Fischer Begins 2nd Term Of Transparency & Compassion, Looks For New Scandals

Greg Fischer was sworn in for his second term as mayor. Just imagine what life would be like if he had a credible opponent. [WDRB]

After suspending his chief financial officer over the weekend following his arrest, Mayor Greg Fischer appointed Daniel Frockt as the interim chief. [C-J/AKN]

Finally, some news you can use. Drumroll please. The Girl Scouts are adding three new cookie varieties to their delicious ranks this year. [WHAS11]

What is now a row of dilapidated houses on York Street could soon become the anchor of Lexington’s first “live-work” community. The project, spearheaded by the North Limestone Community Development Corporation, would allow artists and craftsmen to live, work and sell goods out of their homes. [H-L]

Some businesses in southern Indiana have seen a dip in business lately and they’re blaming all the road construction taking place near the river. A new ad campaign is in the works aimed at giving those businesses a boost. [WLKY]

A member of the grand jury that ultimately decided not to indict former Ferguson, Missouri, Police Officer Darren Wilson in the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown is suing the prosecuting attorney in St. Louis County, accusing Robert McCulloch of mischaracterizing the grand jury process. [HuffPo]

Woah, this place was still alive? Cordish kills everything it gets near. A longtime downtown Louisville restaurant located on Fourth Street is closing its doors – at least for now. [WAVE3]

Kentuckians will soon be breathing a little easier. Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky, with help from Waste Services of the Bluegrass, is converting methane from a local landfill into renewable electricity to power Toyota’s Georgetown assembly plant. [Biomass Magazine]

The chief financial officer for Louisville Metro Government is on unpaid leave following his arrest Friday night on public intoxication and disorderly conduct charges. [WFPL]

The U.S.-led coalition launched 20 more air strikes against Islamic State in Syria and Iraq on Sunday and Monday, targeting fighters for the militant group and hitting its crude oil operations, according to the Combined Joint Task Force leading the operations. [Reuters]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. has completed its $195 million acquisition of Centerre Healthcare Corp., a Franklin, Tenn.-based company that operates inpatient rehabilitation hospitals. The deal was first announced in November. [Business First]

One thought dominated Paul Angela’s mind in the months leading up to his prison release: where he was going to live as a free man. [News & Tribune]

Housing Continues To Be An Afterthought Here

In November 2013, Mayor Greg Fischer formally declared Louisville’s interest in getting the same type of blazing-fast Internet connections that Google is bringing to a few select cities. More than a year later, two companies have expressed interest in bringing a fiber “gigabit” network to Louisville, but no work has begun. [WDRB]

Jefferson County has less public housing assistance than a year ago, long waiting lists and public housing remains heavily concentrated in west Louisville, according to the 2014 State of Metropolitan Housing Report released Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

The WHAS Crusade for Children is able to continue its noble mission of raising money for agencies, schools and hospitals to better the lives of special needs children, thanks to generous donations to the Crusade for Children Endowment fund. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Equine Education Project announced Friday that on Tuesday the board voted unanimously on a resolution stating that for the 2015 session it will not support casino legislation. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Hundreds gathered at the Highland Baptist Church to remember the dozens killed this year here in Louisville. [WLKY]

An outgoing Senate Democrat wants to take federal money from low-income college students to pay student loan contractors, whose tactics toward borrowers have been criticized by consumer advocates, federal regulators and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. [HuffPo]

One week after a teenage girl was killed in Louisville’s West End, a new group is calling for residents to stop the violence and take back their communities. [WAVE3]

Ferguson, Mo., has captured the nation’s attention for the better part of the past four months. But in just a few short days in the national news, Eric Garner has become the political rallying point that Ferguson never has. A new poll shows considerably more unhappiness with the lack of an indictment in Garner’s case than in the one in Ferguson. And, perhaps most important as far as its impact goes, that unhappiness is significantly less connected to a person’s race. [WaPo]

Did anyone expect something less from one of the highest paid people in education? Please. Save the feigned outrage. As Michael McCall winds down his 16-year career as president of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, he will leave behind an operation that ran a budget deficit in his final three years. [WFPL]

Kentuckians have long known that Rand Paul’s outreach in the black community only started because he wants to run for the presidency. [Politico]

More than six months after construction started, Feast BBQ’s second location finally has an opening date. [Business First]

he Clark County Commissioners didn’t take any action on an ordinance that would add a $40 drainage fee to some residents’ property tax bills Thursday, but they heard about how unhappy some residents were about the new fee anyway. [News & Tribune]

A Million Bucks To Study Louisville’s Character

A new grant will help protect JCPS student athletes while they’re playing sports. The grant was officially accepted by JCPS during a board meeting on Monday night. [WDRB]

National preservationists will spend $1 million over the next three years to study Louisville, devising plans to help preserve smaller buildings in “character-rich” areas and neighborhoods and promote healthy, urban living. [C-J/AKN]

On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid. [WHAS11]

Really? We’re now just going to spread Kentucky Lottery games to the internet? What was that, again, about online gambling being the devil? [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! When will all of these murders end? Louisville Metro Police are investigating a fatal shooting in South Louisville and the victim has been identified. [WLKY]

On March 22, 1991, a visibly shaken and angered President George H.W. Bush said he was “sickened and outraged” by what he saw on television. That was the beating of black motorist Rodney King by a swarm of LAPD cops. A year later, following the acquittal of four LAPD cops by a Simi Valley jury with no blacks on it, Bush ordered then-Attorney General William Barr to begin the process of slapping federal civil rights charges on the four officers. [HuffPo]

Is Bobby Flay moving closer to buying a property in Louisville for a new restaurant? [WAVE3]

You can say a lot of things about the U.S. Congress. One thing you can’t really say, though, is that they’v(sic) been in Washington way too long. [WaPo]

When Polish artist Jakub Szczęsny arrived at the GE FirstBuild factory two weeks ago as the company’s first artist in residence, he expected his first day at work to play out like a scene from a mad scientist’s lab in American film. [WFPL]

A Seattle police plan to outfit officers with body cameras was back on for early December after the agency struck an unusual deal with an anonymous programmer whose massive public-records requests threatened to cripple the program, police said on Friday. [Reuters]

A Louisville-based farm has been named the agribusiness of the year in the Kentuckiana region. [Business First]

Removing legal jargon and condensing the city’s property codes into a concise form is the main purpose behind an ordinance that could be introduced by the New Albany City Council next month. [News & Tribune]

Corrupt Politicians Occasionally Held Accountable

Ignore for a moment the reality that WDRB seems to have a serious problem with giving proper credit. Even their competitor stations properly source where they’re stealing stories. Let’s focus on Greg Fischer claiming those photographs were taken a decade ago. Yet another lie from Greg Fischer. [WDRB]

A Jefferson County teacher has been named Kentucky’s “Teacher of the Year.” [More WDRB]

Seems like only yesterday Michael Macfarlane’s campaign manager was telling us that John Yarmuth was toast. Interesting how that worked out. [C-J/AKN]

Glad to have a teevee station give credit where it’s due. Despite them trying to make the story about us, of course (calling/texting/trying to get us to do interviews). [WHAS11]

Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes is accusing Mitch McConnell of trying to take the right to vote away from black people. While at the same time treating the first black president as the devil. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Greg Fischer lied about the current Animal Services mess not having an impact on staff changes. Donald Robinson was forced to resign and there’s a damn criminal investigation going on. Absurd. [WLKY]

America has been doing income taxes wrong for more than 50 years. [HuffPo]

Two candidates vying for an open seat on Louisville’s Metro Council vowed to run a positive campaign in a district focused on traffic and taxes. [WAVE3]

Sure, Grimes’ refusal to say that she voted for the president, and her hollow explanation about upholding the Principles of Privacy at the Ballot Box, isn’t as important in the scheme of things as Mitch McConnell’s inability to articulate anything resembling a coherent Obamacare position. But it was pathetic. And also damaging to her reelection prospects in a way that few mentioned at the time: It’s a kick in the teeth to black voters, some of whom will be wondering, Why exactly should we support her candidacy, aside from the fact that she’s not Mitch McConnell? [Salon]

A pattern of urban neglect—vacant houses, a lack of access to to services—has the potential to spoil Louisville’s Smoketown neighborhood, according to a report released Tuesday. [WFPL]

That’s right — W. Keith Hall got indicted by a federal grand jury this week! [Page One]

The latest project from Hillbilly Tea owner Karter Louis will open Sunday, Oct. 26, in the Highlands. [Business First]

Floyd County is considering a move that could save up to $100,000 annually from the general fund. [News & Tribune]

Really? 5-Sentence Story On Big JCPS Pay Raise?

He sure seems like a nice guy. A Clarksville firefighter is behind bars after police say he shot a dog. Gary Crowe, Jr. is charged with attempted killing of a domestic animal and intimidation. [WDRB]

Because of course they gave them even more time. The Metro Board of Zoning Adjustment on Monday gave the JBS pork slaughter plant until March 16 to show that it has resolved outstanding air pollution control violations [C-J/AKN]

Tumbleweed, a Louisville based Tex-Mex restaurant, is set to appear in court September 30 after being served with an eviction notice after a breach of lease with Waterweed LLC for $17,000 in rent for August. [WHAS11]

The Fayette County School Board got an earful at its first public meeting since the auditor’s report. Fun fact: This guy has done far less than Montgomery County’s superintendent but Frankfort (Adam Edelen, who has staffers telling us they won’t waste their time in Montgomery County) is taking him more seriously. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man was killed after an officer involved shooting in the Russell neighborhood just after midnight in the 900 block of Esquire Alley. [WLKY]

Hundreds of military veterans received free marijuana during a special giveaway in Denver designed to show that pot can help ease their pain. [HuffPo]

Teachers in Jefferson County are set to receive a bonus come pay day. [WAVE3]

More than 120 world leaders – including President Barack Obama – kicked off a one-day United Nations’ summit on climate change in New York City by viewing What’s Possible, a short film on the urgency of global warming. [Bill Moyers]

Absolutely none of this disqualifies Ashley Miller from running for office. None of it. In fact, she should put it all on her campaign website. People would like her more. What DOES disqualify her? Being recruited and supported by Jennifer Moore, someone who has spent years personally attacking and demeaning anyone who doesn’t share her political bent. [WFPL]

The waves of warplanes and Tomahawk cruise missiles targeted the militants’ training compounds, storage facilities and finance center in an aggressive and risky operation that marked a new phase in the conflict. [WaPo]

Call us crazy but none of the tons of other restaurants are suffering as a result of non-existent traffic nightmares on East Market. No one wants to pay an arm and a leg for Mexican street food even if it’s delicious. And to everyone pushing them to start a food truck? That’s what they gave up to open a physical restaurant. [Business First]

On their way to updating a policy on naming facilities in schools, the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp. hashed out some more details on a first reading of the new language at Thursday’s board meeting. [News & Tribune]

What? There Are Homeless People In Louisville?

The biggest homeless camp in Louisville could soon be forced to move. About 40 people live in the homeless camp off Campbell Street and they say if they’re forced to leave, they aren’t sure where they’ll go. [WDRB]

The Falls of the Ohio State Park draws visitors for activities ranging from hiking and fishing to boating and picnicking. But the 390 million-year-old Devonian fossils were the main attraction on Saturday as volunteer naturalist Paul Olliges led a group of about 30 on an exploration of the outer fossil beds. [C-J/AKN]

A majority of Kentucky voters support the Obama administration’s proposal to raise the minimum wage from $7.25 per hour to $10.10 per hour, according to the WHAS11/Courier-Journal Bluegrass Poll released Saturday night. [WHAS11]

Benton was Team Mitch, but considering the intensely loyal army of aides McConnell has cultivated and kept over the years, it’s probably fair to say he was never really part of Mitch’s team. [Sam Youngman]

Louisville Metro police are investigating after a man was shot and killed in Pleasure Ridge Park. [WLKY]

Most people know Labor Day as an extra day off of work. Fewer know the holiday comes from a time when the government was offing workers. [HuffPo]

A violent act on Wednesday – the killing of a toddler and wounding of her mother outside a home – rattled a neighborhood. They rallied for peace this Labor Day weekend. [WAVE3]

International negotiators have been working for years on an agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions around the world to fight climate change. [The Hill]

Mayan ruins, the Pope’s impact on American politics and English gardens are some of the topics that will be discussed soon by University of Louisville professors during a fall luncheon series. [WFPL]

In an election that Republicans want to make all about President Barack Obama, the White House is determined to make him all but disappear in the battleground states that matter. [Politico]

One of the rubs of being a writer is you can’t include every good quote or tidbit of information into a story. Sometimes they just don’t quite fit into the story or the space allotted in the newspaper, and that’s what makes blog posts awesome. [Business First]

The third floor Assembly Room of the City-County Building was full of judges, lawyers, prosecutors and well-wishers. There was tons of food and a lot of smiling faces. [News & Tribune]

Holy Wow! Hell Has Truly Frozen Over In Louisville

This is big – can you believe it? We’re on the same page as the paper! WHAT! And it involves Greg Fischer! Essentially, the paper points out that he’s full of it. Because the jackass had the audacity to lie to the media after we’d already published a mountain of evidence. [C-J/AKN]

Authorities in Clarksville, Indiana are hoping the installation of a number of surveillance cameras will discourage criminals near Ashland Park. [WDRB]

Some Section 8 Louisville recipients will soon be asked to begin paying a minimum rent of $50 a month. The board of commissioners for the Louisville Metro Housing Authority unanimously approved a rent reform study Tuesday that will initiate a minimum rent for selected residents for the first time. However, unlike the controversial original proposal, those selected will be able to opt out. [More C-J/AKN]

A Louisville teen shot in the head Monday night continues to recover at University Hospital. [WHAS11]

One company, Star Coach in Atlanta, said the $456-a-day rate was legitimate. But Dan Neuen, the company’s vice president of operations, said he would have charged the campaign every day regardless of whether they used the bus. “If they’re paying 11 grand to have that bus wrapped for 266 days and use it however many days they want to use it? That’s a sweetheart deal,” Neuen said. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A woman beaten by her boyfriend was found stumbling down a Clarksville street, desperately calling out for help, police said. A couple of residents heard her cries and came to her rescue. [WLKY]

As American students return to classes in a public education system projected to be majority minority for the first time this fall, new test scores provide alarming evidence that students of color remain far behind their white counterparts. [HuffPo]

Ford and the United Auto Workers celebrated Tuesday after building their 100 wheelchair ramp for disabled residents. [WAVE3]

The he said, she said of the legal questions over how the campaign of Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes is renting her 45-foot campaign bus continued Wednesday as companies cited by the Grimes campaign take issue with the numbers and Jerry Lundergan’s business says they do not provide transportation services. [CN|2]

A report released Wednesday by a climate change nonprofit has ranked Louisville among the top 10 U.S. cities with a serious urban heat island effect. [WFPL]

All hell broke loose in Louisville this week and hell froze over. Read Jake’s thoughts on what’s been a long time coming. [The ‘Ville Voice]

After more than two years in business downtown, the partners in Food 4 The Soul are ready to open a second restaurant. But co-owner Calvin Harris said finding a location at the right price has proved tricky. [Business First]

After an analysis of this year’s ISTEP+ scores, administrators at Greater Clark County Schools said they want to pay special attention to middle schoolers taking the test. [News & Tribune]