How Compassionate! Another Child Dead

Ugh, people are the absolute worst. Especially when they’re the type of Christianist who would attack someone for cracking a damn joke. [WDRB]

Nope, hot brown doesn’t put Louisville on any culinary list. The city is filled with amazing, affordable restaurants but get a damn grip on the hot brown front. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another child shot dead in Possumbilly Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

On a scale of 1 to 10, how disconnected from reality is the Metro Council? 30? 50? Youth curfews only make rich white people in St. Matthews feel safer. [H-L]

It’s an effort aimed at keeping youngsters on the right track. My Brother’s Keeper is sponsored by the Catholic Enrichment Center. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama has invited a businessman who helps low-income residents afford solar panels to the State of the Union. [HuffPo]

Maybe it’s time for people to calm down? Graffiti, including what appears to be Arabic text, was found spray painted on the wall of Fairdale High School on Saturday morning, JCPS officials confirmed. [WAVE3]

For the first time, you can easily search whether your hospital, clinic, pharmacy or health insurer has been named in patient privacy complaints, breaches or violations. [ProPublica]

The Louisville Affordable Housing Trust Fund is looking for a new executive director after the departure of Rachel Hurst. [WFPL]

US jobs growth remained solid in December as the economy added 292,000 jobs, beating expectations. [BBC]

Because there’s nothing more pressing at the University of Louisville. [Business First]

A decision on what company will carry out the facilities and feasibility studies for West Clark Community Schools’ referendum project will come next week, after the board interviewed six firms Thursday night. [News & Tribune]

Go To The Falls Visitor Center! It’s A Hidden Gem In The Metro

It seems the fight is over for a seat on Jeffersonville’s City Council, but that hasn’t stopped one candidate from throwing some verbal punches. [WDRB]

Oh, god, Lynn Winter is at it again. It’s time for Louisville to move on. Living in the past is not working. [C-J/AKN]

The warm winter that we have been seeing is bad for business in Paoli, Indiana. [WHAS11]

Fewer people in the state are getting their GED because of more rigorous standards and the move to a computer-based test, according to a report released Tuesday by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [H-L]

Thursday marks the third anniversary of the fatal Christmas Eve attack on a young man in west Louisville. [WLKY]

The federal government’s case against the man suspected of helping the San Bernardino shooters would be weaker if the NRA and other gun rights groups had their way in court. [HuffPo]

It’s absolutely terrible that this guy got shot. But his claim not to know why he was shot? Really? Sure, it could be an accident here in Compassionate City because there’s a new gun murder every five seconds. Just unlikely the son of a high-profile attorney doesn’t know why he got shot. [WAVE3]

With all that’s going on in the world — from record-breaking warm spells to rapidly melting ice sheets — it’s easy to ignore something so seemingly mundane as dirt. But scientists at the University of Sheffield’s Grantham Center for Sustainable Futures suggest that we ignore dirt at our own peril. [ThinkProgress]

Norton Healthcare and the University of Louisville have released the details of the agreement the parties reached Friday to settle an ongoing dispute over Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WFPL]

The Pittsburgh City Council on Monday voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, falling in line with a growing number of municipalities that have taken similar actions in recent years, city officials said. Meanwhile, Kentucky twiddles its thumbs. [Reuters]

The city of Louisville has green-lighted a contract with CTC Consultants in order to chart how to best connect Louisville to the KentuckyWired fiber optic Internet cable network. [Business First]

Visitors to the new Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at and after its grand reopening Jan. 8 can expect an immersive learning experience as they travel through the history of the falls and the affects and relation to the region. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

JCPS Is Turning Into LMAS. No Joke.

JCPS has hired O’Dell Henderson to be the district’s new director of labor management and employee relations amid an open investigation involving him and the director of Louisville Metro Animal Services. Now the Animal Services messes are moving to JCPS. This city is screwed up. [WDRB]

Louisville is beginning to take significant action on affordable housing, but more needs to be done to make sure the city is in compliance with recent federal changes to avoid fair housing violations against protected classes, according to the 2015 State of Metropolitan Housing Coalition. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s amazing how technology can change someone’s life. Translation: UofL needs some positive spin in local media. [WHAS11]

Boxing legend Muhammad Ali on Wednesday criticized Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump’s proposal to ban Muslims from entering the United States, calling on Muslims “to stand up to those who use Islam to advance their own personal agenda.” [H-L]

A new movement aims to give local teenagers and young adults alternatives to crime and violence. [WLKY]

How can a small nation of just 330,000 people, located in the middle of the North Atlantic, be fully self-sufficient when it comes to energy for house heating? And not just independent — but with 99% of it’s energy production renewable. [HuffPo]

A JCPS employee and the mother of two students are accused in a lawsuit by the mother of another student who was allegedly bullied and beaten at school. [WAVE3]

Wanna see what went down with Adam Edelen’s audit of West Buechel? [External PDF Link]

Across the Atlantic Ocean, governments and businesses are taking big steps toward renewable energy. Their transition could provide lessons for Kentucky. [WFPL]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

MozzaPi LLC, a food-truck and catering service, plans to open a bricks-and-mortar restaurant. [Business First]

See the journey of the Ohio River Bridges Project, from the first call for its initiative to the final completion of the Abraham Lincoln Bridge. [News & Tribune]

THE SUPER LICE ARE COMING FOR US

And we don’t mean the teevee newsreaders constantly hyping up Will Russell’s sad state…

A fire in Old Louisville that left three people dead has now been ruled arson. The fire happened on South Second Street in early July. [WDRB]

You should definitely go to this! The Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center in Clarksville will reopen in January with a completely revamped exhibit space including state of the art interactive exhibits. [C-J/AKN]

Wasn’t this flipping great? Around 9 p.m. Sept 21 Johnson and Cornelius escaped from the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections Community Corrections Center on East Chestnut Street. The inmates used bed sheets to facilitate an escape. [WHAS11]

Fees will be waived at several recreation areas in the Daniel Boone National Forest this weekend to celebrate National Public Lands Day. [H-L]

Some Jefferson County Public School pre-kindergarten students are using drama to learn math and other subjects. [WLKY]

The amount of money the world has pledged to divest from fossil fuels now exceeds $2.6 trillion, a group of policymakers, philanthropists and activists announced Tuesday. The figure is 50 times higher than the $52 billion that had been divested exactly one year ago. [HuffPo]

OH GOD WE’RE ALL GONNA GET THE SUPER LICE! The treatment-resistant form of lice scientists are calling ‘super lice’ has been found in 25 states including Kentucky and Indiana. [WAVE3]

If we’re handcuffing autistic children at the elbows or throwing them in jail overnight, then we’re failing them. If we’re hitting kids with felony weapons charges for bringing fishing tackle to school, then we’re failing them. And if we’re using suspensions (which absolutely do not work) against students who build clocks, or twirl pencils, or write about pot, or chew their Pop-Tarts into the shape of a gun, then we’re failing them. [Click this Clicky]

More than 60 percent of Louisville’s occupied housing structures are detached, single-family buildings, according to a Washington Post analysis of U.S. Census data. [WFPL]

Remember LMPD Chief White? He’s still up to the same old crap. [Click this Clicky]

My Morning Jacket drummer Patrick Hallahan, attorney Jon Salomon and chef Bobby Benjamin will open a new restaurant called Butchertown Grocery this November in Louisville. [Business First]

The conversation has only just begun. That’s the goal of Facing Homelessness: A Community Conversation, a public forum hosted by the News and Tribune and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]

Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]

Glad A Local Will Be Your Governator?

Portland neighbors say they’re drowning in water bills that are twice the normal cost. The problems on one block uncovered a bigger issue for Louisville Water Company customers. [WDRB]

Which David Jones crony will get the job this time? Weeks after Superintendent Donna Hargens informed Helene Kramer that her contract was not being renewed, Jefferson County Public Schools has posted the position for its chief communications and community relations officer. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters, police and Animal Control entered a home in the 2200 block of Beargrass Avenue just off Bardstown Road after hearing from multiple neighbors Tuesday. Neighbors were concerned after finding pet abandonment notices on the door, overgrown weeds in the yard and hearing constant barking inside the home. [WHAS11]

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five greater Clark County schools may close as part of a plan the superintendent believes will help the district. [WLKY]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

Some people are just the absolute worst. [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering what really happened to Jamie Comer in the gubernatorial primary? It’s much more simple than he would have you believe. [Page One]

Once again, Louisville has ranked poorly on the annual ranking of city park systems from a national group. [WFPL]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

Too many tables and too little kitchen space — that’s been a pain point for Big Four Burgers & Beer in Jeffersonville since it opened in December 2013. [Business First]

Samuel pointed to tattoos on his forearms and chest to count how many times he’s been incarcerated in Clark County jail. [News & Tribune]

Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]