getting the same type of blazing-fast Internet connections that Google is bringing to a few select cities. More than a year later, two companies have expressed interest in bringing a fiber “gigabit” network to Louisville, but no work has begun. [WDRB]

Jefferson County has less public housing assistance than a year ago, long waiting lists and public housing remains heavily concentrated in west Louisville, according to the 2014 State of Metropolitan Housing Report released Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

The WHAS Crusade for Children is able to continue its noble mission of raising money for agencies, schools and hospitals to better the lives of special needs children, thanks to generous donations to the Crusade for Children Endowment fund. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Equine Education Project announced Friday that on Tuesday the board voted unanimously on a resolution stating that for the 2015 session it will not support casino legislation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Hundreds gathered at the Highland Baptist Church to remember the dozens killed this year here in Louisville. [WLKY]

An outgoing Senate Democrat wants to take federal money from low-income college students to pay student loan contractors, whose tactics toward borrowers have been criticized by consumer advocates, federal regulators and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. [HuffPo]

One week after a teenage girl was killed in Louisville’s West End, a new group is calling for residents to stop the violence and take back their communities. [WAVE3]

Ferguson, Mo., has captured the nation’s attention for the better part of the past four months. But in just a few short days in the national news, Eric Garner has become the political rallying point that Ferguson never has. A new poll shows considerably more unhappiness with the lack of an indictment in Garner’s case than in the one in Ferguson. And, perhaps most important as far as its impact goes, that unhappiness is significantly less connected to a person’s race. [WaPo]

Did anyone expect something less from one of the highest paid people in education? Please. Save the feigned outrage. As Michael McCall winds down his 16-year career as president of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, he will leave behind an operation that ran a budget deficit in his final three years. [WFPL]

Kentuckians have long known that Rand Paul’s outreach in the black community only started because he wants to run for the presidency. [Politico]

More than six months after construction started, Feast BBQ’s second location finally has an opening date. [Business First]

he Clark County Commissioners didn’t take any action on an ordinance that would add a $40 drainage fee to some residents’ property tax bills Thursday, but they heard about how unhappy some residents were about the new fee anyway. [News & Tribune]

A Million Bucks To Study Louisville’s Character

A new grant will help protect JCPS student athletes while they’re playing sports. The grant was officially accepted by JCPS during a board meeting on Monday night. [WDRB]

National preservationists will spend $1 million over the next three years to study Louisville, devising plans to help preserve smaller buildings in “character-rich” areas and neighborhoods and promote healthy, urban living. [C-J/AKN]

On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid. [WHAS11]

Really? We’re now just going to spread Kentucky Lottery games to the internet? What was that, again, about online gambling being the devil? [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! When will all of these murders end? Louisville Metro Police are investigating a fatal shooting in South Louisville and the victim has been identified. [WLKY]

On March 22, 1991, a visibly shaken and angered President George H.W. Bush said he was “sickened and outraged” by what he saw on television. That was the beating of black motorist Rodney King by a swarm of LAPD cops. A year later, following the acquittal of four LAPD cops by a Simi Valley jury with no blacks on it, Bush ordered then-Attorney General William Barr to begin the process of slapping federal civil rights charges on the four officers. [HuffPo]

Is Bobby Flay moving closer to buying a property in Louisville for a new restaurant? [WAVE3]

You can say a lot of things about the U.S. Congress. One thing you can’t really say, though, is that they’v(sic) been in Washington way too long. [WaPo]

When Polish artist Jakub Szczęsny arrived at the GE FirstBuild factory two weeks ago as the company’s first artist in residence, he expected his first day at work to play out like a scene from a mad scientist’s lab in American film. [WFPL]

A Seattle police plan to outfit officers with body cameras was back on for early December after the agency struck an unusual deal with an anonymous programmer whose massive public-records requests threatened to cripple the program, police said on Friday. [Reuters]

A Louisville-based farm has been named the agribusiness of the year in the Kentuckiana region. [Business First]

Removing legal jargon and condensing the city’s property codes into a concise form is the main purpose behind an ordinance that could be introduced by the New Albany City Council next month. [News & Tribune]